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3000 College of Arts and Sciences

Undergraduate programs in the College of Arts and Sciences are described in detail in this chapter. See subsections for specific program information as well as policies and procedures.

3010 General Information

The College of Arts and Sciences consists of 23 departments and institutes within the areas of the humanities, the natural and computational sciences, and the social and behavioral sciences. The college has approximately 12,000 undergraduate majors and 1,800 graduate students. The college also plays a major role in the general education curriculum required of all students in the university.

At the undergraduate level, the College of Arts and Sciences offers the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, and the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies. The requirements for these degrees build directly upon the broad educational foundation provided by the core curriculum.

The College of Arts and Sciences, through its Graduate Studies division, offers graduate degrees and programs in numerous fields. The university publishes a graduate catalog that includes complete descriptions of all of the graduate programs offered at Georgia State University (available online at catalog.gsu.edu/).

Faculty from throughout the college and university collaborate on research and service activities through a variety of interdisciplinary ventures. Additional information on the interdisciplinary centers and programs based in and affiliated with the College of Arts and Sciences is available at cas.gsu.edu/faculty-research/interdisciplinary-research-service-centers/.

Office of the Dean

25th floor, 25 Park Place Building
404-413-5114
cas.gsu.edu

Sara Rosen, Dean
John Augusto, Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives
Amber Amari, Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies
Dan Deocampo, Associate Dean for Research, Graduate Studies, and Innovation
Chad Dillard, Assistant Vice President for Development
Kathryn McClymond, Associate Dean for Faculty Development
John Medlock, Assistant Dean for Academic Success
Fred Mote, Assistant Dean for Administration and Finance
Shelly-Ann Williams, Director, Undergraduate Academic Assistance

Accreditation

In the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Chemistry is accredited by by the American Chemical Society, the Heritage Preservation Program in the Department of History by the National Council for Preservation Education, the programs in secondary education by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, and the graduate program in psychology by the American Psychological Association. The Intensive English Program academic support program is accredited by the Commission on English Language Program Accreditation.

Degrees Offered

Undergraduate degree and certificate programs are offered through the Departments of African-American Studies, Anthropology, Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language, Biology, Chemistry, Communication, Computer Science, English, Geosciences, History, Mathematics and Statistics, Philosophy, Physics and Astronomy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, and World Languages and Cultures; and interdisciplinary institutes in the areas of Creative Media Industries, Gerontology, Global Studies, Neuroscience, and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

In addition, undergraduate degree programs in secondary education for teachers of preschool through twelfth grade in world languages are offered through the College of Arts and Sciences. For application procedures and eligibility requirements, please refer to the “Teacher Preparation Programs” chapter of this catalog.

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

African-American Studies; Anthropology; Applied Linguistics; English; French; Geosciences; German; History; Journalism, Philosophy; Political Science, Psychology; Religious Studies; Sociology, Spanish; Speech Communication; Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geosciences, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Physics, Psychology

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (B.I.S.)

Asian Studies; Environmental Science; Game Design and Development; Gerontology; Global Studies; Italian Studies; Law and Society; Media Entrepreneurship; Middle East Studies; Philosophy, Politics, and Economics; student-planned. (See section 3030.50 below.)

Undergraduate Certificates

Cybersecurity, Data Science, Geographic Information Science, Gerontology, Language Ability (in multiple world languages), Sustainability, Teaching English as a Foreign Language, Water Science

3010.10 Academic Resources and Services

Computer Science Tutoring Center

GSU Sports Arena, Room 107
404-413-5700
cs.gsu.edu/

The Computer Science Tutoring Center supports undergraduate instruction programs by providing tutorial assistance to students who are taking 2000/3000-level major courses in the Department of Computer Science.

ESL Tutoring

Library North 2

library.gsu.edu/learningcommons

The Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language and the Intensive English Program offer ESL tutoring for Georgia State students. ESL tutoring provides students an opportunity to receive expert assistance in improving their written and oral English skills. Check the ESL Tutoring Schedule at the Research Support Desk on Library North 2 for walk-in appointment times.

James M. Cox, Jr. New Media Instructional Lab

307 Classroom South Building
404-413-5600

The Department of Communication’s James M. Cox, Jr., New Media Instructional Lab provides access to a computer-networked facility with 22 workstations. News writing and desktop publishing courses are enhanced through the use of interactive communication between instructors and students. A satellite downlink transmits CNN NewsSource and other national and international video feeds to students who write, edit, and package their own news stories.

Journalism Writing Lab

832 25 Park Place
404-413-5600

The Department of Communication’s Journalism Writing Laboratory provides tutorial support to students enrolled in journalism classes who wish assistance in improving their professional writing skills (including feedback on draft news reporting, public relations projects, and other related writing skills connected to media distribution.  The lab is open during business hours on an open-access basis.

Center for International Resources and Collaborative Language Engagement (CIRCLE)

128 Langdale Hall
404-413-5987
wlc.gsu.edu/home/language-resources/circle/

The Center for International Resources and Collaborative Language Engagement (CIRCLE), is a multi-purpose academic support center that offers walk-in tutoring in each of the languages taught at Georgia State and provides a variety of digital resources (i.e., software, apps, media and materials) to support the language studies of the university community. In addition, the CIRCLE hosts special events focused on cultural awareness and communication opportunities, such as conversation meetups, discussion groups, and other social events, as well as language and technology workshops.

Mathematics Assistance Complex

GSU Sports Arena, Room 110
125 Decatur St.
404-413-6462
mathstat.gsu.edu/undergraduate/current-students/mac/

The Mathematics Assistance Complex supports undergraduate instruction programs by providing tutorial assistance to students who are taking lower-division courses in mathematics and statistics in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

The Mathematics Interactive Learning Environment

301 Urban Life Building
404-463-2780
mathstat.gsu.edu/undergraduate/current-students/mile/

Commons MILE
University Commons Complex
141 Piedmont Ave
404-413-5978

The Mathematics Interactive Learning Environment (The MILE) is designed to support and promote the development of the undergraduate student’s mathematics skill and knowledge by accommodating diverse student learning styles and building student confidence and success in early mathematics courses. The MILE provides student-centered, computer-assisted, self-paced tutorials that include streaming video lectures, tutorial exercises and assistance by faculty, graduate, and undergraduate assistants.

Military Science Leadership Lab

ROTC Leadership laboratory meets every Thursday for 3 hours from 1 to 4 p.m. and focuses on key leadership theory and skills. In addition, we integrate our classroom instruction and individualized leadership training and assessment. Major areas encompass leadership theory and application in problem solving, small group interaction, goal setting and accomplishment, and decision making. We focus on developing today’s best and brightest into tomorrow’s leaders, focusing on confidence, mental agility, sound judgment and getting results. As they progress through the ROTC Leadership Lab, they gain self confidence through practical application of leader skills. There will be some mandatory weekend events and one weekend field training exercise during each semester.  Major areas of instruction include professional officership, leadership values and ethics, and communication skills.

STEM Center

GSU Sports Arena, Room 110
125 Decatur St.
404-413-5563

The STEM Center (Atlanta Campus) provides the face-to-face tutoring in physics, biology, chemistry, computer science and math to all currently enrolled students. No appointment is necessary; just drop by  during the hours of operation (Monday – Thursday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.) and see a tutor.

Writing Studio

23rd Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
writingstudio.gsu.edu/
404-413-5840

The Writing Studio offers space for conversation, coffee, and writers, by creating a welcoming community for undergraduate and graduate students to practice the art of writing. Its purpose is to enhance the writing instruction that happens in academic classrooms by pairing writers with an experienced Reader. Readers, Graduate Assistants in the department of English, engage student writers in talk about their writing assignments and ideas, and familiarize them with audience expectations and academic genre conventions. We focus on invention (coming up with ideas), drafting (expanding ideas and supporting arguments), and arrangement (figuring out the best structure and organization for a text). Readers focus on the rhetorical aspects of the student text, and provide one-on-one, student-centered teaching of works-in-progress. The Writing Studio does not provide editorial or proofreading services. Readers will not write on student papers or in any way “correct” a student text. Students may work on course assignments or application materials for graduate and professional programs and scholarships. The Writing Studio is open only to currently enrolled students and recent alumni. The Studio is open the second week of each semester and closes the last Thursday before the end of classes. The Studio is closed between terms and for all university holidays. Students are welcome to drop in without appointments. More information is located on the website.

3020 College Academic Regulations

The requirements for entrance into Georgia State University are found in the section of this catalog devoted to undergraduate admissions. A transfer student must comply with all academic regulations of the university. The College of Arts and Sciences reserves the right to validate by examination any credits accepted by transfer. This provision in no way affects the acceptance of courses used to satisfy core curriculum requirements at another unit of the University System of Georgia.

Students holding a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university who wish to complete another undergraduate degree are urged to clear all requirements with an adviser in the Office of Academic Assistance.

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Credit by Examination

A maximum of 18 semester hours of degree credit may be granted before or after matriculation to a student who receives satisfactory scores on certain subject examinations of the College Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. The student should consult the appropriate department or school or the Office of Academic Assistance for further information.

The College of Arts and Sciences follows university guidelines for the acceptance of credit by examination. See section 1320.40 Credit by Examination for specific course equivalencies. Credit awarded by the academic departments within the College of Arts and Sciences does not apply toward the academic residence requirement.

Credit for Transient Work

Arts and Sciences students who wish to take course work at another institution, whether as a full-time or as a part-time student, must have prior written approval from the Office of Academic Assistance if they wish to apply the credit hours to a degree program. Failure to obtain the required prior approval will prevent the acceptance of such credits. Approval will be granted for no more than two terms of work and only if the student is in good academic standing at Georgia State University. No approval of requests to take courses in Atlanta-area colleges will be granted if the course is readily available from Georgia State offerings. During the term in which the student is scheduled to graduate, all courses must be taken at Georgia State unless prior written approval has been obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance. The acceptance and application of all course work taken as a transient student is subject to any limitations imposed by the student’s major department, school, or program of study.

Please consult the “Academic Regulations” section of this catalog for further clarification in regard to transient credit.

Credit for Veteran’s Service

University students who are veterans of any service, active, reserve, or National Guard, or who have attended a service academy, may receive advanced placement in the Department of Military Science and Leadership (ROTC).

Course 4999 – Directed Readings

Course 4999, Directed Readings, in any department/school/institute that offers a major in the College of Arts and Sciences is designed to assist seniors who are within two terms of graduation and who have curriculum difficulties in fulfilling the requirements necessary for graduation. One to four credit hours may be earned. The supervising professor, the departmental chair/school director, and the dean of the college must approve registration for the course. Forms for Course 4999 must be completed at the time of regular registration for the term in which the credit is to be earned and can be obtained through department/school offices or the college’s Office of Academic Assistance.

Policy on Allowing Undergraduates to Take Graduate Courses

Under one of the following conditions, an undergraduate student may be permitted to take a graduate course:

  1. Dual Degree Enrollment: The student has been formally accepted into an official university dual degree program that links an undergraduate degree program with a graduate degree program. Students in dual degree programs are granted permission to enroll in specified graduate courses when they reach a designated program milestone. Students who are accepted into the affiliated graduate program upon completion of the undergraduate degree may count specified course work toward fulfillment of the graduate degree requirements. A current listing of official undergraduate/graduate dual degree programs is available at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.
  2. College Approval of Enrollment: The dean’s office of the college will determine a student’s eligibility for admission into a graduate course. To be eligible, an undergraduate student generally must have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 or higher and be within 18 semester hours of graduation, and be enrolled in an undergraduate degree program. Eligibility does not guarantee permission to take a course. Once a student’s eligibility is determined, permission must be granted by the instructor for the course, the department’s/school’s director of graduate studies, the chair/director of the department/school offering the course, and the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. The request form is located at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/. Please note, graduate courses taken by an undergraduate student cannot be applied toward fulfillment of graduate degree requirements unless the student has been formally accepted into an official university dual degree program.

(This approval process does not apply to postbaccalaureate students. Postbaccalaureate students wishing to take graduate courses must be admitted as non-degree seeking students. See cas.gsu.edu/graduate-services/admissions/reentry/ for additional information.)

3030 College Degree Requirements

3030.10 World Language Requirement for B.A./B.I.S. Majors

The College of Arts and Sciences requires the completion of a world language at the 1002 or 1101 level for all students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree (with certain exceptions listed below). This requirement can be met by one of the following options: 1) taking a course numbered 1002, 1101, or higher, 2) Taking the CLEP exam in French, German, or Spanish for credit at the 2001 and 2002 level, or 3) Taking the SAT II exam in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean and receiving at least the equivalent of a grade of “C” (73% of the highest possible exam score). For more information about the exams please contact the Counseling and Testing Center at 404-413-1740.

Students in the following B.I.S. programs that are closely aligned with Bachelor of Science programs are not required to complete a world language: Environmental Science.

The world language requirement for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies programs is most commonly included in core curriculum Area F (Courses Appropriate to the Major); however, programs may also require students to complete world language courses in Area G, the 60 semester hours beyond the core curriculum. Students transferring to Georgia State with a completed core curriculum Area F, yet without sufficient course work to meet a program’s world language requirement, will be required to fulfill the necessary courses in the second 60 semester hours. Students who take a language course in Area C and subsequently declare a major in a program leading to a Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies will find that the language course no longer counts in Area C but in Area F or Area G. For this reason, the college recommends that students in the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies programs not include a world language course in core curriculum Area C (Fine Arts and Humanities). Students who would like to begin a new world language, or to take a second world language, should consult a program adviser concerning the possibility of earning credit for the first semester of elementary world language (1001) in either core curriculum Area F or in the second 60 hours.

3030.30 Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree provides educational opportunities not readily available through traditional departmental degree programs. Students have flexibility in developing a course of study appropriate to their goals by selecting courses from several departments and institutes in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students may also include courses from other colleges of this university in their interdisciplinary program.

It is not the function of the interdisciplinary program to combine an assortment of course work as a last-minute effort to facilitate a student’s graduation.

Enrollment in College-Planned Programs

Students may enroll in a B.I.S. concentration on admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program may also select a concentration with their academic advisor. Enrollment into a concentration can occur only when a student has a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

Program Degree Requirements

There are two options in the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies program, the college-planned option and the student-planned option.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H. Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

Courses in the area of concentration (Area G) and allied field (Area H) must be at the 3000-4000 level. Also, a grade of C or higher is required in all courses in the area of concentration (Area G) and allied field (Area H). Electives are used to build the hours in Areas G-J to have 39 hours at Georgia State University taken at the 3000-4000 level for residency, and complete 120 hours required for graduation.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies College-Planned Programs

Students may choose a program designed by the college as follows: Asian Studies; Environmental Science; Game Design and Development; Gerontology; Global Studies, Law and Society; Media Entrepreneurship; Middle East Studies; and Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. For information about the college-planned programs, see the alphabetical list of programs later in this chapter of the catalog.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Student-Planned Program

Students may choose the option to propose their own program of study for approval by the college B.I.S. coordinator. Students may select their proposed courses from any college in the university, as long as at least 50 percent of the hours in the program are chosen from courses in the College of Arts and Sciences. Students should have their proposed student-planned programs reviewed by the B.I.S. coordinator by the time they have earned 42 hours.

To gain approval into the program, students must articulate a reasonable and educationally justifiable course of study. Proposed interdisciplinary degree programs cannot resemble current programs offered at the university. Students interested in initiating the application process must first schedule an appointment with an academic advisor in the Office of Academic Assistance, 404-413-5000 (see section 3040). Students must also select an appropriate faculty coordinator to provide guidance in developing the interdisciplinary program.

Course of Study Outline for Student-Planned Programs:

Areas A-E: Core Curriculum (42)

All undergraduate students satisfy a common core curriculum. These requirements are printed in the “Academic Regulations” section of this catalog.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

Courses in this area should be included in the program proposal. The courses selected for this area must be at the lower-division level and judged to be programmatically appropriate to the intent of the proposed program. A world language at the 1002 level must be included in Area F of all student-planned programs.

Area G: Area of Concentration (similar to a traditional major area, except interdisciplinary in content).

Area H: Allied Field (similar to a minor, except interdisciplinary in content).

Area J: Electives

When developing a student-planned program, the student may choose one of the following structures:

  • Program Plan Structure One: An area of concentration (27-33 semester hours) with an allied field (15-21 semester hours) and electives (6-18 semester hours).
  • Program Plan Structure Two: An area of concentration (27-33 semester hours) with two allied fields (15-21 semester hours each).
  • Program Plan Structure Three: Two areas of concentration (27-33 semester hours each).

3030.40 The Interdisciplinary Minor

The interdisciplinary minor provides educational opportunities not otherwise available and allows students the flexibility to select courses for the minor from several departments/schools/colleges at the university. Students can choose to pursue either a college-planned or a student-planned interdisciplinary minor.

College planned interdisciplinary minors are available in the following emphasis areas: Advanced Leadership and Management, Asian Studies, Chinese Studies, Communication Sciences, Entertainment Media Management, Game Design and Development, Human Rights and Democracy, Jewish Studies, Latin American Studies, and Middle East Studies are also available. For information about the college-planned interdisciplinary minors, see the alphabetical list of programs later in this chapter of this catalog.

Students pursuing a student-planned interdisciplinary minor must propose their 15-18 hours for approval by the college BIS coordinator. A proposal must identify the way in which the minor fits into the context of the student’s entire degree program. To gain approval, students must articulate a reasonable and educationally justifiable course of study and must keep in mind that this course of study may not duplicate what is currently available.

The following requirements apply to the interdisciplinary minor:

  1. The student must have a Georgia State University cumulative grade-point average of 2.0;
  2. A minor must contain 15 to 18 semester hours of coursework with at least 9 hours of upper-division coursework (3000 to 4999).
  3. No more than six hours from a single discipline/prefix.
  4. Courses counted toward the interdisciplinary minor cannot also count toward the major;
  5. A grade of “C” or better is required in all minor courses; and
  6. For student-planned programs, at least 50 percent of the minor must be completed after the semester in which college BIS coordinator approves the minor program plan.

Students should contact the Office of Academic Assistance at 404-413-5000 for information on the application procedure.

The program of emphasis for the interdisciplinary minor is not listed on the official Georgia State University transcript. The program is designated as Interdisciplinary Minor on the transcript.

3040 Office of Academic Assistance

3rd floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5000
cas.gsu.edu/undergraduate/student-advising/

Director: Shelly-Ann Williams
Associate Director: Linda P. King
Assistant Director: Rene Mondy

The Office of Academic Assistance supports departments and schools in providing academic advisement for students in the college, primarily those who have earned 90 hours. Students with fewer than 90 hours are advised through the University Advisement Center (see advisement.gsu.edu). This office also works with students on career development and on marketing a liberal arts background in the current job environment. The Office of Academic Assistance prepares evaluations of transfer work done at other institutions as well as academic program reviews for each major offered through the college. It also assists with course selections and schedule revisions and provides information concerning college and university policies. Students are advised by appointment or may walk-in for brief consultations. During the academic year, the office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Monday through Friday. Students seeking a degree in the College of Arts and Sciences should become familiar with the academic regulations of the university stated elsewhere in this catalog.

Although the College of Arts and Sciences will endeavor to provide timely and accurate advisement, it is the responsibility of the student to know and to satisfy the degree requirements of his or her academic program. The College of Arts and Sciences encourages its majors to build relationships with the undergraduate support personnel in their major departments and institutes. A strong undergraduate program is possible only if there are frequent opportunities for students to discuss their academic work and career goals with one of their major professors. In a large urban institution such as Georgia State University, contact is essential if students are to receive individual attention and enjoy the full benefits of a liberal arts education.  

3060 Departments and Institutes

Department Main Office Catalog Sections
Department of African-American Studies 962 One Park Place South; 404-413-5135 3090
Department of Anthropology 335 Sparks Hall; 404-413-5156 3100
Department of Applied Linguistics
and English as a Second Language
15th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5200 3110, 3230, 3330
Department of Biology 495 Petit Science Center; 404-413-5300 3170, 3240
Department of Chemistry 380 Petit Science Center; 404-413-5500 3180
Department of Communication 8th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5600 3380, 3540
Department of Computer Science 7th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5700 3210
Creative Media Industries Institute 2nd Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5706 3235, 3285, 3415
Department of English 23rd Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5800 3220
Department of Geosciences 730 Langdale Hall; 404-413-5750 3290
Gerontology Institute 605 One Park Place; 404-413-5210 3310
Global Studies Institute 18th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6645 3315
Department of History 20th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6385 3320, 3480
Department of Mathematics and Statistics 14th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6400 3410
Department of Military Science and Leadership GSU Stadium, ROTC Suite; 404-413-6493 3430, 3445
Neuroscience Institute 800 Petit Science Center; 404-413-5445 3445
Department of Philosophy 16th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6100 3397, 3450, 3480
Department of Physics and Astronomy 6th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-4033 3160, 34603550
Department of Political Science 1005 Langdale Hall; 404-413-6159 3400, 3470, 3480
Department of Psychology 11th floor, Urban Life; 404-413-6200 3500
Department of Religious Studies 17th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6110 3510
Department of Sociology 1041 Langdale Hall; 404-413-6500 3520
Institute for Women’s, Gender,
and Sexuality Studies
22nd floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6587 3570
World Languages and Cultures 19th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5980 3120, 3150, 3183, 3280, 3300, 33503370, 33853420, 35303550

3090 African-American Studies

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in African-American Studies
    • Concentration in Arts and Aesthetics
    • Concentration in Health and Human Development
    • Concentration in Social Justice and Community Empowerment
    • Concentration in Pre-Education
  • Minor in African American Studies

Department of African-American Studies
962 One Park Place South
404-413-5135
aas.gsu.edu

Jonathan Gayles, Chair
Makungu Akinyela, Undergraduate Director

African-American Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of African people nationally and globally. The field recognizes that the lived experience of African and African descendant peoples worldwide are impacted by a myriad of factors including cultural diversity, emerging technologies, and political economy.  As an interdisciplinary field of concentration, it offers, enhances, and critiques knowledge presented in the traditional disciplines and professions, scholarly and artistic accounts of the realities of the lives of African-Americans, and perspectives on social change. The Department of African-American Studies provides students with the intellectual origins, concepts, research, and models of the discipline; the knowledge and skills necessary for the study of group cultures; and a curriculum that contributes to the goals of African-American Studies and a culturally diverse education. Civic engagement, service learning, and a social justice orientation are fundamental aspects to the African-American Studies curriculum. Faculty and courses are drawn from the department itself and from other departments/schools/institutes in the university.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

Alternatives are available to some core and major requirements. Please see a degree program advisor for specific guidelines.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.A. in African-American Studies

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. Required Courses (6)
    • AAS 2010 Introduction to African-American Studies (3)
    • Select one of the following:
      • AAS 1141 Introduction to African and African American History to 1865 (3)
      • AAS 1142 Introduction to African American History Since 1865 (3)
  2. World language at the 1002 level or higher (3)
  3. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:

Area G: Major Courses (33)

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
    • AAS 3980 Research Methods in African-American Studies-CTW (3)
  2. Major Requirements (12)
    • Select the following global competency course:
    • Select one intellectual foundations course from the following:
      • AAS 3975 Concepts and Theories in African-American Studies (3)
      • AAS 4120 African American Political Thought (3)
    • Select one gender and sexuality course from the following:
      • AAS 4125 Black Feminist Thought (3)
      • AAS 3010 Narratives of Race, Gender, and Sexuality (3)
    • Select one AAS literature course from the following:
      • AAS 3880 African-American Literature (3)
      • AAS 3960 African-American Literature by Women (3)
      • AAS 4890 Caribbean Literature (3)
  3. A minimum of 15 hours must be taken from African-American Studies courses at 3000-4000 level which must include: three courses from one of the three areas (1) Health and Human Development, (2) Social Justice and Community Empowerment, and (3) Arts and Aesthetics of concentration and two courses from the other two concentrations.
  4. AAS 4980 Seminar and Practicum in African-American Studies (3)

Arts and Aesthetics (15):

  1. Students in this concentration are required to take three courses, and must engage at least two of the three areas of the arts. For example, a student may take one course in each area of the arts, or two courses in one area and one course in another.
    • Performance Arts
    • Visual and Popular Arts
      • AAS 4625 Black Mecca and Black Popular Culture (3)
      • AAS 4900 African Americans in Film (3)
      • AAS 4350 Black Visual Representation: Iconography of the African Diaspora (3)
      • AAS 4950 African American Popular Culture (3)
    • Musical Arts
  2. Select from the following options (6):
    • Course(s) from Health and Human Development concentration (0-6)
    • Course(s) from Social Justice and Community Empowerment (0-6)

Health and Human Development Concentration (15):

  1.  Core Required Classes: (6)
    • AAS 4105 Race and Health (3)
    • AAS 4000 Issues in the African American Community (3)
  2. Students must choose one course from these:
    • AAS 4030 African American Relationships (3)
    • AAS 4110 Black Women and Health (3)
    • AAS 4280 African American Anthropology (3)
    • AAS 3050 African American Psychology (3)
  3. Select from the following options (6):
    • Course(s) from Social Justice and Community Empowerment concentration (0-6)
    • Course(s) from Arts and Aesthetics concentration (0-6)

Social Justice and Community Empowerment (15)

  1. Take one course from each of the following three categories (9):
    • Social and Community Organization:
      • AAS 3000 African-American Family (3)
      • AAS 4000 Issues in the African-American Community (3)
    • Politics and Activism:
      • AAS 4160 African-American Politics (3)
      • AAS 4180 Politics of the Civil Rights Movement (3)
      • AAS 4550 Activism and Black Freedom Movements (3)
    • Gender and Sexuality in Social Change:
      • AAS 3960 African-American Literature by Women (3)
      • AAS 4080 African-American Female Activism (3)
      • AAS 4100 African-American Women in the United States (3)
      • AAS 4530 Voices of African-American Feminists (3)
      • AAS 4780 African-American Lesbian and Gay Activism (3)
  2. Select from the following options (6):
    • Course(s) from Health and Human Development concentration (0-6)
    • Course(s) from Arts and Aesthetics concentration (0-6)

Pre-Education Concentration 

The Department of African-American Studies offers a pre-education track with a concentration in history for students who wish to become public school teachers and to be certified to teach by completing the initial teacher preparation for the M.A.T. Program in Social Studies Education in the College of Education and Human Development (or a similar master’s level initial preparation program at another university). The pre-education track in African-American studies develops teachers to work effectively in multi-cultural classrooms. The pre-education track in African-American Studies prepares teachers to teach students from diverse ethnic, gender, cultural, and social class groups by offering curricula that examine the histories and experiences of people of African descent and aspects of cultural identity formation in the U.S., Africa, and the Caribbean. This track also prepares educators to develop their students to be citizens of a global community. Students who wish to pursue the pre-education track in African-American Studies must take ten designated upper-division major courses (33 credit hours), take three education courses (9), and complete the coursework in one or more of the following allied fields: political science (9), geography (9), or economics (9).

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (6)
    • AAS 3980 Research Methods in African-American Studies-CTW (3)
    • AAS 4980 Seminar and Practicum in African-American Studies-CTW (3)
  2. Additional Courses (27):

Total Number of Hours: 33

Allied Fields (18)

Select two or more out of the following fields:

    • Political Science (9) (3000-4000 level courses)
    • Geography (9) (3000-4000 level courses)
    • Economics (9) (3000-4000 level courses)
    • Education (Required: EXC 4020; along with two of the following: LT 3210, EDCI 3200, EDUC 3010, EDUC 4982, EDSS 3400, and EDLA 3200) (9)
    • One Behavioral Sciences field: Anthropology, Sociology, or Psychology (9) (3000-4000 level courses)

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

Students majoring in African-American Studies:

  1. Are not required to take a minor.
  2. Must take additional courses as electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

Minor in African-American Studies

A grade of C is required for all courses counting toward the minor.

Students who wish to minor in African-American Studies should complete the following requirements (15).

  1. Complete the following three courses (9)
    • AAS 2010 Introduction to African-American Studies (3)
    • AAS 3120 African Diaspora (3)
    • AAS 4120 African-American Political Thought (3)
  2. Select two African-American Studies courses at the 3000 level or above (6).

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This department offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. In order to achieve distinction in the major, students must earn a GPA of 3.5 or higher within the AAS major and an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher.

3100 Anthropology

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology
  • Minor in Anthropology

Department of Anthropology
335 Sparks Hall
404-413-5156
anthropology.gsu.edu

Kathryn A. Kozaitis, Chair
Cassandra White, Director of Undergraduate Studies

Anthropology, the study of humans, provides students with a perspective on the nature of humankind over time and in different environments. It is concerned with humans as biological beings (biological anthropology), with prehistory and cultural evolution (archaeology), and with how humans order their worlds socially and culturally (social/cultural anthropology), as well as with the nature of human language (linguistic anthropology). The Department of Anthropology offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology. Undergraduate majors are encouraged to take a wide range of courses in archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. Anthropologists are frequently teachers and/or researchers in colleges and universities, or, alternatively, they work for public and private agencies. Within these areas, they may be specifically concerned with historic or cultural resource preservation or cross-cultural competencies in such areas as medicine, community development, education, tourism, business, and other specialties.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Financial Information

No additional expenses are needed to complete this degree program. Some special courses that travel away from campus, such as ANTH 4550 Field School in Anthropology, will have additional costs. The department offers two endowed scholarships for undergraduate majors: the Robert L. Blakeley Endowed Scholarship in Anthropology and the Jeremy D. Gillen Endowed Memorial Scholarship in Anthropology.

Program Degree Requirements

Alternatives are available to some core and major requirements. Please see the Director of Undergraduate Studies for specific guidelines.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.A. in Anthropology

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. Required Courses (12)
    • ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2030 Archaeology and Prehistory (3)
    • World language at the 1002 level or higher (3)
  2. Select additional courses as follows to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    1. Choose at least one course from the following:
      • ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology (3)
      • ENVS 1402 Plant Resources in the Environment (4)
      • GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography (3)
      • GEOL 1122K Introductory Geology II (4)
      • MATH 1401 Elementary Statistics (3)
      • HIST 1111 Survey of World History to 1500 (3)
      • PHIL 1010 Critical Thinking (2)
      • PERS 2001 Perspectives on Comparative Culture (3)
      • SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology (3)
      • WGSS 2010 Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality
      • World language at the 2001 level (3)
    2. Choose no more than one course from the following:
      • AL 2101 Exploring Language (3)
      • AL 2102 Languages of the World (3)
      • ANTH 2040 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)
      • World language at the 2002 level (3)

Area G: Major Courses (27)

  1. Course that fulfills CTW requirement (3):
    • ANTH 4970 Senior Seminar in Anthropology-CTW (3)
  2. Theory Course. Select one:
  3. Methods Course. Select one (at least 3 hours)
    • ANTH 4340 Applied Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 4360 Methods and Theories in Biological Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 4370 Forensic Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 4480 Ethnography Into the 21st Century (4)
    • ANTH 4550 Field School in Anthropology (4-8)
    • ANTH 4590 Archaeological Methods (4)
    • ANTH 4670 Methods in Sociocultural Anthropology (3)
  4. Electives: Additional courses at the 3000 or 4000 level (at least 17 hours)

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

  1. Students majoring in anthropology are not required to take a minor.
  2. Students majoring in anthropology must take additional courses as electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

Minor in Anthropology

A grade of C is required for all courses counting toward the minor.

Students who wish to minor in anthropology should complete the following requirements (1 and 2). (at least 15 hours)

  1. Select one course. (3)
    • ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2030 Archaeology and Prehistory (3)
    • ANTH 2040 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)
  2. Select four anthropology courses at the 3000 level or above (at least 12 hours).

Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in anthropology may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3110 Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Applied Linguistics
  • Certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language
  • Minor in Applied Linguistics
  • ESL Credit-Bearing Courses
  • Intensive English Program
  • Dual B.A. / M.A. in Applied Linguistics

Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language
15th Floor, 25 Park Place Building
404-413-5200
alesl.gsu.edu

Diane Belcher, Chair
Hae Sung Yang, Undergraduate Director

Applied linguistics is an interdisciplinary field that integrates many perspectives on the study of human language. Studying linguistics is not a matter of learning many different languages, but rather it is the study of the nature of language in general. Applied Linguistics is the study of language and communication in relation to real-world problems such as language acquisition and teaching, language assessment, language analysis on a large or small scale, improving intercultural communication, and understanding the relationship between language and social organization or behaviors.

The Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language offers 1) a B.A. degree in Applied Linguistics; 2) a minor in Applied Linguistics; 3) a certificate* in Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TEFL), 4) ESL credit-bearing courses for non-native speakers of English, and 5) Intensive English Program (IEP) courses for non-native speakers of English.

*NOTE: The TEFL certificate overlaps with and may be combined with either the major or the minor.

The major and minor in Applied Linguistics provide the opportunity for students to explore the field of linguistics from an interdisciplinary perspective.

The TEFL certificate program provides students with appropriate skills and a credential that will enable them to teach English as a foreign/world language abroad. Students majoring in any undergraduate program can earn the TEFL certificate. In addition, the certificate can be earned by any post baccalaureate student. TEFL certificate requirements consist of the following five courses: AL 3021, AL 3041, AL 3051, AL 3101, and AL 4161. AL 3021 is a prerequisite for AL 3041, AL 3051, and AL 4161. AL 2021 Intro to English Linguistics is a prerequisite to these courses, except for post-baccalaureate students, but students may be exempted from this requirement by taking a departmental exam. AL 3021 is the first course in the series, but may be taken in conjunction with AL 3051 and AL 3101. AL 4161 should be the last course taken, and AL 3051 is a prerequisite to this practicum course.

For information on credit-bearing ESL courses for non-native speakers of English and the Intensive English Program, see Sections 3230 (English as a Second Language) and 3330 (Intensive English Program).

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

Students must earn a grade of C or better in any courses required for Area F. A grade of C or higher is also required in all courses counting toward an Applied Linguistics minor and/or the TEFL certificate.

Alternatives are available to some core and major requirements. Please see a degree program advisor for specific guidelines. In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Program Financial Information

Effective summer 2009, lab fees will be assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. As a result, students will no longer be required to purchase lab fee cards. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.

B.A. in Applied Linguistics

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. Choose two of the following (6):
    • AL 2021 Introduction to English Linguistics (3)*
    • AL 2101 Exploring Language (3)*
    • AL 2102 Languages of the World (3)
    • AL 2231 Understanding Miscommunication (3)
    • AL 2290 Introductory Special Topics in Applied Linguistics (3)
      *NOTE: Some 2000-level courses are prerequisites to upper-level AL courses. See course descriptions or an advisor for details.
  2. World language requirements (3-12):
    1. World language through the 2002 level (0-9):
      Students must complete world language courses through level 2002 in one world language or demonstrate equivalent proficiency through examination (e.g., Advanced Placement, CLEP, or other approved examination procedures). American Sign Language (ASL) may now be taken for your entire four-semester language series.
    2. Less commonly taught World language (3):
      Students must complete at least one semester of a less commonly taught language (i.e., any language other than French, German, Latin, Spanish, or Italian) and are strongly encouraged to study a non-Indo-European language to fulfill this requirement. This requirement is in addition to the four-semester language series, unless the language studied through 2002 is an LCTL. American Sign Language is considered an LTCL for the purposes of fulfilling this requirement.
      A student may include world language study through course 1002 in area C; in this case additional electives may be taken in Area F to attain 18 credit hours.
  3. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    • World Language 1001-1002 (3-6)
    • World Language 2001-2002 (3-6)
    • ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2040 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology (3)
    • ECON 2100 Global Economy (3)
    • ENGL 2110 World Literature (3)
    • PHIL 2010 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
    • PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology (3)
    • SCOM 1010 Voice and Articulation (3)
    • SCOM 2400 Interpersonal Communication (3)
    • Students who complete their world language requirement through examination or use their world language courses in a minor must choose additional electives at the 1000/2000 level to reach 18 credit hours in Area F. Applied linguistics students are encouraged to study additional languages to fulfill these requirements.

Area G: Major Courses (30)

  1. Students must complete AL 2021 or successfully pass the departmental placement test to enroll in AL 3021.
    • AL 3021 Introduction to Linguistics (3)+
  2. Required courses (6):
    • AL 3031 Language in Society (3)
    • Select one of the following:
      • AL 4151  Communication across Cultures-CTW (3) OR
      • AL 4241 Senior Seminar in Applied Linguistics-CTW (3)
        Note: AL 3031 is a prerequisite to AL 4151. AL 4241 may have other prerequisites, depending on its topic. Take AL 3031 and choose one CTW course (the other may be used as elective under #4 or #5 below).
  3. Major Requirements (9):
    AL 3021 is a prerequisite to the courses in this area. Choose three (the fourth may be used as elective under #4 or #5 below).

    • AL 3041 Introduction to Second Language Acquisition (3)+
    • AL 4011 Phonetics and Phonology (3)
    • AL 4012 Morphology and Syntax (3)
    • AL 4111 Semantics and Pragmatics (3)
  4. Additional Upper-Level Electives in the Department of Applied Linguistics and ESL. (9)
    • AL 3051 Teaching English as a Foreign Language I: Methods and Approaches (3)+
    • AL 3101 English Grammar in Use (3)+
    • AL 4090 Language and Computers (3)
    • AL 4121 Historical Linguistics (3)
    • AL 4131 Bilingualism (3)
    • AL 4141 Special Topics (3) (may be repeated with different topics)
    • AL 4161 Teaching English as a Foreign Language II: Practicum and Classroom Practices (3)+
    • AL 4980 Internship (3) (may be repeated)
    • AL 4985 Internship Abroad (3)
    • AL 4999 Directed Reading (3)
      +NOTE: Students completing the five courses marked with a plus sign (+) will also receive the certificate in Teaching English as a Foreign Language if they apply for it.
  5. One signature experience elective. Choose one course from the following. Other relevant electives inside or outside the department may be taken with departmental approval. (3)
    • AL 4980 Internship
    • AL 4985 Internship Abroad
    • Any 3xxx or 4xxx course taken while on study abroad or international exchange
    • Any  3000- or 4000-level world language course (including American Sign Language) in your world language
    • An extra AL CTW course (AL 4151 or AL 4241, not taken for requirements above)
    • An extra Linguistic Analysis elective (AL 3041, AL 4011, AL 4012, or AL 4111, not taken for requirements above)
    • An approved course in an allied field (see department for approval)

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

  1. Students majoring in applied linguistics are not required to take a minor.
  2. Students majoring in applied linguistics must take additional courses as electives to complete a minimum of 120 total hours, exclusive of KH 1010, and 39 residency hours. Students are strongly encouraged to choose electives from the lists above in cognate disciplines such as Anthropology, World Languages, Sociology, Speech Communication, Psychology, Philosophy, History, Religious Studies, English, Education, etc.

Minor Offerings

Students who wish to minor in applied linguistics should complete the following six requirements (15-18 hours). A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. AL 3021 Introduction to Linguistics is a prerequisite for all courses in 4-6. Students who wish to complete both a minor and a TEFL certificate may count some of the same courses toward requirements for both programs. The minor is 15-18 hours and the TEFL certificate is 15-18 hours; completed together they are 21-27 hours. See the departmental advisor for more information on this combined program of study.

  1. World language at the 1002-level (3)*
  2. Any 2000 level AL course (3)
  3. AL 3021 Introduction to Linguistics (3)+
  4. Select one course. (3)
    • AL 3041 Introduction to Second Language Acquisition (3)
    • AL 4131 Bilingualism (3)
  5. Select one course. (3)
  6. Any 3000 or 4000 level AL course (3):
    *NOTE: The world language 1002 is waived if it is a requirement in the student’s declared major.
    +NOTE: AL 2021 Introduction to English Linguistics or a passing exemption exam score is a prerequisite to AL 3021.

Dual B.A. / M.A. Program in Applied Linguistics

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This department offers undergraduate students the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the department undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3120 Arabic

Program Offered:

  • Minor in Arabic Language and Literature
  • Certificate of Language Ability in Arabic

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Shuai Li, Undergraduate Director
Ian Campbell, Faculty Coordinator

Program Degree Requirements

Minor in Arabic Language and Literature

Students who wish to minor in Arabic must take 15-18 hours in Arabic language and literature, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours of courses in the language may count the additional hours toward their electives. No more than 3 hours may be taken in Arabic literature courses taught in English. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

Current courses available for the minor include:

This minor is not intended for those who are fluent in written and spoken Arabic. Please see a program advisor before signing up for the Arabic minor.

Certificate of Language Ability in Arabic

A strong demand exists by employers for candidates to offer credentials to verify language proficiency in both oral and written communication. The undergraduate Certificate of Language Ability is designed for students to offer tangible proof of their language abilities and makes an ideal complement to other areas of study such as business, international relations, public health, criminal justice, hospitality, and more.

The certificate consists of 12 credit hours at 2000 and 3000 level (minimum of 6 must be at the 3000 level), with a B or higher in the first attempt at each course. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.

3150 Asian Studies

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Asian Studies
  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Asian Studies

Faculty Coordinator: Ghulam Nadri, gnadri@gsu.edu, Department of History

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) program in Asian Studies offers students an opportunity to acquire knowledge of this important and unique world region and a career-oriented range of skills. It allows students to follow a course plan with concentration in international business and economy. By taking a set of courses, students may also take a minor in international business. For students interested in teaching English in China, Japan, Korea, or elsewhere in Asia, it allows a concentration in English as a Second Language (ESL) with an option to obtain a TEFL certificate from the Department of Applied Linguistics (TEFL Certificate). Students interested in Asian societies and cultures will have the option to concentrate in Chinese, Japanese, or Indian/South Asian studies. It allows students to choose from a large pool of courses (taught by Georgia State faculty experts in their regions and disciplines) appropriate to their areas of concentration.

The minor in Asian Studies is an excellent complement to many other majors. Students pursuing a career in teaching English as a second language, international politics, international business, world history, world/comparative religions or another field, should consider a minor in Asian Studies as a way to strengthen their academic/professional credentials and increase marketable skills.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Arts students should also consult regularly with the faculty program coordinator for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic opportunities.

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Asian Studies

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030.30 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program. Requirements follow a student’s catalog edition (year when B.I.S. major was approved).

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H.  Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Areas A-E: Core Curriculum Recommendations

While students are free to choose from the available courses in Areas A-E, the following are recommended choices for students in the Asian Studies BIS.

Area B:

  • PERS 2001 Perspectives on Comparative Culture (2)
  • PERS 2002 Scientific Perspectives on Global Problems (2)
  • PERS 2003 Perspectives on Human Expression (2)

Area C:

  1. Humanities Group: RELS 2001 Intro to World Religions (3)
  2. World Languages Group:

Note: Students studying a new language for the first time must start at 1001, which can count in Area F.

Area D:

Area E:

  • Global Group:
  • Social Science Foundations Group:
    • GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography (3)
    • ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology (3)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required introductory course: (3)
  2. Required Language: Choose courses from one of the following. (6-9)
  3. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours Area F:
    • General electives:
    • Recommended for students concentrating in international business and economy:
    • Recommended for students concentrating in ESL or interested in TEFL certificate:
      • AL 2021 Introduction to English Linguistics (3)
      • AL 2101 Exploring Language (3)
      • AL 2102 Languages of the World (3)
      • SCOM 2900 Intercultural Communication (3)

Area G: Area of Concentration (27-33)

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G.

Courses followed by an asterisk (*) have prerequisites. Asian Studies majors may be exempted from a prerequisite for some of the Economics courses through instructor’s permission. See the Asian Studies program coordinator for additional information.

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (3-4)
    Select one CTW course from below.

    • AL 4151 Communication across Cultures-CTW (3)
    • AL 4241 Senior Seminar in Applied Linguistics-CTW (3)
    • ARBC 4501 Classical Arabic Literature and Culture-CTW (3)
    • ARBC 4502 Modern Arabic Literature and Culture-CTW (3)
    • BUSA 3000 Globalization and Business Practice-CTW (3)
    • CHIN 3080 Topics in Chinese Studies (3)
    • CHIN 3081 Cultural Dimensions of Language Learning (3)
    • CHIN 4995 Directed Readings BIS (CTW) (3)
    • ECON 3900 Macroeconomics-CTW (3)*
    • ENGL 3040 Introduction to Literary Studies-CTW (3)
    • ENGL 3050 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition-CTW (3)
    • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies (4)
    • POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research-CTW (3)
    • RELS 3750 Theories and Methods in Religious Studies-CTW (3)
  2. Required Language Courses (6):
  3. Asian Studies in Context (17-24):
    1. Study abroad (to Asia) or Asia-related internships (3-6 credit hours) (recommended).
    2. History, Politics, and Economy (6-12):
    3. Language, Society, and Culture (6-12):

AL 3051 AND AL 3101 ARE Required for TEFL certificate.

Area H: Allied Fields (choose one) (15-21)

Choose one concentration. Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H.

Courses followed by an asterisk (*) have prerequisites. Asian Studies majors may be exempted from a prerequisite for some of the Economics or Applied Linguistics courses through instructor’s permission or departmental exam. See the Asian Studies program coordinator for additional information.

  • International Business Practices:
    • BUSA 3000 Globalization and Business Practice (3)*
    • ECON 4220 Environment Economics and Policy (3)*
    • ECON 4300 Economics of Cities (3)*
    • ECON 4600 Economic Development (3)*
    • ECON 4800 International Trade (3)*
    • ECON 4810 International Finance (3)*
    • FI 3300 Corporation Finance (3)*
    • FI 4040 Foundations in International Finance (3)
    • GEOG 4762 Economic Geography (3)
    • IB 3090 Introduction to International Business (3)
    • IB 4100 Intro to International Entrepreneurship (3)
    • LGLS 4080 Legal Issues in International Business (3)
    • MGS 3400 Managing People in Organizations (3)*
    • MK 3010 Basic Marketing (3)*
    • MK 4600 International Marketing (3)*
    • SOCI 3201 Wealth, Power, and Inequality (3)
    • SOCI 3208 Work and Employment (3)
  • Language Instruction (English as a Second Language and TEFL):
    • AL 3021 Introduction to Linguistics (3)*
    • AL 3031 Language in Society (3)
    • AL 3041 Second Language Acquisition (3)*
    • AL 3051 Methods of Teaching EFL (3)*
    • AL 3101 English Grammar in Use (3)*
    • AL 4011 Phonetics and Phonology (3)
    • AL 4090 Language and Computers (3)
    • AL 4131 Bilingualism (3)
    • AL 4151 Communication across Cultures-CTW (3)
    • AL 4161 EFL Practicum (3)*
    • FORL 3022 Developing and Marketing Second Language Teaching Skills (3)
    • FORL 4021 Technology Integration for Foreign Language Teaching and Learning (3)
    • FORL 4025 Approaches to Early Language Learning, Grades P-8 (3)
    • FORL 4026 Approaches to Language Teaching, Grades 9-12 (3)
    • FORL 4060 Teaching Diverse World Language Learners – Internship (3)
    • JOUR 4650/MES 4600 International Communication/Journalism (3)
    • SCOM 4800 Communication and Diversity-CTW (3)
  • Chinese Studies:
  • Japanese Studies:
  • Indian/South Asian Studies:
    • GEOG 4406 Advanced Regional Geography (4) (if India/South Asia included)
    • GLOS 3800/HIST 3800 History of India (3)
    • GLOS 3850/HIST 3850 China, India, and Modern World Economy (3)
    • HIST 3615 The Indian Ocean World (4)
    • HIST 4890 Topics in World History (3-4) (if India/South Asia)
    • POLS 4258 Government and Politics of South Asia (3)
    • POLS 4285 Politics and Religion in Comparative Perspective (3) (if India)
    • POLS 4290 Studies in Comparative Politics (3) (if India/South Asia included)
    • RELS 4290 Pilgrimage (3) (if India/South Asia included)
    • RELS 4610 Hinduism (3)
    • RELS 4612 Hindu Sacred Myths and Epics (3)
    • RELS 4615 Buddhism (3)
    • RELS 4628 Topics in Asian Religions (3) (if Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism)
    • SOCI 4360 Religion and Society (3) (if on India/South Asia)
    • WGSS 4240 Sexuality and Gender in Asia (3) (if India/South Asia included)

Area I: Electives

Electives are used to have 39 hours at Georgia State University taken at the 3000-4000 level for residency and complete 120 hours required for graduation.

Area J: Study Abroad/International Student Exchange Programs

Students are strongly recommended to consider a semester study abroad. For general information about study abroad in different countries of Asia, contact Study Abroad Programs, Office of International Initiatives (404-413-2529, mystudyabroad@gsu.edu).

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This program offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the program director, Ghulam Nadri (gnadri@gsu.edu), for the specific criteria for this honor.


Interdisciplinary Minor in Asian Studies

Requirements: 15-18 credit hours of Asia-related courses. A minimum grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. No more than two courses (6-8 hours) may come from a single discipline/prefix. Courses counted toward the interdisciplinary minor cannot also count toward the major.

  1. Required introductory course (3):
  2. Required language course. Choose one Asian language course from the following (3):
    • ARBC 1002, ARBC 2001, or ARBC 2002 Elementary/Intermediate Arabic (3)
    • CHIN 1002CHIN 2001, or CHIN 2002  Elementary/Intermediate Chinese (3)
    • JAPN 1002, JAPN 2001, or JAPN 2002 Elementary/Intermediate Japanese (3)
    • KORE 1002KORE 2001, or KORE 2002 Elementary/Intermediate Korean (3)
      Notes:

      • The selected course should be in addition to the course used to fulfill requirements in Area F or Area G, if appropriate.
      • Students who are native speakers of one of the above languages must either take a course in another language or take four courses from section 3 below. Transfer students who have course credit in other Asian languages may apply these to the minor on approval of the minor faculty coordinator.
  3. Electives. Choose three courses from the following (9-12):

3160 Astronomy

Program Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science in Physics with a Concentration in Astronomy

Department of Physics and Astronomy
Room 605, 25 Park Place
404-413-6033
phy-astr.gsu.edu

Sebastien Lepine, Chair
Brian Thoms, Associate Chair and Undergraduate Director in Physics

Sumith Doluweera, Undergraduate Director in Physics – Lower Division Courses
Ben McGimsey, Undergraduate Director in Astronomy

The Astronomy program at Georgia State University is integrated with the Physics program. For information on the B.S. in Physics with a Concentration in Astronomy, see section 3460.

3170 Biology

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science in Biology
    • General Biology Studies (no concentration)
    • Concentration in Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology
    • Concentration in Microbiology
    • Concentration in Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology
    • Concentration in Neurobiology
    • Concentration in Pre-Medical/Pre-Health
  • Dual B.S./M.S. in Biology
  • Dual B.S. in Biology/M.S. in Health Sciences
  • Minor in Biology

Department of Biology
Petit Science Center, Suite 495
404-413-5300
biology.gsu.edu

Geert de Vries, Chair
Jessica Parilla, Director of Undergraduate Programs
Kavita Oommen, Assistant Director of Undergraduate Programs

Biology, the science of life and life processes, includes the study of structure, function, growth, development, reproduction, origin, evolution, and distribution of living organisms.

A degree in biology provides students with a variety of career opportunities. Potential careers range from applied or basic laboratory research and field studies in numerous state and federal organizations and industry, to education in public and private school systems. Furthermore, the degree provides the ideal preparation for entry into medical, dental, and veterinary schools and other health-related professions. Finally, a bachelor’s degree in biology provides a good foundation for advanced studies at the M.S. or Ph.D. level in biological sciences.

As an alternative to the General Biology Studies program (and in addition to the core degree requirements), courses in one of several areas of concentration, listed below, are available. Interdisciplinary programs with other departments/schools/institutes (such as Behavioral Biology or Environmental Science) are also an option. To plan the major according to the particular needs and goals, students should consult the “Undergraduate Program” area of the Biology Department Website (biology.gsu.edu) for information about the major.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

B.S. in Biology

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400). Alternatives are available for some requirements in Areas A-F. Please see a degree program advisor for specific guidelines.

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G, H, and I to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Area A:

  • Required course: MATH 1113 Precalculus (3) or any higher-level mathematics course) (3)

Area B:

  • Recommended course: PHIL 1010 Critical Thinking (2)

Area D:

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. Required Courses (16):
  2. Select one from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    • BIOL 2106 Introduction to the Biological Sciences (2)
    • BIOL 2110K Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
    • BIOL 2120K Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
    • BIOL 2240 Introduction to Human Physiology (3)
    • BIOL 2300 Microbiology and Public Health (3)
    • BIOL 2500 Neurobiology and Behavior (2)
    • BIOL 2800 Introduction to Molecular Biology (2)
    • RSCH 1203 Research Strategies and Technology (1)
  • Students who decide to major in biology after completing BIOL 1103K may use it for credit toward Area F if they complete BIOL 2108, BIOL 2108L, and BIOL 2800 before enrolling in major courses (Area G).
  • All courses above ending in K are commonly offered as separate lecture and lab (L) courses by GSU’s Perimeter College. The combined (K) courses and separate lecture and lab (L) courses cover the same subject matter and are considered equivalent courses. Beginning Fall 2019, the downtown Biology department will also offer BIOL 2107/BIOL 2107L and BIOL 2108/BIOL 2108L as separate courses. 
  • Any credit hours exceeding 18 earned to complete the Area F requirements will count toward elective hours.

Area G: Major Courses (35)

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
    • BIOL 3810 Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory-CTW  (3)
  2. Major Core Requirements (12)
  3. Choose one of the following labs: (1) *
    • BIOL 3250 Human Physiology Laboratory (1)
    • BIOL 3850 Animal Biology Laboratory (1)
    • BIOL 3890 Microbiology Laboratory (1)
    • BIOL 3910 Genetics Laboratory (1)
    • * Students should consult with an adviser regarding the laboratory most appropriate to their course of study. Additional laboratories may be appropriate and the credit applied to item 4 below.
  4. At least one credit hour of BIOL 4960, Biology Careers Seminar (1), or BIOL 4970, Biology Seminar (1). It is recommended that students take BIOL 4960 early in their courses of study for career advisement.
  5. Additional biology courses at the 3000-4000 to reach 35 credit hours in Area G.

Area H: Chemistry Requirements (6)

Students majoring in biology are required to complete the following:

  1. Required courses (6)

Area I: Additional Courses (17)

Select one two-course physics sequence (8) *

* Two semesters of physics are required for biology majors. If the physics sequence is used to fulfill the Area D requirement, then students should:

Select additional biology courses at the 3000 level or above OR courses from this list:

  • ANTH 4060 Environmental Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 4300 Human Evolution (3)
  • ANTH 4310 Human Biology (4)
  • ANTH 4350 Applied Biocultural Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 4370 Forensic Anthropology (3)
  • ANTH 4390 Diet, Demography and Disease (3)
  • CHEM 2100 Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2)
  • CHEM 3110 Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2)
    Note: (CHEM 2100 and CHEM 3110 are required by most professional programs.)
  • CHEM 4110 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics (3)
  • CHEM 4600 Biochemistry I (5)
  • CHEM 4610 Biochemistry II (3)
  • CRJU 3410 Criminology (3)
  • CSC 2010 Introduction to Computer Science (3)
  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EDSC 3250 Topics in Middle Grades Science (3)
  • GEOL 4002 Oceanography (3)
  • GEOL 4011 Principles of Paleontology (4)
  • GEOL 4017 Environmental Geology (4)
  • GEOL 4644 Environmental Conservation (4)
  • GEOG 4642 Advanced Weather and Climate (3)
  • GEOG 4646 Water Resources (3)
  • EPY 2040 The Science of Learning: Theories, Application, and Practice (3)
  • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development (3)
  • LT 3210 Teaching, Learning, and Technology Integration (3)
  • KH 3000 Personal Health and Wellness (3)
  • KH 3390 Advanced First Aid and Emergency Care (3)
  • KH 3610 Motor Learning and Development (4)
  • MATH 1401 Elementary Statistics (3)
  • MATH 2202 Calculus for the Life Sciences II (4)
  • MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (4)
  • MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (4)
  • MATH 2212 Calculus of One Variable II (4)
  • MATH 2215 Multivariate Calculus (4)
  • PHIL 3740 Advanced Biomedical Ethics (3)
  • PHIL 4130 Philosophy of Science (3)
  • PH 3001 Introduction to Research Methods in Public Health (3)
  • PHYS 3500 Electronics (3)
  • PSYC 3010 Psychological Statistics (4)
  • PSYC 3140 Abnormal Psychology (3)
  • [PT 3000] Introduction to PT and OT Practice (3)
  • [PT 3660] Complementary and Alternative Therapy (3)
  • RT 3005 Clinical Cardiopulmonary Physiology (3)
  • [SNHP 3000] Communication and Cultural Diversity (3)
  • SOCI 3156 Sexuality and Society (3)
  • Any other 3000- or 4000-level course in Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry Neuroscience, Nutrition, Psychology, or Physics.

Students majoring in biology must take additional courses as electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Concentration

Required: Area G3

  • Select one from the following options:

Required: Area G5

  • Both of the following courses are required (7)
  • Choose one Signature Experience course from the following (2-5):
    • BIOL 4050 Natural Environments of Georgia (4)
    • BIOL 4915 Collaborative Internships in Biology (2), on a subject related to EEO
    • BIOL 4916 Internships in Biology (2), on a subject related to EEO
    • BIOL 4905 Theme-Based Biology Laboratory (2-4)
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (2-5), on a subject related to EEO
    • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology (3-4) on a subject related to EEO that has a signature experience component; requires departmental approval.
  • Choose 10-13 credit hours of the following:

Microbiology Concentration

Required: Area F2

  • BIOL 2300 Microbiology and Public Health (3)

Required: Area G3

Required: Area G5

  • Choose two of the following (8):
  • Choose two of the following (6-8)
    • BIOL 3021 Infectious Disease and Society (3)
    • BIOL 4278 Immunology (4)
    • BIOL 4438 Applied Microbiology (4)
    • BIOL 4484 Laboratory Techniques in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (4)
    • BIOL 4576 Neurovirology (4)
    • BIOL 4580 Microbial Pathogenesis (4)
    • BIOL 4696 Laboratory in Molecular Biological Techniques (4)
    • BIOL 4905 Theme Based Biology Laboratory (2-4), on a subject related to microbiology
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (1-5), on a subject related to microbiology
    • BIOL 4915 Collaborative Internships in Biology (2), on a subject related to microbiology
    • BIOL 4916 Internships in Biology (2), on a subject related to microbiology
    • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology (3-4), on a subject related to microbiology
    • Any course not already taken from the list above.

Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology Concentration

Required: Area G3

  • Select one from the following options:

Required: Area G5

  • Choose two of the following (7-8):
  • Choose one Signature Experience course from the following (2-5):
    • BIOL 4696 Laboratory in Molecular Biological Techniques (4)
    • BIOL 4905 Theme Based Biology Laboratory (2-4)
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (1-5), on a subject related to molecular genetics and/or cell biology
  • • Choose two courses from the following (7-8):
    • BIOL 4074 Developmental Biology (4)
    • BIOL 4248 Cell Physiology (4)
    • BIOL 4278 Immunology (4)
    • BIOL 4282 Tumor Immunology (4)
    • BIOL 4500 Human Genetics (4)
    • BIOL 4576 Neurovirology (4)
    • BIOL 4580 Microbial Pathogenesis (4)
    • BIOL 4685 Functional Histology-CTW (4)
    • BIOL 4696 Laboratory in Molecular Biological Techniques (4) (if not taken as the signature experience option)
    • BIOL 4744 Biostatistics (3)
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (1-5), on a topic related to molecular genetics and cell biology
    • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology (3-4), on a subject related to molecular genetics and/or cell biology; requires departmental approval.
    • Any course not already taken from the list above.

Required: Area I

Neurobiology Concentration

Recommended: Area F2

Required: Area G5

  • BIOL 4102 Neurobiology (4)
  • Choose 12 hours of the following (3-5 credit hours each):
    • BIOL 4070 Sensory Neuroscience (3)
    • BIOL 4074 Developmental Biology (4)
    • BIOL 4080 Clinical Neuroscience (4)
    • BIOL 4094 Developmental Neurobiology (4)
    • BIOL 4100 Cell and Molecular Neuroscience (4)
    • BIOL 4115 Medical Neuroanatomy (4)
    • BIOL 4130 Sensation and Perception (3)
    • BIOL 4200 Neuroscience of Memory (3)
    • BIOL 4240 Endocrinology (4)
    • BIOL 4241 Hormones and Behavior (4)
    • BIOL 4246 Advanced Human Physiology (4)
    • BIOL 4248 Cell Physiology (4)
    • BIOL 4800 Principles of Cell Biology (4)
    • BIOL 4905 Theme-based Biology Laboratory (2-4), on a subject related to Neurobiology
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (1-5), on a subject related to Neurobiology
    • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology (3-4), on a subject related to Neurobiology

Recommended Area I:

Pre-Medical/Pre-Health Concentration

Recommended: Area F2

  • Choose one of the following:

Required: Area G5

  • The following courses are required (4 or 3 if Biol 3250 is used in G3)
  • Choose four of the following (15-16)

Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Biology

The department offers two dual bachelors/masters programs:

  • Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Biology
  • Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Health Sciences

Dual degree opportunities enable qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Minor Offerings and Double Major in Biology

Students who wish to minor in biology must take at least 15 hours in courses in biology, including at least nine hours at the 3000 level or above. Students are responsible for meeting all prerequisite requirements (such as CHEM 1211K/CHEM 1212K) for the biology courses they choose to take, and are strongly encouraged to take these prerequisites as early as possible in their academic career. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in biology may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. Students should consult with the Undergraduate Director or Undergraduate Coordinator for more information.

Honors Opportunities

The department encourages qualified students to participate in the Honors College (visit honors.gsu.edu). The department sponsors a Biology Club, a Pre-Vet club, a Pre-Dental club and a local chapter of American Medical Student Association (AMSA) in addition to the Eta Psi chapter of Beta Beta Beta, the national honorary biological society. Interested students are encouraged to participate in these organizations.

Internships

Internships with collaborating institutions and programs (including ZooAtlanta, the Georgia Aquarium and the Bio-Bus program) are available on a limited basis. Students interested in receiving course credit for an internship should consult with the Undergraduate Director or Undergraduate Coordinator for more information.

Undergraduate Research Programs

Students are particularly encouraged to participate in the Undergraduate Research Program after completion of core requirements. Participation in an ongoing research activity provides the student with experience in experimental design and interpretation that is typically not available in routine laboratory courses. Students may enroll in BIOL 4905 and/or BIOL 4910 for undergraduate research experience. Each course may be repeated once. Interested students should consult the departmental website for information on faculty research interests and contact one or more faculty members for development of a specific project.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This department offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. At least four hours of BIOL 4910 and a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher in Areas G and H are required for graduation with distinction.

3180 Chemistry

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science in Chemistry
    • Concentration in Biochemistry
    • Concentration in Pre-Medicine
  • Certification by the American Chemical Society
  • Minor in Chemistry
  • Dual B.S./M.S. in Chemistry

Department of Chemistry
380 Petit Science Center
404-413-5500
chemistry.gsu.edu

Donald Hamelberg, Chair
Giovanni Gadda, Associate Chair
Jeremiah Harden, Co-director of Undergraduate Studies
Joan Mutanyatta-Comar, Co-director of Undergraduate Studies

Chemistry deals with the nature of substances and the changes that occur therein. It ranges from the study of the structure of atoms and molecules to that of the reactions occurring in living organisms. The study of chemistry can provide knowledge that will give students a greater understanding and appreciation of the world in which they live. In addition, knowledge of chemistry is a great asset in areas such as biology, physics, and health-related fields. It is a logical basis for pre-medical training, pre-veterinary, pre-pharmacy, and other allied health professions.

Each student is urged to consult with an academic advisor at the earliest possible time (even before the first semester) to outline a curriculum to meet his or her needs. A typical program of study for chemistry majors is outlined below. Although not required, several minors are possible for chemistry majors without concentrations.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Financial Information

Lab fees are assessed automatically for students who register for certain Chemistry courses. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.

Chemistry Courses for Science Majors

Detailed descriptions of the objectives and prerequisites of each course are available online. The student is urged to consult these descriptions if there is any doubt about requirements or qualifications. Laboratory courses and lecture courses on principles are designed to be mutually reinforcing. The laboratory is the real basis for the science, but the lecture courses are designed to reinforce the learning process. The labs and lectures are separated only to provide added flexibility in scheduling and to meet individual needs, particularly for transfer students. Great care should be exercised in scheduling one course component without the other.

Chemistry Courses for Non-Science Majors

CHEM 1050, CHEM 1151K, and CHEM 1152K are of primary interest to students in liberal arts, health sciences, education, business administration, and policy studies. Students in specific programs should consult with an advisor in their program to verify applicability of the above-named courses to their specific needs. These courses cannot be applied to a science degree program in the College of Arts and Sciences.

B.S. in Chemistry

Program Degree Requirements

Students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400). Alternatives are available to some core and major requirements. Please see one of the undergraduate directors for specific guidelines. Chemistry majors need to take CHEM 1211K during their first term at GSU to be on schedule to graduate in four years.

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Area A:

  • Required course: MATH 1113 Precalculus (3) or a higher-level mathematics course. MATH 1113 is recommended.

Area D:

  • Recommended courses: CHEM 1211K Principles of Chemistry I (4) and CHEM 1212K Principles of Chemistry II (4)
  • Required course (choose one of the following or a higher level mathematics course): MATH 2201 Calculus for the Life Sciences I (4) or MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (4)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

    1. Required Courses (unless used to satisfy Area D requirements) (18):
    2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F if needed. Contact the Undergraduate Director for the BS in Chemistry for advice.
  • Transfer students, students changing their major, and students pursuing an biochemistry concentration may substitute PHYS 1111K/PHYS 1112K  for PHYS 2211K /PHYS 2212K if approved by the Department of Chemistry.
  • All courses above ending in K are commonly offered as separate lecture and lab (L) courses by GSU’s Perimeter College. The combined (K) courses and separate lecture and lab (L) courses cover the same subject matter and are considered equivalent courses. Beginning Fall 2019, the downtown Biology department will also offer BIOL 2107/BIOL 2107L and BIOL 2108/BIOL 2108L as separate courses. 
  • Credit hours exceeding 18 earned to complete the Areas A-F requirements will count toward elective hours.

Area G: Major Courses (30)

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (6)
    • CHEM 4000 Fundamentals of Chemical Analysis-CTW (3)
    • CHEM 4160 Chemistry Laboratory IVA-CTW (3)
  2. Major Requirements (19)
    • CHEM 2100 Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2)
    • CHEM 3110 Intermediate Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2)
    • CHEM 3400 Structure and Reactivity of Biomolecules (3)
    • CHEM 4010 Instrumental Methods I: Chromatography (3)
    • CHEM 4110 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics (3)
    • CHEM 4120 Quantum Chemistry (3)
    • CHEM 4190 Instrumental Methods III: Spectroscopy (3)
  3. Major Electives (5):
    • Select additional 3000- and/or 4000-level chemistry courses.
      • Recommended course: CHEM 4600 Biochemistry I (5) (required for ACS certification)

B.S. in Chemistry (Biochemistry concentration)

Area G: Major Courses (30)

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (6)
  2. Major Requirements (18)
    • CHEM 2100 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2)
    • CHEM 3110 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2)
    • CHEM 3400  Structure and Reactivity of Biomolecules (3)
    • CHEM 4010 Instrumental Methods I: Chromatography (3)
    • Select one course:
      • CHEM 4150 Intro to Biophysical Chemistry (3)
      • CHEM 4110 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics (3)
    • CHEM 4600 Biochemistry I (5)
  3. Major Electives (6):
    • Select additional 3000- and/or 4000-level chemistry courses.
      •  Suggested: CHEM 4610 Biochemistry II (3)

Area H: Biochemistry Concentration (17)

Students majoring in chemistry must take additional courses as electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of 1000/2000 physical education or military science courses. The department recommends that majors take computer and/or world language courses.

B.S. in Chemistry (Pre-Medicine Concentration)

A pre-medicine concentration is available for chemistry majors. Please contact the Department of Chemistry for further information.

Area G: Major Courses (30)

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (6)
  2. Major Requirements (19)
    • CHEM 2100 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (2)
    • CHEM 3110 Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (2)
    • CHEM 3400 Structure and Reactivity of Biomolecules (3)
    • CHEM 4010 Instrumental Methods I: Chromatography (3)
    • Select one course:
      • CHEM 4150 Intro to Biophysical Chemistry (3)
      • CHEM 4110 Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics (3)
    • CHEM 4600 Biochemistry I (5)
  3. Major Electives (6):
    • Select additional 3000- and/or 4000-level chemistry courses.
      •  Suggested: CHEM 4610 Biochemistry II (3)

Area H: Pre-Medical Concentration (18)

Students majoring in chemistry must take additional courses as electives to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of 1000/2000 KH or military science courses.

American Chemical Society Certification

For American Chemical Society certification, students must take CHEM 4600 in Area G, and an additional ten hours of coursework as follows:

  1. Required Courses (10)
  2. Elective Courses (4)
    • CHEM 4170 Chemistry Laboratory IVB (4) strongly recommended
    • CHEM 4170 can be substituted by other approved courses (must be different than major elective courses)

Minor in Chemistry

Students who wish to minor in chemistry must take at least 15 hours in courses in chemistry, including at least nine hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in chemistry may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Chemistry

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Chemistry. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and count the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This department offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the department undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3183 Chinese

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in International Economics and Modern Languages
    • Concentration in Chinese Language and Society
  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Asian Studies (see section 3150)
  • Certificate of Language Ability in Chinese
  • Minor in Chinese Language and Culture
  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Chinese Studies

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

Bill Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Shuai Li, Undergraduate Director and Chinese Program Coordinator

The Department of World Languages and Cultures serves a threefold purpose: to encourage an appreciation of humanistic values through the study of foreign languages, literatures, and cultures; to teach foreign languages as a means of communication; and to prepare students for academic careers and the opportunities available in the field of international business. As part of a dynamic urban university in a city of growing international awareness and status, the department is fulfilling its responsibility to meet the increasing foreign language needs of the governmental, business, and professional communities. The department recognizes that an active command of the foreign language and a thorough exploration of the foreign culture form an essential basis for further study in the various areas of its curriculum.

The department is home to the Center for International Resources and Collaborative Language Engagement (CIRCLE), a multi-purpose academic support center that offers walk-in tutoring in each of the languages taught at Georgia State and provides a variety of digital resources (i.e., software, apps, media and materials) to support the language studies of the university community. In addition, the CIRCLE hosts special events focused on cultural awareness and communication opportunities, such as conversation meetups, discussion groups, and other social events, as well as language and technology workshops. The center addresses the university and College of Arts and Sciences strategic goals of increasing internationalization in the curriculum and of enhancing the global competency (including the study of world languages) of students, faculty and staff.

For students who view language study as a preparation for a career in the business world, the department offers a program in conjunction with the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies: the Bachelor of Arts Major in International Economics and Modern Languages (IEML).

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Students majoring in the B.A. in International Economics should contact the Andrew Young School of Policy studies for advisement. Information for this program is available at aysps.gsu.edu/oaa.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Arts students should also consult regularly with the faculty program coordinator for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic opportunities.

Program Financial Information

Lab fees are assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. As a result, students will no longer be required to purchase lab fee cards. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.


B.A. in International Economics and Modern Languages with a concentration in Chinese Language and Society

Program Admission

There are no admission requirements above the requirements for admission to the University for enrollment in the B.A. program with a major in international economics and modern languages.

Program Financial Information

There are no additional fees other than the tuition and fees charged by the University for enrollment in this program.

Program Degree Requirements

For degree credit, a minimum grade of C must be attained in ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 and all courses in the economics common core curriculum and modern languages core curriculum.

Complete descriptions of requirements for Areas A through E of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum can be found in the “University Degree Requirements and Graduation” chapter of this catalog. The number of semester credit hours required for each section is shown in parentheses.

In addition to courses in Chinese, you are advised to choose courses in other areas that complement your language study. Such courses include other languages, history, philosophy, art and music, business, and education. Faculty advisors in the department are eager to discuss your academic plans with you as you design your course of study. In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
  2. ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
  3. MATH 1401 Elementary Statistics (3) – If taken in Area D, a 1000/2000 level elective from Areas A-E may be substituted.
  4. Choose one of the following language options:
    • CHIN 2001 Intermediate Chinese I (3)
    • CHIN 2002 intermediate Chinese II (3)
      Note: Students who have not already attained elementary-level proficiency in their chosen language will be required to take prerequisite courses: CHIN 1001 and/or CHIN 1002. In that case, the 1002 language course may be used to satisfy 3 credit hours of core requirements in Area C, Humanities, Fine Arts, and World Languages.
      Students who have already attained intermediate-level competency in the primary language may substitute 1000/2000 level courses in another language for CHIN 2001/CHIN 2002) upon approval of the Department of World Languages and Cultures advisor.
  5. Elective: One 1000/2000 level course chosen from Areas A-E.

Area G: Economics Common Core Curriculum (24)

  1. ECON 3900 Macroeconomics-CTW  (3)
  2. ECON 3910 Microeconomics (3)
  3. ECON 4600 Economic Development (3)
  4. ECON 4800 International Trade (3)
  5. ECON 4810 International Finance (3)
  6. ECON 4999 Senior Capstone in Economic Policy-CTW (3)*
  7. Choose two 4000-level Econ courses (6)
    *ECON 4999 is only offered during the Fall and Spring semesters of the academic year. The prerequisites for ECON 4999 are ECON 3900, ECON 3910, and two 4000-level economics courses with a grade of C or better. Students are to plan accordingly with regard to the course pre-requisites and graduation.

Area H: Modern Languages Common Core (24)

Select eight courses from the following eleven options.
Chinese Language and Society:

  1. CHIN 3001 Advanced Chinese I (3)
  2. CHIN 3002 Advanced Chinese II (3)
  3. CHIN 3011 Chinese Culture and Society in Change: Advanced Reading and Writing (3)
  4. CHIN 3080 Topics in Chinese Studies (CTW) (3)
  5. CHIN 3081 Cultural Dimensions of Language Learning (CTW) (3)
  6. CHIN 3082 Cross-Cultural Encounters (3)
  7. CHIN 3083 Modern China Through Film (3)
  8. IB 4030 China’s Economy and International Business Environment (3)
  9. CHIN 4011 Chinese for International Business I  (3)
  10. CHIN 4012 Chinese for International Business II  (3)
  11. One course from the following  (3):

Area I: Electives (12)

Choose any four 3000/4000 level courses, in consultation with the academic advisor.


Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Asian Studies

The interdisciplinary program in Asian Studies provides students an opportunity to acquire a career-oriented range of skills and knowledge of this important and unique region by choosing from a large number of courses offered at Georgia State in a range of departments. See section 3140 for additional information.


Certificate of Language Ability in Chinese

A strong demand exists by employers for candidates to offer credentials to verify language proficiency in both oral and written communication. The undergraduate Certificate of Language Ability is designed for students to offer tangible proof of their language abilities and makes an ideal complement to other areas of study such as business, international relations, public health, criminal justice, hospitality, and more.

The certificate consists of 12 credit hours at 2000- and 3000-level (minimum of 6 must be at the 3000-level), with a B or higher in the first attempt at each course. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.


Minor in Chinese Language and Culture

Students who wish to minor in Chinese Language and Culture should complete 15 credit hours in courses with the CHIN prefix including at least 9 credit hours at the 3000 level or above. A grade “C” or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. Current courses available for the minor include:


Interdisciplinary Minor in Chinese Studies

Program Coordinator: Andrew Wedeman (awedeman@gsu.edu)

Program Degree Requirements

The Chinese Studies minor gives undergraduates in a wide variety of majors the opportunity to take an interdisciplinary set of courses that can combine social sciences, humanities, language, and other disciplines relating to China and Chinese culture. The minor thus provides students with the opportunity to highlight their area studies background and prepares them for higher-level studies on China, Chinese culture and language. Chinese studies minors are highly encouraged to participate in a study abroad program either in China.

Students who wish to minor in Chinese Studies should complete 15 credit hours including at least nine credit hours at the 3000 level or above. Students must complete at least 6 hours in a CHIN course and may obtain credit for no more than two courses from a single other course prefix. A grade of C or higher is required in all minor courses.

Current courses available for the minor include:

  • CHIN 1002 Elementary Chinese II (3) (if not counted in core Area C)
  • CHIN 2001 Intermediate Chinese I (3) (if not counted in core Area C)
  • CHIN 2002 Intermediate Chinese II (3) (if not counted in core Area C)
  • CHIN 3001 Advanced Chinese I
  • CHIN 3002 Advanced Chinese II
  • CHIN 3011 Chinese Culture and Society in Change: Advanced Reading and Writing (3)
  • CHIN 3080 Topics in Chinese Studies (CTW)
  • CHIN 3081 Cultural Dimensions of Language Learning (CTW)
  • CHIN 3082 Cross-Cultural Encounters (3)
  • CHIN 3083 Modern China Through Film (3)
  • CHIN 3395 Study Abroad (3)
  • CHIN 3396 Study Abroad (3)
  • CHIN 3397 Study Abroad (3)
  • CHIN 4021 Modern/Contemporary Chinese Literature in Translation (3)
  • CHIN 4995 Directed Readings BIS-CTW (3-4)
  • HIST 3700 China and Japan to 1600 (4)
  • HIST 3710 China and Japan Since 1600 (4)
  • HIST 4890 Topics in World History (3-4) (if China-related)
  • POLS 4257 Chinese Politics (3)
  • POLS 4290 Studies in Comparative Politics (if China-related) (3)
  • POLS 4465 China in the International System (3)
  • POLS 4490 Studies in International Relations (if China-related) (3)
  • POLS 4900 Senior Seminar–CTW (if China-Related) (3)
  • POLS 4920 Directed Reading and Research (if China-related) (3)
  • RELS 4615 Buddhism (3)
  • RELS 4620 Confucianism and Taoism (3)
  • RELS 4628 Topics in Asian Religion (if China-related) (3)

3200 Communication Sciences

Program Offered:

  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Communication Sciences

Program Coordinator: Luciana Lessa Rodrigues (lrodrigues@gsu.edu)

The Interdisciplinary Minor in Communication Sciences is designed to offer undergraduate students an organized set of classes that will enhance their major coursework and prepare them to apply for graduate programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD).

The goal of the Interdisciplinary Minor in Communication Sciences is to support the completion of courses that are required by Master’s programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders nationally. By completing this minor, students will be able to obtain knowledge in a variety of disciplines that are required for acceptance in a graduate program in CSD.

Recommended Courses for Area A-F

Students should enter the Communication Sciences minor having taken course prerequisites needed for entrance into their planned program of study. Below is a list of courses that are prerequisites for courses included as options in the Communication Sciences minor. Students should plan their desired program of study and identify which prerequisites they need to fulfill.

Required Courses for the Interdisciplinary Minor (15-18)

Students pursuing the interdisciplinary minor in Communication Sciences must take five courses. No more than two of the courses counting towards the minor can have the same course prefix.

  1. Choose two of the following:
    • CSD 4360 Anatomy and Physiology for Communication (3)
    • SCOM 4440 Speech Science (3)
    • PSYC 4400 Psychology of the Atypical Child (3)
  2. Choose three of the following:

3210 Computer Science

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science in Computer Science
  • Dual Degree Programs
    • Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science
    • Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with the Master of Science in Health Administration (Health Informatics specialization)
    • Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with the Master of Science in Information Systems
  • Minor in Computer Science
  • Certificate of Cyber Security
  • Certificate of Data Science

Department of Computer Science
7th floor, 25 Park Place Building
404-413-5700
cs.gsu.edu

Yi Pan, Chair
Anu Bourgeois, Director of Undergraduate Studies

Computer science is the systematic exploration of all aspects of computation. Computer science as a discipline seeks to build a scientific foundation for topics such as computer design, computer programming and software, information processing, algorithmic solutions to problems, and the algorithmic process itself. Computer science provides underpinnings for today’s applications in industry, science, government, and business and prepares the foundation for tomorrow’s applications in ubiquitous computing, medical cures for diseases, and instant access to information by everyone.

The B.S. degree program in computer science provides preparation in the fundamental principles and processes of computation and training in applying these principles in application areas in industry, science, government, and business. The student completes a basic group of required courses in the early stages and chooses courses from several concentrations in the later stages to provide for appropriate breadth and depth of knowledge in the discipline.

A B.S. degree in computer science provides a good foundation for advanced studies at the M.S. or Ph.D. level as well as for careers in industry, science, government, and business. To plan the major according to particular goals, students are encouraged to consult with an adviser in the department. Majors who are interested in having a paid work experience related to their area of study should contact the university’s Office of Cooperative Education, which coordinates the university’s cooperative education programs.

The courses are structured, and the department enforces the prerequisites for its courses. Students are urged to check and take the prerequisites for computer science courses and any computer science requirement as listed by their major department/school/institute. Refer any questions to that major department/school/institute or to the Department of Computer Science.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Academic Regulations

A minimum grade of C is required in all mathematics, physics, and computer science courses and all 3000-level or above courses that are used to fulfill the undergraduate programs of this department.

As part of the core curriculum, students must receive credit for the two calculus courses: Math 2211 and Math 2212. (When counting the number of semester hours in Areas A, D, and F, only 3 of the 4 credit hours of each calculus course will be counted in Area A and/or D. The fourth hour, or the “rollover hour,” will be counted in Area F.)

Prerequisites and co-requisites are strictly enforced in all computer science courses.

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Major Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and to enroll in major-level CSC courses (CSC 2720 Data Structures and all 3000- and 4000-level CSC courses), students must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete the following courses with a grade of C or higher:
    1. CSC 1301 Principles of Computer Science I;
    2. Either CSC 2510 Theoretical Foundations of Computer Science or MATH 2420 Discrete Mathematics; and
    3. Either MATH 1113, MATH 2211, MATH 2212, or MATH 2215.
  • Students must earn an average of 2.5 grade points across the three courses areas (a, b, and c). The GPA will be calculated based on the first attempt at the courses designated above at Georgia State University.
  • Where more than one course may be taken toward fulfilling the requirement (items a and b above), the first attempt at the first course taken from the list will be used to calculate the major eligibility grade-point average. For example, in item c, if a student takes MATH 1113 before taking MATH 2211, then the first attempt at MATH 1113 will be used for the major eligibility GPA.
  • WFs counts as an attempt. Ws do not count as an attempt. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.
  • If a student has AP credit for any course designated above, the course will not be used in this GPA calculation, even if the student chooses to take the course.
  • Transfer students who transfer these course(s) into Georgia State, may use the grades in the transferred course(s) to calculate the GPA or they may attempt them once at Georgia State. Course taken at Georgia State’s Perimeter College count as first-attempts.

Once students are eligible to take major-level Computer Science courses (CSC 2720 and 3000- and 4000-level CSC courses), they remain eligible to take them as long as they are eligible to enroll at Georgia State University, and they satisfy other Computer Science program requirements. Students must meet any prerequisites for the specific 3000- or 4000-level course.

This requirement applies to students entering or re-entering the university in fall 2017 or thereafter, or to students who choose to follow the Computer Science program requirements in the undergraduate catalog for 2017-18 or thereafter. Students who have selected the Computer Science B.S. major but have not yet fulfilled the major eligibility requirement will be designated as Pre-Computer Science majors.

Students in majors other than Computer Science including those minoring in Computer Science, may enroll in major-level CSC courses as long as they meet any pre-requisites for the specific course.

B.S. in Computer Science

Core Curriculum Areas A-E Requirements and Recommendations

Area A:

  • Required course: MATH 1113, or higher level MATH must be taken in Area A. A section of MATH 1113 Precalculus that is designated specifically for this major is recommended (see GoSolar listing to identify appropriate sections).

Area D:

  • Required course: MATH 2211 Calculus I (4) (or a higher level mathematics course) (One credit hour counts in Area F or as an elective.)
  • CSC students may select a lab sequence from any of the options available to science majors.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Carry over from Areas A and/or D (1-2):
    • Students will carry one additional credit hour over to Area F for each 4-credit-hour mathematics course taken in Area A and/or Area D.
  2. MATH 2212 Calculus II (4) (unless taken in either Area A or D) (0-4)
  3. Required courses: (11)
  4. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
  • All courses above ending in K are commonly offered as separate lecture and lab (L) courses by GSU’s Perimeter College. The combined (K) courses and separate lecture and lab (L) courses cover the same subject matter and are considered equivalent courses.
  • Any credit hours exceeding 18 earned to complete the Area F requirements will count toward elective hours.

Area G: Major Requirements (48)

  1. Course to fulfill CTW requirement (4):
  2. MATH 2641 Linear Algebra I (3)
  3. MATH 3020 Applied Probability & Statistics for Computer Science (3)
  4. Computer Science Requirements (22):
    • CSC 2720 Data Structures (3)
    • CSC 3210 Computer Organization and Programming (4) *
    • CSC 3320 System-Level Programming (3)
    • CSC 4320 Operating Systems (4)
    • CSC 4330 Programming Language Concepts (4)
    • CSC 4520 Design and Analysis of Algorithms (4)
  5. For a total of sixteen (16) hours, select at least four courses from the CSc elective courses at the 3000- or 4000-level.
    Note: No courses at or above CSC 4870 can count towards the Area G section without departmental approval.

* CSC 3210 will be scheduled as a three-hour course in fall 2019. Students covered by this catalog will need to complete a one-hour CSC 4999 Directed Reading section to complete this area. Please contact the CSC Undergraduate Director for additional information.

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses (12)

  1. Twelve hours of additional courses taken at the 2000-4000 level (12)
  2. Students earning a B.S. in the Department of Computer Science are not required to complete a minor.
  3. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

Minor in Computer Science

Students choosing to minor in computer science should complete CSC 1302 and CSC 2720 and nine hours of additional computer science courses at the 3000 level or above. Consultation with an adviser in computer science is recommended. Students majoring in mathematics may not include CSC 4610 or CSC 4620 in the minor. A grade of C is required for all courses counting toward the minor.


Certificate in Cyber Security

Along with the emerging technologies such as Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, Internet etc. are the emerging cyber threats. There is a growing need for professionals who are skilled at keeping digital information and infrastructure safe. The certificate would develop expertise in network security, information security and cyber-crime in order to prevent and respond to large scale cyber threats and attacks. The certificate in cybersecurity is designed for students to offer tangible proof of their technical and strategic knowledge in cybersecurity.

The certificate consists of 16 credit hours at the 4000-level from a restricted set of courses listed below with an earned grade of B or higher in the first attempt at each course. All corresponding prerequisites will need to be met for the certificate courses. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts. Normally, students must be Computer Science majors to meet the requirements of the certificate.

  1. Required courses (4):
  2. Select 3 of the following courses (12):
    • CSC 4220 Computer Networks (4)
    • CSC 4221 Wireless Networks and Mobile Computing (4)
    • CSC 4224 Ethical Hacking (4)
    • CSC 4225 Internetwork Programming (4)
    • CSC 4360 Mobile App Development (4)
    • Other courses approved by the department

 Certificate in Data Science

With the proliferation of social networks and mobile computing and emerging areas of Internet of Things (IoT), cycber sensing and networking technologies, generating and collecting data has become ubiquitous. The computation and analysis of such large amounts of data have become increasingly important for today’s global and competitive economy. Businesses and industries are striving to use data analytics, data mining, machine learning and statistical models to make better data-driven decisions. As a result, a significant growing demand exists for scientists trained in managing large data sets, developing and utilizing computer systems/software to process data, extracting knowledge or insights from data in various forms and modeling predictive analytics.

The certificate consists of 16 credit hours at the 4000 level from the restricted set of courses listed below with an earned grade of B or higher in the first attempt at each course. All corresponding prerequisites will need to be met for the certificate courses. Courses retaken using the university Repeat-to-Replace policy are not counted as first attempts. Normally, students must be Computer Science majors to meet the requirements of the certificate.

  1. Required courses (4):
    • CSC 4780 Fundamentals of Data Science (4)
  2. Select 3 of the following courses (12):

Cooperative Education and Internship Programs
The department participates in the University’s Cooperative Education program, in which students rotate between being a full-time student and working in paid, full-time professional positions. Details are available on the department’s website.
The department also encourages students to seek out relevant internships to enhance their preparation for careers related to Computer Science. We offer elective credit, to count towards Area H requirements, subject to department approval.


Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the participating departments and colleges to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Cooperative Education and Internship Programs

The department participates in the University’s Cooperative Education program, in which students rotate between being a full-time student and working in paid, full-time professional positions. Details are available on the department’s website. The department also encourages students to seek out relevant internships to enhance their preparation for careers related to Computer Science. We offer elective credit, to count towards Area H requirements, subject to department approval.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3220 English

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in English
    • Concentration in Creative Writing
    • Concentration in Literature
    • Concentration in Pre-Education
    • Concentration in Rhetoric and Composition
  • British-American Joint Studies Program Concentration
  • Minor in English
  • Minor in Folklore

Department of English
23rd Floor, 25 Park Place Building
404-413-5800
english.gsu.edu

Lynée Lewis Gaillet, Chair
Audrey Goodman, Associate Chair
Stephen B. Dobranski, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Elizabeth Sanders Lopez, Director of Lower Division Studies
Josh Russell, Director of Creative Writing

The Department of English is concerned with the study of language and literature and with the craft of writing considered integral to education since ancient times. Although the department concentrates on texts written in English by authors from Great Britain, Ireland, and the United States, it also examines translations of texts from other languages as well as newly emerging literatures in English from other cultural perspectives. Students may also encounter practices that are not, strictly speaking, “writing” at all, such as oral compositions, hypertexts, and folk art.

In the first year, all students in the university take courses in the fundamentals of college-level writing and in the reasoned analysis of texts. Other English courses that form part of the core curriculum provide students with opportunities to study topics in world literature or surveys of British, American, and World literature.

English majors may concentrate in one of four areas: literature, rhetoric and composition, creative writing, and pre-education. Before choosing their concentrations, all English majors have the opportunity at the sophomore level to gain a broad foundation in British and American literature and studies in literature or rhetoric. Then, with the help of their advisers, majors choose upper-division courses, which allow them to pursue their interests in more depth. Finally, students study within their chosen concentrations in seminars designed as capstones for the major.

In addition, the department’s joint studies program with the University of Northumbria in Newcastle, England, offers Georgia State University English and history majors the opportunity to complete their degrees with a concentration in British and American Cultures.

On successfully completing their studies, English majors will have acquired a sensitivity to the written word and an appreciation for the creative process. They will have developed their skills in organization, writing, and interpretation. English courses offer students the opportunity to discover their own insights and to articulate them with precision.

Majors who concentrate in literature take a range of courses that afford them opportunities to read poetry, prose, and drama from a variety of historical periods and cultural groups. These literature courses seek to promote students’ verbal acuity and abilities at thoughtful evaluation.

Closely related to the study of literature is the department’s creative writing program. Faculty in this program guide students as they practice and refine their creative work.

Students who concentrate in rhetoric and composition learn about the history, theory, and practice of writing to specific audiences for particular purposes. In this concentration, students may focus on either historical rhetoric and the teaching of composition or writing within business and technical environments. Courses in this area allow students to explore the history and theory of writing as applied to the teaching of composition and to writing practices in the workplace.

English majors who wish to teach English in secondary schools integrate studies of literature, language, and composition with a senior seminar that combines these areas with pedagogy.

The Department of English offers courses in the related field of folklore. Georgia State University is the only institution in the state offering a wide selection of folklore courses.

A number of courses in the Department of English have an interdisciplinary approach, and several are crosslisted with other units within the university, such as the Department of African-American Studies and the Institute for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Because of the dynamic and varied nature of our discipline, many of the courses offered (especially on the 4000 level) focus on specific topics not indicated in detail here. Students should inquire in the department office for further information about courses.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

Students must pass ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or higher or be currently enrolled in ENGL 1102 to register for ENGL 2105, ENGL 2110, ENGL 2120, ENGL 2130, or ENGL 2160. Students must pass ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or be currently in the course to take ENGL 2105 or  ENGL 2160. All English majors must pass ENGL 1102 and either ENGL 2120 or ENGL 2130 with a grade of C or higher to enroll in upper-division English courses. ENGL 2110 may be substituted for ENGL 2120 or ENGL 2130 as a prerequisite for 3000-level literary studies courses with a global or postcolonial mandate (ENGL 3940, ENGL 3945, ENGL 3965, and ENGL 3970). Students must pass at least 6 hours in 3000-level English courses with a grade of C or higher in order to enroll in any 4000-level English course. All English minors who plan to take British literature courses must have completed ENGL 2120 with a grade of C or higher, and all English minors planning to take American literature courses must have completed ENGL 2130 with a grade of C or higher.

The department requires a minimum of 30 semester hours in upper-division English, with no more than 11 being transferred credits.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.A. in English

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. World language or literature (6)
    • World language (including American Sign Language) at the 2001 level (3)
    • Either ENGL 2110 World Literature (3) or world language at the 2002 level  (3)
  2. Required Courses (6)
  3. Select additional elective courses from Area C or from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:

Area G: Major Courses (30)

The English major requires ten upper-division courses (30 semester hours) distributed as described below. The same course may not be used to satisfy more than one of the listed requirements.

Each of the four concentrations within the major has specific requirements as outlined here. Students should consult the department for specific information about which courses offered in each two-year sequence will fit the requirements for each concentration. All students are encouraged to pursue internships (ENGL 4500).

Creative Writing Concentration

  1. Creative Writing Core Requirements (12)
    A student electing to pursue the B.A. in English, Concentration in Creative Writing must choose a sub-concentration in either Poetry or Fiction and complete the 12-hour/4-class sequence of Creative Writing classes in that sub-concentration.

    • Poetry (12):
      • ENGL 3150A Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry  (3) or ENGL 3150C Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry & Fiction (3)
      • ENGL 3170 Poetic Techniques (3)
      • ENGL 3180A Contemporary Poetry (3)
      • ENGL 4310A Senior Seminar: Poetry Writing (CTW) (3)
    • Fiction (12):
      • ENGL 3150B Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (3) or ENGL 3150C Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry and Fiction (3)
      • ENGL 3160 Narrative Techniques (3)
      • ENGL 3180B Contemporary Fiction Craft (3)
      • ENGL 4310B Senior Seminar: Fiction Writing (CTW) (3)
  2. Methods: Select one course from Literature Studies Area 1. (3)
  3. Literature before 1800: Select one class from Literature Studies Area 2. (3)
  4. Literature after 1800: Select one course from Literature Studies Area 3. (3)
  5. 4000-level Literature Elective: Select one 4000-level course from Literature Studies Area 2 or Area 3. (3)
  6. Creative Writing, Literature, Rhetoric and Composition, Folklore, Pre-Education in English Electives. Select two 3000-level or 4000-level English or Folklore courses. (6)

When choosing classes from this section, consider how you can use this coursework to increase your professional and/or personal post-graduate options. If your primary interest is writing poetry or fiction, take an additional Creative Writing class or classes (fiction if your sub-concentration is poetry, poetry if your sub-concentration is fiction; Special Topics in Creative Writing (ENGL 4205); etc.). If you would like the option of entering the workforce directly after graduation, use these elective hours to prepare for a career as a technical or professional writer by enrolling in ENGL 3110 Technical Writing or ENGL 4510 Grant and Proposal Writing. If you’re considering graduate school in Literature, Creative Writing, or a research-and-writing-focused field (Law, Education, etc.), choose an additional Literature or Folklore class. Editing classes, including ENGL 3140 Editing for Publication and ENGL 4501 Literary Editing and Publishing, can be useful if you’re interested in launching your own magazine or small press, or entering the workforce as an editor. ENGL 4500 Internship offers a variety of experiences useful for both professional and personal growth.

Literature Concentration

  1. Methods: Select one course. (3)
  2. Literature before 1800: Select three courses, including at least one at the 4000 level. (9)
  3. Literature after 1800: Select three courses, including at least one at the 4000 level. (9)
  4. Applications: Select one course. (3) Majors must have completed at least twelve semester hours of upper-division English course work before registering for an Applications course.
  5. Literature Elective: Select one courses from areas 1, 2, or 3 above (3000- or 4000-level). (3)
  6. General Elective: Select one course in English or Folklore (3000- or 4000-level). (3)

Pre-Education in English Concentration

Majors with the Pre-education in English concentration should be sure to take a mix of courses that focus on British and American literature to prepare effectively for a career in English education.

Courses appearing in more than one category can fulfill only one requirement.

  1. Methods: Select one course; ENGL 3105, ENGL 3210, and ENGL 3220 recommended. (3)
  2. Literature before 1800: Select one course. (3)
  3. Literature after 1800: Select one course. (3)
  4. Multicultural/Genre Literature: Select two courses. (6)
  5. Single Author: Select one course. (3)
  6. Writing: Select one course; ENGL 3100 recommended. (3)
    • ENGL 3080 Persuasion: History, Theory, Practice (3)
    • ENGL 3090 Exposition: History, Theory, Practice (3)
    • ENGL 3100 Composition Studies: History, Theory, Practice (3)
    • ENGL 3105 Practical Grammar (3)
    • ENGL 3150 A or B Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
    • ENGL 3210 Advanced Grammar (3)
  7. Electives: Select two courses in English or Folklore from those listed above (3000- or 4000-level); ENGL 4500 Internship is strongly recommended. (6)
  8. Applications: Select one course. (3) Majors must have completed at least twelve semester hours of upper-division English course work before registering for an Applications course.

Further coursework (9 hours) in the major is recommended but not required for this concentration. Specific recommendations are one additional course from section 2 (Literature before 1800) and ENGL 3100, or, if already taken, one additional course from section 6 (Writing).

Additional courses for the Pre-Education in English concentration. These are not required, but are recommended for elective credit:

  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • LT 3210 Teaching and Technology (3)

Majors with the Pre-Education in English concentration are encouraged to apply to the College of Education and Human Development Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in English Education (TEEMS) for certification preparation. The Master’s degree has a track of four semesters begun in the summer term and a three-semester certification track also begun in the summer and completed in the spring. Hours earned in the certification track can be applied later toward the completion of the Master’s degree.

Teacher Certification

English majors who want to pursue certification to teach at the middle or secondary school level should seek advisement from the College of Education Office of Academic Assistance (300] College of Education Building, 404-413-8000) and the Middle Secondary Education and Instructional Technology Department (639 College of Education Building, 404-413-8060). Georgia State University offers a four-semester Master of Arts in Teaching degree in Middle Childhood or in English Education (TEEMS MCE and TEEMS Secondary English) with initial certification that is a four-semester program. Application deadlines are October 1 and February 1 for the following semesters. Students interested in teaching in middle school should major and minor in a combination of English (Pre-Education in English Concentration) and Social Studies. The English minor interested in teaching middle school should complete the following plan of study: ENGL 2120, ENGL 2130, and ENGL 3040, ENGL 3105, ENGL 3910, and one of the following: ENGL 3100, ENGL 3180.

Rhetoric and Composition Concentration

  1. Entry and Capstone Courses for the Concentration. (6)
    • ENGL 3050 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition (3)
    • ENGL 4320 Senior Seminar: Rhetoric, Advanced Composition and Technical Writing (CTW) (3)
      Majors must have completed at least twelve hours of upper-division courses in rhetoric and advanced composition and technical and professional writing before taking ENGL 4320.ENGL 3050 is a prerequisite for ENGL 4320.
  2. Select two courses from the history, theory, practice cluster. (6)
    • ENGL 3080 Persuasion: History, Theory, Practice (3)
    • ENGL 3090 Exposition: History, Theory, Practice (3)
    • ENGL 3100 Composition Studies: History, Theory, Practice (3)
  3. Select two courses from the production cluster. (6)
  4. Select two electives from Rhetoric and Composition courses not already taken. (6)
  5. Select one elective from any 3000 level English or Folklore courses. (3)
  6. Select one elective from any 4000 level English or Folklore course. (3)

British-American Joint Studies Program Concentration

  1. Methods: Select one course. (3)
  2. Literature before 1800: Select two courses, including at least one at the 4000 level. (6)
  3. Literature after 1800: Select one course. (3)
  4. Applications: Select one. (3) Majors must have completed at least twelve semester hours of upper-division English course work before registering for an Applications course.
  5. Exchange Program course in British & American Cultures at GSU. (3)
    • Exchange Program course in British & American Cultures at GSU. (3)
    • ENGL 3266 British/American Cultures Seminar (3)
  6. Courses in British & American Cultures at Northumbria. (6)
    • Six hours of coursework taken at Northumbria in British history or literature and/or in the American Studies program.
  7. General Electives: select two courses in English or Folklore (3000- or 4000-level). (6)

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

English majors have three options: a minor, a double major, or additional courses in the major. One of these options, combined with electives, will complete their degree requirements. Each student should discuss these options with a department advisor and choose the one that will best serve the student’s long-term goals.

  • Minor: at least 15 semester hours, 9 hours of which must be taken at the 3000 level or above, either in Folklore or from one department, school, or institute other than the English department. The requirements for a minor must be fulfilled in a department, school, or institute that offers a baccalaureate degree. Students interested in an interdisciplinary minor should consult their advisors. The College of Arts and Sciences requires a grade of C or higher in each course counted toward the minor.
  • Double major: course work to satisfy requirements for a second major in addition to English; all college and departmental requirements apply to this second major to the first major.
  • Further course work in the major: three courses (9 hours) beyond the ten courses (30 hours) required for the major. Additional courses from departments, schools, or institutes other than the major must be taken to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of 1000-2000 level physical education. One of these courses must be Lang 2002 (see “Major Courses” above).

Departmental Student Assessment: Senior Exit Portfolio

To graduate, English majors must submit an exit portfolio designed appropriate to their concentration. All portfolios include a statement of self-assessment and four to six substantial pieces of writing that demonstrate their skills appropriate to their concentration. Specific information about the exit portfolio for each concentration is available from the department. Portfolios are due at the mid-point of the semester of graduation.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

Students who are majoring or minoring in English may earn Graduation with Distinction in the Department of English if they meet the following three criteria:

  1. They are nominated by a faculty member to write an Honors Thesis;
  2. They successfully complete an Honors Thesis, under either Model 1 or Model 2, as described in the Department of English’s Honors Thesis Requirements and Guidelines; and
  3. They maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 upon graduation.

Students who choose on their own to pursue an Honors Thesis in English (and thus are not nominated by a faculty member), who are not minoring or majoring in English, or who do not maintain at least a 3.5 GPA may still graduate with honors. But they are not eligible to earn the additional award of Graduation with Distinction in English.

Faculty members may nominate students to undertake an Honors Thesis by contacting in writing the Chair of the Events and Awards Committee, who will then contact the student. With rare exceptions, the nominating faculty member is expected to serve as the supervisor of the student’s Honors Thesis.

For more information about the Honors Thesis, please see the Department of English’s Honors Thesis Requirements and Guidelines.

Minor in English or Folklore

Students who minor in English or Folklore must complete at least 15 hours of course work in English or Folklore, and the minimum for those interested in teaching middle school is 18 hours. Regardless of concentration, 12 hours applied to the minor must be at the 3000 level or above, and some of these upper-division courses might also require students to take prerequisites. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in English may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. See above under “Teacher Certification” for an English minor in preparation to teach middle school. (A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.)

3230 English as a Second Language (ESL)

Programs Offered:

  • ESL Credit-Bearing Courses
  • Intensive English Program (IEP)

Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language
15th Floor, 25 Park Place Building
404-413-5200
alsl.gsu.edu

Diane Belcher, Chair
Sarah Kegley, ESL Director (credit-bearing courses)
John Bunting, IEP Director

The ESL credit–bearing courses for bilingual/non-native speakers of English at the undergraduate level include special sections of ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 and Human Communication (SCOM 1000 and SCOM 1500). These courses are for both international students and resident bilingual/bicultural students. For more information, see “ESL Program” at alsl.gsu.edu.

The IEP is a non-credit program designed to prepare students with the language and study skills necessary for successful academic work in American colleges and universities. Classes are offered at advanced beginning, low intermediate, intermediate, high intermediate, and advanced levels in the following areas: structure/composition, reading/listening, academic writing, extensive reading, and oral communication.

Students are admitted to the IEP through the Department of Applied Linguistics and ESL and not through regular Georgia State admission procedures. For information and/or application forms, contact: Intensive English Program, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 4099, Atlanta, GA 30302-4099, or at iep.gsu.edu.

Admission to the Intensive English Program does not constitute regular admission to a degree-granting program of Georgia State or of any other branch of the University System of Georgia. Students who wish to take degree work at the university must complete the student application appropriate for the desired program, submit all credentials, and receive an official decision from the Office of Admissions or Office of Graduate Services.

3235 Entertainment Media Management

Program Offered:

  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Entertainment Media Management

Creative Media Industries Institute

Brennen Dicker, Executive Director
David Cheshier, minor coordinator, dcheshier@gsu.edu

The interdisciplinary Entertainment Media Management minor prepares students for a variety of management-related careers in the entertainment and music industries. The curriculum is founded on a basic knowledge of business administration, contracts, intellectual property issues, event management, artist management, marketing, promotion and branding basics. The minor would prepare students to work in a range of capacities in artist management, concert promotion, music publishing, recording, publicity and marketing/promotion firms. Graduates will leave with an understanding of the distinctiveness of the entertainment business and will be prepared to enter this rapidly changing and multifaceted world.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Arts students should also consult regularly with the faculty program coordinator for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic opportunities.

Interdisciplinary Minor in Entertainment Media Management

Recommended Courses for Area A-F

Students should enter the Entertainment Media Management minor having taken course prerequisites needed for entrance into their planned program of study. Below is a list of courses that are common prerequisites for courses in the Entertainment Media Management.

Required Courses for the Interdisciplinary Minor (15-18 hours)

Students pursuing the interdisciplinary minor in Entertainment Media Management must take five courses, with at least one from each of three areas: Media Industry/Law/Policy, Marketing and Promotion, and Production Perspectives. No more than two of the five courses counting toward the minor can have the same course prefix. Additionally, no more than two of the five courses counting toward the minor may also count toward the major.

Courses in the Media Industry/Law/Policy area survey the contemporary media landscape in terms of ownership, distribution structures, and intellectual property/regulation issues. Marketing and Promotion Courses equip the student with the basic tools to analyze entertainment markets and publicize media properties. Production Perspectives courses allow the student to briefly engage in media production in order to better understand how to interact with media creative personnel.

Media Industry/Law/Policy

Marketing and Promotion

Production Perspectives

3240 Environmental Science

Program Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Environmental Science

Faculty Coordinator: Rebekah Chapman, rchapman@gsu.edu

The BIS in Environmental Science program provides a foundation in the physical and life sciences, policy, and global and urban sustainability issues. This concentration emphasizes a broad-based course of study, exposing students to the complex social and scientific processes involved in understanding and addressing environmental issues. Students are encouraged to develop specific areas of focus depending on their future goals (e.g., graduate school, government agencies, and environmental consulting firms).

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Arts students should also consult regularly with the faculty program coordinator for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic opportunities.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030.30 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H.  Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.I.S. in Environmental Science

Area A: 

  1. Recommended: MATH 1101, MATH 1111, MATH 1113, MATH 1401, or any higher-level mathematics course.

Area C:

  1. Recommended: World language at the 1002 level or higher (3)

Area D: 

  1. Recommended courses (either of the following sequences):

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

Please discuss Area F selections with program coordinator or your academic advisor, as many of the options below are prerequisites for upper-level courses.

  1. Required courses (if not taken in Area D) (16):
    1. Select one geosciences lab sequence from the following options (8):
    2. Select one biology lab sequence from the following options (8):
  2. Select additional courses from the list below to complete 18 hours in Area F. (Please discuss these choices with your academic advisor to be certain you are taking the prerequisites necessary for Areas G and H.)
  • Students who decide to major in biology after completing BIOL 1103K may use it for credit toward Area F if they complete BIOL 2108, BIOL 2108L, and BIOL 2800 before enrolling in major courses (Area G).
  • All courses above ending in K are commonly offered as separate lecture and lab (L) courses by GSU’s Perimeter College. The combined (K) courses and separate lecture and lab (L) courses cover the same subject matter and are considered equivalent courses. Beginning Fall 2019, the downtown Biology department will also offer BIOL 2107/BIOL 2107L and BIOL 2108/BIOL 2108L as separate courses. 
  • Any credit hours exceeding 18 earned to complete the Area F requirements will count toward elective hours.

Area G: Area of Concentration — Foundations of Environmental Science and Sustainability (27-34)

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G. Some of the Area G courses listed below are also in Area H. They may only count in one place.

  1. Required of all BIS Environmental Science Majors (9)
    1. Geosciences. Select one course:
    2. Public Management and Policy. Select one course:
      • Recommended option:
        • PMAP 3021 Citizenship, The Community, and The Public Sector (3)
      • Additional options:
        • PMAP 3011 Policy and Politics in the American City (3)
        • PMAP 4421 GIS Application to Planning and Policy Analysis (3)
    3. Biology. Select one course:
      • BIOL 3020 Introduction to Marine Biology (3)
      • BIOL 3820 Plant Biology (3) (consult with advisor prior to registration)
      • BIOL 3840 Animal Biology (3) (consult with advisor prior to registration)
  2. CTW Course. Students must take one CTW course appropriate to the program (3-4). CTW courses do not count toward the maximum number of courses within a single discipline.
  3. Research Methods/Spatial Analysis (3-10)
    • Recommended options:
      • BIOL 4045K General Ecology (4)
      • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology: Experimental Methods in Environmental Science (3-4)
      • GEOG 4532 Geographic Information Systems (4)
      • PMAP 4421 GIS Application Planning and Policy Analysis (3)
    • Additional options:
  4. Elective Courses in Environmental Science (3-10)
  5. Elective Courses at Large (0-8)
    • Additional courses may be taken from areas 1-4 to bring total hours to 27-34.

Area H: Allied Field – Environmental Science in Context (15-21)

Choose one area of concentration from the options below and select the courses that fit your career goals. If courses have been taken to fulfill Area G, they cannot also count in Area H. Students may combine courses to create their own area of focus with the approval of the faculty program coordinator and the college BIS director. Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H.

Courses with multiple prerequisites are indicated with an asterisk (*). Please consult with the faculty program coordinator regarding prerequisite waivers, which may not be possible for many courses.

  1. Sustainability Focus:
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (Ecology/Sustainability) (1-5)
    • BIOL 4915 Collaborative Internships in Biology (Ecology/Sustainability) (2)
    • BIOL 4916 Internships in Biology (focus: Ecology/Sustainability Internships) (2)
    • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology (Ecology or Sustainability focus) (3)
    • EDCI 4100 Service Learning in Action (3)
    • ENGL 3110 Technical Writing (3)
    • GEOG 4644 Environmental Conservation (3)
    • GEOG 4534 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4)
    • PMAP 3210 Introduction to Nonprofits (3)
    • PMAP 3211 Career Development in Public and Nonprofit (3)
    • PMAP 3213 Nonprofit Financial Resources (3)
    • PMAP 3231 Nonprofit Leadership and Management (3)
    • SCOM 3040 Communicating Environmental Issues (3)
    • SOCI 3350 Social Change and the Future (3)
  2. Natural and Cultural Resources Management:
    • ANTH 4060 Environmental Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 4170 Mesoamerican Archeology (4)
    • ANTH 4180 Archeology of the Southeastern US (4)
    • ANTH 4550 Field School in Anthropology (4-8)
    • BIOL 3020 Introduction to Marine Biology (3)
    • BIOL 3820 Plant Biology (3) (consult with advisor prior to registration)
    • BIOL 3840 Animal Biology (3) (consult with advisor prior to registration)
    • BIOL 4045K General Ecology-CTW (4) (consult with advisor prior to registration)
    • BIOL 4451 Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology (4)
    • BIOL 4910 Undergraduate Research in Biology (Ecology/Sustainability) (1-5)
    • BIOL 4915 Collaborative Internships in Biology (focus: Ecology/Sustainability Externship) (2)
    • BIOL 4916 Internships in Biology (focus: Ecology/Sustainability) (2)
    • BIOL 4930 Topics in Biology (topic: Ecology/Sustainability) (3-4)
    • BIOL 4050/GEOG 4050 Natural Environments of Georgia (4)
    • ENGL 3110 Technical Writing (3)
    • GEOG 4518 Digital Cartography (3)
    • GEOG 4534 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4)
    • GEOG 4550 Field School in the Geosciences (3-6)
    • GEOG 4640 Geomorphology (3)
    • GEOG 4644 Environmental Conservation (3)
    • GEOG 4646 Water Resource Management (3)
    • GEOG 4648 Biogeography (3)
    • GEOG 4650 Applied Hydrology (3)
    • GEOL 4003 Aqueous Geochemistry (3)
    • GEOL 4005 Geology of Georgia (3)
    • GEOL 4007 Hydrogeology (4)
    • HIST 4325 Introduction to Public History and Historic Preservation (3)
    • PMAP 4421 GIS Application of Planning and Policy Analysis (3)
    • POLS 4422 NGOs and World Politics (3)
  3. Urban Ecology/Sustainable Development:
  4. Global Environmental Issues:
  5. Environmental Health and Toxicology:
  6. Conservation Biology:
  7. Environment and the Media
  8. Sustainable Food Sources/Urban Gardens:
    • ANTH 4240 Food: History, Ecology and Political Economy (3)
    • ANTH 4550 Field School in Anthropology (topic: Growing Local Food: Field School in Sustainable Food Systems and Ethnographic Methods) (4-8)
    • ANTH 4390 Diet, Demography and Disease (4)
    • BIOL 3820 Plant Biology (3)
    • BIOL 4915 Collaborative Internships in Biology (Ecology/Sustainability) (2)
    • BIOL 4916 Internships in Biology (focus: Ecology/Sustainability Externship) (2)
    • BIOL 4916 Ecology Research Internship (2)
    • EDCI 4100 Service Learning in Action (3)
    • GEOG 4648 Biogeography (3)

Area I: Electives

Electives are used to build the hours in Areas G-I to 60 hours, have 39 hours at Georgia State University taken at the 3000-4000 level for residency, and complete 120 hours required for graduation.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This program offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the program director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3260 European Union Studies

Program Offered:

  • European Union Studies Certificate

Department of Political Science
1005 Langdale Hall
404-413-6159
politicalscience.gsu.edu/

Program Coordinator: Jeannie Grussendorf (jgrussendorf@gsu.edu)

The certificate in European Union Studies is operated under the supervision of the European Council of the University System of Georgia. The program is open to all institutions and students of the University System as well as to professionals with an undergraduate degree. The program’s purpose is to promote knowledge of the European Union (EU) and certify individuals as competent in the subject area of EU studies. Since the EU is the most important economic and political partner of the United States, this certification demonstrates valuable professional expertise to potential employers. For students in the academic track, this interdisciplinary certificate can be earned as a supplement to any conventional undergraduate degree.

Admission to the Program

A certificate in European Union Studies can be earned in one of two ways. Under the academic track, a certificate is taken in tandem with an undergraduate degree program. Students from all academic majors are eligible to participate so long as they possess a minimum 2.75 cumulative grade point average (GPA). Under the professional track, non-degree seeking students — such as business executives — are eligible to enroll in the program upon proof of a valid undergraduate degree from an accredited institution. The minimum GPA requirement is waived.

Under either track, an application to the program cannot be made until successful completion of the following: (1) the introductory course on the European Union (POLS 4242) with a grade of “C” or better, (2) 30 semester hours of academic credit, and (3) a course in world or western civilization (HIST 1111 or HIST 1112).

The European Union Studies Certificate

To earn the EU Studies Certificate, students must complete the certificate curriculum (18 hours) and fulfill the practicum experience requirement. Students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA in curriculum courses upon completion of the program. An official certificate is awarded upon graduation, and the certificate is noted on a student’s permanent transcripts.

The EU Studies Certificate Curriculum (18):

  1. POLS 4242 The European Union (3)
  2. Multidisciplinary Menu (12)
    A student must complete four courses from an approved menu of courses dealing substantially with the EU. These courses must be distributed among at least three different discipline areas: Social Sciences, Humanities and Fine Arts, Business and Economics, and Natural and Health Sciences. The program’s campus representative decides which courses qualify for the certificate and maintains an updated list of approved courses in the different discipline areas. No more than one course in this menu can be taken at the 1000-2000 level, with the exception of EU Studies online courses (see below) and study abroad courses. Students may substitute for up to two menu courses by performing an internship and/or composing a thesis.
  3. Capstone Seminar in EU Studies (3)
    Taken either as a Directed Study (PolS 4920) or online course, this is ideally the last course in the certificate program. It has three learning objectives: (1) to update students on EU developments and reinforce their general knowledge of the EU, (2) to provide in-depth knowledge of important EU issues, and (3) to allow students to conduct intensive research on EU-related topics.
  4. Practicum Experience:
    Since it is deemed crucial that students demonstrate more than an academic knowledge of the European Union to be certified as adequately prepared in the subject, a “real-life” practicum experience pertaining to the EU must be performed either in the form of an overseas visit or an internship. The overseas option is broadly defined and can be accommodated by a wide range of activities, including study or research abroad. The same flexibility applies to the internship, which can be served domestically or internationally. A student’s specific practicum experience must be approved by the program’s campus representative.

Online Courses and Transatlantic Joint Certificate

The EU Studies program has developed a curriculum of online courses in conjunction with European university partners. These are courses in different discipline areas that deal with various aspects of the EU and are taught jointly by University System institutions and European universities at specified times throughout the academic year. The program’s campus representative maintains an updated list of these courses and a teaching schedule, as well as information about course registration.

The EU Studies program offers the option of acquiring a certificate that is jointly conferred with a European institution. This option requires students to complete — with a grade of “B” or better — a minimum of two online courses that are co-taught with European partner universities. Students completing this option have the EU Studies certificate awarded by both their home institution and one in Europe, thus giving them an academic credential from a respected European university.

Areas of Distinction

In addition to acknowledging competence in the EU generally, the certificate also highlights special achievements by providing a notation of “distinction” in two areas: (1) foreign language proficiency (six semester hours at or above the 2000 level and (2) composition of a thesis.

The foreign language distinction must be earned in a European language approved by the program’s campus representative as appropriate to the certificate’s objectives. A student with prior language skills can earn a distinction by successful completion of an examination demonstrating competency equivalent to the 2000 level. The exam is administered at the student’s home institution.

The thesis can be written anytime during the final year of study. It is supervised by a committee composed of three faculty members representing at least two different academic disciplines. The program’s campus representative maintains a more detailed description of thesis requirements.

3280 French

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in French
    • Concentration in Language, Culture, and Society
    • Concentration in Language and International Business
    • Concentration in Foreign Language Education
  • Bachelor of Arts in International Economics and Modern Languages
  • Minor in French
  • Certificate of Language Ability in French
  • Dual B.A. / M.A. Program in French

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlcgraduate@gsu.edu
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Shuai Li, Undergraduate Director
Gladys M. Francis, French Program Coordinator
Germán Torres, Language Coordinator (FREN 1001-2002 courses)

The Department of World Languages and Cultures serves a threefold purpose: to encourage an appreciation of humanistic values through the study of world languages, literatures, and cultures; to teach world languages as a means of communication; and to prepare students for academic careers and the opportunities available in the field of international business. As part of a dynamic urban university in a city of growing international awareness and status, the department is fulfilling its responsibility to meet the increasing world language needs of the governmental, business, and professional communities.

The department recognizes that an active command of the world language and a thorough exploration of the related cultures form an essential basis for further study in the various areas of its curriculum. To this end, the department sponsors a study-abroad program in Tours (France) and exchange programs in France (Bordeaux and Paris), in the French Caribbean (Guadeloupe and Martinique), and in Africa (Senegal).

The department is home to the Center for International Resources and Collaborative Language Engagement (CIRCLE), a multi-purpose academic support center that offers walk-in tutoring in each of the languages taught at Georgia State and provides a variety of digital resources (i.e., software, apps, media and materials) to support the language studies of the university community. In addition, the CIRCLE hosts special events focused on cultural awareness and communication opportunities, such as conversation meetups, discussion groups, and other social events, as well as language and technology workshops. The center addresses the university and College of Arts and Sciences strategic goals of increasing internationalization in the curriculum and of enhancing the global competency (including the study of world languages) of students, faculty and staff.

The department sponsors two Freshman Learning Communities each year. One group is designed for students interested in using their world language in international business. The other, sponsored jointly by the Department of Applied Linguistics/ESL, is in Language Studies.

For students who hope to teach at the K-12 levels, the department offers a concentration that leads to certification in French.

For students who view language study as a preparation for a career in the business world, the department has two special programs: a concentration in the business language of French; and a practicum in an internationally oriented business or service organization in the metro area for qualified and interested students in their senior year. The department also offers the Bachelor of Arts Major in International Economics and Modern Languages (IEML), in collaboration with the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies.

All French majors are encouraged to consult regularly with their departmental advisor in designing and following a program of study that fits their own career objective and the requirements of their particular concentration.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to courses in the language major, students are advised to choose courses in other areas that complement their language study. Such courses include other languages, history, philosophy, art and music, business, and education. Faculty mentors in the department are eager to discuss students’ academic plans as they design their course of study.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Program Financial Information

Lab fees are assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. As a result, students will no longer be required to purchase lab fee cards. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.


B.A. in French

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required courses (0-9):
    • FREN through the 2002 level (0-9)
      Majors must achieve competence at the intermediate level before beginning courses at the 3000 level. They may demonstrate competence through placement exam scores, including the CLEP exam, prior study, or courses taken at Georgia State University.
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:

Area G: Major Courses (30)

The major in French consists of 30 hours (ten courses) on the 3000/4000 level. Prerequisite for all courses on the 3000 level is FREN 2002. Prerequisite for all courses at the 4000 level is the completion of the three courses at the 3000 level.

  1. Major Requirements (6)
    • FREN 3013 Intensive Grammar Review (3)
    • FREN 3023 Advanced Conversation and Composition-CTW (3)
  2. Concentration Courses (24)
    • Language, Culture, and Society Concentration
      1. Required Course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
        • FREN 3033 Introduction to Analysis of Literary Texts-CTW (3)
      2. Select four courses. (12)
        • FREN 4000 Text Analysis (3)
        • FREN 4019 French Literature and Culture of the Nineteenth Century (3)
        • FREN 4020 French Literature and Culture of the Twentieth Century (3)
        • FREN 4414 Topics in French and Francophone Culture and Society (3)
        • FREN 4632 Francophone Cinema (3)
        • FREN 4633 Francophone Literature (3)
        • FREN 4634 Francophone Perspectives on the Media, the Arts and Popular Culture (3)
        • FREN 4635 Francophone Perspectives on Power, Human Rights, and Resistance (3)
        • FREN 4636 Francophone Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, Race, and Class (3)
        • FREN 4639 Francophone Immersion through Workshops (3)
      3. Select three additional courses in French at the 3000/4000 level (9)
    • Language and International Business Concentration
      1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
        • FREN 3033 Introduction to the Analysis of Literary Texts-CTW (3)
      2. Concentration Requirements (9)
        • FREN 4033 French for International Business I (3)
        • FREN 4043 French for International Business II (3)
        • FREN 4123 Contemporary France-CTW (3)
      3. Select two courses. (6)
        • FREN 4414 Topics in French and Francophone Culture and Society (3)
        • FREN 4632 Francophone Cinema (3)
        • FREN 4634 Francophone Perspectives on the Media, the Arts and Popular Culture (3)
        • FREN 4635 Francophone Perspectives on Power, Human Rights and Resistance (3)
        • FREN 4636 Francophone Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, Race and Class (3)
        • FREN 4639 Francophone Immersion through Workshops (3)
      4. Select two additional courses in French at the 3000/4000 level (6)
        • Students interested in FREN 4063 Practicum in French must consult with the section coordinator early in the semester prior to taking the course.
    • Foreign Language Education Concentration
      1. Required Course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
        • FREN 3033 Introduction to the Analysis of Literary Texts-CTW (3)
      2. Concentration Requirement (3)
      3. Select two courses. (6)
        • FREN 4019 French Literature and Culture of the Nineteenth Century (3)
        • FREN 4020 French Literature and Culture of the Twentieth Century (3)
        • FREN 4414 Topics in French and Francophone Culture and Society (3)
        • FREN 4632 Francophone Cinema (3)
        • FREN 4633 Francophone Literature (3)
        • FREN 4634 Francophone Perspectives on the Media, the Arts and Popular Culture (3)
        • FREN 4635 Francophone Perspectives on Power, Human Rights, and Resistance (3)
        • FREN 4636 Francophone Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, Race, and Class (3)
        • FREN 4639 Francophone Immersion through Workshops (3)
      4. Select four additional courses in French at the 3000/4000 level (12)

Requirements for Teacher Certification

Students who wish to be certified to teach French in the public schools of Georgia should choose the courses listed under the “Foreign Language Education Concentration” above and the following methodology courses offered by the Foreign Language Education faculty in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education in the College of Education and Human Development: FORL 3022, FORL 4025, FORL 4026, and FORL 4030. All students will register for Opening School Experience (FORL 4650) and Student Teaching (FORL 4061, FORL 4062, FORL 4063).

All students seeking certification in French must pass EXC 4020 in the College of Education and Human Development with a grade of B or higher.

Students must apply formally and be admitted to the Teacher Education program in world languages. For the application, please go to the admissions page on the College of Education and Human Development web site, To qualify for the Student Teaching experience, students must receive a grade of B or higher on a departmental test of oral and written proficiency in their target languages. Specific information about date and place of these exams is available in the department office. To apply, students must have:

  • Earned a 2.5 overall cumulative GPA,
  • Passed [Combined Test I, II, and III (700)] or been exempted from the GACE Program Admission Assessment. When registering for the assessment, program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University – school code 5090) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.; and
  • Completed the Georgia Educator Ethics – Program Entry (350) Assessment; though there is no “Pass/Fail” grade assigned. Program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.

In order to be recommended for K-12 certification in French, students must complete all major courses taken in the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the methodology courses taken in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education (FORL courses) with a grade of B or higher.

Pre-Service Certificate

Upon admission to a teacher education program, students will be contacted by the college advisement/admissions office and provided with instructions to claim enrollment in their program and submit a GaPSC Pre-Service Certificate Application. The pre-service certificate is required for placement in required field experiences or clinical practice.

Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE)

The state of Georgia requires such candidates to take various GACE and Educator Ethics assessments as part of the educator certification process. These computer-delivered assessments have been developed by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) and are delivered by the Education Testing Service (ETS). You will take these tests at different times.

Program Admission and Content Assessments: Program Admission Assessment [Combined Test I, II, and III (700)] is an admission requirement (unless candidate meets qualifications for exemption – scroll down to “Options to Satisfy the Program Admission Assessment Requirement”). When registering for the assessment, program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University – school code 5090) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.

Content Assessment (different content assessments for each program) tests your content knowledge and is taken after enrollment and prior to program completion. You will receive specific information regarding this test as you near completion of your program (required for certification).

Georgia Educator Ethics Assessment: Georgia Educator Ethics – Program Entry (350) Assessment is an admission requirement. Completion of this assessment is required for admission, though there is no “Pass/Fail” grade assigned. Program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.

edTPA

edTPA is a preservice assessment process designed by educators to answer the essential question: “Is a new teacher ready for the job?” edTPA includes a review of a teacher candidate’s authentic teaching materials as the culmination of a teaching and learning process that documents and demonstrates each candidate’s ability to effectively teach his/her subject matter to all students.

edTPA is a program completion and teacher certification requirement. Students may graduate from the program while continuing to complete teacher certification requirements for edTPA.

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

  1. French majors are not required to take a minor. French majors who choose a minor in other departments/schools/institutes are encouraged to select courses that are appropriate to their area of concentration. Students are also urged to consider combining their major with a second major in another language or another discipline under the Double Major option.
  2. Up to six additional hours may be taken in the major.

Critical Thinking Through Writing Requirement

As of summer 2015, all students are required to complete one Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) course as part of the major. The university formerly required two CTW courses. Students following previous catalog requirements who have passed one CTW course in the major should consult with their senior academic advisor to determine which courses may be used as a substitution for the other formerly required CTW course. Information on senior advisement in the Office of Academic Assistance is available at cas.gsu.edu/undergraduate/senior-advisement-90-credit-hours/.


Bachelor of Arts in International Economics and Modern Languages

Students majoring in the International Economics and Modern Languages (IEML) program with a French concentration should contact the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies for advisement. Information for this program is available at aysps.gsu.edu/oaa.

Program Admission

There are no admission requirements above the requirements for admission to the university for enrollment in the IEML.

Program Financial Information

There are no additional fees other than the tuition and fees charged by the university for enrollment in this program.

Program Degree Requirements

For degree credit, a minimum grade of C must be attained in ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 and all courses in the economics common core curriculum and modern languages core curriculum.

Complete descriptions of requirements for Areas A through E of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum can be found in the “University Degree Requirements and Graduation” chapter of this catalog. The number of semester credit hours required for each section is shown in parentheses.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (15):
  2. Select additional 1000/2000-level elective courses from Areas A-E to complete 18 hours in Area F.

Students who have not already attained elementary-level proficiency in their chosen language will be required to take prerequisite courses (FREN 1001 and/or FREN 1002). In that case, the 1002 language course may be used to satisfy 3 credit hours of core requirements in Area C.

Students who have already attained intermediate-level competency in French may substitute 1000/2000-level courses in another language for FREN 2001/FREN 2002 upon approval of the Department of World Languages and Cultures advisor.

Area G: Economics Common Core Curriculum (24)

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Area H: Modern Languages Common Core (24) A minimum grade of C is required for all courses in this area.

  • FREN 3013 Intensive Grammar Review (3)
  • FREN 3023 Advanced Conversation and Composition-CTW (3)
  • FREN 3033 Introduction to Analysis of Literary Texts-CTW (3)
  • FREN 4033 French for International Business I (3)
  • FREN 4043 French for International Business II (3)
  • Choose three additional 3000- or 4000-level French courses (3)
    • Students interested in FREN 4063 Practicum in French must consult with the section coordinator early in the semester prior to taking the course.

Area I: Electives (12) Choose any four 4000-level courses, in consultation with the faculty advisor.


Minor in French

Students who wish to minor in French must take 15-18 hours in courses in French, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours of courses in the language may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.


Certificate of Language Ability in French

A strong demand exists by employers for candidates to offer credentials to verify language proficiency in both oral and written communication. The undergraduate Certificate of Language Ability is designed for students to offer tangible proof of their language abilities and makes an ideal complement to other areas of study such as business, international relations, public health, criminal justice, hospitality, and more.

The certificate consists of 12 credit hours at the 2000- and 3000-level (minimum of 6 must be at the 3000-level), with a B or higher in the first attempt at each course. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.


Dual B.A. / M.A. Program in French

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in French. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and count the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs. More specifically: BA students can take 4 (four) graduate courses during their 3rd or 4th year (these courses count toward their BA and MA); they then complete their MA degree in 1 year after receiving their BA.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Contact Rene Mondy (Email: reneprestimondy@gsu.edu; Phone: 404.413.5000; Location: 25 Park Place 3rd Floor) for more information about the BA/MA dual degree program and your eligibility.

Contact the Director of Graduate Studies, Dr. Gladys M. Francis, to discuss course options once admitted into the BA/MA dual degree.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This department offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the department undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3285 Game Design and Development

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration in Game Design and Development
  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Game Design and Development

Creative Media Industries Institute

Brennen Dicker, Executive Director
David Cheshier, faculty coordinator, dcheshier@gsu.edu

The interdisciplinary Game Design and Development major concentration and the minor explore the interactive entertainment landscape, along with other related areas of software development and interactive storytelling. The program has its technical roots in computer and information science, while simultaneously covering the breadth of courses in many academic disciplines, including writing, film, graphic design, music, and psychology. The programs are for students who aspire to gain the background and technical skill necessary for a career in gaming or related areas in interactive media, and are closely connected to the region’s game design companies.

Two tracks are offered to students in the major concentration. The Game Development track trains students to code and program in game-relevant software platforms (such as C#); the Game Design track is more conceptual, and introduces students to the broader logic of game conceptualization, rendering, story boarding, leveling, and more.

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Arts students should also consult regularly with the faculty program coordinator for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic opportunities.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030.30 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H.  Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration in Game Design and Development

Recommended Courses for Area F:

Students should enter the Game Design and Development major having taken course prerequisites needed for entrance into their planned program of study. Below is a list of courses that are prerequisites for courses included as options in Game Design and Development. Students should plan their desired program of study and identify which prerequisites they need to fulfill.

  1. World language at 1002 level or above (3)
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:

Many of the courses listed above are required prerequisites for Game Design and Development BIS courses in Area G and H. Students should select Area F courses in consultation with a BIS advisor.

Additionally, any student planning to take 3000- or 4000-level courses in CSC in Area G or Area H should determine which programming sequence (indicated with * above) best meets their academic needs, as many CSC classes require CSC and/or Math prerequisites.

Area G: Area of Concentration (27-33 hours)

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G. Some film and sound production courses require departmental authorization.

  1. CTW requirement. Choose one course from the following (3):
    • CMIS 4910 Special Topics in Creative Media (3)
    • CSC 4995 Directed Readings BIS – CTW (3-4)
    • FLME 4995 Directed Readings BIS – CTW (3-4)
    • GRD 4995 Directed Readings BIS – CTW (3-4)
  2. Required courses (9-12 hours) Choose three of the following:
  3. Program focus area (15-18) Select courses as directed from either the Game Development or the Game Design areas below:
    1. Game Development (12-15 hours) Choose 3-5 courses from the following:
    2. Game Design (12-15 hours) Choose 3-5 courses from the following:

Area H: Allied Field (15 – 21 hours)

Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H. Students who chose to focus on Game Development in Area G should choose their minor area from courses listed in the Game Design list from Area G. Students who chose to focus on Game Design in Area G should choose their minor area from courses listed in the Game Development list in Area G.

BIS students without backgrounds in statistics should consider taking MATH 1070; while students without backgrounds in writing take ENGL 3150B, FLME 3115, or ENGL 4204 and students without backgrounds in programming should take CSC 2301.


Interdisciplinary Minor in Game Design and Development

Recommended Courses for Area A-F

Students should enter the Game Design and Development minor having taken course prerequisites needed for entrance into their planned program of study. Below is a list of courses that are prerequisites for courses included as options in Game Design and Development minor. Students should plan their desired program of study and identify which prerequisites they need to fulfill.

Required Courses for the Interdisciplinary Minor (15-18 hours)

Students pursuing the interdisciplinary minor in Game Design and Development must take five courses. No more than two of the courses counting towards the minor can have the same course prefix. Additionally, no more than two of the five courses counting toward the minor may also count toward the major.

  1. Choose two of the following:
    • CMIS 3150 Game Programming and Development 1 (4)
    • CMIS 4120 Game Programming and Development 2 (4)
    • GRD 3000 Introduction to Graphic Design (3)
    • GRD 3400 Graphic Design Survey (3)
    • FLME 4780 Introduction to Writing Interactive Fiction (3-4)
    • FLME 4361 Sound Design (3)
    • CSC 4821 Fundamentals of Game Design (4)
  2. Choose three of the following:

3290 Geosciences

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Geosciences (3290.1)
    • Concentration in Geography
    • Concentration in Urban Studies
  • Bachelor of Science in Geosciences (3290.2)
    • Concentration in Geology
    • Concentration in Environmental Geosciences
    • Concentration in Geography
    • Concentration in Urban Studies
  • Minor in Geosciences (3290.3)
  • Dual B.A. or B.S. / M.S. in Geosciences (3290.4)
  • Certificate in Geographic Information Science (3290.5)
  • Certificate in Sustainability (3290.6)
  • Certificate in Water Science (3290.7)

Department of Geosciences
730 Langdale Hall
404-413-5750
geosciences.gsu.edu

Katherine Hankins, Chair
Christy Visaggi, Undergraduate Director

Geosciences involves the study of the social and physical dimensions of the earth, including its interior, surface, atmosphere, and people. The Department of Geosciences makes available to students instruction, training, and experiences in the fields of Geology and Geography. These two disciplines provide complementary perspectives on a broad range of issues dealing with natural landscapes at all spatial and temporal scales, human-environment interactions, geospatial analysis, including Geographic Information Systems, and the social and physical dynamics of urban life.

The Department of Geosciences offers the B.A. degree in Geosciences with a concentration in either Geography or Urban Studies; and the B.S. degree in Geosciences with a concentration in Geology, Geography, Environmental Geosciences, or Urban Studies. In addition, the department offers undergraduate certificates in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), water science, and sustainability. These certificates complement the expertise students develop in the B.A./B.S. degrees in Geosciences and in other departments.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.


3290.10 Bachelor of Arts in Geosciences

Students earning the B.A. degree in Geosciences must choose one of two concentrations: either Geography or Urban Studies.

The Geography concentration develops a broad understanding of social and environmental issues, attains depth in a specialized area within Geography, and provides students with skills needed to gain employment and engage in lifelong learning. An undergraduate degree in Geosciences with a Geography concentration affords many opportunities for employment in both the public and private sectors. Geographers generally find employment as cartographers, city/regional planners, conservationists, environmental managers, environmental regulators, Geographic Information System (GIS) specialists, historic preservationists, location analysts, and as physical scientists working for the government. In addition, with their broad liberal arts training, geographers also qualify for professional management positions as well as teachers.

The Geography concentration also provides a solid intellectual foundation for students getting advanced degrees in either the social or natural sciences. In addition to having substantial flexibility of course selections, students in the Geography concentration are required to take multiple upper-division courses in human geography, physical geography, and geospatial techniques. Finally, the Geography concentration enables majors interested in geography to find their intellectual niche within geography. Pursuing a certificate in GIS, water science, or sustainability provides a complementary suite of courses for students to further specialize in their areas of interest.

The Urban Studies concentration enables students to focus on the study of cities including urban development and economics, urban politics and institutions, the urban built environment, social and environmental disparities in cities, and the changing physical and social dynamics of urbanization processes. This interdisciplinary approach allows students to draw from a variety of courses to solve some of the most pressing challenges of the twenty-first century city. The Urban Studies concentration draws from classes in other complementary departments, enabling the student to develop specific interests within the concentration.

In addition to course content focused on different aspects of urban problems and solutions, students will gain a skill set to address such issues, including a holistic approach to understanding urban dynamics, critical thinking and writing skills to express the complexity of urban issues, and a tool kit of data collection and analysis skills, which may include Geographic Information Systems (GIS), quantitative spatial analysis, and/or qualitative analysis. Students graduating with this concentration will be well poised to enter jobs and graduate study in urban planning, urban policy work, non-governmental organization administration, community-based work, and in urban public health, among many others. Pursuing a certificate in GIS, water science, or sustainability provides a complementary suite of courses for students to further specialize in their areas of interest.

Students interested in any geography or urban studies course, or in enrolling in these concentrations within the B.A. degree in Geosciences or pursuing a minor in Geosciences, are invited to contact the Geosciences Undergraduate Director to discuss how this degree program may best help make their college experience positive and productive. Note that additional course options may be available by working directly with a faculty member such as through offerings of Topics (GEOG 4097) or Independent Research (GEOG 4098). The department encourages our students and prospective majors to attend the weekly seminar series (and/or enroll in the affiliated one credit hour course GEOL 4095/GEOG 4095) to learn more about the range of opportunities in the discipline both at the university and after graduation. All students are required to complete an entry level class early on in the major GEOL 3000/GEOG 3000, an internship or other course that includes experiential learning (field-, lab-, or research-based work), and a senior capstone GEOL 4830/GEOG 4830 to help prepare them for their career goals in geosciences after graduation.

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Program Financial Information

Lab fees will be assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.

B.A. in Geosciences

Area D:

Area E:

  • Recommended course: GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography (3)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major

  1. Required courses (if not taken in Areas C-E) (17):
    • GEOG 1112 Weather and Climate (4)
    • GEOG 1113 Introduction to Landforms (4)
    • MATH 1401 Elementary Statistics (3)
    • GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography (3) or GEOG 1125 Resources, Society, and the Environment (3)
    • World language at the 1002 level or higher (3)
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    • AAS 2010 Introduction to African-American Studies (3)
    • ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2030 Archaeology and Prehistory (3)
    • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
    • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
    • Any HIST course not taken in Area E
    • PHIL 1010 Critical Thinking (2)
    • POLS 2401 Global Issues (3)
    • PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology (3)
    • SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology (3)
    • SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems (3)
    • WGSS 2010 Introduction to Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies (3)
    • World language at the 1001 level (3) (if student has no previous experience with language)
    • World language at the 2001 or higher level (3)
  • Students should select Area F elective courses in consultation with their advisor, as some upper level geosciences courses have prerequisites.

Area G: Major Courses, B.A. in Geosciences

Geography Concentration Courses (39)

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
  2. Required courses (10)
    • GEOG 3000 Foundations in Geosciences: Skills, Careers, and Navigating the Major (1)
    • GEOG 4515 Qualitative Methods (3)
    • GEOG 4518 Digital Cartography (3)
    • GEOG 4520 Quantitative Spatial Analysis (3)
  3. Required selection of courses (14-18):
    • Group I: Select one field experience or internship course from the following (3-4):
      • GEOG 4050 Natural Environments of Georgia (4)
      • GEOG 4550 Field School in Geosciences (3-4)
      • GEOG 4832 Geosciences Internship (2-3)
      • or another approved course focused on field, lab, or research experience as available including study abroad
    • Group II: Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group III: Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group IV: Select one course from the following (3-4):
    • Group V: Select one course from the following (3-4):
  4. Remaining Geography or Geology courses selected in consultation with advisor. Students are encouraged to choose courses from Groups I–V that exceed the required number of courses.

Urban Studies Concentration Courses (39)

At least half of the required 39 hours be GEOG courses as specified in the options below.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
  2. GEOG 3000 Foundations in Geosciences: Skills, Careers, and Navigating the Major (1)
  3. Required selection of courses (18-21):
    • Group I. Select a field or internship experience from the following (3):
      • GEOG 4550 Field School in Geosciences (3-4)
      • GEOG 4832 Geosciences Internship (2-3)
      • or another approved course focused on field, lab, or research experience as available including study abroad
    • Group II. Select at least three courses from the following (9):
    • Group III. Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group IV. Select one or more courses from the following (3-4):
  4. Remaining Geography or Geology courses selected in consultation with advisor. These may include courses from Groups I–IV that exceed the required number of courses.

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

Students earning a B.A. in Geosciences are not required to have a minor.


3290.20 Bachelor of Science in Geosciences

Students earning the B.S. degree in Geosciences must choose one of four concentrations: Geology, Environmental Geosciences, Geography, or Urban Studies. Many career opportunities allow for practical application of geosciences in industry, consulting firms, non-governmental organizations, and governmental agencies at all levels. Practical and essential applications of geology and geography include development and stewardship of water resources, both surface and subsurface; land-use planning for urban, suburban, and rural development; exploration for and development of mineral and energy resources including petroleum and other fossil fuels; and development of environmentally sound strategies for hazardous waste disposal and treatment. The curriculum leading to the B.S. degree in geosciences is excellent preparation for graduate work in geology and environmental science, geography, and urban studies. For students who are interested in geoscience and environmental science but who intend to pursue graduate or advanced study in other fields, for example environmental law or business, the B.S. degree may still be an appropriate choice. The B.S. degree meets certain federal criteria required for science-track career pathways in federal agencies such as the EPA, USGS, and others.

The concentrations in Geography and Geology are the most traditional of the programs, and they are designed to prepare the student for graduate studies or employment in a wide variety of geoscience areas. Students considering employment and state licensure as a Professional Geologist (required for supervisory environmental consultants) and other careers founded in geology should select the traditional Geology concentration. The Environmental Geosciences concentration offers a more interdisciplinary set of courses that emphasize the study of the delicate environmental balances of the natural world. The Geography concentration allows for a suite of skills to be gained in studying the world around us from both physical and human perspectives. The Urban Studies Concentration is focused on geoscience topics applicable to the study of urban settings. Specific requirements for the concentrations are shown below.

For all of the concentrations, students may find tremendous benefit in pursuing undergraduate certificates in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), water science, and/or sustainability. These certificates, described in more detail below, complement the different concentrations and provide students with an opportunity to explore in more depth the skills and knowledge needed to obtain employment and/or further their academic studies.

Majors should be aware that there are prerequisites for several courses in our department (especially in the Geology concentration). In addition, most of our courses are offered only once a year (and several specialty courses only every other year). Note that classes in the Department of Geosciences are listed under either Geology or Geography in the course catalog. Additional course options may be available by working directly with a faculty member such as through offerings of Topics (GEOG 4097/GEOL 4097) or Independent Research (GEOG 4098/GEOL 4098).

To prepare for the most appropriate path leading up to graduation, it is important to choose a concentration upon declaring the major based on career aspirations (e.g., a geology concentration may still be recommended for certain environmental work). Students are encouraged to seek advisement early on to ensure that programs of study accord with their specific career goals and needs and that they plan ahead by reviewing the schedule of projected courses on the department website. The department encourages our students and prospective majors to attend the weekly seminar series (and/or enroll in the affiliated one credit hour course GEOL 4095/GEOG 4095) to learn more about the range of opportunities in the discipline both at the university and after graduation. All students are required to complete an entry level class early on in the major GEOL 3000/GEOG 3000, an internship or other course that includes experiential learning (field-, lab-, or research-based work), and a senior capstone GEOL 4830/GEOG 4830 to help prepare them for their career goals in geosciences after graduation.

Program Financial Information

Lab fees will be assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. For more information, please feel free to contact the department.

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements outlined below, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

B.S. in Geosciences

Area A:

  • Required course:
  • MATH 1113 Precalculus (3) or higher level MATH course. Recommended: Section of MATH 1113 specifically for Geosciences majors.

Area D:

  • Required course: MATH 2201 Calculus for Life Sciences I (4) or MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (4) or a higher-level mathematics course.
  • Recommended courses:

Area E:

  • Recommended course: GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography (3)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (if not taken in Area D) (11):
  2. Complete one of the following science sequences. Students in the Geology concentration are strongly advised to complete the chemistry sequence. Students in the Environmental Geosciences concentration are strongly advised to complete either the geography, biology, or chemistry sequence depending on their interests. Students in the Geography or Urban Studies concentrations are strongly advised to complete the geography sequence. (8)
  3. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F. Students in the Geology concentration are recommended to take a physics sequence and an additional calculus course if possible. Students in the Environmental Geosciences, Geography, or Urban Studies concentrations are recommended to take either the biology, chemistry, or computer science sequence depending on their interests.
  • All courses above ending in K are commonly offered as separate lecture and lab (L) courses by GSU’s Perimeter College. The combined (K) courses and separate lecture and lab (L) courses cover the same subject matter and are considered equivalent courses (but both lecture and lab sections must be completed with a passing grade). Beginning Fall 2019, the downtown Biology department will also offer BIOL 2107/BIOL 2107L and BIOL 2108/BIOL 2108L as separate courses. 
  • Any credit hours exceeding 18 earned to complete the Area F requirements will count toward elective hours.

Area G: Major Courses, B.S. in Geosciences.

Geology Concentration Courses (39)

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
  2. Required courses (25):
    • GEOL 3000 Foundations in Geosciences: Skills, Careers, and Navigating the Major (1)
    • GEOL 4006 Sedimentary Environments and Stratigraphy (4)
    • GEOL 4013 Structural Geology (4)
    • GEOL 4015 Crystallography and Optical Mineralogy (4)
    • GEOL 4016 Petrology of Igneous and Metamorphic Rocks (4)
    • GEOL 4120 Basic Field Geology (4)
    • GEOL 4121 Advanced Field Geology (4)
  3. Remaining Geology or Geography courses selected in consultation with advisor, such as:

Environmental Geosciences Concentration Courses (39)

  1. CTW requirement. Select one of the following (3):
  2. Required selection of courses (15-19):
    •  GEOL 3000 or GEOG 3000 Foundations in Geosciences: Skills, Careers, and Navigating the Major (1)
    • Group I. Select one field course or internship from the following (2-4):
      • GEOG 4050 Natural Environments of Georgia (4)
      • GEOG 4550/GEOL 4550 Field School in Geosciences (3-4)
      • GEOG 4832/GEOL 4832  Geosciences Internship (2-3)
      • or another approved course focused on field, lab, or research experience as available including study abroad.
    • Group II. Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group III. Select one course from the following (3-4):
    • Group IV. Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group V. Select one course from the following (3-4):
  3. Remaining courses from Geography or Geology selected in consultation with advisor. These may include any from Groups I–V that exceed the minimum requirements in addition to other courses, such as:

Geography Concentration Courses (39)

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
  2. Required courses (10):
    • GEOG 3000 Foundations in Geosciences: Skills, Careers, and Navigating the Major (1)
    • GEOG 4515 Qualitative Methods (3)
    • GEOG 4518 Digital Cartography (3)
    • GEOG 4520 Quantitative Spatial Analysis (3)
  3. Required selection of courses (14-18):
    • Group I. Select one field experience or internship course from the following (2-4):
      • GEOG 4050 Natural Environments of Georgia (4)
      • GEOG 4550 Field School in Geosciences (3-4)
      • GEOG 4832 Geosciences Internship (2-3)
      • or another approved course focused on field, lab, or research experience as available including study abroad.
    • Group II. Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group III. Select one course from the following (3-4):
    • Group IV. Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group V. Select one course from the following (3-4):
  4. Remaining Geography or Geology courses selected in consultation with advisor. Students are encouraged to choose courses from Groups I–V that exceed the required number of courses.

Urban Studies Concentration Courses (39)

At least half of the required 39 hours be Geography courses as specified in the below options.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
  2. Required selection of courses (18-21):
    • GEOG 3000 Foundations in Geosciences: Skills, Careers, and Navigating the Major (1)
    • Group I. Select one field experience or internship course from the following (2-4):
      • GEOG 4550 Field School in Geosciences (3-4)
      • GEOG 4832 Geosciences Internship (2-3)
      • or another approved course focused on field, lab, or research experience as available including study abroad.
    • Group II. Select at least three courses from the following (9):
    • Group III. Select one course from the following (3):
    • Group IV. Select one course from the following (3-4):
  3. Remaining Geography or Geology courses selected in consultation with advisor. These may include courses from Groups I–IV that exceed the required number of courses.

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

Students earning a B.S. in Geosciences are not required to have a minor.


3290.30 Minor in Geosciences

Students who wish to minor in Geosciences must take 15-18 hours in courses in Geosciences, including at least nine hours at the 3000-level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in Geosciences may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. Courses that are being applied to the core may not also be applied to the minor.


3290.4 Dual B.A./M.S. and Dual B.S./M.S. Programs in Geosciences

The department offers a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Sciences and Master of Science dual degree in Geosciences. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and count the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses in their final semester. Additionally, acceptance into the dual degree program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must complete their undergraduate degree, fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements, and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual degree program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.


3290.5 Certificate in Geographic Information Science

Geographic Information Science (GIS) is a rapidly growing discipline, with applications in many fields. A strong demand exists for proficient users of geospatial technology. The undergraduate-level certificate program in GIS is designed to facilitate the learning of GIS by students working toward undergraduate degrees in Geosciences and in many other disciplines. The certificate program consists of five courses with a total of 17-19 credit hours.

GIS Certificate Requirements (17-19 hours)

  1. Group I. Required courses (11):
  2. Group II. Select two courses from the following, at least one of which must be completed in the Department of Geosciences (6-8):

Students interested in this certificate should contact the Undergraduate Director in Geosciences to enroll in the program. Courses that apply to a degree program in Geosciences also may be used in support of the certificate; however, only one course can be applied to two different certificates. Other electives for this certificate pending approval from the Undergraduate Director in Geosciences may include GEOG 4834 Applied Research in GIS, or options available through the Department of Computer Science for students interested in programming.


3290.6 Certificate in Sustainability (14-17)

The certificate in sustainability offers an interdisciplinary approach to sustainability as a concept, area of study, social practice, organizational goal, and policy objective that concerns the effects and durability of relationships and interactions between social and biophysical systems. The certificate entails five courses, including at least two credit hours of internship experience. All internships must be approved through the Undergraduate Director before they can be applied to this certificate.

  1. Group I. Required courses (8-9):
    • Internship. Select one from the following (2-3):
      • GEOG 4832/GEOL 4832 Geosciences Internship (2-3) (if related to sustainability)
      • BIOL 4915 Collaborative Internships in Biology (2) (if related to sustainability)
      • BIOL 4916 Internships in Biology (2) (if related to sustainability)
    • GEOG 4020 Urban Environments (3)
    • GEOG 4644 Environmental Conservation (3)
  2. Group II. Select two courses from the following (6-8):

Students interested in this certificate should contact the Undergraduate Director in Geosciences to enroll in the program. Courses that apply to a degree program in Geosciences also may be used in support of the certificate; however, only one course can be applied to two different certificates.


3290.7 Certificate in Water Sciences (15-18)

A strong demand exists in the public sector and private industry for understanding of aquatic systems. The undergraduate certificate in water sciences is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of both the quality and quantity of water in the environment, and modern techniques to assess, model, and remediate aquatic environmental problems, and understand the social context and implications of water resources.

The certificate program consists of five courses with a total of 15-18 credit hours, and is an excellent complement to undergraduates pursuing careers in natural resources or environmental fields.

  1. Group I. Required courses (6-7):
  2. Group II. Select two courses from the following options (6-8):
    • BIOL 4451 Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology (4)
    • GEOG 4650 Surface Water Hydrology (3) (if not taken in Group I)
    • GEOL 4007 Hydrogeology (4) (if not taken in Group I)
    • GEOL 4003 Aqueous Geochemistry (3)
    • GEOG 4642 Advanced Weather and Climate (3)
    • GEOG 4784 Global Climate Change (3)
  3. Group III. Select one course below or an additional course from Group I or Group II (3-4)

Students interested in this certificate should contact the Undergraduate Director in Geosciences to enroll in the program. Courses that apply to a degree program in Geosciences also may be used in support of the certificate; however, only one course can be applied to two different certificates.

Honors College

The Department of Geosciences encourages qualified students to participate in the Georgia State Honors College. Please contact the Undergraduate Director for more details on the Honors College experience in our department including course offerings, research opportunities, and theses.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the Undergraduate Director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3300 German

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in German
    • Concentration in Language, Culture, and Society
    • Concentration in Foreign Language Education
    • Concentration in Language and International Business
  • Bachelor of Arts in International Economics and Modern Languages
  • Minor in German
  • Certificate of Language Ability in German

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Shaui Li, Undergraduate Director
Robin Huff, German program coordinator

The Department of World Languages and Cultures serves a threefold purpose: to encourage an appreciation of humanistic values through the study of world languages, literatures, and cultures; to teach world languages as a means of communication; and to prepare students for academic careers and the opportunities available in the field of international business. As part of a dynamic urban university in a city of growing international awareness and status, the department is fulfilling its responsibility to meet the increasing world language needs of the governmental, business, and professional communities.

The department recognizes that an active command of a world languages and a thorough exploration of related cultures form an essential basis for further study in the various areas of its curriculum.

The department is home to the Center for International Resources and Collaborative Language Engagement (CIRCLE), a multi-purpose academic support center that offers walk-in tutoring in each of the languages taught at Georgia State and provides a variety of digital resources (i.e., software, apps, media and materials) to support the language studies of the university community. In addition, the CIRCLE hosts special events focused on cultural awareness and communication opportunities, such as conversation meetups, discussion groups, and other social events, as well as language and technology workshops. The center addresses the university and College of Arts and Sciences strategic goals of increasing internationalization in the curriculum and of enhancing the global competency (including the study of world languages) of students, faculty and staff.

The department sponsors two Freshman Learning Communities each year. One group is designed for students interested in using their world language in international business. The other, sponsored jointly by the Department of Applied Linguistics/ESL, is in Language Studies.

For students who hope to teach at the K-12 levels, the department offers a concentration that leads to certification in German.

For students who view language study as a preparation for a career in the business world, the department has two special programs: a concentration in the business language of German, and a practicum in an internationally oriented business or service organization in the metro area for qualified and interested students in their senior year. The department also offers the Bachelor of Arts Major in International Economics and Modern Languages (IEML), in collaboration with the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies.

All German majors are encouraged to consult regularly with their academic advisor in designing and following a program of study that fits their own career objective and the requirements of their particular concentration.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to courses in the language major, students are advised to choose courses in other areas that complement their language study. Such courses include other languages, history, philosophy, art and music, business, and education. Faculty in the department are eager to discuss students’ academic plans as they design their course of study.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Program Financial Information

Lab fees are assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. As a result, students will no longer be required to purchase lab fee cards. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.


B.A. in German

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required courses (0-9):
    • GRMN through the 2002 level (0-9)
      Majors must achieve competence at the intermediate level before beginning courses at the 3000 level. They may demonstrate competence through placement exam scores, including the CLEP exam, prior study, or courses taken at Georgia State University.
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:

Area G: Major Requirements (30)

The major in German consists of 30 hours (10 courses) on the 3000/4000 level. Prerequisite for all courses on the 3000 level is Grmn 2002. Prerequisite for all courses at the 4000 level is the completion of at least 3 of the 4 courses at the 3000 level.

  1. Required courses to fulfill CTW requirement (6)
    • GRMN 3301 Advanced German I-CTW  (3)
    • GRMN 4402 German Communication and Perspective-CTW (3)
  2. Major Requirements (9)
    • GRMN 3302 Advanced German II: Practical Conversation (3)
    • GRMN 3311 Stories and Histories (3)
    • GRMN 3313 Introduction to German Cultural Studies (3)
  3. Concentration Courses (15)
    • Language, Culture, and Society Concentration
      • GRMN 4411 Crossing Borders: German and Culture (3)
      • GRMN 4413 Screen Cultures: German Film and Media Studies (3)
      • GRMN 4421 Introduction to German Civilization (3)
      • Select two additional courses in German at the 4000 level (6)
    • Language and International Business Concentration (15)
      • GRMN 4422 Contemporary Germany (3)
      • GRMN 4431 German for International Business I (3)
      • GRMN 4432 German for International Business II (3)
      • Select two additional courses in German at the 4000 level (6)
    • Foreign Language Education Concentration (15)
      • GRMN 4401 History of the German Language (3)
      • GRMN 4421 Introduction to German Civilization (3)
      • GRMN 4422 Contemporary Germany (3)
      • Select two additional courses in German at the 4000 level (6)

Requirements for Teacher Certification

Students who wish to be certified to teach German in the public schools of Georgia should choose the courses listed under the “Foreign Language Education Concentration” above and the following methodology courses offered by the Foreign Language Education faculty in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education in the College of Education and Human Development: FORL 3022, FORL 4025, FORL 4026, and FORL 4030. All students will register for Opening School Experience (FORL 4650) and Student Teaching (FORL 4061, FORL 4062, FORL 4063).

All students seeking certification in French must pass EXC 4020 in the College of Education and Human Development with a grade of B or higher.

Students must apply formally and be admitted to the Teacher Education program in world languages. For the application, please go to the admissions page on the College of Education and Human Development web site, To qualify for the Student Teaching experience, students must receive a grade of B or higher on a departmental test of oral and written proficiency in their target languages. Specific information about date and place of these exams is available in the department office. To apply, students must have:

  • Earned a 2.5 overall cumulative GPA,
  • Passed [Combined Test I, II, and III (700)] or been exempted from the GACE Program Admission Assessment. When registering for the assessment, program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University – school code 5090) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.; and
  • Completed the Georgia Educator Ethics – Program Entry (350) Assessment; though there is no “Pass/Fail” grade assigned. Program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.

In order to be recommended for K-12 certification in German, students must complete all major courses taken in the Department of World Languages and Cultures and the methodology courses taken in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education (FORL courses) with a grade of B or higher.

Pre-Service Certificate

Upon admission to a teacher education program, students will be contacted by the college advisement/admissions office and provided with instructions to claim enrollment in their program and submit a GaPSC Pre-Service Certificate Application. The pre-service certificate is required for placement in required field experiences or clinical practice.

Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE)

The state of Georgia requires such candidates to take various GACE and Educator Ethics assessments as part of the educator certification process. These computer-delivered assessments have been developed by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) and are delivered by the Education Testing Service (ETS). You will take these tests at different times.

Program Admission and Content Assessments: Program Admission Assessment [Combined Test I, II, and III (700)] is an admission requirement (unless candidate meets qualifications for exemption – scroll down to “Options to Satisfy the Program Admission Assessment Requirement”). When registering for the assessment, program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University – school code 5090) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.

Content Assessment (different content assessments for each program) tests your content knowledge and is taken after enrollment and prior to program completion. You will receive specific information regarding this test as you near completion of your program (required for certification).

Georgia Educator Ethics Assessment: Georgia Educator Ethics – Program Entry (350) Assessment is an admission requirement. Completion of this assessment is required for admission, though there is no “Pass/Fail” grade assigned. Program entry candidates must add your program provider (Georgia State University) as a score recipient when you register or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.

edTPA

edTPA is a preservice assessment process designed by educators to answer the essential question: “Is a new teacher ready for the job?” edTPA includes a review of a teacher candidate’s authentic teaching materials as the culmination of a teaching and learning process that documents and demonstrates each candidate’s ability to effectively teach his/her subject matter to all students.

edTPA is a program completion and teacher certification requirement. Students may graduate from the program while continuing to complete teacher certification requirements for edTPA.

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

  1. World language majors are not required to take a minor. World language majors who choose a minor in other departments/schools/institutes are encouraged to select courses that are appropriate to their area of concentration. Students are also urged to consider combining their major with a second major in another language or another discipline under the Double Major option.
  2. Up to six additional hours may be taken in the major.

Critical Thinking Through Writing Requirement

As of summer 2015, all students are required to complete one Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) course as part of the major. The university formerly required two CTW courses. Students following previous catalog requirements who have passed one CTW course in the major should consult with their senior academic advisor to determine which courses may be used as a substitution for the other formerly required CTW course. Information on senior advisement in the Office of Academic Assistance is available at cas.gsu.edu/undergraduate/senior-advisement-90-credit-hours/.


Bachelor of Arts in International Economics and Modern Languages

Students majoring in the International Economics and Modern Languages (IEML) program with a German concentration should contact the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies for advisement. Information for this program is available at aysps.gsu.edu/oaa.

Program Admission

There are no admission requirements above the requirements for admission to the University for enrollment in the B. A. program with a major in international economics and modern languages.

Program Financial Information

There are no additional fees other than the tuition and fees charged by the University for enrollment in this program.

Program Degree Requirements

For degree credit, a minimum grade of C must be attained in ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102 and all courses in the economics common core curriculum and modern languages core curriculum.

Complete descriptions of requirements for Areas A through E of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum can be found in the “University Degree Requirements and Graduation” chapter of this catalog. The number of semester credit hours required for each section is shown in parentheses.

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (15):
  2. Select additional 1000/2000-level elective courses from Areas A-E to complete 18 hours in Area F.

Students who have not already attained elementary-level proficiency in German will be required to take prerequisite courses (GRMN 1001 and/or [GRMN 1002]). In that case, the 1002 language course may be used to satisfy 3 credit hours of core requirements in Area C.

Students who have already attained intermediate-level competency in German may substitute 1000/2000-level courses in another language for GRMN 2001/GRMN 2002 upon approval of the Department of World Languages and Cultures advisor.

Area G:

Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (6)

Economics Common Core Curriculum (21)

  • ECON 3910 Microeconomics (3)
  • ECON 4600 Economic Development (3)
  • ECON 4800 International Trade (3)
  • ECON 4810 International Finance (3)
  • Choose 3 elective 4000-level Econ courses (9)

Area H: Modern Languages Common Core (21) 

  • GRMN 3301 Advanced German I-CTW (3)
  • GRMN 3302 Advanced German II:Practical Conversation (3)
  • GRMN 3311 Stories and Histories (3)
  • GRMN 3313 Introduction to German Cultural Studies (3)
  • GRMN 4431 German for International Business I (3)
  • GRMN 4432 German for International Business II (3)
  • Choose one of the following two courses (3)

Area I: Electives (12) Choose any four 3000/4000-level courses, in consultation with the faculty advisor.


Minor in German

Students who wish to minor in German must take 15-18 hours in German, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours of courses in the language may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.


Certificate of Language Ability in German

A strong demand exists by employers for candidates to offer credentials to verify language proficiency in both oral and written communication. The undergraduate Certificate of Language Ability is designed for students to offer tangible proof of their language abilities and makes an ideal complement to other areas of study such as business, international relations, public health, criminal justice, hospitality, and more.

The certificate consists of 12 credit hours at the 2000 and 3000 level (a minimum of 6 must be at the 3000 level), with a B or higher in the first attempt at each course. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.


Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This department offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the department undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3310 Gerontology

Program Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Gerontology
  • Certificate in Gerontology

605 One Park Place
404-413-5210
gerontology.gsu.edu

Elisabeth Burgess, Director
Chivon A. Mingo, Director of Undergraduate Studies

The Gerontology Institute offers a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (BIS) in Gerontology and an Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontology. Gerontology is an Interdisciplinary discipline that encompasses the biological, psychological, and social aspects of aging. The Gerontology program is designed to provide students with an opportunity to gain foundational, contextual, and interactional competencies in Gerontology that will support their future goals of engaging in professional careers in aging that would ultimately enhance an aging society.

The BIS in Gerontology will provide undergraduate students an opportunity to gain knowledge of aging across the life course through a diverse perspective. Gerontology-related courses are designed to draw on a variety of disciplines to expose students to the issues, knowledge, and research about aging processes, older people, and the complex needs of our rapidly aging society. The overarching objective is to offer a major that will provide students with a gerontological knowledge base and skills that will prepare them for career opportunities in the field of aging (e.g., entry-level professional jobs in direct services to older persons in nutrition programs, senior centers, volunteer programs, nursing homes, and residential and assisted living facilities) and/or admission to graduate and professional degree programs (e.g., such as gerontology, medicine, nursing, psychology, public administration, sociology, and social work) in which they plan to pursue a specialization in gerontology. Students interested in pursuing the BIS in Gerontology major can select either the Behavioral and Social Sciences or Health and Health Services Allied Field.

The Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontology gives students throughout the university the option of combining their existing major of study with an emphasis in gerontology. This certificate is designed to support students who have an interest in adding an aging focus to their declared major. The certificate curriculum provides an overview of biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of aging; health care and social service programs for older persons; and contemporary aging policy issues.

Both the BIS in Gerontology and the Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontology include an internship experience that will allow students to gain specialized skills needed to live and work in today’s aging society.
For more information visit gerontology.gsu.edu

B.I.S. with a Concentration in Gerontology

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H.  Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition, Per Georgia State University’s requirements, all undergraduate students must satisfy a common core curriculum. The requirements can be found in the current university Undergraduate Catalog (see sections 3030 and 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Area F: Courses appropriate to the major (18)

  1. Required Courses (3-6)
    • GERO 2000 Introduction to Gerontology (3)
    • PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology (3) (if not taken in Area E)
  2. World language 1002 or higher course (3)
  3. Select additional courses as necessary from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    • AAS 1141/HIST 1141 Introduction to African and African American History to 1865 (3)
    • AAS 1142/HIST 1142 Introduction to African American History Since 1865 (3)
    • AAS 2010 Introduction to African-American Studies (3)
    • ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    • BIOL 1103K Introductory Biology I (4)
    • BIOL 1104K Introductory Biology II (4)
    • BIOL 2110K Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
    • BIOL 2120K Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
    • BIOL 2107 Principles of Biology I (3) and BIOL 2107L Principles of Biology I Lab (1)
    • BIOL 2108 Principles of Biology II (3) and BIOL 2108L Principles of Biology II  Lab (1)
    • BIOL 2240 Introduction to Human Physiology (3)
    • BIOL 2300 Microbiology and Public Health (3)
    • BIOL 2310 Microbiology and Public Health Lab (2)
    • CHEM 1151K Survey of Chemistry I (4)
    • CHEM 1152K Survey of Chemistry II (4)
    • CHEM 2100 Intermediate Organic Chemistry Lab I (2)
    • CHEM 2400 Organic Chemistry I (3)
    • CHEM 2410 Organic Chemistry II (3)
    • ECON 2100 Global Economics (3)
    • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
    • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
    • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development (3)
    • KH 2130 Introduction to the Allied Fields of Health, Physical Education and Fitness (3)
    • KH 2220 Anatomy in Kinesiology and Health (3)
    • KH 2230 Physiology in Kinesiology and Health (3)
    • MATH 1101 Introduction to Mathematical Modeling (3)
    • MATH 1111 College Algebra (3)
    • MATH 1113 Precalculus (3)
    • MATH 1401 Elementary Statistics (3)
    • MATH 1220 Survey of Calculus (3)
    • MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (3)
    • MATH 2201 Calculus for the Life Sciences (3)
    • NURS 2010 Health and Human Development Across the Lifespan (3)
    • PH 2000 Introduction to Public Health (3)
    • PHYS 2211K Principles of Physics I (4)
    • PHYS 2212K Principles of Physics II (4)
    • POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science (3)
    • POLS 2401 Global Issues (3)
    • PSYC 1100 Introduction to Biological Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 2040 Introduction to Applied Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 2050 Introduction to Drugs and Behavior (3)
    • PSYC 2103 Introduction to Human Development: Individual and Family Issues (3)
    • PHYS 1111K Introductory Physics I (4)
    • [PHYS 1112 K] Introductory Physics II (4)
    • [SNHP 2010] Medical Terminology for Healthcare (3)
    • SOCI 1101 Introductory to Sociology (3)
    • SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems (3)
    • SCOM 1010 Voice and Articulation (3)
    • SCOM 1500 Public Speaking (3)
    • SW 2000 Introduction to Social Work (3)
    • WGSS 2010 Introduction to Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies (3)

Area G: Area of Concentration – Gerontology (27-29)

Interdisciplinary Course Selection

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G.

Students are strongly encouraged to take the statistics and methods courses in sequence. Specifically, a course in section 1 below should be taken prior to the course selected in section 2 below. Several courses in section 2 have a prerequisite from section 1, and in this case sequencing is not optional. Students may not take courses in section 1 and 2 below during the same term.*

  1. Select One Course (3-4)
    • PSYC 3510 Introduction to Research Design and Data Analysis (4)
    • SOCI 3010 Social Statistics (3)
    • SW 3500 Methods of Social Work Research (3)
  2. Select One Course (3-4)
    • AAS 3980 Research Methods in African Americans Studies (CTW) (3)
    • PSYC 3530 Advanced Research Design and Analysis (CTW) (4)
    • SOCI 3020 Social Research Methods (CTW) (3)
  3. Required Courses (21)
    See “Interdisciplinary Course Selection” guidance above.

Area H: Allied Field – Behavioral and Social Science (15)

Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H.

  1. Select Five Courses (15)

Or

Area H: Allied Field – Health and Health Services (15)

Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H.

  1. Select Five Courses (15)
    • ANTH 4460 Health and Culture (4)
    • ECON 4210 Health Economics (3)
    • ECON 4350 Economics of Poverty and Public Policy (3)
    • HA 3950 Health Economics and Financing (3)
    • HA 445 Legal Concepts in Healthcare (3)
    • KH 3360 Disability, Sport, and Physical Activity (3)
    • KH 3600 Biomechanics (3)
    • KH 3610 Motor Learning and Development (3)
    • KH 3650 Physiology of Exercise (3) (CTW)
    • KH 3710 Health Risk Behaviors (3) (CTW)
    • NURS 3200 Introduction to Clinical Nutrition (2)
    • NUTR 3105 Normal Nutrition through the Life Cycle (3)
    • NUTR 4955 Nutrition and Food Policy (3)
    • PH 3001 Introduction to Epidemiology (3)
    • PH 3004 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
    • PH 4300 Introduction to Controversies in Public Health (3)
    • [PT 3660] Complementary and Alternative Therapies (3)
    • RT 3005 Clinical Cardio Physiology (3)
    • RT 3027 Pulmonary Disease (4) (CTW)
    • RT 3040 Respiratory Care Pharmacology (3)
    • RT 4020 Neurobiology of Sleep (3)
    • RT 4096 End of Life Issues (1)
    • CNHP 3000 Communication and Cultural Diversity (3)
    • CNHP 3010 Advanced Medical Terminology (3)
    • CNHP 3100 Electronic Health Records (3)
    • CNHP 4010 Leadership and Ethics in Healthcare (3)
    • CNHP 4110 Future Trends-Telemedicine, Telehealth (3)
    • SCOM 4560 Health Communication (3)
    • SW 4320 Social Work Administration (3)
    • SW 4330 Contemporary Health Challenges (3)
    • SW 4440 Global Social Work Practice, Policy, Research (3)
    • SW 4460 Aging Practice, Policy and Research (3)
    • SW 4480 Disabilities Practice, Policy, and Research (3)

Courses selected within Area H: Allied Field – Health and Health Services may require authorization from the instructor prior to registration.

Area J: Electives

Students take elective courses beyond those specified in Areas A-H to reach the 120 hours needed to earn a bachelor’s degree (including 39 hours at the 3000-4000 level taken at Georgia State University). The following courses are recommended as elective options for students pursuing the BIS with a concentration in Gerontology if additional hours are needed to reach 120 hours.

  • GERO 4119 Global Aging and Families (3)
  • GERO 4122 Death, Dying and Loss (3)
  • GERO 4130 Family, Intimacy, and Aging (3)
  • GERO 4475 Communication and Aging (3)
  • GERO 4700 Special Topics in Gerontology (3)
  • GERO 4800 Directed Study in Gerontology (3)
  • SW 4460 Aging Practice, Policy and Research (3)
  • Any course listed in Area H not taken to meet Area H requirements

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This program offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontology

Program Admission

To be admitted to the undergraduate Certificate in Gerontology, students must be regularly enrolled in a degree program at Georgia State University. Students are required to submit an application to the certificate program obtained from the Gerontology Institute and have a minimal institutional GPA of 2.0.

Program Degree Requirements

To receive the undergraduate Certificate in Gerontology, students must complete the following 18-semester-hour curriculum with a grade of C or higher on all course work.

Undergraduate Certificate in Gerontology

  1. Required courses (9):
    • GERO 2000 Introduction to Gerontology (3)
    • Select two of the following required courses (6):
  2. Select one course (3):
    • GERO 4110 Aging Policy and Services (3)
    • SW 4460 Aging Practice, Policy and Research Issues (3)
  3. Select one course (3):
    • GERO 3124 Diversity and Aging (3)
    • GERO 4110 Aging Policy and Services (3) (if not taken in section 2 above)
    • GERO 4116 Aging and Society (3) (if not taken in section 1 above)
    • GERO 4119 Global Aging and Services
    • GERO 4122 Death, Dying, and Loss (3)
    • GERO 4130 Family, Intimacy, and Aging (3)
    • GERO 4200 Health and the Older Adult (3) (if not taken in section 1 above)
    • GERO 4475 Communication and Aging (3)
    • GERO 4610 Psychology of Aging (3) (if not taken in section 1 above)
    • GERO 4700 Selected Topics in Gerontology (3)
    • GERO 4800 Directed Study in Gerontology (3)
    • SW 4460 Aging Practice, Policy and Research Issues (3) (if not taken in section 2 above)
  4. Required course (3):
    • GERO 4910 Gerontology Internship (1-3) (or an approved alternate internship course)

3315 Global Studies

Program Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Global Studies

25 Park Place, 18th floor
404-413-6645
gsi.gsu.edu

Anthony Lemieux, Director
Jennie Burnet, Associate Director
Laura Hastings, Director of Undergraduate Studies

The Global Studies Institute brings together different academic disciplines to tackle pressing problems in today’s world. We are a diverse group of researchers, including political scientists, psychologists, anthropologists, geographers, environmental policy experts, sociologists, and social psychologists. We are united by a deep concern to address critical global issues through our research and teaching.

The Global Studies Institute offers a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (B.I.S.) with a concentration in Global Studies. The degree prepares students to be globally aware in their chosen careers. Students develop a broad set of perspectives and skills. Our aim is to equip students with the knowledge and abilities needed to be successful in today’s fast-moving and inter-connected world. We offer students courses on critical issues like conflict, terrorism, peace building, water access, urbanization, and global cities. In addition to focusing on global issues, students develop deep regional knowledge of the world. Students are encouraged to pursue world language study at an advanced level.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies students should also consult regularly with the director of undergraduate studies for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic and co-curricular opportunities.

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

We recommend that students decide to become global studies majors early in their sophomore year to maximize the opportunities for experiential learning and study abroad.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030.30 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H.  Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

In selecting courses for this program, students are responsible for completing any required prerequisites. Courses below marked with an asterisk (*) have prerequisites. Students should ensure that they include prerequisites for selected courses elsewhere in their degree program.

Internship experiences may be undertaken only after completing at least 21 hours of credit in the concentration area.

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.I.S. with a Concentration in Global Studies

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Intermediate World Language (3-9):
    Students must complete a world language 2001 or higher course, or demonstrate intermediate proficiency through a CLEP, SAT, or other exam approved by the Department of World Languages and Cultures.
  2. Select additional courses from the following list to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    Pay close attention to prerequisites for courses planned for Areas G and H. No more than two courses (6-8 credit hours) may be completed from the same department without advisor’s authorization.

    • Any other world language at the 1001 or 1002 level (not the same language to fulfill no. 1 above)
    • AAS 2010 Introduction to African-American Studies (3)
    • AAS 1141/HIST 1141 Introduction to African and African American History to 1865 (3)
    • AAS 1142/HIST 1142 Introduction to African American History Since 1865 (3)
    • ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I (3)
    • AH 1750 History of Western Art II (3)
    • AL 2021 Introduction to English Linguistics (3)
    • AL 2101 Exploring Language (3)
    • AL 2102 Languages of the World (3)
    • ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2030 Archaeology and Prehistory (3)
    • BUSA 2106 The Legal and Ethical Environment of Business (3)
    • ECON 2100 Global Economics (3)
    • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)*
    • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics (3)*
    • ENGL 2110 World Literature (3)*
    • ENGL 2120 British Literature (3)*
    • GEOG 1112K Introduction to Weather and Climate (4)
    • GEOG 1113K Introduction to Landforms (4)*
    • GLOS 2030/HIST 2030 Introduction to Asian Studies (3)
    • GLOS 2401/POLS 2401 Global Issues (3)
    • HIST 1111 Survey of World History to 1500 (3)
    • HIST 1112 Survey of World History since 1500 (3)
    • JOUR 2500 Foundations of Media Research (3)*
    • PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 2040 Introduction to Applied Psychology (3)
    • PSYC 2107 Introduction to Social Psychology (3)
    • RELS 2001 Introduction to World Religions (3)
    • SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology (3)
    • SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems (3)
    • SCOM 1000 Human Communication (2)
    • WGSS 2010 Introduction to Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (3)

Area G: Major Courses (27)

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G.

All Global Studies students must combine courses from the following categories to achieve a minimum of 27 hours. A grade of C or higher is required in all major courses.

Courses with an asterisk (*) have prerequisites.

  1. CTW (3 hours). Students must take the following:
    • GLOS 3000 Foundations in Global Research-CTW (3)
  2. Regional Understanding (12-18 hours). Select courses from the following to complete 12-18 hours.
    1. Advanced world language courses at or beyond the 3001 level. If the language is not offered at Georgia State, speak to your advisor about agreements with other USG institutions.
    2. Area Studies Courses:
  3. Research/Analytic/Writing Skills (6-9 hours)
    Select additional courses from the following to complete 6-9 hours. Other relevant courses may be by the faculty advisor:

      • AAS 3980 Research Methods in African American Studies-CTW (3)*
      • AL 4151 Communication Across Cultures-CTW (3)*
      • ANTH 3033 Anthropology of Violence-CTW (3)*
      • ANTH 4340 Applied Anthropology (3)*
      • ANTH 4480 Ethnography Into the 21st Century (4)*
      • ANTH 4670 Methods in Sociocultural Anthropology (3)*
      • ANTH 4970 Senior Seminar in Anthropology-CTW (3)*
      • CRJU 3020 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3)
      • ECON 3900 Macroeconomics-CTW (3)*
      • ECON 4230 Experimental Economics (3)*
      • ECON 4950 Econometrics and Applications (3)*
      • ENGL 4521 Archival Research Methods (3)*
      • GEOG 4515 Qualitative Methods in Geography (3)*
      • GEOG 4520 Quantitative Spatial Analysis (3)*
      • GEOG 4518 Digital Cartography (3)
      • GEOG 4532 Geographic Information Systems (4)
      • GEOG 4764 Urban Geography CTW (3)
      • GEOG 4784 Climatic Change CTW (3)*
      • GLOS 4651 Special Topics in Global Studies CTW (3)
      • GLOS 4990 Topics in International Development Methods (1-3)
      • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW (4)
      • HIST 4330 Oral History (4)
      • HIST 4990 Seminar in Historical Research-CTW (4)*
      • MATH 4547 Introduction to Statistical Methods (3)*
      • MATH 4548 Methods of Regression and Analysis of Variance (3)*
      • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
      • POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research-CTW (3) (may not be counted toward the Global Studies BIS if GLOS 3000 has been taken previously)
      • PSYC 3510 Introduction to Research Design and Analysis (4)*
      • PSYC 3530 Advanced Research Design and Data Analysis-CTW (4)*
      • SCOM 3050 Speech Communication Research Methods (3)*
      • SOCI 3010 Social Statistics (3)*
      • SOCI 3020 Social Research Methods-CTW (3)* (may not be counted toward the Global Studies BIS if GLOS 3000 has been taken previously)
  4. Experiential Learning (3-9 hours):
    A minimum of 3 credit hours of designated experiential learning courses must be completed as part of the degree program. Additional credit hours of experiential learning may be counted in other relevant areas of the degree program pending approval by a faculty advisor in the Global Studies Institute.

    1. Honors Thesis Research and Writing in Global Studies or any other Arts and Sciences department:
      • GLOS 4870 Honors Thesis I (3)
      • GLOS 4880 Honors Thesis II (3)
      • Honors Thesis I (4870) in another discipline (3)
      • Honors Thesis II (4880) in another discipline (3)
    2. Other Regular Courses from Arts & Sciences Departments:
    3. Study Abroad:
      • Credit hours from any GSU-sponsored study abroad program.
      • Non-GSU study abroad programs may also count with preapproval from a Global Studies Institute faculty advisor.

Area H: Thematic Allied Fields (15-21 hours)

Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H.

Students select one of the thematic allied fields listed below. Then, choose courses from the pre-approved list below or other appropriate courses in consultation with the faculty advisor.

Courses with an asterisk (*) have prerequisites.

  1. Conflict, Violence, and Peace-Building:
  2. Globalization, Power, and Culture:
  3. International Development, Trade, and Urbanization:
  4. Global Information and Media:
    • AL 4151 Communication Across Cultures (3)*
    • ANTH 4114/GLOS 4114 Language and Social Justice (4)
    • ANTH 4490/GLOS 4490 Anthropology of Globalization (4)*
    • ANTH 4520 Anthropology of Public Culture (3)*
    • ENGL 3940 Postcolonial Literature (3)*
    • FLME 4180 International Cinemas (3)*
    • FLME 4185 Global Media and Culture (3)*
    • FREN 4113 French and Francophone Culture and Civilization: Immigration and Identity in Contemporary Francophone Film (3)
    • GLOS 4211 Psychology of Terrorism (3)
    • GLOS 4650 Special Topics in Global Studies (3-4)
    • HIST 3635 Media, Technology, and Popular Culture (4)
    • JOUR 4650/MES 4600 International Communication (3)*
    • JOUR 4665 International Public Relations (3)*
    • POLS 4160 Political Attitudes and Public Opinion (3)
    • POLS 4422 NGOs and World Politics (3)
    • SPAN 4467 Latin American and Latino Film and Video (3)*
    • SPAN 4480 Special Topics (Representations of Violence in Latin American Film) (3)*
    • SPAN 4480 Special Topics (Realism in Latin American Cinema) (3)*
  5. Global Health and Environment:
  6. Human Rights and Democracy:
  7. International Business

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3320 History

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in History
    • Concentration in Pre-Education
    • Concentration in Pre-Law
  • Minor in History
  • Dual B.A./M.A. in History
  • Dual B.A. in History and Master of Historic Preservation

Department of History
20th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-6385
history.gsu.edu

Michelle Brattain, Chair
Robert Baker, Undergraduate Director

Historians study various aspects of humanity’s recorded past. Some historians explore the rise and fall of empires, while others describe the everyday lives of men and women. They are interested in every period of the past and all parts of the world. Historians also examine the principles and theories that influence the writing of history. They seek to understand the forces that have structured human life and the ideas that have shaped the way people perceive and experience their worlds. Historians are concerned with change and continuity within societies and interactions among cultures. Historians pay particular attention to the effect of perspectives and values because their discipline involves the interpretation of findings, not just the collection of facts. History can teach us many lessons, not simply about our past but also about the paradoxes and potentials of our present.

The Department of History offers a wide range of courses in African, Asian, European, Latin American, Middle Eastern, and United States history. Arranged in three levels — introductory, intermediate, and advanced — these courses afford students an opportunity not only to become familiar with a body of historical knowledge but also to enhance their skills as readers, discussants, writers, and researchers. Because it emphasizes analytic and critical thinking, history prepares students for further professional training in education, international studies, journalism, law, politics, and public policy, and for all manner of careers. All students can benefit from the insights history provides into the human condition.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

Students should complete the freshman courses in history in the core curriculum and HIST 3000 (Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW) before enrolling in other history courses numbered 3000 and above. In all lower-division history courses the department requires that majors attain a minimum grade of C.

The department requires a total of 30 hours in upper-division history. At least one course must be taken from each of the areas of American, European, and African/Asian/Latin American/Middle Eastern History. All majors must take HIST 4990 (Historical Research-CTW) after completing HIST 3000 and at least four other upper-division courses. However, students enrolling in the dual degree BA/MA program may elect to substitute a graduate level research course for HIST 4990. No more than 15 hours of upper-division history may be transfer credits.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.A. in History

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. Required Courses (9):
    • HIST 1111 Survey of World History to 1500 (3)
    • HIST 1112 Survey of World History since 1500 (3)
    • World language at the 1002 level or higher (3)
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:

The Department of History recommends that all majors complete the world language 1002, 2001, and 2002 sequence. (See “World Language Requirement for B.A. and B.I.S. Majors,” previously described.)

Area G: Major Courses (30)

Unless otherwise specified, HIST 1111, HIST 1112, and HIST 2110 are prerequisites for all advanced course work in history. History majors may complete no more than eight hours of 3000/4000-level history courses before completing HIST 3000.

A minimum total of 30 hours must be taken from courses at the 3000-4000 level, and must include one course from each of the following:

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (4)
    • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW  (4) (should be taken first among upper-division courses)
  2. U. S. History (one course)
  3. European History (one course)
  4. African, Asian, Latin American, or Middle Eastern History (one course)
  5. Capstone Course in Historical Research (4)
    • HIST 4990 Historical Research-CTW (4) (Prerequisite: HIST 3000 and at least four other upper-division HIST courses, including at least two 4000-level classes.)

Area H: Additional Courses

Additional courses must be taken to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

The department strongly recommends that majors take the fourth semester of a world language (2002).

Pre-Education Concentration

The Department of History offers a pre-education track for those students who plan to teach at the middle school or high school level. Students have the opportunity to take a variety of courses in U.S., European, and world history, which will provide the analytic and writing skills, the global perspective, and the historical content that they will need to teach in the public schools. Along with the B.A. in History, it prepares students to be tested for temporary certification or to enter the M.A.T. Program in Social Studies Education in the College of Education and Human Development at Georgia State or a similar program elsewhere to complete the requirements for state certification.

Area A-F requirements for the Pre-Education Concentration are the same as for the B.A. in History.

Area G (Pre-Education): Major Courses (30)

Students in the pre-education track will take eight history courses at the 3000-4000 level distributed as follows:

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (4)
    • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW  (4) (should be taken first among upper-division courses)
  2. Two courses in U.S. history. The department strongly recommends that one of these be History 4310 (Georgia).
  3. One course in European history.
  4. One course in African, Asian, Latin American, Middle Eastern, or world history.
  5. Two additional HIST courses the 3000-4000 level.
  6. Capstone Course in Historical Research (4)
    • HIST 4990 Historical Research-CTW (4) (Prerequisite: HIST 3000 and at least four other upper-division HIST courses, including at least two 4000-level classes.

Area H (Pre-Education): Additional Courses

Students in the pre-education track will also complete a minimum of nine hours of 3000-4000-level course work in two or more of the following allied fields:

A C- or better is required in all the courses in the Allied Field of the Pre-Ed track.

Additional courses must be taken to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

History as an allied field consists of three courses at the 3000-4000 level: one in U.S. history, one in European history, and one in African, Asian, Latin American, or Middle Eastern history.

Pre-Law Concentration

Students who wish to major in history and prepare for law school or prestigious J.D.-Ph.D. programs can opt for a pre-law concentration. Students should contact Robert Baker, the department’s pre-law advisor, for more information about law school admissions.

Area A-F requirements for the Pre-Law Concentration are the same as for the B.A. in History. One or more of the following courses are strongly recommended:

Area G (Pre-Law): Major Courses (30)

  1. Required Courses to fulfill CTW requirement (4)
    • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW (4) (should be taken first among upper-division courses)
  2. Two of the following courses (8):
    • HIST 4450 Crime in America (4)
    • HIST 4460 Bills of Rights (4)
    • HIST 4470 The Founders’ Constitution (4)
    • HIST 4532 Crime & Law, Early Modern Europe (4)
    • HIST 4540 Britain, Ireland, and the British Atlantic, 1485-1689 (4)
    • HIST 4550 Britain, Ireland, and the British Empire since 1689 (3)
  3. One course in African, Asian, Latin American, Middle Eastern, or world history.
  4. Capstone Course in Historical Research (4)
    • HIST 4990 Historical Research-CTW (4) (Prerequisite: HIST 3000 and at least three other upper-division courses, including at least two 4000-level classes.)

Area H (Pre-Law): Minor and Additional Courses

Students in the pre-law concentration must take an additional 9 hours. At least three credit hours must come from Field 2.

Field 1:

  • HIST 3250 Religion in American Life (4)
  • HIST 3900 Human Rights in World History (3)
  • HIST 4100 Philosophy of History (3)
  • HIST 4190 American Culture and Ideas I (4)
  • HIST 4200 American Culture and Ideas II (4)
  • HIST 4630 European Intellectual History I: from Medieval to Marx (4)
  • HIST 4640 European Intellectual History II: from Marx to Postmodernism (4)

Field 2:

  • PHIL 4500 Symbolic Logic (prerequisite: PHIL 2500 with grade of B or higher) (3)
  • PHIL 4700 Ethics (prerequisite: one 2000 or 3000-level Philosophy course) (3)
  • PHIL 4820 Philosophy of Law (prerequisite: one 2000 or 3000-level Philosophy course) (3)
  • RELS 4140 Religion and Law (3)
  • RELS 5150 Religion, Nation, and Law (3)
  • RELS 4670 Church and State (3)
  • SOCI 3224 Crime and Punishment (3)
  • POLS 3140 Judicial Process and Courts (3)
  • POLS 4130 American Constitutional Law (3)
  • POLS 4131 Civil Liberties and Rights (3)

Other courses may be substituted for the Area H requirement by the History pre-law advisor.

Additional courses from departments other than the major must be taken to complete a minimum of 120 hours, exclusive of KH 1010. The department strongly recommends that majors take the fourth semester of a foreign language: Lang 2002.

Minor in History

Students who wish to minor in history must take 15-18 hours in history courses, including at least three courses at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in history may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

The department offers the following dual degree program:

  • Dual B.A./M.A. in History
  • Dual B.A. in History and Master of Historic Preservation

These dual degree opportunities enable qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3325 Human Rights and Democracy

Program Offering:

  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Human Rights and Democracy

This program offers students an avenue to take advantage of the rich offerings in the areas of human rights and democracy available across several departments in the College of Arts and Science. The minor addresses the needs of students interested in a multidisciplinary, non-traditional introduction to issues and skills surrounding human rights and democracy.

Minor Coordinator: Ryan Carlin (rcarlin@gsu.edu)

Program Admission

A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required to apply to the program. Application materials can be obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance (see below). Students should apply to the program by the time they have earned 42 credit hours to avoid a delay in graduation.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to The Interdisciplinary Minor section 3030.40 of the course catalog for academic regulations for this program.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

Students who wish to minor in Human Rights and Democracy should choose courses in consultation with faculty advisor. This minor is open to all students. A few courses in this program have prerequisites.

Area H: 

No more than two 3-4 credit hour courses (6-8 hours) can be taken within a single discipline. All courses must be at the 3000-4000 levels. Students must take at least two courses from the Foundations area, no more than two from the Social Conflict and Conflict Resolution area, and no more than two from the Identity Perspectives area. Other related 3000- or 4000-level courses (in any college) may be approved in advance by the faculty advisor. No courses will be approved after a student has enrolled in the course. (* Denotes course with prerequisites)

  1. Foundations (6-7)
    Choose two courses from the following:

    • AAS 4550 Activism and the Black Freedom Movement (3)
    • AAS 4600/HIST 4280 Enslavement and Resistance in North America (3)
    • AAS 4620/HIST 4290 Enslavement and Resistance in the Americas (3)
    • ANTH 3033 The Anthropology of Violence (3)*
    • ANTH 4370 Forensic Anthropology (3)*
    • HIST 3540 Film and the Holocaust (4)
    • HIST 4640 The Holocaust (3)
    • POLS 4131 Civil Liberties and Rights (3)
    • POLS 4205 Comparative Democratization (3)
    • POLS 4220 Comparative Legal Systems and Politics (3)
    • POLS 4420 International Law (3)
    • POLS 4427 Politics of International Human Rights (3)
    • POLS 4520 Theories on Democracy (3)
    • PSYC 4650 Special Topics (Study Abroad: Human Rights in Argentina) (3)*
    • RELS 4030 Introduction to Human Rights (3)
    • SPAN 3395 Special Topics (Study Abroad: Human Rights, Historical Memory, and Democracy in Spain) (3)
  2. Social Conflict and Conflict Resolution (3-7)
    Choose no more than two courses from the following:

  3. Identity Perspectives. Choose no more than two courses from the following (3-7):

3330 Intensive English Program

Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language
15th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5200
iep.gsu.edu

John Bunting, Director

The Intensive English Program (IEP) is a non-credit program designed to prepare students in the language and study skills necessary for successful academic work in American colleges and universities. The IEP offers academic English courses from basic to advanced levels of proficiency. Students who successfully complete the final level of the IEP (level 5) receive an English Proficiency Test waiver for undergraduate admission. In some cases, students who have been accepted to a degree program at Georgia State may combine upper-level IEP courses and regular academic work. Level six in the IEP is specifically for students seeking graduate admission at Georgia State.

Every level in the IEP offers five courses each semester (a total of 18 hours in class each week). Courses include academic writing, structure/composition, academic reading/listening, extensive reading, proficiency test preparation (TOEFL / GRE) and oral communication. Tutoring services are available for students as well as weekly conversation exchange activities and excursions.

3370 Japanese

Program Offered:

  • Certificate of Language Ability in Japanese
  • Minor in Japanese

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Shuai Li, Undergraduate Director
Mizuki Mazzotta, Japanese program coordinator

Certificate of Language Ability in Japanese

A strong demand exists by employers for candidates to offer credentials to verify language proficiency in both oral and written communication. The undergraduate Certificate of Language Ability is designed for students to offer tangible proof of their language abilities and makes an ideal complement to other areas of study such as business, international relations, public health, criminal justice, hospitality, and more.

The certificate consists of 12 credit hours at 2000- and 3000-level (minimum of 6 must be at the 3000-level), with a B or higher in each course. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.

Minor in Japanese

Students who wish to minor in Japanese must take 15-18 hours in Japanese, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours of courses in the language may count the additional hours toward their electives. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

3380 Journalism

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Journalism
    • Concentration in Media and Society
    • Concentration in Multimedia Reporting
    • Concentration in Public Relations
  • Minor in Journalism

Department of Communication
8th floor, 25 Park Place
404-413-5600
communication.gsu.edu

Greg Lisby, Chair
Jaye Atkinson, Associate Chair
Douglas Barthlow and Rasha Ramzy, Undergraduate Directors

Journalism is the practice of collecting, evaluating, and disseminating current, relevant information and opinion. The journalism major prepares students for a variety of careers as multimedia news producers or public relations practitioners. Journalism courses are also useful electives for students planning to enter other vocations who wish to deepen and expand their media-literacy.

Credit for special projects and internships is available in all majors. Internships provide students who have already completed all other requirements to gain experience in a variety of professional sectors in the metropolitan area and to tailor programs to their specific career goals.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Major Eligibility Requirements

Effective fall semester 2013, to be eligible for the Journalism major and to enroll in 3000-4000 level Journalism courses (i.e., JOUR courses), students must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete all courses with the JOUR prefix that are in Journalism’s Area F (with a minimum grade of “C” in the first attempt) and
  • Earn a 2.5 grade-point average in all Area F JOUR courses. This GPA will be calculated based on the first attempt at these JOUR courses at Georgia State University. WFs counts as an attempt. Transfer students who transfer these course(s) into Georgia State, may use the grades in the transferred course(s) to calculate the GPA or they may attempt them once at Georgia State.
  • Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.

Once a student is eligible to take 3000-4000 Journalism courses, they remain eligible to take them as long as they are eligible to enroll at Georgia State University.

In addition to the Major Eligibility Requirements for Journalism, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Program Financial Information

Effective summer 2009, lab fees will be assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. As a result, students will no longer be required to purchase lab fee cards. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the PAWS or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.

B.A. in Journalism

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. World Language at the 1002 level or higher (3)
    (See “World Language Requirement for B.A. and B.I.S. Majors,” previously described.)
  2. Required Courses (minimum grade of “C” required.) (12)
  3. Electives: Select one course (3)
    AAS 1141, AAS 1142, AAS 2010, ANTH 2020, ECON 2105, ECON 2106, FLME 2700, GEOG 1101, HIST 1111, HIST 1112, HIST 1141, HIST 1142, HIST 2110, MUA 1500, MUA 1930, PHIL 2010, POLS 2101, POLS 2401, PSYC 1101, SOCI 1101, SOCI 1160, SCOM 1010, THEA 2040, WGSS 2010; World language 1001 (if no previous experience with language), World Lang 2001, World Lang 2002

* Students must have a 2.5 grade-point average in these Area F JOUR courses to be eligible for the B.A. in Journalism and to take 3000- and 4000-level JOUR courses. (See Major Eligibility Requirements.)

Media and Society Concentration: Area G (24)

  1. Course to fulfill Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) requirement (3):
  2. Required core courses (3):
    • JOUR 3060 Mass Comm Law and Regulation (3)
  3. Select one of the following capstone courses (3):
  4. Select five of the following Media Studies courses (15):

Multimedia Reporting Concentration: Area G (24)

  1. Course to fulfill Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) requirement (3):
  2. Required Core courses (8-10):
  3. Select one of the following capstone courses (3):
  4. Select advanced media practice courses from the following (8-10):

Public Relations Concentration: Area G (24)

  1. Course to fulfill Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) requirement (3):
    • JOUR 3560 Public Relations Writing and Projects-CTW (3)
  2. Mandatory core course (3):
    • JOUR 3060 Mass Comm Law and Regulation (3)
  3. Concentration mandatory core courses (6):
  4. Select one of the following capstone courses (3):
  5. Select two experiential learning courses (6):
  6. Select one course from the following (3):

H: Minor and Additional Courses

Majors in the Department of Communication’s three B.A. programs must select a minor consisting of at least 15 hours of courses in a discipline within the Department of Communication other than the major (journalism, film/video, or speech) or in another academic department/school/institute that offers a baccalaureate degree. At least nine semester hours of minor courses must be at the 3000 level or above, unless otherwise specified by the minor-granting department/school/institute. A grade of C or higher is required in all minor courses.

Minor in Journalism

Students who wish to minor in one of the department’s three programs must take 15-18 hours in the specific area, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in the specific area may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. Students wishing to take 3000-4000 level Journalism courses (i.e., JOUR) as part of a minor must first request departmental registration approval.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3385 Korean

Programs Offered:

  • Certificate of Language Ability in Korean
  • Minor in Korean Language and Culture

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Shuai Li, Undergraduate Director
Hakyoon Lee, Korean program coordinator

Certificate of Language Ability in Korean

A strong demand exists by employers for candidates to offer credentials to verify language proficiency in both oral and written communication. The undergraduate Certificate of Language Ability is designed for students to offer tangible proof of their language abilities and makes an ideal complement to other areas of study such as business, international relations, public health, criminal justice, hospitality, and more.

The certificate consists of 12 credit hours at 2000- and 3000-level (minimum of 6 must be at the 3000-level), with a B or higher in the first attempt at each course. Courses retaken using the university Repeat to Replace policy are not counted as first attempts.

Minor in Korean Language and Culture

Students who wish to minor in Korean Language and Culture should complete 15 credit hours including at least 9 credit hours at the 3000 levels or above. A grade “C” or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. Current courses available for the minor include:

  • Korean 2001 Intermediate Korean I (3)
  • Korean 2002 Intermediate Korean II (3)
  • Korean 3001 Advanced Korean I (3)
  • Korean 3002 Advanced Korean II (3)
  • Korean 3011 Korean Proficiency Through Korean Drama (3)
  • Korean 4011 Business Korean (3)
  • Korean 4300 Korean Language, Culture, and Society (3)
  • Korean 4995 Directed Readings (3)

3395 Latin American Studies

Program Offered:

  • Interdisciplinary Minor in Latin American Studies 

Minor Coordinator: Leslie L. Marsh (llmarsh@gsu.edu), Center for Latin American and Latino/a Studies

Program Requirements:

The specific requirements for an interdisciplinary minor in Latin American Studies are as follows:

  • The minor course work must consist of 15 hours of classes with significant Latin American content with a GPA of 3.0.
  • These courses must be selected from at least two different departments.
  • Courses counted toward the interdisciplinary minor cannot also count toward the major.
  • Students are encouraged (but not required) to pursue a Certificate of Language Ability in Spanish and explore study abroad opportunities to a Latin American country.

The following is a list of a few—but not all—courses that may be taken to fulfill the requirements of the interdisciplinary minor in Latin American Studies.

  • AH 4669 Pre-Columbian Art (3)
  • AH 4660 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art in Latin America (3)
  • AH 4665 Latin American Avant-Gardes of the 1920s (3)
  • AH 4669 Art in Latin America I: 1900-1950 (3)
  • AH 4670 Art in Latin America II: 1950-2000 (3)
  • AH 4900 Special Studies Seminar (3)
  • AH 4980 Special Problems in Art History (3)
  • ANTH 4040 Race, Class, and Gender in Global Perspective (when the course deals with Latin America and/or U.S. Latino/as (3)
  • ANTH 4170 Mesoamerican Archaeology (3)
  • ANTH 4530 Ancient Cities (when course deals with Latin America) (3)
  • GEOG 4406 Advanced Regional Geography (3)
  • GLOS 3620/HIST 3620 Atlantic World (4)
  • POLS 4250 Latin American Politics (3)
  • PSYC 4680 Special Topics in Psychology (topic: Argentina- Human Rights in Argentina: From Dictatorship to Democracy (1976-Today) (3)
  • RELS 4700 Between Animals and Gods (3)
  • SPAN 3395 Study Abroad (for programs in Latin America; please consult the Office of Study Abroad for program opportunities and then confer with the Director of the Center for Latin American and Latino/a Studies)
  • SPAN 4454 Literature of Social and Political Conflict in Latin America (in Spanish) (3)
  • SPAN 4456 Tales of Love, Madness, and Death (in Spanish) (3)
  • SPAN 4467 Latin American and Latino Film and Video (3)
  • SPAN 4470 Special Topics in Latin American Literature (in Spanish) (3)
  • SPAN 4480 Special Topics in Hispanic Culture (3)
  • WGSS 4910 Gender, Sexuality, and Postcoloniality in Contemporary Ecuador (3)

3397 Law and Ethics

Program Offered:

  • Minor in Law and Ethics

Department of Philosophy
16th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
philosophy.gsu.edu

Eddy Nahmias, Chair
Eric Wilson, Director of Undergraduate Studies
S.M. Love, Pre-Law Advisor

A study of the philosophy of the law can deepen our understanding of the proper foundations, limits, and applications of legal authority. Legal theorists often consider the meaning of legal doctrine but philosophers of law help to frame the ethical considerations that guide and constrain the law. The minor in law and ethics gives students the skills and knowledge needed for a critical assessment of law, especially in light of the principles of ethics and social values. The minor also improves argumentative, writing, and logical skills invaluable for law school and many other careers in legal fields. The minor in law and ethics is designed to be a complement to any major. Students with majors in the humanities or social sciences planning a career in law, public service, advocacy, or policy are particularly encouraged to consider the minor in law and ethics.

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

Minor in Law and Ethics

Complete 15 credit hours as follows:

  1. Required Courses (6 hours):
  2. Elective Courses (9 hours): Select at least two courses (6 hours) from the following:
  3. Select one more course (3 or 4 hours) either from the list below or from the list above.
    • AAS 4120 African-American Political Thought (3)
    • AAS 4550 Activism and the Black Freedom Movement (3)
    • AAS 4600 Enslavement and Resistance in North America (3)
    • AAS 4780 African-American Lesbian and Gay Activism (3)
    • CRJU: Any 3000- or 4000-level Criminal Justice course
    • ECON 4450 Law and Economics (3)
    • ENGL 3080 Persuasion – History, Theory, Practice (3)
    • ENGL 415 John Milton (3)
    • HIST 3900 Human Rights in Historical Perspective (3)
    • HIST 4450 History of Crime in America (4)
    • HIST 4460 Bill of Rights (4)
    • HIST 4470 The Founders’ Constitution (4)
    • HIST 4532 Crime, Law, and Society in Early Modern Europe (4)
    • LGLS: Any 3000- or 4000-level Legal Studies course
    • PMAP 4411 Introduction to the Law for Public and Nonprofit Managers (3)
    • POLS: Any 3000- or 4000-level Political Science course
    • RELS 4255 Religion, Race, Nation (3)
    • RELS 4650 Religion and Ethics (3)
    • SOCI 3224 Crime and Punishment (3)
    • SOCI 4218 Power and Politics (3)
    • WGSS 4510 Feminist Political Theory (3)
    • WGSS 4760 Activism: History and Theory (3)
    • Other courses may count towards the Minor in Law and Ethics. However, these courses require advance approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies in Philosophy. No courses will be approved after the mid-point of the semester of the course.

3400 Law and Society

Program Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Law and Society

Faculty Coordinator: Michael Fix, mfix@gsu.edu

This program emphasizes the social sciences and humanities perspectives of the law. Drawing on the disciplines of political science, sociology, history, English, philosophy, psychology, criminal justice, and business law, the Law and Society area of concentration offers the student a broad liberal but non-professional background in law. It is a viable option for pre-law students. For students interested in the program, please contact the program coordinator or the Department of Political Science (404-413-6159).

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Arts students should also consult regularly with the faculty program coordinator for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic opportunities.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030.30 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H.  Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.I.S. with a Concentration in Law and Society

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

Area G: Area of Concentration — Law and Society (27)

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G.

  1. Select one course to fulfill CTW requirement (3-4)
    • CRJU 3060 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice-CTW (3)
    • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW (4)
    • PHIL 3000 Introductory Seminar in Philosophy-CTW (3)
    • POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research-CTW (3)
    • SCOM 3250 Persuasion-CTW (3)
  2. Select two courses (6)
  3. Select two courses (6-7)
  4. Select four additional courses (12)

Area H: Allied Fields

Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes).

  1. Select additional courses to reach at least 15 credit hours from the list in section 4 above (excluding courses already counting toward Area G) or from any of the following::
    • ENGL 3110 Technical Writing (3)
    • ENGL 3130 Business Writing (3)
    • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW (4)
    • PHIL 3000 Introductory Seminar in Philosophy-CTW (3)
    • PMAP 4411 Introduction to the Law for Public and Nonprofit Managers (3)
    • POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research-CTW (3)

Area J: Electives

Electives are used to build the hours in Areas G-J to 60 hours, have 39 hours at Georgia State University taken at the 3000-4000 level for residency, and complete 120 hours required for graduation.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3410 Mathematics and Statistics

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science in Mathematics
    • Concentration in Actuarial Science
    • Concentration in Applied Mathematics
    • Concentration in Computer Information Systems
    • Concentration in Computer Science
    • Concentration in Managerial Sciences
    • Concentration in Statistics
  • Dual Degree Programs:
    • B.S. in Mathematics / M.S. in Mathematics
    • B.S. in Mathematics (Actuarial Science concentration) with the Master of Actuarial Science
    • B.S. in Mathematics (Computer Information Systems concentration) with the Master of Science in Information Systems
    • B.S. in Mathematics (Mathematical Risk Management concentration) with the Master of Science in Risk Management and Insurance (Mathematical Risk Management specialization)
    • B.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration) / M.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration)
  • Minor in Mathematics

Department of Mathematics and Statistics
25 Park Place, 14th Floor
Atlanta, Georgia 30303-3083, USA
Phone: 404-413-6400
Web address: www.mathstat.gsu.edu

Guantao Chen, Chair
Alexandra Smirnova, Associate Chair
Michael Stewart, Director of Undergraduate Studies

All freshmen entering Georgia State University are required to take either the College Entrance Examination Board Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or the assessment of the American College Testing Program (ACT). The results of the test, performance in and time of previous mathematical education, and the student’s intended major or career goals are all factors to be considered when registering for any mathematics course. In order to register for courses numbered 1111 or higher, students must make an appropriate score on the mathematics placement test (see Section 1410.10) or have other appropriate prerequisite work. Therefore, students are urged to check the prerequisites for mathematics courses, and the mathematics requirement as listed by their major department/school/institute. Refer any questions to that department/school/ institute or to the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Mathematics is one of the great unifying themes in our modern culture. It is a language, a science, an art form, and a tool of tremendous power. The Department of Mathematics and Statistics, in its courses for both majors and non-majors, seeks to introduce students to this vast area of knowledge and to show them how mathematics can be used to solve problems.

The B.S. degree program in mathematics prepares a student for positions in business, industry, and government; a career in the teaching of mathematics at the secondary level; or further study in mathematics or statistics leading to graduate degrees.

Six concentrations are offered within the B.S. degree in mathematics. The concentration in actuarial science prepares a student to work as an actuary. The concentration in computer information systems prepares students for work in the field of management information systems. The concentration in computer science provides education in more scientific aspects of computing. The concentration in managerial sciences provides training in management modeling, problem solving, and computer-assisted decision support/expert systems technologies. The concentration in statistics prepares students for work as applied statisticians. The concentration in applied mathematics provides background in core areas of applied mathematics, computational mathematics, and statistics.  Finally, in addition to the undergraduate concentrations, the department offers dual degrees that give students a seamless path from a B.S. in mathematics to business graduate degrees in actuarial science, information systems, and mathematical risk management.

Guidelines for minors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics are given after the program descriptions.

In addition to immediate employment, there are opportunities for good students to pursue further study at the graduate level in mathematics, statistics, and other fields.

In 1978, the department initiated a cooperative education program with International Business Machines, Inc. Over the years, the program has expanded to include many other firms. Hundreds of majors have benefited from a co-op experience. Majors have an opportunity for paid work experience related to their area of study. They may also make important contacts that may lead to full-time employment after graduation. The Office of Cooperative Education has been established to coordinate the university’s cooperative education programs.

Majors are asked to consider carefully the career objectives they wish to pursue after graduation. A particular career objective may suggest a special choice for the minor or concentration that would prepare one for that career. It also might suggest that a co-op experience would be useful. Faculty who serve as academic advisers for majors can discuss choices and concentrations that are available to majors.

Program Financial Information

There are no extra fees, scholarships or other expenses outside of regular Georgia State University fees applicable to a B.S. degree in mathematics, other than those associated with teacher preparation (see Sections 1605 and 1610).

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Academic Regulations

Students must earn a grade of C or higher in all mathematics courses in Area A, D, and F.

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.S. in Mathematics

Program Degree Requirements

Students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

Area A:

  • Required course: MATH 1112, MATH 1113, or higher level MATH must be taken in Area A. A section of MATH 1113 Precalculus that is designated specifically for this major is recommended (see GoSolar listing to identify appropriate sections).

Area D:

  • Required course: MATH 2211 Calculus of One Variable I (4) (or a higher-level mathematics course)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Carry over from Areas A and/or D (1-2):
    • Students will carry one additional credit hour over to Area F for each four hour mathematics course taken in Area A and/or Area D.
  2. Required Courses (1-2 of the following should be taken in Area A and/or D) (10-14):
  3. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
  • All courses above ending in K are commonly offered as separate lecture and lab (L) courses by GSU’s Perimeter College. The combined (K) courses and separate lecture and lab (L) courses cover the same subject matter and are considered equivalent courses. Beginning Fall 2019, the downtown Biology department will also offer BIOL 2107/BIOL 2107L and BIOL 2108/BIOL 2108L as separate courses. 
  • Students with MATH 2211 (4) in Area A2 and MATH 2212 (4) in Area D will have MATH 2215 (4), MATH 2420 (3), MATH 2641 (3), and two extra hours from Areas A2 and D in the required portion of Area F, for subtotals of 12 hours of required courses and 6 hours of additional courses. Students with MATH 1112 (3) in Area A2 and MATH 2211 (4) in Area D will have MATH 2212 (4), MATH 2215 (4), MATH 2420 (3), MATH 2641 (3), and one extra hour from Area D in the required portion of Area F, for subtotals of 15 hours of required courses and 3 hours of additional courses. Any credit hours exceeding 18 earned to complete the Area F requirements will count toward elective hours.

Area G: Major Courses (39)

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
    • MATH 3000 Bridge to Higher Mathematics-CTW (3)
  2. Required Courses (21):
  3. Mathematics Electives (15):
    Select 15 additional hours of 3000- or 4000-level mathematics courses, of which six hours at most may be at the 3000 level (excluding Math 3030, 3050, 3070, and 3090).
  4. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of KH 1010.

Area H: Additional Major Courses, Concentrations, Minor, and Electives

See descriptions below as to the specifics of special programs, such as the various concentrations offered. Students earning a B.S. in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics are not required to complete a minor.

Actuarial Science Concentration (42-48)

An actuary is an executive who uses mathematical and statistical skills to define, analyze, and solve problems of society. Actuaries create and manage programs to reduce the adverse financial impact of the expected and unexpected events that happen to people. They are employed in business, industry, and government.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics, in cooperation with the actuarial science program in the Department of Risk Management and Insurance, offers the Bachelor of Science with a major in mathematics and a concentration in actuarial science. This program provides strong preparation in both mathematics and actuarial science. Students completing this program may request that a suitable annotation be placed on their permanent record.

Students must receive credit for CSC 1301, CSC 1302, ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 in the core curriculum Areas A-F or as electives.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
    • MATH 3000 Bridge to Higher Mathematics-CTW (3)
  2. Mathematics Requirements (24):
  3. Actuarial Science Requirements (15):
  4. Required Economics Courses (6) (if not completed in Area F):
  5. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of KH 1010. (9)

Applied Mathematics Concentration (39-43)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers the Bachelor of Science with a major in mathematics and concentration in applied mathematics. The program provides a broad background in core areas of applied mathematics, including differential equations, modeling, computational mathematics, numerical methods, and statistics.

Students must receive credit for CSC 1301 and CSC 1302 in the Area F or as electives.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
    • MATH 3000 Bridge to Higher Mathematics-CTW (3)
  2. Mathematics Requirements (21-25):
  3. Choose four courses from the following list (12)
  4. Select three additional hours of 3000/4000-level mathematics courses, of which 3 hours at most may be at the 3000 level (excluding MATH 3030, MATH 3050, MATH 3070, and MATH 3090).
  5. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, excluding KH 1010.

Computer Information Systems Concentration (42-43)

In cooperation with the Department of Computer Information Systems, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers the Bachelor of Science with a major in mathematics and a concentration in computer information systems. This program provides strong preparation in both mathematics and computer information systems. Students completing this concentration may request that a suitable annotation be placed on their permanent record. They are eligible to receive a certificate signed by the chair of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. Students must receive credit CSC 1301, CSC 1302, and CIS 2010 in the core curriculum Areas A-F or as electives.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
    • MATH 3000 Bridge to Higher Mathematics-CTW (3)
  2. Mathematics Requirements (15):
  3. Select one additional upper-level mathematics course (exclusive of MATH 3030, [Math 3050], [Math 3070], and [Math 3090]). (3)
  4. Computer Science Requirements (9-10):
    • CSC 2720 Data Structures (3)
    • CSC 3210 Computer Organization and Programming (3)
    • Select one of the following:
  5. Computer Information Systems Requirements (12):
    • CIS 3210 End User Applications Programming (3)
    • CIS 3300 Systems Analysis (3)
    • CIS 3310 Systems Design (3)
    • Select one additional CIS course, preapproved by the director of undergraduate studies. (3)
  6. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of KH 1010. (8-9)

Computer Science Concentration (43-45)

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers the Bachelor of Science in mathematics with a concentration in computer science. This program provides strong preparation in both mathematics and computer science. Students completing this program may request that a suitable annotation be placed on their permanent record. Students must receive credit CSC 1301, and CSC 1302 in the core curriculum Areas A-F or as electives.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
    • MATH 3000 Bridge to Higher Mathematics-CTW (3)
  2. Mathematics Requirements (15):
  3. Select one additional upper-level mathematics course (exclusive of Math 3030, 3050, 3070, and 3090). (3)
  4. Computer Science Requirements (16):
  5. Additional Computer Science Courses (6-8):
    Select two additional upper-level computer science courses with at least one selected from the following:

  6. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of KH 1010. (6-8)

Managerial Sciences Concentration (45)

In cooperation with the Department of Managerial Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers the Bachelor of Science with a major in mathematics and a concentration in managerial sciences. In the managerial sciences, students receive training in management modeling, problem solving, and computer-assisted decision support/expert systems technologies. They learn to apply these skills to the functional areas of administration to increase managerial effectiveness and productivity. Managerial sciences training leads to such careers as management consultants; logistics specialists; quality assurance analysts; data analysts/statisticians; and decision support/expert systems builders. Students completing this program may request that a suitable annotation be placed on their permanent record. Students must receive credit CSC 1301 and CSC 1302 in the core curriculum Areas A-F or as electives.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
    • MATH 3000 Bridge to Higher Mathematics-CTW (3)
  2. Mathematics Requirements (15):
  3. Statistics Requirements (6):
    Select one of the following two-course sequences.

    • MATH 4547 Introduction to Statistical Methods (3) and MATH 4548 Methods of Regression and Analysis of Variance (3)
    • MATH 4751 Mathematical Statistics I (3) and MATH 4752 Mathematical Statistics II (3)
  4. Select one additional courses in mathematics and/or computer science (6-7) (exclusive of Math 3030, 3050, 3070, and 3090).
  5. Managerial Sciences Requirements (15):*
    • MGS 3100 Business Analysis (3)
    • MGS 4000 Managerial Decision Making (3)
    • MGS 4020 Introduction to Business Intelligence (3)
    • MGS 4110 Analysis of Business Data (3)
    • MGS 4120 Optimal Resource Allocation (3)
  6. Managerial Sciences Electives (3):
    Select one course.

  7. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of KH 1010. (11-12)

*Students must have satisfied the statistics requirements before enrolling in any Mgs courses.

Statistics Concentration (42)

Statisticians give advice on the statistical design of experiments, conduct surveys, and analyze data. They use computers, often writing their own programs. They collaborate with specialists in fields such as biology, health sciences, medicine, economics, marketing, psychology, and sociology as well as in business and industry. They are employed in business, industry, and government. The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers the Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics with a concentration in statistics. Students in this program should select additional courses from a field to which statistics can be applied. Such a selection is called a related field and must be pre-approved by a departmental adviser. Examples of seven related fields are shown in section 5. Students must receive credit CSC 1301 and CSC 1302 in the core curriculum Areas A-F or as electives.

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
    • MATH 3000 Bridge to Higher Mathematics-CTW (3)
  2. Mathematics and Statistics Requirements (21):
  3. Select one course (3):
    • MATH 4544 Biostatistics (3)*
    • MATH 4547 Introduction to Statistical Methods (3)*
      *At most, one semester of Math 4544 and 4547 may be counted in this program.
  4. Select one course (3):
    • MATH 4211 Optimization (3)
    • MATH 4610 Numerical Analysis I (3)
    • Any one of the courses not taken in group 2 (3)
  5. Related Field Courses (12):
    Select 12 hours of course work in a field other than mathematics. (12) Related field courses must be pre-approved by a faculty adviser and must include at least nine hours of upper-division course work. Examples of related fields are: Actuarial Science, Biology, Computer Information Systems, Computer Science, Economics, Managerial Sciences, and Marketing.
  6. Additional courses must be taken as electives to complete a minimum of 120 semester hours, exclusive of KH 1010. (14-15)

Minor in Mathematics

Students choosing to minor in mathematics should complete Math 2212, 2215, and nine hours of additional mathematics courses at the 3000 level or above. There are some restrictions, and course selections must be approved by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Students are urged to consult with members of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics to determine which courses would be most useful in their major field.

Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

The department offers the following dual degree programs, three in partnership with the J. Mack Robinson College of Business:

  • B.S. in Mathematics / M.S. in Mathematics
  • B.S. in Mathematics (Actuarial Science concentration) with the Master of Actuarial Science
  • B.S. in Mathematics (Computer Information Systems concentration) with the Master of Science in Information Systems
  • B.S. in Mathematics (Mathematical Risk Management concentration) with the Master of Science in Risk Management and Insurance (Mathematical Risk Management specialization)
  • B.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration) / M.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration)

These dual degree opportunities enable qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by participating departments and colleges to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3415 Media Entrepreneurship

Program Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration in Media Entrepreneurship

Creative Media Industries Institute

Brennen Dicker, Executive Director
David Cheshier, faculty coordinator, dcheshier@gsu.edu

The interdisciplinary major concentration in Media Entrepreneurship prepares students for entry into a changing media environment with an understanding of current business dynamics and opportunities. Students will gain grounding in the skills they need to start their own businesses and to bring innovative and entrepreneurial thinking to traditional media organizations. Throughout the program, students will examine organizational culture, emerging and traditional business models, opportunities and challenges presented by the start-up climate, and will discuss how to leverage digital media tools in an entrepreneurial context.

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Arts students should also consult regularly with the faculty program coordinator for the specific program regarding course selection, program plans, experiential learning, and other academic opportunities.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030.30 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H.  Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Concentration in Media Entrepreneurship

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. World language at the 1002 level or above (3)
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:

Many of the courses listed above are required prerequisites for Media Entrepreneurship BIS courses in Area G and H. Students should select Area F courses in consultation with a BIS advisor.

Area G: Area of Concentration (27-33 hours)

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G.

    1. Required courses (9)
      • BUSA 3090 Survey of Business Principles for Non-Business Students (3)
      • ENI 3101 Entrepreneurial Thinking for Startups (3)
      • Select one course to fulfill the Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) requirement:
        • CMIS 4910 Topics in Creative Media-CTW (3)
        • JOUR 4800 Media Ethics and Society-CTW (3)
        • Directed Readings-CTW course (number 4995 in multiple subjects)
    2. Entrepreneurship Core (6)
      • CMIS 4000 New Ventures in Creative Media (3)
      • CMIS 4010 Media Business Development  (3)
      • ENI 3102 The Startup Venture (3)
      • ENI 3103 Commercializing the Startup (3)
      • FLME 4156 Media Entrepreneurship (4)
      • JOUR 4900 Journalism Entrepreneurship (3)
      • MTM 3440 Entrepreneurship in the Music Industry-CTW (3)
      • MK 4850 Marketing for Entrepreneurs (3)
    3. Media Industry/Law/Policy/Management (9)
      • ACCT 4111 Intermediate Accounting I (3)
      • BCOM 3950 Business Communication and Professional Development (3)
      • BUSA 3000 Globalization and Business Practice (3)
      • CIS 3730 Database Management Systems (3)
      • CMIS 4030 Managing the Creative Enterprise (3)
      • CMIS 4050 Producing Television (3)
      • CMIS 4914 Special Topics in Media/Arts Entrepreneurship (3)
      • CMIS 4600/MTM 3010 Introduction to Music Industry (3)
      • CMIS 4630/MTM 3050 Legal Aspects of the Music Industry (3)
      • CMIS 4660/MTM 3450 Artist Representation (3)
      • CMIS 4915 Special Topics in Advanced Technology Media Production (3)
      • CMIS 4980 Internship (1-6)
      • ENI 4100 From Startup to Growth Company (3)
      • FLME 4800 Media Industries (3)
      • JOUR 3060 Communication Law and Regulation (3)
      • JOUR 4770 Media Management and Marketing (3)
      • LGLS 3020 Introduction to the Law (3)
      • LGLS 4050 Principles of Business Law (3)
      • LGLS 4060 Internet Law (3)
      • MGS 3400 Managing People in Orgs (3)
      • MGS 4430 Negotiation (3) (BIS students have only BUSA 3090 as prereq with consent of instructor.)
      • MGS 4500 Entrepreneurship/New Venture Management (3) (BIS students have only BUSA 3090 as prereq with consent of instructor.)
      • MTM 3300 Copyright and Music Publishing (3)
      • MTM 3440 Entrepreneurship in the Music Industry-CTW (3)
    4. Marketing and Promotion (6)

Area H Allied Field (15-21 hours)

Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H.

All courses taken in Area H must be approved by the faculty program coordinator. Courses cannot count in both Area G and Area H.

3420 Middle East Studies

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Middle East Studies
  • Minor in Middle East Studies
  • Minor in Arabic 

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Shuai Li, Undergraduate Director
Ian Campbell, Faculty Coordinator

The Department of World Languages and Cultures offers an interdisciplinary major in Middle East Studies (MES), a minor in Middle East Studies and a minor in Arabic. The major is ideal for students who want a well-rounded understanding of the Middle East along with the opportunity to study languages of the region. Students take courses on the Middle East in a variety of disciplines, including history, literature, political science, religious studies, communication and women’s studies. Each student selects the specific courses included in his or her program of study in consultation with a program advisor. The MES major prepares students for graduate school or for careers in government, business, the non-profit sector or the military.

MES faculty offer courses in Arabic. Summer intensive courses may be offered. The department encourages students to take advantage of study abroad opportunities to deepen their knowledge of the culture and languages of the Middle East.

The department and the Middle East Center sponsor a dynamic set of activities outside the classroom, including a lecture series and cultural activities, focused on achieving greater understanding of the rich and varied cultures of the Middle East. Arabic coffee hours are a great way for students to engage with other students and faculty and experience Middle East culture. For more information visit: wlc.gsu.edu.

Program Admission

Students may enroll in a concentration upon admission to Georgia State University. Students who wish to change their major to this degree program should select a concentration in consultation with their academic advisor and the faculty coordinator. A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required.

Students who enroll in a concentration will be required to submit a course plan checklist to demonstrate their understanding of the degree requirements. It is highly recommended that students develop a course of study with their specific faculty coordinator before taking coursework in the degree program to avoid taking courses that will not count towards graduation.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 3030.30 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G and in at least two disciplines in Area H. Areas G and H should be constructed so that students take courses in distinct disciplines in each area (with some overlap expected); that is, the same prefix should not predominate in both Area G and H.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Program Financial Information

Effective summer 2009, lab fees will be assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. As a result, students will no longer be required to purchase lab fee cards. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.

B.I.S. with a Concentration in Middle East Studies

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Language Courses: competency in Arabic or another Middle Eastern language through 2002 level (9-12)
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    • AH 1700 Survey of Art I: Western Art from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (3)
    • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present (3)
    • AH 1850 Survey of Art III: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)
    • AL 2102 Languages of the World (3)
    • ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
    • GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography (3)
    • HIST 1111 Survey of World History to 1500
    • HIST 2500 Contemporary World History (3)
    • POLS 2401 Global Issues (3)
    • RELS 2001 Introduction to World Religions (3)

Area G: Area of Concentration (27-33)

Students must complete coursework in at least three disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area G.

  1. Required Course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
    Select one course:

    • ECON 3900 Macroeconomics (3)
    • HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW (3)
    • POLS 3800 Introduction to Political Research-CTW (3)
    • RELS 3750 Theories and Methods in Religious Studies-CTW (3)
  2. Required Course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
    Select one course:

    • ARBC 4501 Classical Arabic Lit & Culture (3)
    • ARBC 4502 Modern Arabic Literature in Translation (3)
  3. Select two courses (6-8)
  4. Fifteen to nineteen hours taken at the 3000 level or above from the Middle East Studies course list below or other appropriate courses selected in consultation with the program coordinator.

New courses are regularly added to this list, please check with the Department of World Languages and Cultures for the most recent list of courses.

Area H: Allied Field (15-21)

Students must complete coursework in at least two disciplines (defined by course prefixes) in Area H. In consultation with the adviser, students choose courses in from two or more departments.

Area J: Electives

Electives are used to build the hours in Areas G-J to 60 hours, have 39 hours at Georgia State University taken at the 3000-4000 level for residency, and complete 120 hours required for graduation.

Study Abroad

Students are strongly encouraged to participate in a study abroad program to the region. MES faculty members regularly conduct related summer programs. Students may also study abroad in the region on semester and year-long programs.

Minor in Middle East Studies

Select 15 semester hours from the following courses or other appropriate courses selected in consultation with the program coordinator:

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This unit offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the undergraduate director for the specific criteria for this honor.

3430 Military Science and Leadership

Program Offered:

  • Minor in Advanced Leadership and Management

Department of Military Science and Leadership
GSU Stadium, ROTC Suite (Sub Level)
404-413-6493
www.gsu.edu/rotc

Minor in Advanced Leadership and Management

Students must be enrolled in the Advanced Military Science (AMS) program to purse the minor. See the chair of the Department of Military Science and Leadership for program admission information. Additional coursework beyond the minor is required as part of the AMS program (see www.goarmy.com/rotc/schools/georgia-state-university.html).

General Requirements

  1. A cumulative Georgia State University grade-point average of 2.0.
  2. A grade-point average of 2.0 or higher in all military science courses.
  3. All courses for the minor must be taken at the 3000 level or above.
  4. No more than six hours may be taken in any department/school/institute.
  5. A grade of C or higher is required in all minor courses.
  6. Minor courses cannot be from a major area.

Minor Course Requirements

  1. HIST 3625 War in Europe and America Since 1500 (4)
  2. Select one course. (3)
  3. Select one Military Science course from the following (3-8):
  4. Select two courses, with only one course at most chosen from each group (6-7)
    • Human Behavior Group:
    • Military History Group:
      • HIST 3220 United States in the Twentieth Century (4)
      • HIST 3790 The Middle East since 1800 (4)
      • HIST 4230 Foreign Relations of the United States (4)
      • HIST 4600 Russia and the Soviet Union since 1861 (4)
      • HIST 4610 Modern Eastern Europe (4)
    • Management Group:
      • BCOM 3950 Fundamentals of Business Communication (3)
      • MGS 3400 Managing People in Organizations (3)
      • MGS 4470 Organizational Communication (3)
    • National Security Studies Group:

In addition to the minor, a student can pursue a commission in the United States Army. Please contact the Officer Recruiter, Mr. Anthony Savage asavage@gsu.edu.

Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC)

The Department of Military Science and Leadership, most often referred to as the Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (ROTC), develops leadership and problem solving skills training, through hands-on training and classroom instruction by experienced, active-duty Army officers and non-commissioned officers. Students learn the necessary skills to become successful civilian or military professionals. Students apply leadership, organizational and personnel management skills in a variety of challenging environments. Qualified students may obtain a commission as a Second Lieutenant, with the opportunity to serve as either full time in the active Army, or full or part time in the National Guard or U.S. Army Reserve. Students may also compete for two, three, or four year ROTC scholarships.

The basic courses (MSL 1000 and 2000 series) are normally taken in the freshman and sophomore years. Contracted students in the basic course are paid $420 per month while enrolled. Successful completion of the basic course gives students the credentials necessary for enrollment in the advanced program. The advanced program (MSL 3000 and 4000 series) is taken during the final two years of college and includes an advanced summer training between the junior and senior years. Students in the advanced program are paid $420 per month while enrolled, and earn a salary for all summer internships.

Army ROTC offers opportunities for scholarships for the full amount of tuition and fees or use the scholarship for room and board up to $10,000. Students may apply for two, three and four year scholarships. Each scholarship covers full tuition, provides an annual allotment of $1,200 for books and fees, and gives students a tax-free allowance each month classes are in session. Army ROTC scholarships are awarded on the basis of merit. Family income has no bearing on eligibility for an award. For more details, contact the scholarship advisor at the ROTC department at 404-413-6486.

Nursing

GSU Army ROTC also offers a unique scholarship opportunity for School of Nursing students. These scholarships cover full tuition, books and fees, and provide a monthly allowance. Two, three, and four-year scholarships are available for all qualified nursing majors. Contact the scholarship advisor at the ROTC department at 404-413-6486.

Veterans

Students with prior military experience can fulfill credit requirements for the ROTC basic course sequence. If credit is granted, and provided the student is not on a three year Army ROTC scholarship, veterans may bypass the freshman and sophomore years of ROTC and enroll directly in the advance course sequence. Students with prior service may be eligible for special veteran scholarships. In addition to any financial assistance from ROTC veterans are still qualified to receive any and all GI Bill, Army College Fund, or VEAP benefits to which they are entitled.

Simultaneous Membership Program

Students my take advantage of the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP), which allows participation in ROTC and enlistment in the Army National Guard or Reserve at the same time. SMP students serve as officer trainees in a Guard or Reserve unit and perform duties commensurate with the grade of Second Lieutenant. SMPs are paid at the rate of at least a Sergeant E-5 for Guard or Reserve service.

Students must complete one of the following programs of instruction to qualify for a commission in the U.S. Army:

Standard:

  •  MSL 1000-4000 level courses
  • Advanced Camp (Fort Knox, KY- Summer)

Basic Progression:

  • MSL 3000-4000 level courses
  • Advanced Camp (Fort Knox, KY – Summer)

JROTC-ROTC:

  • MSL 1000-4000 level courses
  • Advanced Camp (Fort Knox, KY – Summer)

Lateral Entry:

  • 4 weeks Basic Camp (Fort Knox – Summer)
  • MSL 3000-4000 level courses
  • MSL 3000 Advanced Camp (Fort Knox – Summer)

Prior Service:

  • Basic Training
  • MSL 3000-4000 level courses
  • Advanced Camp (Fort Knox, KY-Summer)

3435 Naval Science

Program Offered:

  • Minor in Naval Sciences

Minor info: Maj. Nick Francois, Department of Military Science and Leadership, Georgia State University (nfrancois@gsu.edu, 404-413-6495)
Minor liaison: Lt. Jacob Bush, Navy ROTC, Georgia Institute of Technology (navy@nrotc.gatech.edu, 404-385-6304)

The minor will familiarize the student with basic and advanced concepts of Naval Science with emphasis on naval history, technology, and leadership. This minor will support the students who plan to serve their country by recognizing their academic achievement outside of their major coursework. The minor will also give students who do not pursue military service a basic working knowledge of the United States Navy and Marine Corps. Concepts learned complement any chosen career path.

The Naval Sciences minor is offered in collaboration with the Navy ROTC (NROTC) program based at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia. Students pursuing the minor take Naval Science coursework on the campus of Georgia Tech. Students register for courses through the cross-registration process, which is described at https://registrar.gsu.edu/registration/cross-registration/.

Admission to the Minor

Students interested in pursuing the Naval Science minor should discuss this option with their Georgia State University academic advisor. Transfer students and other students who have taken the majority of their undergraduate coursework at institutions other than Georgia State University should consult their academic advisor before cross-registering for courses to ensure that they will have a suitable number of Georgia State credits at the expected term of graduation.

Program Requirements

A minimum of nine credit hours of upper-division coursework must constitute the required 15 credit hours of minor coursework. Students may not repeat any course for double credit. Courses taken to satisfy core curriculum Areas A through E may not be counted as coursework in the minor. Core Area F courses may be counted as coursework in the minor.

Courses may be taken in any order, but students are highly encouraged to complete NS 1321 before enrolling in any other courses.

  • NS 1321 Introduction to Naval Science. This course is an introduction and orientation class designed to give students a broad overview of the roles of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps. This course also provides an introduction to the structure, terminology, customs, and uniforms of the Navy and Marine Corps. (3)
  • NS 1323 Naval Maritime History. This course surveys U.S. Naval history from its European origin to the present with emphasis on major developments and the geographical forces shaping these developments. The course also covers present day concerns on seapower and maritime affairs, including the economic and political issues of maritime commerce, the law of the sea, and the rise and decline of the Soviet Navy. (3)
  • NS 2321 Naval Leadership and Management. Survey of managerial functions, communication, and major theories of leadership and motivation applied to the Navy organization. The course culminates with focus on naval core values. (3)
  • NS 2323 Navigation. This course develops and broadens the student’s understanding of basic piloting and the laws of vessel operations by applying the fundamentals of navigation at sea. (3)
  • NS 3323 Evolution of Warfare. A historical exploration of warfare practiced by great nations. Selected campaigns are studied with emphasis on leadership, evolution of tactics, weaponry, and principles of war. (3)
  • NS 3325 Naval Weapon Systems. This course develops and broadens the student’s understanding of basic engineering concepts and principles as applied to naval weapon systems, with a focus on sensors and weapon delivery. (3)
  • NS 3326 Naval Systems Engineering. This course develops and broadens the student’s understanding of basic engineering concepts and principles as applied to naval engineering. (3)
  • NS 4320 Naval Operations. This course develops and broadens the student’s understanding of relative motion, surface ship operations, and naval command, control, and communications. (3)
  • NS 4322 Naval Leadership and Ethics. Study of Naval values and ethics to include core values, Navy regulations, and military law. Duties and responsibilities of a junior naval officer. (3)
  • NS 4333 Amphibious Warfare. A historical exploration of warfare practice by great nations. Selected campaigns are studied with emphasis on leadership, evolution of tactics, and principles of war. (3)

3445 Neuroscience

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience
    • Pre-Medical Concentration
  • Minor in Neuroscience
  • Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Neuroscience

Neuroscience Institute
Georgia State University
880 Petit Science Center
neuroscience.gsu.edu

Nancy G. Forger, Director
Joseph J. Normandin, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Aras Petrulis, dual B.S./M.S. coordinator

Neuroscience asks how the brain and body produce our sensations, our thoughts, our behavior and the behavior of other animals. Neuroscientists address fundamental and health-related questions that affect every aspect of our lives and society. To answer them, neuroscience bridges the biological, chemical, physical, behavioral and computational sciences, as well as philosophy, engineering, and medicine. Neuroscience is among the fastest growing fields of science and medicine. Neuroscience is interdisciplinary, as shown by the Neuroscience Institute’s faculty and the neuroscience course offerings. Faculty are drawn from multiple departments, including Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Communication, Education, Law, Mathematics and Statistics, Neuroscience Institute, Nursing, Philosophy, Physics and Astronomy, and Psychology (see neuroscience.gsu.edu/faculty/ for a full list). They teach courses in cell and molecular neuroscience, computational neuroscience, neuroethology (animal behavior), drugs and the nervous system, cognitive neuroscience, neuroethics, and medical neuroanatomy, among many others. For questions about the major, students should contact the Undergraduate Coordinator who will help connect them with an appropriate faculty member.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

B.S. in Neuroscience

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

Area A:

  • Recommended course: MATH 1112 College Trigonometry (3) or MATH 1113 Precalculus (3) or higher level MATH course. MATH 1113 recommended.

Area B:

  • Recommended course: PHIL 1010 Critical Thinking (2)

Area D:

  • Recommended lab sequence: PHYS 2211K Principles of Physics I (4) and PHYS 2212K Principles of Physics II (4)
  • Required course: Any mathematics course not taken in Area A from the following choices: MATH 2201, MATH 2202, or any comparable higher-level math.

Area F: Courses Appropriate for the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (16):
  2. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Area F:
    • ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (3)
    • BIOL 2240 Human Physiology (3)
    • BIOL 2800 Introduction to Molecular Biology (2)
    • CHEM 2400 Organic Chemistry I (3)
    • NEUR 2000 Brain Basics: Introduction to Neuroscience (3)
    • PHIL 2010 Introduction to Philosophy (3)
    • PSYC 2050 Introduction to Drugs and Behavior (3)
  • Students who decide to major in neuroscience after completing BIOL 1103K may take it for credit toward Area F if they complete BIOL 2108, BIOL 2108L, and BIOL 2800 before enrolling in major courses (Area G).
  • Students who decide to major in neuroscience after completing BIOL 1103K and BIOL 1104K may use these courses for credit toward Area F if they complete BIOL 2800 before enrolling in major courses (Area G).
  • All courses above ending in K are commonly offered as separate lecture and lab (L) courses by GSU’s Perimeter College. The combined (K) courses and separate lecture and lab (L) courses cover the same subject matter and are considered equivalent courses. Beginning Fall 2019, the downtown Biology department will also offer BIOL 2107/BIOL 2107L and BIOL 2108/BIOL 2108L as separate courses. 
  • Any credit hours exceeding 18 earned to complete the Areas A-F requirements will count toward elective hours.

Area G: Major Courses (36)

  1. Neuroscience Core Requirements (18)
    • NEUR 2010 Professional Development in Neuroscience (2)
    • NEUR 3000 Principles of Neuroscience I (4)
    • NEUR 3001 Principles of Neuroscience II (4)
    • NEUR 3020 The Scientific Method in Neuroscience-CTW (4)
    • Select one of the following:
      • NEUR 4000 Neuroscience Laboratory (4)
      • NEUR 4001 Computational Neuroscience Laboratory (4)
      • Note: Students may choose to take both NEUR 4000 and NEUR 4001 with the credits from NEUR 4001 being applied to their neuroscience-related electives.
  2. Neuroscience Electives (at least 10 hours from the following list of courses):
  3. Neuroscience-related Electives (at least 8 hours from courses on the list below, or from the list of Neuroscience Electives above, if the course is not being used to fulfill the Neuroscience Electives requirement). Other neuroscience-related electives not on this list may fulfill this elective requirement with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Pre-Medicine Concentration

A pre-medicine concentration is available for B.S. in Neuroscience majors. Please contact the Undergraduate Coordinator for further information.

Pre-med students are also required to take:

Minor in Neuroscience

Students who wish to minor in Neuroscience must take NEUR 3000 and at least 12 additional hours in Neuroscience courses (any courses with NEUR prefix). A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

  1. Students majoring in Neuroscience are encouraged, but not required, to take a minor.
  2. Students majoring in Neuroscience must take additional courses as electives to complete 120 hours.  Students are encouraged to choose electives from the lists above.

Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Neuroscience

The Neuroscience Institute offers a dual Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Neuroscience. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the Neuroscience Institute and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. To graduate with distinction in the Neuroscience major, the student must have at least a 3.5 GPA in the major and a 3.5 GPA overall, and must be in good academic standing. The Undergraduate Program Committee may make rare exceptions (e.g. for students with a record of outstanding research or other accomplishments in neuroscience).

3450 Philosophy

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy
    • Concentration in Pre-Law
  • Minor in Philosophy
  • Minor in Law and Ethics

Department of Philosophy
16th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-6100
philosophy.gsu.edu

Eddy Nahmias, Chair
Eric Wilson, Director of Undergraduate Studies
S.M. Love, Pre-Law Advisor

Philosophy is the study of what exists, how we know, and how to live. Students of philosophy consider questions about the scientific method, human nature, justice, God, art, and the meaning of life. Philosophy majors develop the intellectual abilities to think critically and to write and communicate effectively. They learn to apply these valuable skills in other disciplines, in their career, and in their life.  Because philosophy deals with fundamental questions and explores methods for answering them, it is highly interdisciplinary, connecting to every other discipline in the university curriculum.  Hence, philosophy is an ideal double major or minor. Philosophy prepares students for careers and graduate programs that value the abilities to solve problems, to communicate clearly, to learn new skills, and to use new knowledge. It is an excellent major for a wide range of careers, including law, government, the sciences, medicine, public service, education, religion, writing, media, and all areas of business.

The Department of Philosophy offers a B.A. in Philosophy and B.A. in Philosophy with a Pre-Law Concentration, as well as a minor in Philosophy and a minor in Law and Ethics. The Department maintains an extensive website at philosophy.gsu.edu.

Academic Advisement for Undergraduate Students

Academic advisement for undergraduate students is provided through the University Advisement Center (freshman through junior status/fewer than 90 hours) and the college’s Office of Academic Assistance (senior status/90 or more hours). See section 3040 for additional information.

Program Degree Requirements

A 2000 or 3000-level philosophy course is a prerequisite for all 4000-level philosophy courses. Majors are strongly urged to take PHIL 2010 or PHIL 2030 and PHIL 3000 before taking 4000-level courses.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of Arts and Sciences Degree Requirements (see section 3030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

University Grade-Point Average and Grade Requirements

Georgia State University undergraduate students must achieve an overall institutional grade-point average of 2.0 and a major GPA of 2.0 in Areas G and H to receive a bachelor’s degree from the university. Grades of C- can be used to satisfy graduation requirements. However, some courses have prerequisites that require a grade of C or higher. (See section 1460 for additional information.)

B.A. in Philosophy

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8-9):
    1. One of the following (2-3):
      • PHIL 1010 Critical Thinking (2)
      • PHIL 2500 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (3) (Required for Graduation with Distinction and can improve performance on LSAT for Pre-Law students.)
    2. One of the following (3):
    3. World language at the 1002 or higher level (3)
  2. Select additional 1000- or 2000-level courses from any department with a subject in the core curriculum to complete 18 hours in Area F.
    • Recommended courses for the B.A. in Philosophy with no concentration: Any 1000/2000-level philosophy courses not used to fulfill requirements in Areas B, C, or F.
    • Recommended courses for the B.A. in Philosophy with a Pre-Law concentration:
      • Any 1000/2000-level philosophy courses not used to fulfill requirements in Areas B, C, or F.
      • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
      • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics (3)

Area G: Major Courses (27)

To satisfy the requirements for the B.A. degree with a major in philosophy, students must take a total of 27 semester hours in philosophy courses at the 3000 level or above, including the following distribution requirements:

  1. CTW Requirement (3):
    • PHIL 3000 Introductory Seminar in Philosophy-CTW (3)
  2. History of Philosophy Requirements (6):
  3. Value Theory Requirement (3):
    Select at least one of the following courses.

  4. Metaphysics and Epistemology Requirement (3):
    Select at least one of the following courses.

  5. Select four more philosophy courses at the 3000 or 4000-level. (12)

B.A. in Philosophy with a Pre-Law Concentration

Area A-F requirements are the same for the B.A. in Philosophy and the B.A. in Philosophy with a Pre-Law Concentration

Area G: Major Courses (27-28)

To satisfy the requirements for the B.A. degree with a major in philosophy with a Pre-Law concentration, students must take a total of 27 semester hours at the 3000 level or above, including the following distribution requirements:

  1. CTW Requirement (3):
    • PHIL 3000 Introductory Seminar in Philosophy-CTW (3)
  2. History of Philosophy Requirements (6):
  3. Value Theory Requirement (3):
    Select at least one of the following courses.

  4. Metaphysics and Epistemology Requirement (3):
    Select at least one of the following courses.

  5. PHIL 4820 Philosophy of Law (3)
  6. Select two more philosophy courses at the 3000 or 4000 level. (6)
  7. Select one of the following courses (3-4):
    • CRJU: Any 3000- or 4000-level Criminal Justice course
    • LGLS: Any 3000- or 4000-level Legal Studies course
    • POLS: Any 3000- or 4000-level Political Science course
    • AAS 4120 African-American Political Thought (3)
    • AAS 4550 Activism and the Black Freedom Movement (3)
    • AAS 4600 Enslavement and Resistance in North America (3)
    • AAS 4780 African-American Lesbian and Gay Activism (3)
    • ECON 4450 Law and Economics (3)
    • ENGL 3080 Persuasion – History, Theory, Practice (3)
    • ENGL 4150 John Milton (3)
    • HIST 3900 Human Rights in Historical Perspective (3)
    • HIST 4450 History of Crime in America (4)
    • HIST 4460 Bill of Rights (4)
    • HIST 4470 The Founders’ Constitution (4)
    • HIST 4532 Crime, Law, and Society in Early Modern Europe (4)
    • PMAP 4411 Introduction to the Law for Public and Nonprofit Managers (3)
    • RELS 4255 Religion, Race, Nation (3)
    • RELS 4650 Religion and Ethics (3)
    • SOCI 3224 Crime and Punishment (3)
    • SOCI 4218 Power and Politics (3)
    • WGSS 4510 Feminist Political Theory (3)
    • WGSS 4760 Activism: History and Theory (3)
    • Other law-related 3000- or 4000-level courses (in any college) approved in advance by the Philosophy Pre-Law Advisor. No courses will be approved after the mid-point of the semester of the course.

Graduation with Distinction

To graduate with distinction in the Philosophy major, the student must have excelled in his or her philosophy courses and undergraduate career.  For a student to earn Graduation with Distinction, the student must have at least a 3.5 GPA in the major and 3.5 GPA overall, must have passed PHIL 2500 (Introduction to Symbolic Logic), and must be in good academic standing. Rare exceptions may be made by faculty vote.

Minor in Philosophy

Students who wish to minor in Philosophy must take at least 15 hours in courses in philosophy, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 or 4000-level. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in the specific area may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

Minor in Law and Ethics

See section 3397 for information about the Minor in Law and Ethics.