10000 College of the Arts

Undergraduate programs in the College of the Arts are described in detail in this chapter. See subsections for specific program information as well as policies and procedures.

10010 General Information

The College of the Arts consists of three schools and two centers. The college has approximately 2,000 undergraduate majors and 220 graduate students.

The liberal arts education offered by the College of the Arts prepares students for professional careers and provides the foundation for lifelong learning. Programs in the liberal arts promote the independent discovery of knowledge, an appreciation of the arts, and the ability to think critically and analytically.

At the undergraduate level, the College of the Arts offers the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Fine Arts, the Bachelor of Music, and the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degrees. The requirements for these degrees build directly upon the broad educational foundation provided by the core curriculum.

Within the framework of the various degree offerings, specific programs have been designed for students who wish to pursue a career in teaching. In collaboration with the College of Education & Human Development, these teacher education programs provide for a major concentration within a special field of knowledge suitable for teaching at the various school levels. The programs prepare a student to meet the certification requirements of the Professional Standards Commission of the State of Georgia.

The College of the Arts offers graduate degrees and programs in art and design, music, film studies and production. The university publishes a graduate catalog that includes complete descriptions of all of the graduate programs offered at Georgia State University (available online at catalog.gsu.edu).

Office of the Dean

55 Park Place Building, Suite 910
404-413-3151
thearts.gsu.edu

Wade Weast, Dean
Maria Gindhart, Associate Dean

Accreditation

In the College of the Arts, the Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design is accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design, the School of Music by the National Association of Schools of Music, and the programs in secondary education by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Degrees Offered

Undergraduate degrees are offered through the Schools of Art & Design, Music, and Film Media, & Theatre. In addition, undergraduate degree programs in secondary education for teachers of preschool through twelfth grade in art and music are offered through the College of the Arts. For application procedures and eligibility requirements, please refer to “Educator Preparation,” chapter 1600 of this catalog.

Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

Art, Film and Media

Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

Art Education, Studio

Bachelor of Music (B.Mu.)

Music

Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

Music Management

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies (B.I.S.)

Arts Administration–Speech/Theatre, Theatre, Student-Planned. See section 10200 below.

10020 College Academic Regulations

The requirements for entrance into Georgia State University are found in section 1100 of this catalog, which is devoted to undergraduate admissions. A transfer student must comply with all academic regulations of the university. The College of the Arts reserves the right to validate by examination any credits accepted by transfer. This provision in no way affects the acceptance of courses used to satisfy core curriculum requirements at another unit of the University System of Georgia.

Students holding a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university who wish to complete another undergraduate degree are urged to clear all requirements with an advisor in the Office of Academic Assistance or the University Advisement Center.

Grades of C- in Major/Minor

Courses in the major require a grade of C- or higher. Courses in the minor chosen within or outside the college, require a grade of C- or higher. Some prerequisite courses for both the major and minor require a grade of C or higher to progress through the program.

Credit by Examination

A maximum of 18 semester hours of degree credit may be granted before or after matriculation to a student who receives satisfactory scores on certain subject examinations of the College Level Examination Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. The student should consult the appropriate school, the Office of Academic Assistance, or the University Advisement Center for further information.

The College of the Arts follows university guidelines for the acceptance of credit by examination. See section 1320.40 Credit by Examination for specific course equivalencies. Credit by examination awarded by the academic schools within the College of the Arts does not apply toward the academic residence requirement.

Credit for Transient Work

College of the Arts’ students who wish to take course work at another institution, whether as a full-time or as a part-time student, must have prior written approval from the school, Office of Academic Assistance, or the University Advisement Center if they wish to apply the credit hours to a degree program. Failure to obtain the required prior approval will prevent the acceptance of such credits. Approval will be granted for no more than two terms of work and only if the student is in good academic standing at Georgia State University. No approval of requests to take courses in Atlanta-area colleges will be granted if the course is readily available from Georgia State University offerings. During the term in which the student is scheduled to graduate, all courses must be taken at Georgia State University unless prior written approval has been obtained from the school, Office of Academic Assistance, or the University Advisement Center. The acceptance and application of all course work taken as a transient student is subject to any limitations imposed by the student’s major school or program of study.

Please consult the “Academic Regulations” section of this catalog for further clarification in regard to transient credit.

Course 4999 – Directed Readings

Course 4999, Directed Readings, is offered in various schools within the College of the Arts and is designed to assist seniors who are within two terms of graduation and who have curriculum difficulties in fulfilling the requirements necessary for graduation. One to four credit hours may be earned. The supervising professor and the school director must approve registration for the course. Forms for Course 4999 must be completed at the time of regular registration for the term in which the credit is to be earned and can be obtained through school offices or the college’s Office of Academic Assistance.

Policy on Allowing Undergraduates to Take Graduate Courses

Under one of the following conditions, an undergraduate student may be permitted to take a graduate course:

  1. Dual Degree Enrollment: The student has been formally accepted into an official university dual degree program that links an undergraduate degree program with a graduate degree program. Students in dual degree programs are granted permission to enroll in specified graduate courses when they reach a designated program milestone. Students who are accepted into the affiliated graduate program upon completion of the undergraduate degree may count specified course work toward fulfillment of the graduate degree requirements.
  2. College Approval of Enrollment: The Office of Academic Assistance of the college will determine a student’s eligibility for admission into a graduate course. To be eligible, an undergraduate student must have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 or higher, be within 18 semester hours of graduation, and be enrolled in an undergraduate degree program. Eligibility does not guarantee permission to take a graduate level course. Once a student’s eligibility is determined, permission must be granted by the instructor for the course, the school’s director of graduate studies, the director of the school offering the course, and the Office of Academic Assistance of the Arts. The request form is available in the college’s Office of Academic Assistance. Please note, graduate courses taken by an undergraduate student cannot be applied toward fulfillment of graduate degree requirements unless the student has been formally accepted into an official university dual degree program.

(This approval process does not apply to postbaccalaureate students. Postbaccalaureate students wishing to take graduate courses must be admitted as non-degree seeking students.)

10030 College Degree Requirements

10030.10 World Language Requirement for B.A./B.I.S. Majors

The College of the Arts requires the completion of a world language above the 1002 or 1101 level for all students seeking a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree. This requirement can be met by one of the following options: 1) Taking a course numbered 1002, 1101, or higher, 2) Taking the CLEP exam in French, German, or Spanish for credit at the 2001 and 2002 level, or 3) Taking the SAT II exam in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean and receiving at least the equivalent of a grade of “C” (73% of the highest possible exam score). For more information about the exams please contact the Counseling and Testing Center at 404-413-1740.

The world language requirement for students enrolled in Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies programs is most commonly included in the core curriculum or Area F (Courses Appropriate to the Major); however, programs may also require students to complete world language courses in Area G, (60 semester hours in the major). Students transferring to Georgia State University with a completed Area F, yet without sufficient course work to meet a program’s world language requirement, will be required to fulfill the necessary courses in the remaining 60 semester hours. Students who take a language course in Area C and subsequently declare a major in a program leading to a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies will find that the language course no longer counts in Area C but in Area F. For this reason, the college recommends that students in Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies programs not include a world language course in core curriculum Area C (Fine Arts and Humanities).

10030.20 Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree provides educational opportunities not available through the existing, traditional degree programs. The purpose of the program is to offer students an avenue by which they may take advantage of the rich offerings available in several colleges, schools, departments, and institutes at the university. An individual student, in consultation with a faculty advisor, may tailor a program of study that meets his or her particular educational needs, desires, and interests.

A student can pursue either a college-planned or a student-planned interdisciplinary program. The established college-planned programs address the needs of many students interested in a multidisciplinary, non-traditional education. Existing areas of concentration within the College of the Arts are Arts Administration-Speech/Theatre, and Theatre. Information about the B.I.S. program, including program options and the application process, is available from the college’s Office of Academic Assistance or the University Advisement Center.

Purpose

The Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degree provides educational opportunities not readily available through traditional departmental degree programs. Students have flexibility in developing a course of study appropriate to their goals by selecting courses from several schools in the College of the Arts. Students may also include courses from other colleges of this university in their interdisciplinary program.

It is not the function of the interdisciplinary program to pull together an assortment of course work as a last-minute effort to facilitate a student’s graduation. A proposal should be planned by the time a student has earned 42 credit hours and should reflect a logical, consistent course of study that is based on acceptable and germane student objectives.

Program Degree Requirements

There are two options in the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies program, the student-planned option and the college-planned option. Descriptions are listed below.

Courses in the area of concentration (Area G) and allied field (Area H) must be at the 3000-4000 level. Also, a grade of C- or higher is required in all courses in the area of concentration (Area G) and allied field (Area H). Electives are used to build the hours in Areas G-J to 60 hours, to ensure 39 hours are taken at Georgia State University at the 3000-4000 level to fulfill residency, and complete 120 hours required for graduation. The last 27 semester hours prior to graduation must be completed while formally enrolled in the program.

Option One: Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies Student-Planned Program

Students may choose the option to propose their own program of study for approval by the Associate Dean. Students may select their proposed courses from any college in the university, as long as at least 50 percent of the hours in the program are chosen from courses in the College of the Arts. Students should have their proposed student-planned programs reviewed by the Associate Dean by the time they have earned 42 hours.

To gain approval into the program, students must articulate a reasonable and educationally justifiable course of study. Proposed interdisciplinary degree programs cannot resemble current programs offered at the university. Students interested in initiating the application process must first schedule an appointment with an academic advisor in the college’s Office of Academic Assistance or the University Advisement Center. Students must also select an appropriate faculty advisor to provide guidance in developing the interdisciplinary program.

Course of Study Outline for Student-Planned Programs:
Areas A-E:

Core Curriculum (42)

All undergraduate students satisfy a common core curriculum. These requirements are printed in the “University Academic Regulations” section 1300 of this catalog.

Area F:

Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

Courses in this area should be included in the program proposal. The courses selected for this area must be at the lower-division level and judged to be programmatically appropriate to the intent of the proposed program. A world language at the 1002 level must be included in Area F of all student-planned programs.

Area G:

Area of Concentration (3000-4000-level courses similar to a traditional major area, except interdisciplinary in content).

Area H:

Allied Field (3000-4000-level courses similar to a minor, except interdisciplinary in content).

Area J:

Electives

When developing a student-planned program, the student may choose one of the following structures:

Program Plan Structure One:

An area of concentration (27-33 semester hours) with an allied field (15-21 semester hours) and electives (6-18 semester hours).

Program Plan Structure Two:

An area of concentration (27-33 semester hours) with two allied fields (15-21 semester hours each).

Program Plan Structure Three:

Two areas of concentration (27-33 semester hours each).

Option Two: Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies College-Planned Programs

Students may choose a program designed by the College of the Arts as follows, as well as select an appropriate faculty advisor.

Arts Administration – Speech/Theatre

Theatre-Design

Theatre-Performance

10030.30 The Interdisciplinary Minor

The interdisciplinary minor provides educational opportunities not otherwise available and allows students the flexibility to select courses for the minor from several colleges, schools, departments, and institutes at the university. Students must submit their student-planned interdisciplinary minor of 15-18 hours for approval to the Associate Dean. A proposal must identify the way in which the minor fits into the context of the student’s entire degree program. To gain approval, students must articulate a reasonable and educationally justifiable course of study and must keep in mind that this course of study may not duplicate what is currently available.

The following requirements apply to the interdisciplinary minor:

  1. The student must have a Georgia State University cumulative grade-point average of 2.0.
  2. All courses included must be at the 3000 level or above.
  3. No more than six hours may be taken in any one department or school, and courses cannot be from the major area.
  4. A grade of C- or better is required in all minor courses.
  5. At least 50 percent of the minor must be completed after the semester in which the Associate Dean approves the minor program plan.

Students should contact the college’s Office of Academic Assistance or the University Advisement Center for information on the application procedure.

10040 Office of Academic Assistance

55 Park Place Building, Suite 990

404-413-5855

thearts.gsu.edu/college-of-the-arts/academics/about-student-advising/

Director: Sekeia Harris
Assistant Director: Tony Davis

The Office of Academic Assistance supports schools in providing academic advisement for students in the College of the Arts, primarily those who have earned 90 credit hours. Students with fewer than 90 credit hours are advised through the University Advisement Center (see advisement.gsu.edu). This office also works with students on career development and on marketing a liberal arts background in the current job environment. The Office of Academic Assistance prepares evaluations of transfer work done at other institutions as well as academic program reviews for each major offered through the college. It also assists with course selections and schedule revisions and provides information concerning college and university policies. Students are advised by appointment or may walk-in for brief consultations. During the academic year, the office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Monday through Friday. Students seeking a degree in the College of the Arts should become familiar with the academic regulations of the university.

Although the College of the Arts will endeavor to provide timely and accurate advisement, it is the responsibility of the student to know and to satisfy the degree requirements of his or her academic program. The College of the Arts encourages its majors to build relationships with the undergraduate support personnel in their major school. This position reflects the belief that a strong undergraduate program is possible only if there are frequent opportunities for students to discuss their academic work and career goals with one of their major professors. In a large urban institution such as Georgia State University, contact is essential if students are to receive individual attention and enjoy the full benefits of a liberal arts education.

10060 Academic Resources and Services

Creative Media Center (CMC)

460 Art and Humanities Building
404-413-5278
cmc.gsu.edu

The Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design’s Creative Media Center (CMC) offers access to cutting-edge digital technology for students who are currently enrolled in courses within the school. The CMC offers an array of Macintosh computer workstations and functions as both a digital classroom and computer laboratory, offering Open Lab access during scheduled times. The CMC includes specialized input and output computer hardware for print, sound, and video, as well as many industry-standard design and imaging software packages.

Music Media Center

400 Haas Howell Building
404-413-5903

The School of Music’s Music Media Center provides students with a valuable resource for music study through the use of the Bobbie Bailey Technology Classroom, consisting of 18 workstations that facilitate the art of music composition, a multi-media seminar room, and the Charles Thomas Wurm Circulation area with access to 16 listening-keyboard computer workstations.

Visual Resource Center (VRC)

520 Art and Humanities Building
404-413-5233

The Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design’s Visual Resource Center (VRC) has a large collection of art and architecture slides, print, and digital media covering all phases of art history. The collection is used extensively for instruction and learning by university faculty and students as well as visual arts professionals throughout the region. The university subscribes to Artstor Digital Library, a database of more than 1.4 million images in the arts, architecture, humanities, and sciences from outstanding museums, photo archives, photographers, scholars, and artists.

10060.10 Centers

Center for Collaborative and International Arts (CENCIA)

Nickitas Demos, Director

cencia.gsu.edu/

The Center for Collaborative and International Arts (CENCIA) brings together visual artists, composers, musicians, actors and playwrights, filmmakers, and scholars engaged in arts-related research at Georgia State University. This cutting-edge union of arts-related disciplines is helping to guide the trajectory of the arts in the 21st century, as boundaries between traditional disciplines give way to exciting new partnerships.

Center for Educational Partnerships in Music

Michelle Mercier-DeShon, Director

music.gsu.edu/centers/center-educational-partnerships-music/

The Center for Educational Partnerships in Music is increasingly  recognized as a conduit for artistic excellence and innovation in urban music education. The centerunites university music faculty and undergraduate/graduate music students with the greater education community in a collaboration that advances the role of music in school culture and prepares strong leaders to teach in a diverse and interdependent context. Drawing on Atlanta’s unique community resources, the relationship created by the center fosters relevant and engaging music-making for all learners throughout the lifespan.

10100 Art and Design

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Art
    • Concentration in Art History
    • Concentration in Studio
    • Dual B.A. in Art (Concentration in Art History) / M.A. in Art History
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art Education
  • Bachelor of Fine Arts in Studio
    • Concentration in Drawing and Painting or Printmaking
    • Concentration in Graphic Design
    • Concentration in Interior Design
    • Concentration in Photography
    • Concentration in Textiles
    • Concentration in Three Dimensional Studies (emphasis in Ceramics or Sculpture)
  • Minors in Art and Art History

The Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design
117 Arts and Humanities Building
404-413-5221
artdesign.gsu.edu

TBD, Director
TBD, Associate Director

The Ernest G. Welch School of Art & Design offers degree programs in studio, art education, and art history. The Bachelor of Fine Arts professional degree is available in studio and art education. Within the studio degree, students may choose from these concentrations: drawing and painting or printmaking, graphic design, interior design, photography, textiles, or three-dimensional studies (ceramics or sculpture).

The School of Art & Design offers the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree for students who wish to pursue a liberal arts education. They may select a concentration in studio or in art history. The B.A. program in Studio covers a range of art courses and a studio concentration. Art history is an academic liberal arts program devoted to preparing future scholars and curators.

The School of Art & Design seeks to provide an educational environment that encourages the creation and presentation of the visual arts, the study of visual culture, the creation and enhancement of our interior environments, and the promotion of the visual arts to the larger community. Graduates of the school carry their knowledge forward and contribute to the cultural conscience of the community. A strong corps of the school’s graduates is found in prominent art centers and schools. Others hold positions with regional, national, and international design firms. Faculty, student artists, and alumni frequently exhibit in national and international galleries and competitions. Their works are in numerous private and corporate collections.

The School of Art & Design is professionally accredited by the National Association of Schools of Art & Design.

Program Admission

Admission to B.F.A

Students who wish to pursue a Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) degree must apply to seek this degree. Students may pursue the B.F.A. by being accepted either into studio or into art education. The studio program requires a concentration in one of the following areas: drawing, painting, or printmaking, graphic design, interior design, photography, textiles, or three-dimensional studies (ceramics or sculpture). Acceptance to a concentration is determined by application and portfolio review following completion of the art core sequence. Students should consult with the undergraduate area coordinator in their area of interest for details.

Portfolios and applications are reviewed fall and spring semesters on Portfolio Review Day. Students should check with the School of Art & Design office for information about Portfolio Review Day.

Admission to Art Education B.F.A.

The Art Education program offers two tracks for students to develop their teaching skills. One track is the traditional model of art teacher preparation with a focus on students meeting the certification requirements for K-12 teaching in the state of Georgia. Another option for study in Art Education has a focus on preparing students to teach in a community-based arts organization or museum. The primary difference in the student’s experience will be the setting in which they complete most of their observation hours, practicum, and internship. Otherwise, developing effective methods for teaching art is the goal for both programs.

Application to the B.F.A. program in Art Education should occur upon completion of the 18 semester hours required in Area F as well as the introductory art education course (AE 4200). Admission to the major takes place at the mid point of the second semester in the program during which students are taking AE 4400 Media, Technology, and Visual Presentation.

To apply to the Art Education certification track, students must have:

  • passed the portfolio review of artwork professionally presented in an electronic portfolio or PowerPoint
  • received at least “Good” in all dispositional ratings
  • earned a 2.5 overall cumulative GPA
  • earned a 3.0 GPA in all art content courses
  • passed [Combined Test I, II, and III (700)] or been exempted from the GACE Program Admission Assessment. When registering for the assessment, program entry candidates must add their program provider (Georgia State University – school code 5090) as a score recipient when registering or we will not receive notification of completion of the assessment
  • provided proof of completing the Georgia Educator Ethics – Program Entry (350) Assessment, although there is no Pass/Fail grade assigned. Program entry candidates must add their program provider (Georgia State University) as a score recipient when registering or we will not receive notification of completion of the assessment

To apply to the Art Education non-certification community-based teaching track, students must have:

  • passed the portfolio review of artwork professionally presented in an electronic portfolio or PowerPoint
  • received at least “Good” in all dispositional ratings
  • earned a 2.5 overall cumulative GPA
  • earned a 3.0 GPA in all art content courses
  • submitted an essay detailing goals and reasons for wishing to teach in a community-based program

Guidelines for the Entry-to-the-Major Review will be distributed during Art Education courses and posted in the Art Education area. Art Education faculty will assist students in preparing their pre-teaching certification and portfolio requirements for admission. In the event that a student is not accepted into the Art Education certification track, or is accepted with pending status, the student will not be allowed to take any further Art Education courses until the issue for admission to the major is resolved. If the issue cannot be resolved within the second semester of the program students may elect to complete a degree in Art Education with a focus on community-based art education settings or museums, which does not lead to a teaching certification, or consider other degree options. In the community-based track, students complete the last ten hours of the Art Education program in an alternative teaching setting rather than in public schools.

Admission to Studio B.F.A.

Upon completion of the 18 semester hours required in Area F and prior to completion of 15 additional semester hours, each student who wishes to seek a B.F.A. in Studio must submit an application and pass a portfolio review for acceptance into a major concentration. Applications to concentrate in a discipline are available in the School of Art & Design office and are reviewed fall and spring semesters on Portfolio Review Day scheduled prior to Phase I registration (Graphic Design Portfolio Review is held at the end of Spring Semester only and Interior Design Portfolio Review is held at the end of the Fall semester only). Students should meet with the area coordinator in the concentration they are considering one semester before they apply for the concentration. In the event that a student is not accepted into the concentration, the student should see the Office of Academic Assistance to explore other options.

Program Academic Regulations

Evaluation of transfer credits should be completed during the first semester of attendance at the university by the School of Art and Design.

Program Degree Requirements

Art students should seek regular advisement from the Office of Academic Assistance or the University Advisement Center. Once accepted into a Bachelor of Fine Arts concentration, students should seek advisement from the Area Coordinator for that concentration. Students in the B.F.A. degree program should declare their intention to pursue a B.F.A. degree to the Office of Academic Assistance in the College of the Arts or the University Advisement Center when they initiate their Area F requirements. Students intending to pursue the B.F.A. should enroll in two Area F courses during their first semester and should continue taking two Area F courses each semester until those courses are completed. Upon completion of the Area F requirements and prior to completion of 15 additional hours in art, students who intend to pursue the B.F.A. degree program must submit an application and portfolio to the concentration faculty for review and approval. In order to facilitate advisement, students in the Bachelor of Arts degree program should declare their major and area of concentration (studio or art history) prior to completion of their Area F courses.

A grade of C- or higher is required for all Studio and Art History courses in Area G. Bachelor of Art Studio majors must satisfy the world language requirement to the 1002 level with a passing grade of D or higher. For Art Education a grade of B and a GPA of 3.0 or higher is required in all art content courses.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of the Arts Degree Requirements (see section 10030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

Graduation with Distinction

This Welch School of Art and Design offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the School of Art & Design for the specific criteria for this honor.

Program Financial Information

Lab fees will be assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. For more information, please feel free to contact the school or review GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.

B.A. in Art

Areas A-E: Core Curriculum Recommendations

Area B: Recommended courses: Cross-cultural Art History courses may be offered in this area as sections of PERS 2001 Perspectives in Comparative Culture (2), or PERS 2003 Perspectives on Human Expression (2).

Area C: Recommended courses: Either AH 1700 Survey of Art I, AH 1750 Survey of Art II, or AH 1850 Survey of Art III to maximize the opportunity to take elective courses in Art History.

Art History Concentration

All Art History students are required to meet with the area coordinator for assignment of a faculty advisor.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)
1. Required Courses (15):

  1. World language (French or German recommended) (9):*
    • World language at the 1002 level (3)
    • World language at the 2001 level (3)
    • World language at the 2002 level (3)
    b. Select two of the following Art History courses (6):

    • AH 1700 Survey of Art I: Western Art from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (3)
    • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present (3)
    • AH 1850 Survey of Art III: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)

2. Select an additional elective course recommended below to complete 18 hours in Area F:

    Art History (Select course not completed in Area C or above: (3)
  • AH 1700 Survey of Art I: Western Art from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (3)
  • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present (3)
  • AH 1850 Survey of Art III: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)

If all three 1000-level Art History courses have been taken Art Studio (1000-level) (3)

* The School of Art & Design requires that art history students complete the world language 1002, 2001, 2002 sequence. (See “World Language Requirement for B.A. and B.I.S. degrees,” previously described.)

Area G: Major Courses (30)

  1. AH 3000 Introduction to Art Historical Methodology-CTW (3)
  2. Distribution Requirement: Select at least one course from each of the following categories (12):
    1. Ancient and Medieval
      • AH 4025 Art of Egypt and the Near East (3)
      • AH 4120 Art and Architecture of Ancient Rome (3)
      • AH 4200 Art and Architecture of the Middle Ages (3)
      • AH 4630 Pre-Columbian Art (3)
    2. Early Modern
      • AH 4310 Art of Northern Europe in the Renaissance Era (3)
      • AH 4320 Italian Renaissance Art: The Age of Humanism (3)
      • AH 4400 Baroque Art (3)
      • AH 4450 Eighteenth-Century European Art (3)
    3. Modern and Contemporary
      • AH 4500 Nineteenth-Century European Art (3)
      • AH 4600 Modern Architecture (3)
      • AH 4610 20th Century Art of Europe & US  (3)
      • AH 4700 Contemporary Art: Theory and Criticism (3)
      • Also counting for this area with permission of advisor:
        • AH 4030 Contemporary African Art (3)
        • AH 4620 African-American Art (3)
        • AH 4650 American Art (3)
        • AH 4720 Feminist Issues in Contemporary Art (3)
    4. Global South
      • AH 4000 African Art (3)
      • AH 4030 Contemporary African Art (3)
      • AH 4620 African-American Art (3)
      • AH 4685 Memory & Identity in Latin American Art (3)
      • Also counting for this area with permission of advisor:
    5. Other Art History courses that may be chosen to satisfy the distribution requirement in consultation with a departmental adviser are:
      • AH 4660 Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Art in Latin America (3)
      • AH 4690 Asian Art (3)
      • AH 4750 Women Artists (3)
      • AH 4800 Special Studies Lecture (3)*
      • AH 4900 Special Studies Seminar (3)*
      • AH 4930 Art History Internship (3) (may be taken only once)
      • AH 4980 Special Problems (3)*
      • Cross-disciplinary Art History Seminars (PHOT 3910, TEXT 3910, and GRD 3910). No more than two cross-disciplinary seminars may count towards degree requirements.

* May be taken more than once

  1. Select four additional Art History courses from the courses listed in Area G2. (12)
  2. Select one more Art or Art History course. This course must be an Art Studio, if not already taken. (3)

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

  1. Select additional courses to complete a minimum of 120 hours.
  2. Students in art history are not required to take a minor, although they may complete one if they so choose.

Dual B.A. in Art (Art History Concentration) / M.A. in Art History

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts with an Art History concentration and Master of Arts in Art History. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the school and College of the Arts to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following the college’s processes, though  GRE scores are not required for admission into the M.A. in Art History if applying through the dual degree program. All students accepted into the master’s program via the Dual Degree program are only allowed to pursue the non-thesis track.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at http://artdesign.gsu.edu.

Studio Concentration

Areas A-E: Core Curriculum Recommendations

  1. Students may select one art history survey in Area C.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (6):
    1. World language at the 1002 level or higher (3)
    2. Select one of the following Art History courses (3):
      • AH 1700 Survey of Art I: Western Art from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (3)
      • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present (3)
      • AH 1850 Survey of Art III: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)
      c. Studio Foundations (12)

Area G: Major Courses (45)

In order to graduate, students must have taken the one CTW course required for this concentration (ART 3910These courses should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

  1. AH 2000 Survey of Art Since 1900 (3)
  2. ART 3910 Critical Issues in Contemporary Art-CTW (3)
  3. Three Art History 3000/4000-level elective (9)
  4. Complete 19-21 hours in 2000/4000-level courses from among four different studio disciplines. Note: 3000/4000-level studio courses vary from three to four credit hours. Only one 2000-level course is allowed.
  5. Studio Concentration (3000/4000 level, select from one discipline previously studied) (6-8)
  6. ART 4500 Directed Study in Art (3)

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

Students seeking the B.A. in Studio Art are not required to take a minor, although they may complete one if they so choose.

B.F.A. in Art Education

Areas A-E: Core Curriculum Recommendations

  1. Area B: Cross-cultural Art History courses may be offered in this area as sections of PERS 2001 Perspectives in Comparative Culture (2) or PERS 2003 Perspectives on Human Expression (2).
  2. Area C: Students may select one Art History survey in Area C.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Studio Requirements (12)
  2. Art History Requirements (6)
    1. Select one course in addition, if any were taken in Area C. (3)
      • AH 1700 Survey of Art I: Western Art from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (3)
      • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present (3)
      • AH 1850 Survey of Art III: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)
    2. AH 2000 Survey of Art Since 1900 (3)

See “Admission to Art Education B.F.A.” above for complete admission requirements. Once admitted to the Art Education program, students should maintain continual contact with the school and should submit an “Intent to Student Teach” form for the following year. Failure to submit the “Intent to Student Teach” form may result in a delay in student teaching placement and graduation.

Area G: Major Courses

A grade of C- or higher must be earned in all required courses, a grade of B- or higher is required in all Art Education courses, and a GPA of 3.0 is required for all art content courses.

In order to graduate, students must have taken one CTW courses required for this concentration (AE 4200). This course should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

Art Education Certification Track: (67)

  1. Required Education Courses (12)
    • EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical & Contemporary Issues in Education (3)
    • EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts (3)
    • EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning & Teaching (3)
    • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  2. Required Art History and Studio Courses (27-29)
      1. Art History
        • Two 3000-4000 level AH electives or one 1000-level survey not taken in Area C or F2.a (recommended), and one AH 3000-4000 level (6)
      2. Art Studio
        • 3DS 3050 Hand Building I (3)
        • DPP 3000 Life Drawing (3)
        • DPP 3200 Painting with Water-Based Media (3)
        • 3DS 3000 Introduction to Sculpture (3)
        • Select one:
          • DPP 3200 Painting with Water-Based Media (3)
          • DPP 3300 Painting with Oil-Based Media (3)
          • PHOT 3000 Introduction to Photography (3)
          • DPP 3050 Introduction to Printmaking (3)
        • Select two additional courses in one area to satisfy the 24-hour requirement of a studio art concentration. (6-8)
  3. Required Art Education Courses (25)
    • AE 4200 Art for Preschool through Fifth Grade (3)
    • AE 4300 Art for Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
    • AE 4400 Media, Technology, and Visual Presentation (3)
    • AE 4600 Teaching Practicum (4)  (This course requires a large number of hours spent in observations in schools off campus, so schedules and transportation must be arranged accordingly.)
    • AE 4650 Opening School Experience (0)
    • AE 4750, AE 4760, AE 4770, and AE 4780 (Student Teaching) (12)
  4. Select additional courses to complete a minimum of 127 hours. ART 4980 Special Problems (1-6), may be used in order to meet the specified requirements. Consent of Art Education Area Coordinator and instructor required.

Art Education Non-Certification Community-based Teaching Track: (63)

  1. Required Education Courses (12)
    • EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical & Contemporary Issues in Education (3)
    • EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts (3)
    • EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning & Teaching (3)
    • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  2. Required Art History and Studio Courses (27-29)
      1. Art History
        • Two 3000-4000 level AH electives or one 1000-level survey not taken in Area C or F2.a (recommended), and one AH 3000-4000 level (6)
      2. Art Studio
        • 3DS 3050 Hand Building I (3)
        • DPP 3000 Life Drawing (3)
        • DPP 3200 Painting with Water-Based Media (3)
        • 3DS 3000 Introduction to Sculpture (3)
        • Select One:
          • DPP 3200 Painting with Water-Based Media (3)
          • DPP 3300 Painting with Oil-Based Media (3)
          • PHOT 3000 Introduction to Photography (3)
          • DPP 3050 Introduction to Printmaking (3)
        • Select two additional courses in one area to satisfy the 24-hour requirement of a studio art concentration. (6-8)
  3. Required Art Education Courses (18)
    • AE 4200 Art for Preschool through Fifth Grade (3)
    • AE 4300 Art for Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
    • AE 4400 Media, Technology, and Visual Presentation (3)
    • AE 4000 Selected Topics: Art Education (3)  (This course requires a large number of hours spent in observations in community-art organizations, so schedules and transportation must be arranged accordingly.)
    • AE 4800 and AE 4810 Community Arts Internship/Seminar (6)
  4. Select additional courses to complete a minimum of 123 hours. ART 4980 Special Problems (1-6), may be used in order to meet the specified requirements. Consent of Art Education Area Coordinator and instructor required.

Minors

Students seeking the B.F.A. in Art Education may not seek a minor.

Application for Entry into Teacher Education

Prior to being approved for entry into the program, art education students must meet professional requirements and standards, including but not limited to displaying professional dispositions and attitudes, the ability to speak in public, professional ethics, and strong content knowledge, as listed in the “Teacher Preparation” chapter of this catalog. Students are evaluated throughout the Art Education program, and their progress is noted during the Entry-to-the-Art-Education-Major and Pre-Student-Teaching Reviews. If students fail to pass benchmark reviews, they may not be allowed to progress to the next course until they demonstrate the competencies in question. Students are also required to have a 2.5 overall cumulative GPA and to have passed the GACE Program Admission Assessment exam. See “Admission to Art Education B.F.A.” above for complete admission requirements.

Upon admission to a teacher education program, students will be contacted by the Office of Academic Assistance Office with instructions to claim enrollment in their program and submit a GaPSC Pre-Service Certificate Application. The pre-service certificate is required for placement in required field experiences or clinical practice. Due to the sequence of course offerings, the student’s program of study will be delayed for another year if the candidate does not have a pre-service certification by the mid-point of the second semester of art education coursework in AE 4400.

Pre-Student-Teaching Review

One semester prior to student teaching, all student teaching applicants will practice their teaching at a local community school art class before their official student-teaching semester, regardless of whether the applicants have previous teaching experiences or not. Prior to being approved for student teaching, all Art Education students must have met all criteria for entry to the major, and have earned a grade of B- or higher in all art education courses, with a 3.0 GPA for all art courses. Art Education faculty members will review applications according to the teacher certification standards. Students must submit a form declaring their “Intent to Student Teach” immediately upon admission to the Art Education Teacher Education program. Failure to submit the “Intent to Student Teach” form may result in a delay in student teaching placement and graduation. For details about the Pre-Student-Teaching Review, students should contact their Art Education advisor.

Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators (GACE)

The state of Georgia requires such candidates to take various GACE and Educator Ethics assessments as part of the educator certification process. These computer-delivered assessments have been developed by the Georgia Professional Standards Commission (GaPSC) and are delivered by the Education Testing Service (ETS). You will take these tests at different times.

Program Admission and Content Assessments

Program Admission Assessment [Combined Test I, II, and III (700)] is an admission requirement (unless candidate meets qualifications for exemption – scroll down to “Options to Satisfy the Program Admission Assessment Requirement”). When registering for the assessment, program entry candidates must add their program provider (Georgia State University – school code 5090) as a score recipient when registering or we will not receive notification of completion of the assessment.

Content Assessment (different content assessments for each program) tests your content knowledge and is taken after enrollment and prior to program completion. You will receive specific information regarding this test as you near completion of your program (required for certification).

Georgia Educator Ethics Assessment

Georgia Educator Ethics – Program Entry (350) Assessment is an admission requirement. Completion of this assessment is required for admission, although there is no “Pass/Fail” grade assigned. Program entry candidates must add their program provider (Georgia State University) as a score recipient when registering or we will not receive notification that you have completed the assessment.
Georgia Educator Ethics – Program Exit (360) Assessment is taken after enrollment and prior to program completion. You will receive specific information regarding this test as you near completion of your program (required for certification).

Student Teaching

The Art Education program and the Office of Field Placements (housed in the College of Education and Human Development) will place each student with two placements—elementary and secondary—during the semester of student teaching. Student teaching involves full participation by the students for at least one full academic term. Because student teaching constitutes a full load of academic credit, it is recommended that the students attempt neither regular employment nor other courses during the term of student teaching.

Students electing to complete their Art Education degree in the community-art teaching track will complete a practicum and internship experience at an approved arts organization.

edTPA

edTPA is a preservice assessment process designed by educators to answer the essential question: “Is a new teacher ready for the job?” edTPA includes a review of a teacher candidate’s authentic teaching materials as the culmination of a teaching and learning process that documents and demonstrates each candidate’s ability to effectively teach their subject matter to all students. edTPA is a program completion and teacher certification requirement. Students may graduate from the Art Education program while continuing to complete teacher certification requirements for edTPA.

B.F.A. in Studio

See the Program Admission requirements at the beginning of this section.

Areas A-E: Core Curriculum Recommendations

  1. Area B: Cross-cultural art history courses may be offered in this area as sections of PERS 2001 Perspectives in Comparative Culture (2) or PERS 2003 Perspectives on Human Expression (2).
  2. Area C: Students may select one Art History survey in Area C.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major Field (18)

  1. Studio Requirements (12)
  2. Art History Requirements (6)
    1. Select one course in addition to any taken in Area C. (3)
      • AH 1700 Survey of Art I: Western Art from Antiquity to the Middle Ages (3)
      • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present (3)
      • AH 1850 Survey of Art III: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas (3)
    2. AH 2000 Survey of Art Since 1900 (3)

Drawing, Painting, and Printmaking (DPP) Concentration

The following courses are required in Area G for students who are accepted into the Drawing, Painting, and Printmaking (DPP) concentration. Prospective students should attend the DPP orientation/group advisement offered once each fall. ART 4980, Special Problems (1-6), may be used to adjust program in order to meet the 60-hour requirement. Consent of the Area Coordinator and instructor are required. Acceptance to the DPP concentration is determined by application and portfolio review following completion of at least two DPP 3000-level courses from the art core sequence listed below.

In order to graduate, students must have taken the CTW course required for this concentration (ART 3910). These courses should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Concentration Core Requirements (9)
  2. ART 3910 Critical Issues in Contemporary Art-CTW (3)
  3. Art History: Select one course (3)
    • AH 4610 20th Century Art of Europe & US  (3)
    • AH 4700 Contemporary Art: Theory and Criticism (3)
  4. Art and Art History Electives: any 4000-level art history course and/or one to two 3000/4000-level studio courses outside Drawing, Painting, and Printmaking (6-8)
  5. ART 3400 Space, Scale, Time: Digital Possibilities (3)
  6. Areas of Emphasis
    Students must elect to follow the Drawing and Painting emphasis or the Printmaking emphasis. Each program of study is described below.

    1. Drawing and Painting Emphasis Requirements (35-36)
      • The following courses are required in Area G for students who are accepted into the Drawing and Painting emphasis (16).
        • DPP 3200 Painting with Water-Based Media (3)
        • DPP 3300 Painting with Oil-Based Media (3)
        • DPP 3600 Drawing Research (4)
        • DPP 4940 Portfolio I (3)
        • DPP 4950 Portfolio II-CTW (3) fulfills CTW exit level requirement
      • Select from below for a total of 16 hours: (Students should register for these courses a combined total of 4 times.)
        • DPP 3900 Selected Topics in Drawing and Painting (4-8)
        • DPP 4500 Directed Study in Drawing and Painting (8-12)
      • Select one course from below (3-4): (Note: if 6 credit hours were taken in area 4, must take 4 credit hours here)
    2. Printmaking Emphasis Requirements (36)
      • The following courses are required in Area G for students who are accepted into the Printmaking emphasis. (18)
        • DPP 3150 Intaglio/Etching and Lithography (4)
        • DPP 3250 Screen Print and Experimental Printmaking (4)
        • DPP 4500 Directed Study in Drawing and Painting (4)
        • DPP 4940 Portfolio I (3)
        • DPP 4950 Portfolio II-CTW (3)
      • Select from below for a total of 12 hours: (Students should register for these courses a combined total of 4 times.)
        • DPP 3900 Selected Topics in Drawing and Painting (4-8)
        • DPP 4550 Directed Study in Printmaking (4-8)
      • Select one course from below (3)
      • Select one course from below (3)
        • DPP 3200 Painting with Water-Based Media (3)
        • DPP 3300 Painting with Oil-Based Media (3)

Graphic Design Concentration

The following courses are required in Area G for students who wish to pursue the Graphic Design concentration. Graphic Design courses must be taken in the order listed below. Prospective students should attend a Graphic Design orientation/group advisement offered once each fall. Graphic design course work should begin fall semester of the sophomore year. Additional information about the Graphic Design program is available on the School of Art & Design website at http://artdesign.gsu.edu/undergraduate/bfa-in-studio-concentration/graphic-design/. Students who are not enrolled in Graphic Design courses for more than one semester, during the junior or senior sequences, are required to resubmit an entrance portfolio for review and acceptance.

In order to graduate, students must have taken the CTW course required for this concentration (GRD 3910). This course should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Sophomore Requirements (9)
    1. Sophomore Level (fall) (6)
      • GRD 3000 Introduction to Graphic Design (3)
      • GRD 3150 Introduction to Typography (3)
    2. Sophomore Level (spring) (3)
      • GRD 3200 Intermediate Graphic Design (3)
  2. BFA Entrance Review
  3. Concentration Requirements (42)
    1. Junior Level (fall) (9)
    2. Junior Level (spring) (12)
      • GRD 3910 History of Graphic Design-CTW (3)
      • GRD 4150 Collateral Design for Print Applications (3)
      • GRD 4250 Graphic Design in Popular Culture (3)
      • GRD 4300 Internship in Graphic Design (3)
      • GRD 4400 Design for Film and Television (3)
    3. Senior Level (fall) (9)
      • GRD 4200 Corporate Identity Design (3)
      • GRD 4350 Graphic Design through Advertising (3)
      • GRD 4450 Professional Practices in Graphic Design (3)
    4. Senior Level (spring) (9)
      • GRD 4550 Specialized Applications of Graphic Design (3)
      • GRD 4600 Senior Workshop in Graphic Design (3)
      • GRD 4950 Graphic Design Portfolio-CTW (3)
    5. Select two electives from the list below; other business, marketing, or art courses taken during the B.F.A. curriculum may apply with approval of Area Coordinator. (6)
    6. Select one AH 4000-level Art History (3)
    7. Senior B.F.A. Exit Portfolio Review
    8. Participation in B.F.A. Senior Group Exhibition

Interior Design Concentration

The following courses are required in Area G for students who wish to pursue the Interior Design concentration. Interior Design courses should be taken in the order listed below. Interior Design course work should begin fall semester of the sophomore year. Additional information about the Interior Design program is available in the School of Art & Design. Prospective students should also attend an Interior Design orientation/group advisement offered once each Fall. ART 4980, Special Problems (1-6), may be used to adjust program in order to meet the 60-hour requirement. Consent of the Area Coordinator and instructor required. Students who are not enrolled in Interior Design courses for more than one semester, during the junior or senior sequences, are required to resubmit an entrance portfolio for review and acceptance.

Students pursuing a degree in Interior Design are advised that the educational requirements vary in each state regarding the profession of interior designer.

In order to graduate, students must have taken the CTW course required for this concentration (ID 3910). This course should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Sophomore Level (fall) Requirements in Area G prior to Portfolio Review for acceptance into Interior Design concentration (9)
    1. Sophomore Level (spring)
      • ID 3000 Drafting (3)
      • ID 3300 Interior Design: Theory (3)
      • ID 3910 History of Interior Design I: Antiquities to the Nineteenth Century (3)
  2.  B.F.A. Entrance Portfolio Review at the end of Fall semester
  3. Upper Level Area G Requirements for accepted Interior Design students (36)
      1. Sophomore Level (spring) (13)
        • ID 3350 Interior Design: Materials (3)
        • ID 3500 Interior Design: Spatial Organization (3)
        • ID 3600 Building Systems and Codes (2)
        • ID 3920 History of Interior Design II: Nineteenth Century to Present (3)
        • ID 3250 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design (2)
      2. Junior Level (fall) (7)
        • ID 4100 Lighting Design (2)
        • ID 4200 Residential Design I (3)
        • ID 4350 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design II (2)
      3. Junior Level (spring) (5)
        • ID 4300 Commercial Design (3)
        • ID 4400 Computer-Aided Drafting and Design III (2)
      4. Senior Level (fall) (6)
        • ID 4000 Interior Design: Selected Topics: (3)
        • ID 4940 Interior Design Portfolio I (3)
      5. Senior Level (spring) (5)
        • ID 4800 Professional Practice (2)
        • ID 4950 Interior Design Portfolio II-CTW (3)
  4. Select one 4000-level Art History and one 3000-level studio elective, or select two studio electives (6):
    Interior Design studios listed below are recommended and may be repeated for a maximum of six credit hours.

    • ID 4000 Selected Topics (3)
    • ID 4500 Directed Study (3)
    • ID 4930 Interior Design Internship (3-6) Recommended for summer between junior/senior level and continuing into fall of senior year.
  5. Upper level ID students should discuss elective options with their assigned ID Area Coordinator to plan and schedule adequate electives (9) to meet total 60-hour requirement in Area G. Recommended elective courses include:
  6. Senior Portfolio Review
  7. Senior Exhibition

Photography Concentration

The following courses are required in Area G for students who are accepted into the Photography Concentration. Prospective students should attend the Photography orientation/group advisement offered once each fall. ART 4980 Special Problems (1-6) may be used to adjust program in order to meet the 60-hour requirement. Consent of faculty advisor and instructor required.

In order to graduate, students must have taken the CTW course required for this concentration (ART 3910). This course should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. ART 3910 Critical Issues in Contemporary Art-CTW (3)
  2. Concentration Requirements (38)
  3. Select one Art History course at the 4000 level (consult Area Coordinator) (3)
  4. Select four studio courses at the 3000/4000 level (consult Area Coordinator) (9-16).
    Recommended courses:

  5. ART 3400 Space, Scale, Time: Digital Possibilities (3)

Textiles Concentration

The following courses are required in Area G for students who are accepted into the Textiles Concentration. Prospective students should attend the Textiles orientation/group advisement offered once each fall. ART 4980 Special Problems (1-6) may be used to adjust program in order to meet the 60-hour requirement. Consent of Area Coordinator and instructor required.

In order to graduate, students must have taken the CTW courses required for this concentration (ART 3910). This course should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Concentration Requirements (42)
  2. ART 3910 Critical Issues in Contemporary Art-CTW (3)
  3. Textiles Elective: Select two courses (8)
  4. Select one 3000/4000-level studio (4)
    • DPP 3150 Intaglio/Etching and Lithography (4)
    • DPP 3250 Screen Print and Experimental Printmaking (4)
    • 3DS 3000 Introduction to Sculpture (3)
    • TEXT 3300 Fibers, Fabrics, and Forms (3)
  5. ART 3400 Space, Scale, Time: Digital Possibilities (3)

Three-Dimensional Studies Concentration (emphasis in Ceramics or Sculpture)

The following courses are required in Area G for students who are accepted into the Three-Dimensional Studies Concentration, which includes an emphasis in Ceramics or Sculpture. Prospective students should attend the Three-Dimensional Studies orientation/group advisement offered once each fall.

In order to graduate, students must have taken the CTW course required for this concentration (ART 3910). This course should be taken at the appropriate time, as described below.

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Concentration Core Requirements (9)
  2. ART 3910 Critical Issues in Contemporary Art-CTW (3)
  3. Two-Dimensional Studio Elective (3-4). Select one 3000/4000-level course from the following disciplines:
  4. Three Dimensional Studies (3DS) studio Elective (3-4)
  5. Select one 4000-level Art History (3)
  6. ART 3400 Space, Scale, Time: Digital Possibilities (3)
  7. Area of Emphasis
    Students must elect to follow an emphasis in Ceramics or Sculpture. Each program of study is described below. ART 4980, Special Problems (1-6), may be used to adjust program in order to meet the 60-hour requirement. Consent of Area Coordinator and instructor required.

    1. Ceramics Emphasis Requirements (34-36)
    2. Sculpture Emphasis Requirements (34-36)

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

Students seeking a B.F.A. may not seek a minor due to the focused nature of the B.F.A. degree.

Senior Portfolio Review and Exhibition

Recommendation for graduation with a B.F.A. degree in a studio concentration requires the presentation of a body of work. This includes work completed as part of portfolio courses. B.F.A. candidates who successfully complete portfolio courses 4950 are required to participate in the B.F.A. Senior Group Exhibition.

As an additional condition of graduation for Graphic Design and Interior Design students, a final portfolio of student work includes portfolio course 4950 projects(s), is to be submitted for review and approval by a Senior Exit Review Committee comprised of area faculty.

Art Education students may participate in the B.F.A. Senior Group Exhibition. Artwork from a student’s final portfolio will be recommended by faculty for submission to the exhibition.

Minor in Art or Art History

Students pursuing non-art degrees may take a minor in Art or Art History. The Art Minor is an 18 credit hour program consisting of two 1000-level studio courses, one 1000-level Art History course, two 3000- or 4000-level studio courses, and either one 3000- or 4000-level Art History course or one cross-disciplinary Art History course (3DS 3920, GRD 3910, ID 3910, ID 3920, PHOT 3910, TEXT 3910).

The Art History Minor is an 18 credit hour program consisting of three 1000-level Art History courses and three 3000- or 4000-level Art History courses. A grade of C- or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

10200 Arts Administration – Speech and Theatre

Program Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies with a Concentration in Arts Administration — Speech and Theatre

The purpose of this program is to provide a broad-based knowledge of the fine arts and business in order to prepare students for managerial positions in the fine arts areas. This program should allow the student with an interest in the arts to develop widely marketable skills. Please contact the School of Film, Media & Theatre or faculty advisement in the program.

Program Admission

A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required in order to apply to the program. Application materials can be obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance. Students should apply to the program by the time they have earned 42 credit hours to avoid a delay in graduation.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 10030.20 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of the Arts Degree Requirements (see section 10030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

Courses used to fulfill the two Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) courses for each B.I.S. program will not count towards the rules of Area G — no more than three to four 3-4 credit hour courses (12 hours) from a single discipline — nor of Area H — no more than two 3-4 credit hour courses (6-8 hours) can be taken within a single discipline.

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Course (15)

Area G: Area of Concentration — Speech and Theatre (27)

No more than three to four 3-4 credit hour courses (12 hours) can be taken within a single discipline.

  1. Required Course to fulfill CTW requirement (Choose one)(3)
  2. Required Courses (9)
    • Choose one: SCOM 3450 Nonverbal Communication (3) or SCOM 4500 Visual Communication (3)
    • PMAP 3210 Introduction to Nonprofits (3)
    • MUA 3930 Music, Society, and Culture (3) or [MTM 3010 Introduction to the Music Industry (3)
  3. Select one Art History course at the 4000 level.
  4. Select two additional courses at the 3000/4000 level in Speech and two additional courses at the 3000/4000 level in Theatre for which the prerequisite has been met. No more than 12 hours from one discipline.

Area H: Allied Field (21)

No more than two 3-4 credit hour courses (6-8 hours) can be taken within a single discipline.

  1. Required Courses (9)
    • JOUR 3500 Introduction to Public Relations Techniques(3)
    • PMAP 3231 Nonprofit Leadership and Management (3)
    • Choose one: BCOM 3950 Business Communication and Professional Development (3) or SCOM 3060 Communication Law and Regulation (3)
  2. Required Courses (6)
  3. Select two courses (6)
    • ENGL 4510 Grant and Proposal Writing (3)
    • JOUR 3560 Public Relations Writing and Projects (3)
    • SCOM 3010 Advanced Public Speaking (3)

Area J: Electives

Electives are used to build the hours in Areas G-J to 60 hours, have 39 hours at Georgia State University taken at the 3000-4000 level for residency, and complete 120 hours required for graduation.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This program offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the program director for the specific criteria for this honor.

10300 Film and Media

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Arts in Film and Media
  • Dual B.A. in Film and Media Studies/ M.A. in Communication, Film and Media Concentration

School of Film, Media & Theatre
10th Floor, 25 Park Place

Greg Smith, Director
Phil Lewis, Associate Director
The Film and Media major is devoted to the interdisciplinary study of film, television, and new media. Courses focus on the histories and theories of cinematic, electronic, and digital media in addition to providing the opportunity for hands-on experience in film/media production. Students work closely with faculty members to devise an optimum program of study integrating creative and collaborative thinking, critical analysis, primary research, and media production.

The curriculum invites students to discover how meanings circulate through the conventions and alternative practices specific to various media and their institutions. Courses in the major also pay close attention to the broader cultural, social, industrial, and aesthetic contexts out of which media representations emerge. This liberal arts approach to film, television, and new media provides the student with the necessary skills and knowledge to adapt to the changing media environment of the 21st century. The major equips students for active and critical participation in contemporary visual culture.

Internships are available in the Atlanta metro area and beyond. A flexible curriculum has been configured to enable students to pursue interests in production, historical and critical studies, industries and contemporary culture, and screenwriting. Students graduating with a Film and Media major are prepared to succeed in film/media production, in media industries, or in graduate study.

Major Eligibility Requirements

To be eligible for the Film and Media major and to enroll in 3000-4000 level Film and Media courses (i.e., FLME courses), students must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete [FLME 1010] and FLME 2700 with a minimum grade of C, but a combined grade-point average of 2.5 or better for these two classes.
  • This GPA will be calculated based on the first attempt at these FLME courses at Georgia State University. The University’s Repeat to Replace Policy may not be used to fulfill this requirement. WFs counts as an attempt. Transfer students who transfer these course(s) into Georgia State, may use the grades in the transferred course(s) to calculate the GPA or they may attempt them once at Georgia State.

Once a student is eligible to take 3000- and 4000-level Film and Media courses, they remain eligible to take them as long as they are eligible to enroll at Georgia State University.

College and University Degree Requirements

In addition to the Major Eligibility Requirements for Film and Media, students must fulfill the College of the Arts Degree Requirements (see section 10030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

B.A. in Film and Media

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. World language at the 1002 level or higher (3)
    (See “World Language Requirement for B.A. and B.I.S. Majors,” previously described.)
  2. Required Courses (minimum grade of C is required). (6)
    • FLME 1010 Film Aesthetics and Analysis (3)*
    • FLME 2700 History of the Motion Picture (3)*
  3. Select additional elective courses from the following to complete 18 hours in Are F:
    • AAS 1140/HIST 1140 Introduction to African and African-American History and Culture
    • AAS 2010 Introduction to African-American Studies
    • AH 1700 Survey of Art I: Western Art from Antiquity to the Middle Ages
    • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present
    • AH 1850 Survey of Art III: Art of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas
    • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics
    • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics
    • ENGL 2120 British Literature
    • ENGL 2130 American Literature
    • FLME 2000 Introduction to Film Genres
    • FLME 2800 Introduction to On-Set Production
    • FLME 2801 Georgia Film Academy Internship
    • HIST 1111 Survey of World History to 1500
    • HIST 1112 Survey of World History since 1500
    • HIST 2110 Survey of United States History
    • JOUR 2500 Foundations of Media Research
    • MUA 1500 Jazz: Its Origins, Styles, and Influence
    • MUA 1900 Dramatic Music from the Renaissance through the Twentieth Century
    • MUA 1930 Music, Society, and Culture
    • PHIL 2010 Introduction to Philosophy
    • POLS 2101 Introduction to Political Science
    • POLS 2401 Global Issues
    • PSYC 1101 Introduction to General Psychology
    • SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology
    • SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems
    • SCOM 1500 Public Speaking
    • THEA 2040 Introduction to the Theatre
    • WGSS 2010 Introduction to Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies
    • World language 1001 (if no previous experience with language)
    • World Lang 2001
    • World Lang 2002­

* Students must have a combined 2.5 grade-point average in these two Area F courses to be eligible for the B.A. program in Film and Media and to take 3000- and 4000-level FLME courses. (See B. A. Program Eligibility Requirements.)

Area G: Major Courses (24)

A grade of C- or higher is required in all major courses.

  1. Select one of the following courses to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
  2. Required course (3):
  3. Electives:
    Select a sufficient number of the following courses to bring the course total to the 24 credit hours which complete the major.

*Students must obtain consent of instructor for FLME 4125, 4130, 4150, 4165, 4780, 4870, 4880, 4890 and 4915.

** Students must apply in the school before obtaining an internship for credit.

Area H: Minor and Additional Courses

  1. Students majoring in Film and Media must select a minor consisting of at least 15 hours of courses in an academic department/school/institute that offers a baccalaureate degree. At least nine semester hours of minor courses must be at the 3000 level or above, unless otherwise specified by the minor-granting department/school/institute. A grade of C- or higher is required in all minor courses. Students who are double majoring in Film and Media and another area are still required to have a minor.

Minor in Film and Media

Students who wish to minor in Film and Media must take 15-18 hours in the specific area, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Students taking more than 15 hours in courses in the specific area may count the additional hours toward their electives or may consider completing a double major. A grade of C- or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor. Students wishing to take 3000- and 4000-level Film and Media (i.e., FLME) courses as part of a minor must first request school registration approval.

Dual B.A. in Film and Media/ M.A. in Communication, Film and Media Concentration

The school offers a dual B.A. in Film and Media / M.A. in Communication with a concentration in Film and Media. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and count the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the Dual Degree program by the school and the College of the Arts to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the Dual Degree program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Critical Thinking Through Writing Requirement

As of summer 2015, all students are required to complete one Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) course as part of the major. The university formerly required two CTW courses. Students following previous catalog requirements who have passed one CTW course in the major should consult with their senior academic advisor to determine which courses may be used as a substitution for the other formerly required CTW course.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This school offers undergraduate students with the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the School of Film, Media & Theatre for the specific criteria for this honor.

10400 Music

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Music
    • Concentration in Composition
    • Concentration in Jazz Studies
      • Emphasis in Piano
      • Emphasis in Instrumental
    • Concentration in Music Education
      • Emphasis in Choral/General
      • Emphasis in Instrumental
    • Concentration in Music Technology (Recording)
    • Concentration in Performance
      • Emphasis in Piano
      • Emphasis in Orchestral Instrument or Guitar
      • Emphasis in Organ
      • Emphasis in Voice
  • Bachelor of Science in Music Management
  • Dual B.Mu./M.Mu. Program

School of Music
5th floor Haas-Howell Building
404-413-5900

music.gsu.edu
Email: music@gsu.edu

Nick Demos, Interim Director
Robert J. Ambrose, Associate Director for Student Recruitment
Marie Sumner Lott, Undergraduate Director

The mission of the Georgia State University School of Music is to preserve, promote, and advance humanity’s rich and expanding tradition of artistic music-making through performance, composition, education, and research in accordance with the urban and global initiatives of the University.

The School of Music meets this mission by providing all university students with courses designed to help them understand and enjoy music, and by offering Bachelor of Music and Bachelor of Science degrees that prepare students for careers in music or further study at the graduate level. The undergraduate degrees in music include specializations in performance, music education, music composition, jazz studies, music technology (recording), and music management. In addition to courses and degree programs, the School of Music offers concerts, recitals, lectures, and workshops that are open to all students and the community.

The School of Music is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Music. It participates in the Honors College and offers Honors courses in music. The School of Music also offers scholarships that are awarded to students based on their musical merit and academic achievement.

The School of Music is located in the historic Fairlie-Poplar District in downtown Atlanta. Four buildings comprise the Music Complex: the Haas-Howell Building at 75 Poplar Street, the Rialto Center for the Performing Arts at 80 Forsyth Street, the Standard Building at 92 Luckie Street, and the Aderhold Learning Center at 60 Luckie Street, which houses instrumental and choral rehearsal halls. Some classes are held in the Arts and Humanities Building at 10 Peachtree Center Avenue. Chamber music, faculty, and student recitals are presented in the Kopleff Recital Hall in the Art and Humanities Building. Large ensembles perform throughout the academic year in the Rialto Theater, a 850-seat, state-of-the-art performance venue. The administrative offices are on the fifth floor of the Haas-Howell Building.

Program Admission

Applicants to the School of Music must meet the entrance requirements of both the School of Music and those of Georgia State University. Please refer to the Undergraduate Admissions section of this catalog for information concerning admission requirements to the university.

Individuals who wish to apply for admission to the School of Music should complete the School of Music application.

Prospective students applying for any Bachelor of Music degree program in any concentration (Performance, Composition, Jazz Studies, Music Education, or Music Technology) must perform a live audition before beginning first-year coursework in music. Audition requirements are explained below.

Prospective students applying for the Bachelor of Science degree program in Music Management have two options for admissions consideration:

Option 1:

  • You may give a live audition as an instrumental performer or vocalist (see below)

Option 1:

  • You may submit a digital portfolio as described below.

Equal consideration will be given to either option; students need only complete one of these admissions processes.

Admission to the School of Music is based on (1) the level of musical skill demonstrated in the audition, (2) the availability of openings in the various performing areas.

Students who have been absent from the School of Music for twelve consecutive months must re-audition for reentry.

Audition Requirements for Prospective B.Mu. and B.S. Students

The audition requirements are determined by the applicant’s instrument and are not tied to the program of study. These requirements  can be found on the School of Music website at music.gsu.edu/undergraduate/audition-information/

Digital Portfolio for Prospective B.S. Students Only

The Georgia State University School of Music recognizes that many musicians today have career aspirations beyond performance, including music management, promotion, arts administration and similar fields. Nevertheless, as a NASM-accredited institution, the School of Music requires every music major to engage in active music making at some level. For those students who engage in musical activities outside the traditional genres of classical vocal, classical instrumental, contemporary classical music composition or jazz idioms, the School of Music is interested in learning how you engage in the musical arts. The audition portfolio provides a way for students to demonstrate their musical fluency outside traditional genres.

The digital portfolio should contain a minimum of three and a maximum of five audio and/or video recordings (not to exceed five minutes each) that show evidence of the applicant’s significant engagement in music. The successful portfolio will clearly demonstrate facility in non-traditional music making areas including (but not limited to) computer-based music creation/performance, D.J. turntable mixing, and popular musical performance (such as pop/rock band performance videos). Evaluators will base decision on the overall musical quality and recording quality of the submitted electronic selections.

In addition to the audio and/or video recording submissions, the student is required to create and appear in a 60-second video describing the following:

  • Professional musical aspirations and goals;
  • How he or she may contribute to the musical life of the School of Music; and
  • Why Georgia State University is a good fit

Recorded materials will be uploaded via a web link provided at the time of application and evaluated by faculty of the School of Music.

Program Financial Information

All applicants to the School of Music are automatically considered for talent-based scholarships. Program fees include locker, laboratory, and recital expenses associated with certain programs, classes, and degree requirements. Every student registering for an Applied Music course will be charged an Applied Music fee. For each 1000-level Applied Music course, a $200.00 fee will be charged. For all other Applied Music courses, a $350.00 fee will be charged.

Program Academic Regulations

Undergraduate music degrees (B.Mu. and B.S.) require students to take general education courses in the sciences and humanities, courses in musical foundations, and courses in a concentration of their choice. Foundation courses include music performance, piano, music theory, and music history/literature. In addition to foundation courses, students must complete courses in a concentration. Available concentrations for the B.Mu. degree are: performance, composition, music technology (recording), music education, and jazz studies. The music management curriculum leads to a B.S. degree. Some concentrations have specializations that are detailed below.

Explanation of Applied Music Levels

Applied music consists of individual or small-group performance instruction in a student’s principal performing medium. All music majors must study applied music as part of their degree programs.

  • 1000 level: Introductory. May be used by students who are admitted to the School of Music but who wish to study in a secondary area. With permission, introductory level courses may also be used by music minors or approved non-majors. 1000-level applied music classes are not applicable to degree requirements in a student’s principal performing medium. Authorization is required. One credit hour per semester; one half-hour lesson each week:
  • 1001/1002 level: Freshman level. One credit hour per semester; one-hour lesson per week.
  • 2001/2002 level: Sophomore level. One or two credit hours per semester; one-hour lesson per week.
  • 3001/3002 level: Junior level. One to three credit hours per semester; one-hour lesson per week.
  • 4001/4002 level: Senior level. One to three credit hours per semester; one-hour lesson per week.

Musical Ensembles

Musical ensembles (choral groups, jazz ensembles, orchestra, and wind ensembles) are open to all Georgia State University students by audition. Non-music majors should contact the School of Music or the appropriate ensemble director for information on scheduling a pool audition.

Every student who is registered for applied music is required to enroll concurrently in a conducted ensemble. Factors considered in making assignments will include the specific needs and abilities of the student and the requirements of the various ensembles.

All Bachelor of Music students (with the exception of music education) are required to complete a minimum of eight credit hours of ensemble. Only one credit hour of ensemble per semester may be applied to the total. Assignments to specific ensembles are made each fall semester through pool auditions. Students are required to perform in those ensembles to which they are assigned. Students in the jazz studies concentration may count four credit hours of jazz band toward the eight required credit hours of large ensemble.

The Applied Cluster

Music students who register for applied music must also register for both chamber music/performance laboratory and a large ensemble. These activities are collectively known as the Applied Cluster. Students may be required to participate in studio classes, labs, and/or master classes as required by applied instructors.

Program Degree Requirements

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of the Arts Degree Requirements and the University Degree Requirements, sections 10030.20 and 1400 of this catalog.

Admission to a Concentration

Music students must pass a qualifying examination specific to their concentration during their fourth semester of study. The rising junior jury determines whether the student has made adequate progress to qualify for entry to the 3000-level of applied music study. Students intending to enter the Recording and Technology Concentration or the composition Concentration should contact faculty in those areas about the application and interview process for admission to upper-level (junior and senior) coursework in those areas. Further information about qualifying examinations is available from the School of Music Office

Teacher Education Requirements for Music Education Majors

Music Education faculty evaluate each Music Education student prior to enrollment in upper level methods courses in order to determine their qualifications. These qualifications include 1) an overall gpa of 2.5 or above, 2) a gpa of at least 2.5 in all music courses, 3) grades of C- or higher in all of the courses in the concentration, and 4) a grade of B or higher in MUS 3310 Introduction to Music Education. Music Education students must also demonstrate teaching competence as determined by the Music Education faculty and must demonstrate a record of professional attributes and personal behaviors suitable for placement in a school with children.

Application for Entry to Music Education/Teacher Education occurs at the end of MUS 3310 Introduction to Music Education using the form supplied by the Music Education faculty. Some of the requirements include completion of 60 credit hours of coursework, including courses required in Areas A through D, and EDUC 2110. Students are also required to have passed or been exempted from the GACE Program Admission Exams (Georgia Assessments for the Certification of Educators, standardized test of basic reading, writing, and mathematics skills), and the Georgia Educators Ethics Assessment. Other exams, including the GACE content exams in music and the edTPA will be completed during the final semester of enrollment at GSU.

See complete requirements for entry to Teacher Education in the Georgia State University College of Education and Human Development section of the catalog 1600.

Double-Numbered Courses

Students may only receive credit for one level of a double-numbered course, with the exception of courses for which they are required to register in more than one semester.

B.Mu. in Music

Note: All B.Mu. students must take a mixture of courses from Area F and Area G during all 8 semesters of undergraduate study. First-year and second-year students must enroll in required MUS coursework to avoid a delayed graduation date.

B.Mu. courses to fulfill Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) requirement 

All B.Mu. students take at least one of the following, as prescribed in concentration Area G requirements.

  • MUS 4810 Music History from the Classical Period to the Present-CTW (3)
  • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)

Area C:

  • Recommended course: It is recommended that Bachelor of Music students complete three hours of Fine Arts with a lower-division music appreciation course.

Composition Concentration

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4 semesters, 1 credit each) (4)*
  3. Group Piano (2)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
  4. Applied Lessons (four semesters)(4):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 1002 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2002 Applied Music (1)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (8-11)
    • APXX 3001 Applied Music — Junior I (1)
    • APXX 3002 Applied Music — Junior II (1)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory or Chamber Music (0/.5) (6 semesters)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (1) (4 semesters)
    • MUS 2710 Group Instruction in Piano III (1)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano IV (1)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (32)
    • APCP 3001 Applied Composition — Junior I (1)
    • APCP 3002 Applied Composition — Junior II (1)
    • APCP 4001 Applied Composition –Senior I (1)
    • APCP 4001 Applied Composition — Senior II (1)
    • MUS 2440 Theory III (3)
    • MUS 2450 Theory IV (3)
    • MUS 2540 Aural Skills III (1)
    • MUS 2550 Aural Skills IV (1)
    • MUS 4000 Recital II/Composition (0)
    • MUS 4110 Instrumentation and Orchestration (3)
    • MUS 4210 Composition Seminar (4 semesters) (8)
    • MUS 4450 Advanced Tonal Analysis (3)
    • MUS 4460 Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (3)
    • MUS 4500 Historical Counterpoint (3)
  3. Music History/Literature Requirements (9)
    • MUS 4800 Music History from Antiquity through the Baroque Period (3)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from Classical to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
  4. Choose (6) credit hours from the following:
  5. Electives (2-5) to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Jazz Studies Concentration, Emphasis in Piano

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4 semesters, 1 credit each) (4)*
  3. Group Piano (2)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
  4. Applied Lessons (four semesters)(4):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 1002 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2002 Applied Music (1)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (21-22)
    • APJP 3001 Applied Jazz Piano — Junior I (2)
    • APJP 3002 Applied Jazz Piano — Junior II (2)
    • APJP 4001 Applied Jazz Piano — Senior I (2)
    • APJP 4002 Applied Jazz Piano — Senior II (2)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory or Jazz Combo (0/.5) (2 semesters)
    • MUS 3160 Jazz Combos (.5) (6 semesters)
    • MUS 3090 Jazz Band (1) (4 semesters)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0)
    • MUS 4000 Recital II (0)
    • MUS 2780 Beginning Jazz Improvisation I (1)
    • MUS 2790 Beginning Jazz Improvisation II (1)
    • MUS 4790 Advanced Jazz Improvisation I (1)
    • MUS 4791 Advanced Jazz Improvisation II (1)
    • MUS 4360 Advanced Keyboard Skills (2)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (15)
  3. Music History/Literature Requirements (11)
    • MUS 4800 Music History from Antiquity through the Baroque Period (3)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from Classical to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4850 Jazz Styles (2)
  4. Additional Course Requirements (3)
    • MUS 2010 The Music Business for Jazz Musicians (1)
    • MUS 4220 Jazz Ensemble Techniques (2)
  5. Choose (3) credit hours from the following:
    • MUA 3500 Jazz: Its Origins, Styles, and Influences (3)
    • MUS 4110 Instrumentation and Orchestration (3)
    • MUS 4730 Computer Applications in Music (2)
    • MUS 4770 Advanced Aural Skills I (1)
    • MTM 3010 Introduction to Music Industry (3)
  6. Electives (6-7) credit hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Jazz Studies Concentration, Emphasis in Instrumental

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4 semesters, 1 credit each) (4)*
  3. Applied Lessons (four semesters) (6):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 1002 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2001 Applied Music (2)
    • APXX 2002 Applied Music (2)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (24-25)
    • APXX 3001 Applied Music — Junior I (2)
    • APXX 3002 Applied Music — Junior II (2)
    • APXX 4001 Applied Music — Senior I (2)
    • APXX 4002 Applied Music –Senior II (2)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory or Jazz Combo (0/.5) (2 semesters)
    • MUS 3160 Jazz Combos (.5) (6 semesters)
    • MUS 3090 Jazz Band (1) (4 semesters)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0)
    • MUS 4000 Recital II (0)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
    • MUS 2710 Group Instruction in Piano III (1)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano IV(1)
    • MUS 2780 Beginning Jazz Improvisation I (1)
    • MUS 2790 Beginning Jazz Improvisation II (1)
    • MUS 4750 Jazz Piano Class (1)
    • MUS 4790 Advanced Jazz Improvisation I (1)
    • MUS 4791 Advanced Jazz Improvisation II (1)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (14)
  3. Music History/Literature Requirements (9)
    • MUS 4800 Music History from Antiquity through the Baroque Period (3)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from Classical to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
  4. Additional Course Requirements (3)
    • MUS 2010 The Music Business for Jazz Musicians (1)
    • MUS 4220 Jazz Ensemble Techniques (2)
  5. Choose (3) credit hours from the following:
    • MUA 3500 Jazz: Its Origins, Styles, and Influences (3)
    • MUS 2490 Basic Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4110 Instrumentation and Orchestration (3)
    • MUS 4450 Advanced Tonal Analysis (3)
    • MUS 4460 Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (3)
    • MUS 4730 Computer Applications in Music (2)
    • MUS 4770 Advanced Aural Skills I (1)
    • MTM 3010 Introduction to Music Industry (3)
  6. Electives (6-7) to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Music Education Concentration, Emphasis in Choral/General

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4) (4 semesters, 1 credit each)*
  3. Group Piano (2)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
  4. Applied Lessons (four semesters) (4):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 1002 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2002 Applied Music (1)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (14)*
    • APXX 3001 Applied Music — Junior I (1)
    • APXX 3002 Applied Music — Junior II (1)
    • APXX 4001 Applied Music — Senior I (1)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory (0) (7 semesters)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0) (optional)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (1) (3 semesters)
      • *Note: MUS 3071 Collaborative Piano (1) may be substituted for one semester of large ensemble.
    • MUS 2710 Group Instruction in Piano III (1)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano IV (1)
    • MUS 2490 Basic Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4480 Choral Conducting (2)
    • Select one:
      • MUS 1730 or MUS 1740 Group Instruction in Voice I or II (2)
      • MUS 4440 Vocal Pedagogy (2)
      • APXX 1000 Applied Music (2 semesters) (2)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (8)
  3. Music History & Literature Requirement (6)
  4. Music Education Requirements (24). Students must earn a grade of B or higher in these courses.
    • MUS 3310 Introduction to Music Education (3)
    • MUS 3320 General Music in Early Childhood (3)
    • MUS 3330 General Music in Middle and Secondary Schools (3)
    • MUS 3340 Choral Music in the Schools (3)
    • MUS 4260 Practicum in Music Education (3)
    • MUS 4270 (TE) Student Teaching in Music (6)
    • MUS 4290 (TE) Senior Seminar in Music Education (3)
    • MUS 4650 (TE) Opening School Experience (0)
  5. Professional Education Requirements (12)
    • EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical & Contemporary Issues in Education (3)
    • EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts (3)
    • EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning & Teaching (3)
    • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  6. Choose (3) credit hours to complete a minimum of 127 hours from the following:
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
    • MUS 2780 Beginning Jazz Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 3010 Basic Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 4100 Jazz Combo Arranging (1)
    • MUS 4110 Instrumentation and Orchestration (3)
    • MUS 4140 Arranging for Chorus (1)
    • MUS 4450 Advanced Tonal Analysis (3)
    • MUS 4460 Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (3)
    • MUS 4730 Computer Applications in Music (2)
    • MUS 4810 Music History Classical to Present-CTW (3)

Music Education Concentration, Emphasis in Instrumental

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4) (4 semesters, 1 credit each)*
  3. Group Piano (2)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
  4. Applied Lessons (four semesters) (6):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 1002 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2002 Applied Music (1)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (12)*
    • APXX 3001 Applied Music — Junior I (1)
    • APXX 3002 Applied Music — Junior II (1)
    • APXX 4001 Applied Music — Senior I (1)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory (0) (7 semesters)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0) (optional)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (3 semesters) (3)
    • MUS 2710 Group Instruction in Piano III (1)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano IV (1)
    • MUS 2490 Basic Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4490 Instrumental Conducting (2)
  2. Instrumental Techniques Requirements (4)
  3. Theory/Composition Requirements (8)
  4. Music History & Literature Requirement (6)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from the Classical Period to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
  5. Music Education Requirements (22). Students must earn a grade of B or higher in these courses.
    • MUS 3310 Introduction to Music Education (3)
    • MUS 3358 Teaching Beginning Strings (2)
    • MUS 3359 Teaching Beginning Winds and Percussion (2)
    • MUS 3360 Teaching Intermediate and Advanced Instrumental Music (3)
    • MUS 4260 Practicum in Music Education (3)
    • MUS 4270 (TE) Student Teaching in Music (6)
    • MUS 4290 (TE) Senior Seminar in Music Education (3)
    • MUS 4650 (TE) Opening School Experience (0)
  6. Professional Education Requirements (12)
    • EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical & Contemporary Issues in Education (3)
    • EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts (3)
    • EDUC 2130 Exploring Learning & Teaching (3)
    • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  7. Choose (3) credit hours from the following to complete a minimum of 127 hours.:
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
    • MUS 2780 Beginning Jazz Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 3010 Basic Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 4100 Jazz Combo Arranging (1)
    • MUS 4110 Instrumentation and Orchestration (3)
    • MUS 4140 Arranging for Chorus (1)
    • MUS 4450 Advanced Tonal Analysis (3)
    • MUS 4460 Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (3)
    • MUS 4730 Computer Applications in Music (2)
    • MUS 4810 Music History Classical to Present-CTW(3)

Music Technology Concentration (Sound Recording)

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4) (4 semesters, 1 credit each)*
  3. Group Piano (2)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
  4. Applied Lessons (four semesters) (4):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 1002 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2002 Applied Music (1)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (6-8)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory or Chamber Music (0/.5) (4 semesters)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (1) (4 semesters)
    • MUS 2710 Group Instruction in Piano III (1)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano IV (1)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (8)
    • MUS 2440 Theory III (3)
    • MUS 2450 Theory IV (3)
    • [MUS2540] Aural Skills III (1)
    • [MUS2550] Aural Skills IV (1)
  3. Music History/Literature Requirements (9)
    • MUS 4800 Music History from Antiquity through the Baroque Period (3)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from Classical to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
  4. Music Technology/Recording (31-33)
    • PHYS 2030K Physical Science: Physics of Music and Speech (3)
    • MTM 3010 Introduction to Music Industry (3)
    • MTM 3040 Practicum (2) (optional)
    • MTM 3080 Internship (6)
    • MTM 3110 Introduction to Audio Recording (4)
    • MTM 3120 Digital Audio Technology and Recording Techniques (4)
    • MTM 3130 Advanced Topics in Recording and Audio Production (4)
    • MTM 3230 Audio Post-Production (4)
    • MTM 4900 Music Technology Final Project (3)
  5. Choose (3) credit hours from the following:
  6. Electives (0-3) to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Performance Concentration, Emphasis in Piano

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4) (4 semesters, 1 credit each)*
  3. Applied Lessons (four semesters) (6):
    • APPF 1001 Applied Classical Piano — Freshman I (1)
    • APPF 1002 Applied Classical Piano — Freshman II (1)
    • APPF 2001 Applied Classical Piano — Sophomore I (2)
    • APPF 2002 Applied Classical Piano — Sophomore II (2)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (21)*
    • APPF 3001 Applied Classical Piano — Junior I (3)
    • APPF 3002 Applied Classical Piano — Junior II (3)
    • APPF 4001 Applied Classical Piano — Senior I (3)
    • APPF 4002 Applied Classical Piano — Senior II (3)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory (0) (8 semesters)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0)
    • MUS 4000 Recital II (0)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (1) (4 semesters)
      • *Note: MUS 3071 Collaborative Piano (1) may be substituted for one semester of large ensemble.
    • MUS 2490 Basic Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4360 Advanced Keyboard Skills (2)
    • MUS 4530 Accompanying (1)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (11)
  3. Music History/Literature Requirements (12)
    • MUS 4610 Piano Literature (3)
    • MUS 4800 Music History from Antiquity through the Baroque Period (3)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from Classical to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
  4. MUS 4410 Piano Pedagogy I (3)
  5. Choose (6) credit hours from the following:
    • MUS 2780 Beginning Jazz Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 3010 Basic Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 4100 Jazz Combo Arranging (1)
    • MUS 4110 Instrumentation and Orchestration (3)
    • MUS 4140 Arranging for Chorus (1)
    • MUS 4450 Advanced Tonal Analysis (3) [if not taken in category 2 above]
    • MUS 4460Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (3) [if not taken in category 2 above]
    • MUS 4480 Choral Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4490 Instrumental Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4500 Historical Counterpoint (3) [if not taken in category 2 above]
    • MUS 4730 computer Application n Music (2)
    • MUS 4770 Advanced Aural Skills (1)
    • MUS 4940 Orchestral Literature I (3)
    • MUS 4941 Orchestral Literature II (3)
    • MTM 3010 Introduction to the Music Industry (3)
  6. Electives (7) to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Performance Concentration, Emphasis in Orchestral Instruments or Guitar

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4) (4 semesters, 1 credit each)*
  3. Applied Lessons (four semesters) (6):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 1002 Applied Music (1)
    • APXX 2001 Applied Music (2)
    • APXX 2002 Applied Music (2)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (22-26)
    • APXX 3001 Applied Music (3)
    • APXX 3002 Applied Music (3)
    • APXX 4001 Applied Music (3)
    • APXX 4002 Applied Music (3)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory (0) (8 semesters)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (4 semesters) (4)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0)
    • MUS 4000 Recital II (0)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
    • MUS 2710 Group Instruction in Piano III (1)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano IV (1)
    • MUS 2490 Basic Conducting (2)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (11)
  3. Music History/Literature Requirements (12)
    • MUS 4800 Music History from Antiquity through the Baroque Period (3)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from Classical to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
    • Select one:
  4. Choose (6) credit hours from the following to complete a minimum of 120 hours:
    • APXX 1000 (up to 3 credits)
    • MUS 2780 Beginning Jazz Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 3010 Basic Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 3230 Brass Techniques (1)
    • MUS 3240 String Techniques (1)
    • MUS 3250 Woodwind Techniques (1)
    • MUS 3260 Percussion Techniques (1)
    • MUS 4100 Jazz Combo Arranging (1)
    • MUS 4110 Instrumentation and Orchestration (3)
    • MUS 4140 Arranging for Chorus (1)
    • MUS 4210 Composition Seminar (2)
    • MUS 4450 Advanced Tonal Analysis (3) [if not taken in category 2 above]
    • MUS 4460Analysis of Post-Tonal Music (3) [if not taken in category 2 above]
    • MUS 4480 Choral Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4490 Instrumental Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4500 Historical Counterpoint (3) [if not taken in category 2 above]
    • MUS 4730 computer Application n Music (2)
    • MUS 4770 Advanced Aural Skills (1)
    • MUS 4940 Orchestral Literature I (3)
    • MUS 4941 Orchestral Literature II (3)
    • MTM 3010 Introduction to the Music Industry (3)
  5. Electives (5-9) to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Performance Concentration, Emphasis in Voice

Area F: Courses Related to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (8)
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4) (4 semesters, 1 credit each)*
  3. Group Piano (2)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction in Piano I (1)
    • MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
  4. Applied Lessons (four semesters)(4):
    • APVC 1001 Applied Voice–Freshman I (1)
    • APVC 1002 Applied Voice–Freshman II (1)
    • APVC 2001 Applied Voice–Sophomore I (1)
    • APVC 2002 Applied Voice–Sophomore II (1)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Performance Requirements (26)
    • APVC 3001 Applied Voice–Junior I (2)
    • APVC 3002 Applied Voice–Junior II (2)
    • APVC 4001 Applied Voice–Senior I (2)
    • APVC 4002 Applied Voice–Senior II (2)
    • MUS 4010 Performance Laboratory (0) (8 semesters)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (4 semesters) (4)
    • MUS 3000 Recital I (0)
    • MUS 4000 Recital II (0)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano III (1)
    • MUS 2720 Group Instruction in Piano IV (1)
    • MUS 2490 Basic Conducting (2)
    • MUS 4011 Singing in English, Italian, and Latin (1)
    • MUS 4021 Singing in German (1)
    • MUS 4031 Singing in French (1)
    • MUS 2490 Basic Conducting (2)
    • MUS 3010 Basic Improvisation (1)
    • MUS 3100 Opera Workshop (4 semesters) (4)
    • MUS 3105 Acting for Singers (2)
  2. Theory/Composition Requirements (8)
  3. Music History/Literature Requirements (12)
    • MUS 4620 Vocal Literature (3)
    • MUS 4800 Music History from Antiquity through the Baroque Period (3)
    • MUS 4810 Music History from Classical to the Present-CTW (3)
    • MUS 4820 World Music-CTW (3)
  4. Foreign Language: (9)
    • FREN 1001 Elementary French I (3)
    • GRMN 1001 Elementary German I (3)
    • select 3 credits of foreign language studies (e.g., FREN 1002 or GRMN 1002 or a third language, in consultation with the studio instructor)
  5. MUS 4440 Vocal Pedagogy (2)
  6. Electives (3) to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

B.S. In Music, Concentration in Music Management

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

Students in the B.S. program are advised to take a combination of courses from Area F and Area G during their first and second year of study.

  1. Required Courses (10): Course options are dependent upon the results of Theory Placement
  2. MUS 10XX Appropriate large ensemble (4 semesters)* (4)
  3. Select two of the following options (4):
    • APXX 1001 Applied Music — Freshman I (1) and APXX 1002 Applied Music-Freshman II (1)
    • MUS 30XX Appropriate large ensemble (2 semesters) (2)
    • MUS 1710 Group Instruction n Piano I (1) and MUS 1720 Group Instruction in Piano II (1)
    • MUS 1800 Introduction to Guitar (2)

Area G: Major Courses (60)

  1. Composition Requirement (2)
    • MUS 4730 Computer Applications in Music (2)
  2. Music History/Literature Requirements (3)
    • Select one:
      • MUA 3810 History of African-American Music (3)
      • MUA 3970 Rhythm ‘N’ Blues, Rock, and Rap (3)
      • MUA 3950 Popular and Folk Music of the world (3)
  3. Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) Requirement (3)
    • MTM 3440 Entrepreneurship Music Industry-CTW (3)
  4. Music Management (22-23)
    • Required courses (16)
      • MTM 3010 Introduction to the Music Industry (3)
      • MTM 3030 Marketing and Branch Sales in the Music Industry (3)
      • MTM 3050 Legal Aspects of the Music Industry (3)
      • MTM 3080 Internship (6)
      • MTM 4910 Music Management Senior Project (1)
    • Select (6-7) credit hours:
  5. Business Requirements (15)
    • Required courses:
    • Select (12) credit hours:
      • BCOM 3950 Business Communication and Professional Development (3)
      • BUSA 2106 The Legal & Ethical Environment of Business (3)
      • BUSA 3000 Globalization and Business Practice (3)
      • BUSA 3090 Survey of Business Principles for Non-Business Students (3)
      • CIS 2010 Introduction to Computer-Based Information Systems (3)
      • CMIS 4000 New Ventures in Creative Media (3)
      • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
      • ECON 2105 Principles of Macro Economics (3)
      • ENI 3101 Entrepreneurial Thing for Startups (3)
      • MGS 3400 Managing People in Organizations (3)
      • MK 3010 Basic Marketing (3)
      • MK 4100 Buyer Behavior (3)
      • MK 4300 Advertising (3)
      • MK 4305 Social Media Marketing (3)
  6. Choose 14-15 credit hours to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Minor in Music

The School of Music offers a minor in music with either an emphasis in general music studies or in music management. A background in music is helpful but not necessary.  The minor requires 18 semester hours of course work in music, 9 of which must be at the 3000-4000 level. Required courses include music theory, music history, performance, and electives. Certain prerequisites may not count toward the requirements for the minor. Interested students should contact the School of Music for further information.

Dual B.Mu./M.Mu. Program

The school offers a dual Bachelor of Music and Master of Music program. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the school and College of the Arts to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following school and college processes.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This school offers undergraduate students the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the School of Music for the specific criteria for this honor.

10500 Theatre

Programs Offered:

  • Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Theatre
    • Concentration in Performance Studies
    • Concentration in Design and Production
  • Minor in Theatre

The B.I.S. in Theatre program focuses on the history, theory, and practice of creating live theatrical performance. Theatre courses are designed to promote the artistic development of students whose interests and talents will lead them to careers in theatre or allied arts, and to help students with other vocational interests to understand and appreciate the cultural heritage represented in drama and to improve their oral communication skills. The University Theatre and the Georgia State University Players afford majors practical experience through participation in productions. Credit for special projects and internships is available so students can take advantage of the expertise in the professional sector of the metropolitan area and to tailor programs to their specific career goals.

Program Admission

A 2.0 Georgia State University GPA is required in order to apply to the program. Application materials can be obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance. Students should apply to the program by the time they have earned 42 credit hours to avoid a delay in graduation. Theatre faculty in the School of Film, Media & Theatre are available to advise for the B.I.S. in Theatre degree.

Program Degree Requirements

Please refer to the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies section 10030.20 of this catalog for academic regulations for this program.

In addition to the Program Degree Requirements, students must fulfill the College of the Arts Degree Requirements (see section 10030) and the University Degree Requirements (see section 1400).

Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies in Theatre

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  1. Required Courses (13)
    • World language at the 1002 or higher level (3)
    • THEA 2210 Beginning Acting (3)
    • THEA 2100 Play Analysis for Production(3)
    • Select four hours from the following (4):
      • THEA 2010 Theatrical Design and Production (4) or
      • THEA 1607 Stagecraft Skills (3)* and select one of the following:
  2. Select additional elective courses to complete at least 18 hours in Area F:
    • Required for students with a concentration in Design and Production:
      • AH 1750 Survey of Art II: Western Art from the Renaissance to the Present (3)
      • Select one from the following:
    • Recommended for students with a concentration in Performance Studies:

THEA 1701 or THEA 1702 may each be taken two times for credit or once each if both courses are taken for credit.

*Courses currently only offered at Perimeter College.

**To be eligible to take 3000-4000 level Film courses FLME 1010 and FLME 2700 Require grades of C or higher and 2.5 combined grade-point average on the first attempt.

Many of the courses listed above are required prerequisites for Theatre B.I.S. courses in Area G and H. Students should select Area F courses in consultation with a B.I.S. faculty advisor.

Performance Studies Concentration

Area G. Area of Concentration – Performance Studies (25-27)

  1. Required Course to fulfill CTW requirement (3):
  2. Required Courses (16):
    • THEA 3210 Acting II (3)
    • THEA 4210 Acting Styles (3) (Note: This course may be repeated up to three times under different topics as part of the Allied Field, Area G, or Electives.)
    • THEA 4760 Performance Theory and Practice (3)
    • THEA 4850 Directing (3)
    • THEA 4950 Production Seminar (4) (Note: This course may be repeated once under different topics as part of the Allied Field, Area G, or Electives.)
  3. Select two courses (6-8):

Area H. Allied Field – Thematic Concentrations (15-16)

In consultation with B.I.S. faculty advisor, choose one of the course clusters below, and then choose four courses within that cluster. Students can also create a four-course, student-planned cluster that must be approved by a B.I.S. faculty advisor.

Drama and Literature

Theatre and Arts: Gender and Race

Writing for Stage and Screen

  • ENGL 3150A Introduction to Creative Writing-Poetry
  • [EGL 3150B] Introduction to Creative Writing-Fiction
  • ENGL 3160 Narrative Techniques
  • FLME 3115 Screenwriting & Visualization for the Short Film/Video
  • FLME 4260 Adapting Literature to Film
  • FLME 4310 Feature Screenwriting I
  • FLME 4320 Feature Screenwriting II
  • THEA 3300/FLME 3300 Dramatic Writing for Stage and Screen (if not taken in Area G)

Arts and Entertainment Industry

Film Studies and Production

Electives

Select additional courses to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Design & Production Concentration

Area G. Area of Concentration – Design & Production (29-31)

  1. Required course to fulfill CTW requirement (3)
  2. Required Courses (20-22):
    • THEA 3000 Lighting Design for Theatre (4)
    • THEA 3110 Technical Production II (3)
    • THEA 4050 Directed Activities – Technical Theatre (3-5) (This is a 1-3 credit course that may be repeated for a maximum of nine credit hours.)
    • THEA 4130 Stage Management (3)
    • THEA 4950 Production Seminar (4) (Note: This class may be repeated under a different topic, in Electives)
    • ID 3000 Architectural Drawing I
  3. Choose two (6):
    • AH 4310 Art of N Europe: Renaissance Era (3)
    • AH 4320 Ital Renaissance: Age of Humanism (3)
    • AH 4400 Baroque Art (3)
    • AH 4450 18th Century European Art (3)
    • AH 4500 19th Century European Art (3)
    • AH 4610 Twentieth-Century European and American Modernism (3)
    • AH 4650 American Art (3)

Area H. Allied Field – Art and Design (9-16)

  1. Choose four courses (9-16)

Electives

Select additional courses to complete a minimum of 120 hours.

Minor in Theatre

Theatre is both a respected art form whose roots reach back 4,000 years and a field of academic study whose practitioners have made major contributions to our understandings of art, culture, the social sciences, political activism, multicultural awareness, and gender diversity. The minor in theatre can prepare students to incorporate theatre studies and production within a wide variety of career paths in such fields as education, filmmaking, journalism, literary studies, and community service. In addition, Georgia State’s theatre minors have gone on to advanced studies in theatre on the graduate level and professional careers as actors, directors, writers, designers, and technicians.

Program Degree Requirements

Students who wish to minor in Theatre must take 15-18 hours in Theatre, including at least nine semester hours at the 3000 level or above. Theatre minors are held to the same course prerequisite requirements as majors. Students taking more than 15 hours of courses in the field may count the additional hours toward their electives. A grade of C- or higher is required in all courses counting toward the minor.

Graduation with Distinction in the Major

This program offers undergraduate students the opportunity to earn the designation of graduation with distinction in the major. Please contact the School of Film, Media & Theatre for the specific criteria for this honor.