HIST 1111 Survey of World History to 1500
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

A survey of world history to early modern times.

HIST 1112 Survey of World History since 1500
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

A survey of world history from early modern times to the present.

HIST 1140 Introduction to African and African-American History
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as AAS 1140.) African history and culture, the coming of Africans to the Americas, and the development of African-American culture.

HIST 1200 Introduction to the Middle East
Credit Hours 3.0
Prerequisites Exit or exemption from ENGL 0989 or all ESL requirements except ENSL 0091
Description
HIST 2030 Introduction to Asian Studies
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

This course provides a broad overview of Asias historical, political, socio-economic, and cultural diversity and dynamics. Students will learn what Asia is all about and how it has been conceptualized and understood in the West by critically engaging with the Orientalism,” Asian modernity,” and great divergence debates. They will study Asian societies, economies, cultures, and politics in a multidisciplinary framework and from global and comparative perspectives. Anyone interested in Asian politics, history, economies, and cultures will find this course interesting and useful.

HIST 2110 Survey of United States History
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

A thematic survey of U.S. history to the present.

HIST 2200 Women In American History
Credit Hours 3.0
Prerequisites Exit or exemption from ENGL 0989 or all ESL requirements except ENSL 0091
Description

The course will review changes in feminism, gender, and the Constitution of the United States, i.e., the 19th amendment, the Suffragettes, their relationship to abolition and other feminist campaigns. This course includes an analysis of the social and economic disparity between women and men, women’s roles within state, local, and federal governments, their intellectual, cultural, and social interaction in the larger society. It explores the issues of women in major ethnic groups in the United States, and interaction of women within and outside each group. Topics include colonial women, frontier women, progressivism, unions, birth control, discrimination, sectional conflict from the perspective of women, WWII, “Rosie the Riveter”, Vietnam, the modern industrial complex, globalization, and urban demographic patterns as they relate to the lives of women.

HIST 3000 Introduction to Historical Studies-CTW
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(History majors should take History 3000 as the first course among their upper-division selections.) The nature of historical knowledge and analysis, historical resources in Atlanta-area research libraries and archives, and exercises in historical writing and thinking. Serves as one of the two Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) courses required of all History majors.

HIST 3200 North America before 1800
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Development of Native American cultures before European contact; cultural interactions among Native Americans, Africans, and Europeans during conquest and colonization; emergence of United States of America as dominant economic and political force in North America.

HIST 3210 United States in the Nineteenth Century
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Major developments in United States history from 1800 to 1900, including the growth of political parties and the changing role of the presidency; sectionalism and the Civil War and Reconstruction; immigration, economic expansion, and the American response to industrialization; changes in American social classes and American life.

HIST 3220 United States in the Twentieth Century
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Major developments in the United States from 1900 to the present.

HIST 3230 American Environmental History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

History of interactions with the natural world from the 17th through the 20th century, focusing on the US and its global influence. Explores the history of nature’s effects on culture and economy, the history of people’s activities on their environments, conceptions of nature, and environmental politics. Topics include urban growth, pollution, colonialism, natural resource issues, the history of parks and wild lands, and global environmental problems.

HIST 3240 History of Sports and Leisure
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Examines diverse examples of sports and leisure in human history, with special focus on their relationship to industrialization, nation-building, and empire.

HIST 3250 Religion in American Life
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

This course will explore the history of religion in the United States from the early colonial period to the present.

HIST 3260 The Harlem Renaissance
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Harlem became the epicenter of Black America in the 1920s and 1930s. This course explores the historical social, political, and economic forces that set the stage for the emergence of this dynamic urban community and the contributions by writers, artists, journalists, folklorists, political leaders, organizations, and working class African Americans.

HIST 3270 History of the 1970s and 1980s
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

From the persistence of post-1960s radical politics to the media revolution represented by MTV to the fall of the Soviet Union, the 1970s and 1980s have had profound effects on the way we experience the world today. This class will challenge students to rethink what we know/remember about these two decades from a broader, deeper, historical perspective. As a 3000-level survey, the class will consider many approaches to the history of these decades, including political, social, military, economic, cultural, and intellectual history.

HIST 3300 History of Capitalism
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

This course examines the intellectual, cultural and social history of capitalism from the eighteenth century to the present. Readings include texts written by historians, economists, sociologists, and social and political theorists; topics range from the emergence of free market economics, the formation of social classes, the rise of the corporation, the cultural impact of consumerism, and the global reach of capitalism in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

HIST 3400 History of Sex
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

Sex has a history. Topics may vary, but include the theory and history of sexuality, the science of sexual difference, and the social and cultural ramifications of sexual revolution, the historical dimensions of population management and family planning, as well as sex as identity, metaphor, and ideology.

HIST 3410 History of Food
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

What does soup have to do with labor rights in 16th-century France Why did the ancient Romans legislate how many chickens could be served at a dinner party How did Chicago change the American farming landscape This course examines the ways that people have used food to engage with their social worlds and debate issues such as health, industrialization, and power structures. Looking at the way food has been produced and consumed, the course considers a wide range of topics, including: the history of cookbooks, public eating and restaurants, agriculture from its origins to urban farms,” hunger, food taboos, networks of food production, disordered eating, and modern food movements.

HIST 3500 The Ancient Mediterranean
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as MES 3110.) Political, cultural, religious, economic, and social developments of the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome and their influence on Western Civilization.

HIST 3505 Classical and Early Modern Western Political Thought
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as PHIL 3855 and POLS 3530.) A survey of the historical writings in political thought from Plato to Machiavelli. Special emphasis on the contributions these thinkers made to Western conceptions of democracy, equality, human nature, citizenship, etc., as well as the continuing relevance of the texts for explaining contemporary political phenomena.
3.000 credit hours.

HIST 3510 Medieval Mediterranean/Islamic World
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Overview of the history of the Medieval Mediterranean World, from the fall of the Roman Empire to the rise of the Atlantic World (500-1500). Topics will include the origins and spread of Islam, cross-cultural contacts around the Mediterranean, the Crusades, and the other examples of Islamic/Christian/Jewish interaction.

HIST 3515 North Africa and the World to 1800
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Political, economic, cultural and social history of North Africa and its interactions with the Mediterranean world, Sub-Saharan Africa and the broader world system. Examines the history of the Berbers alongside the history of Arab and European influences in the region from Roman times to 1800.

HIST 3520 Early Modern Europe, 1500-1789
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Transition from medieval to modern Europe; special attention to the Northern Renaissance, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations; the emergence of a competitive state system; the evolution of nation states; gender roles and the pre-industrial economy; and the conceptual revolution in science and philosophy.

HIST 3525 Modern Western Political Thought
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as PHIL 3540 and PHIL 3855.) A survey of the historical writings in political thought from Hobbes to Marx. Special emphasis on the contributions these thinkers made to Western conceptions of democracy, equality, human nature, citizenship, etc., as well as the continuing relevance of the texts for explaining contemporary political phenomena. 3.000 credit hours.

HIST 3530 Europe Since 1789
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Society and politics since the age of enlightenment; special attention to revolution, reaction and reform; class, gender and industrial capitalism; imperialism and nationalism; democracy, fascism, and communism; economic integration: citizenship, immigration, and new social movements.

HIST 3540 Film and the Holocaust
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Explores the history of intersections among feature and documentary films and the Holocaust, with an emphasis on the ways filmmakers have interpreted and represented the causes, events, consequences, and recollections of the mass murder of European Jews and other groups during World War II.

HIST 3600 The Modern Caribbean
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This undergraduate course introduces students to conceptual, comparative, and integrative issues of Caribbean History by exploring abolition of slavery in the nineteenth century, nationalist movements and revolutions, post-colonial regimes, American involvement in the region, and immigration in the 20th century. Students will examine how the comparative legacies of colonialism, slavery, abolition, indentured labor, and independence influenced the regions, contemporary culture and society. Special emphasis will be placed on issues related to politics, race and gender relations, cultural and intellectual production of national identity, and immigration, particularly in Cuba, Haiti, and Jamaica. There are no prerequisites for this course.

HIST 3605 Oceans in World History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course explores oceans in world history from antiquity to the present. It examines how people came into contact with one another by sea and the maritime movement of ideas, goods, institutions, and social systems, as well as animals, plants, and diseases. We will consider waterways as sites of connection and dispersal, movement and regulation, oppression and empowerment, and division and solidarity. Topics include voyaging and exploration, cross-cultural encounters and transformations, commercial and religious networks, forced and voluntary migrations, state building and social movements, regional and global integration, as well as ships and navigation, navies and naval power, piracy and pilgrimage, and maritime law and literature. HIST 1111, HIST 1112, or another globally-oriented survey is recommended.

HIST 3615 The Indian Ocean World
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce undergraduate students to the Indian Ocean world, a geographical zone running from East Africa to China and consisting of regions bordering the oceans body of water. The Ocean has been a highway of commercial and cultural exchanges since the ancient times. This course introduces students to the history of maritime Asia (since the fifteenth century) and allows them to study empires, trade, and cultures in monsoons Asia and their role in the world economy from non-Western and non-Eurocentric perspectives.

HIST 3620 The Atlantic World: Encounters, Empires, Diasporas, Revolutions
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The Atlantic World as a space of cross-cultural contact, empire and nation-building, diasporas, and revolutions since the fifteenth century; transatlantic encounters in Africa, Europe, and the Americas; conquest, colonialism, and creolization; slavery, emancipation, and capitalism; indigenous survival, subaltern resistance, and popular religion; Atlantic world legacies in cultural and political identities.

HIST 3625 War in Europe and America Since 1500
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Warfare and military institutions as they relate to social, economic, political, and technological developments.

HIST 3635 Media, Technology, and Popular Culture
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Examines evolution of communication technologies from the rise of printing in early modern Europe through the foundation of American media, and the globalization of mass media in the twentieth century. Topics include nationalism and the public sphere; media constructions of race, gender, and sexuality; legal and regulatory issues; and the changing aesthetics of print, film, television, and new media.

HIST 3640 Piracy from Ancient to Modern Times
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course examines the history of piracy from the ancient Egyptians to present-day piracy off Somalia and the Straits of Malacca. Particular attention to the Golden Age of Piracy in the West from 1640 to 1730 is complemented by the study of piracy in a range of times and places. This comparative approach presents piracy as a series of complex social, political, and economic interactions, asking how transformations in piracy reveal larger patterns of change and continuity in world history. The course also examines how the study of pirates and piracy as a contemporary cultural phenomenon in films and other media can help us to understand how modern and contemporary culture claims and re-presents history.

HIST 3645 Contemporary Africa
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

The major historical, socio-political, cultural and economic developments, which have shaped conditions in Africa, since the Second World War are explored. The topics will cover major development from the impact of the Second World War in Africa to the Ebola Crisis and the War on Terror in Africa today. These historical developments continue to have an impact on how we interpret Africas most recent past, while holding tremendous implications for the continents current circumstances and future prospects.

HIST 3650 Africa and the world
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This interdisciplinary course explores the long and extensive international history of Africa, focusing on its relations with other civilizations and regions of the world, from medieval times to the present. The weekly inter-related and inter-woven topics will include Medieval African Kingdoms and the Trans-Saharan Trade; the Indian Ocean Trade; European colonialism; Africa, the World Wars and the Cold War; African relations with the US, Western Europe and the former USSR; China and India in Africa; the UN and other global IGOs/NGOs in Africa; Africa and the global economy; globalization and Africa; and Africa and the African Diaspora in the Americas.

HIST 3660 20th Century World History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

A global historical survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural events that defined and shaped the 20th century. Particular emphasis inludes European imperialism, First World War, rise of totalitarian regimes, Second World War, Cold War, decolonization and the rise of nation-states, genocides and civil wars, revolutions in Asia, Africa and Latin America, Middle East conflict, fall of the Soviet bloc, social and intellectual movements, scientific and technological breakthroughs, and globalization. Global Perspectives Course.

HIST 3665 History of Ideas about Race
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

An interdisciplinary, comparative history of ideas about race, ethnicity, and human variation from the 17th century to the present, with emphasis on the social interactions, historical contexts, and social conflicts that produced those ideas. “Race” is primarily a Western historical construction, but the course also compares race with other systems for defining natural or in-born differences, such as ethnicity, religion, caste, or class. It also provides an insight into how the subjects of racial regimes viewed or challenged them from the inside. Global Perspectives Course.

HIST 3675 Teaching Difficult Topics in United States History
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

This course will introduce students to the pedagogy of U.S. history, following the Georgia performance standards and the AP U.S. History curriculum framework. Topics will challenge the master narrative of American history, such as colonization, slavery, racial violence, and class conflict. Through readings, discussion, document analyses and classroom observations, students will explore a variety of teaching methods designed to develop historical thinking skills and maximize student engagement.

HIST 3680 Modern Jewish History
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

This course offers an intensive survey of the major currents in Jewish history from the year 1500 to the late twentieth century. Focusing upon the many different societies in which Jews have lived, the course explores Jewish responses to the political, economic, and cultural challenges of modernity. Topics to be covered include the political emancipation of European Jews, Jews experience in Muslim nations, Jewish engagement with socialism and capitalism, immigration, Zionism, the Holocaust, and American Jewish cultural production (including music, film, and television). No prior background in Judaism or Jewish history is expected.

HIST 3690 Honors Readings
Credit Hours 1.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites Good standing with the Honors College and consent of instructor
Description
HIST 3700 China and Japan to 1600
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Origins and development of two ancient civilizations, with emphasis upon traditional thought, cultures, institutions, and change.

HIST 3710 China and Japan since 1600
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

East Asia in modern transformation from 1600 to the present, emphasizing pre-nineteenth century prosperity, nineteenth-century crises, and twentieth-century change.

HIST 3715 Modern Japan
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course explores the history of Japan during the modern period, from late 1500s through the present. Special attention will be paid to the development of Japanese national identity in local, regional and global contexts. Primary and secondary sources, including writing and other media, will allow students to understand and appreciate Japans transformation from relative isolation to a major regional and global power in the twentieth century.

HIST 3720 Colonial Latin America
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Spain’s and Portugal’s conquests and settlements in the Western hemisphere; the organization and collapse of their colonial systems.

HIST 3730 Latin America since 1810
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Political, economic, and social developments of the major countries, such as Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, and Chile.

HIST 3740 Mexico
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course explores the history of Mexico and its people from the time before the Spanish arrived to the present day. Focusing on culture, everyday life, and the borderlands, it gives a thorough introduction to the United States closest Latin American neighbor. The class is designed to work for students from a wide variety of majors for whom an understanding of Mexico would be useful.

HIST 3780 Middle East 600-1800
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as MES 4110.) Political, cultural, social, and economic developments in the lands from Spain to Central Asia since the rise of Islam.

HIST 3790 The Middle East since 1800
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as MES 4120.) Political, cultural, social, and economic developments from Morocco to Iran, including imperialism, nationalism, independence, and religious revival.

HIST 3795 The Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire, 1300-1922
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Explores the six hundred year history of the Ottoman Empire and its roles in bridging the Medieval and Modern eras in world, Middle Eastern, and Mediterranean/European history. Examines social institutions, economic dynamics, and modernization in the Ottoman Empire, as well as a rival political and social order in Persia, the Safavid Empire. Brings a detailed look at a crucial series of processes that ultimately helped to create the Modern Middle East after World War One.

HIST 3800 South Asia to 1757
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Political, cultural, social, and economic developments in the Indian subcontinent from prehistoric times to the era of British hegemony.

HIST 3810 Modern India
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course familiarizes students with the political, social, economic and cultural dynamics of modern India from the beginning of colonialism in 1757 to the present day. We will explore some major issues and themes that have shaped the politico-economic culture of the subcontinent in modern times and continue to influence the present-day life. This course tracks the trajectory of colonialism in India (late 18th and 19th centuries) and of the anti-colonial movement spearheaded by the Indian National Congress (late 19th to mid-20th centuries). Problems and issues of post-colonial India and the political and economic aspirations of the nation states of India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh in the late 20th and early 21st centuries will be analyzed from the perspectives of globalization and the changing balance of power in the contemporary world. We will also frequently read and discuss extracts from primary sources/documents.

HIST 3820 Southeast Asia
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

This course introduces students to Southeast Asia as a region, exploring the major cultural, political, and economic aspects of its development. Students may explore how the events in Southeast Asia compare and contrast with larger global transformations, as evidenced in the closely linked Indian Ocean and larger Islamic or East Asian worlds. Among the themes possibly covered in the course (depending on the professor): 18th and early 19th Century Southeast Asia and Imperialism; Nationalism; Migrations from South Asia, Middle East and the Americas; Decolonization; the Cold War, and Contemporary Southeast Asia. 3-4 credit hours.

HIST 3900 Human Rights in Historical Perspective
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Exploration of the historical development of human rights as contested ideal, movement, and institution. Topics may include premodern origins of human rights, modern struggles for the recognition of human rights, and historic and recent controversies around the legitimacy of human rights. May be repeated if topic varies.

HIST 4100 Philosophy of History
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

What is history How do we understand and represent the past How does historical inquiry relate to a given society and culture Western thinkers have asked these questions time and again since the Enlightenment; this course will examine the most important arguments and issues in the philosophy of history. Key topics will include: the validity of grand historical narratives of history; the rise of scientific history and historical positivism; historicism and its critique; and postmodern reflections on history.

HIST 4190 American Culture and Ideas I
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course will explore the history of American culture and ideas from the colonial era to the Civil War through books, essays, films, novels, and more.

HIST 4200 American Culture and Ideas II
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course will explore the history of American culture and ideas from the Civil War to the twenty-first century through books, essays, films, novels, and more.

HIST 4220 The American City
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Origins and growth of American cities from the colonial period to the present; economic, political, and cultural developments; the process of urbanization; and the influence of urbanism on the American experience.

HIST 4225 Immigrants in America
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The history of immigration and the creation of “ethnic” identity in the United States from European contact to the present. The course will explore the relationship between the changing economic, social, legal, cultural, and political conditions of immigration in different historical periods and will examine the ways in which immigrant and native-born Americans have continuously renegotiated and evolved notions of ethnicity, race, and American citizenship.

HIST 4230 Foreign Relations of the United States
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Legacy of the colonial era, problems of a new nation, expansion and evolution of America as a great power, New Deal diplomacy, the United States in World War II, the “Cold War,” and the “American Empire.”.

HIST 4240 American Labor and Working Class
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Includes an examination of working class culture, labor and politics, trade union leadership, government and philosophy, and contemporary labor problems.

HIST 4245 The United States in the 1960s
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

A social and cultural history of the U.S. in the 1960s, with special attention to the civil rights, peace, and women’s movements; the counterculture; race, gender, and electoral politics; the New Left and radical politics; the lasting influence of the 1960s on late 20th-century U.S. politics and culture.

HIST 4250 Women in America
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as WGSS 4440.) Issues involving American women from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics include women’s changing economic role, the family, religion, race and ethnicity, and the struggle for legal and political equality.

HIST 4255 U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Survey of the American Civil War era, including causes of the war, the war itself, Reconstruction, and the war’s commemoration from the 1860s to the present.

HIST 4260 African-American Women
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4660.) Examination of the varied history of African-American women. Centered in the tradition of race and gender protest; how women have generationally developed agendas and forums around social justice reform; exploration of themes, individuals, and collective action, revealing the impact of race, class, and gender on the lives of African-American women.

HIST 4270 Topics in African American History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Advanced studies in African American history; topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated if the topic differs.

HIST 4280 Enslavement and Resistance in North America
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4600.) Examines the character of chattel slavery and racial oppression in Colonial America and in the United States and insurgent responses to it by the captive and “free” population of African descent in North America.

HIST 4290 Enslavement in the Americas
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4620.) Comparative examination of systems of captivity and forced labor in the western hemisphere and the social development and popular responses of captive Africans to these systems. Emphasis on the continuities of African culture and the unique adaptation of culture and social organization in each country. The nature of resistance and the process of eliminating the system of captivity.

HIST 4300 The American South
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

History of the South from the early nineteenth century to the present, emphasizing the changes in the region and important issues such as the growth of southern sectionalism in the 1820s and the impact of urbanization and civil rights in the twentieth century.

HIST 4310 Georgia
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

History of Georgia from pre-colonial times to the present, including Native American cultures and strategies; colonization; Georgia in the new republic; slavery and antebellum development; Civil War and Reconstruction; the New South era; the civil rights movement; the emergence of modern Georgia. Of particular significance to teachers and prospective teachers in elementary and secondary education.

HIST 4320 Metropolitan Atlanta
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as GEOG 4768 and SOCI 4279.) Interdisciplinary perspective focusing on social, historical, and geographic processes which have shaped the Atlanta region.

HIST 4325 Introduction to Public History and Historic Preservation
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the theory and practice of Public History and Historic Preservation. The course will cover a variety of topics including museum studies, material culture, the application of National Register criteria, historic interpretation, oral history, local history and preservation at the local, state and federal levels. The class will include field trips to areas sites, local museums and historic neighborhoods.

HIST 4330 Oral History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Comprehensive introduction to oral history, its evolution, methodological and theoretical concerns, interviewing techniques, and applications.

HIST 4340 Administration and Use of Historical Archives
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Creation, preservation, and use of historical records which includes the study of archival principles and techniques; practical experience in the university and local, federal, and state archival depositories.

HIST 4345 Case Study in International Preservation
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The study of preservation and conservation programs and processes in foreign countries, through lectures, readings, and site visits. Comparison of preservation and public history as it is practiced in foreign programs with the approaches taken in the United States. Field trips abroad are required. May be repeated for credit if topics vary.

HIST 4350 Film and History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as Film 4350.) Explores multiple interactions between cinema and the past, how film produces history, and how history can be examined through film.

HIST 4400 The History of the American West
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

History of the American west from the 17th through the 20th century, from the establishment of the French and Algonquin fur trade empire in the Great Lakes region through the US conquest and settlement of the trans-Mississippi west. Particular attention will be paid to the meeting of different peoples on the frontier borderlands, and the economic, social, and environmental consequences of their interaction.

HIST 4430 American Jewish History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course surveys the Jewish experience in the United States, examining the religious, cultural, political, and economic activities of American Jews from the colonial period to the present. Students will explore the ways Jewish tradition has been adapted in America, what the relationship of American Jews has been to other Americans, and how American Jewish identities have been created from modern Jews’ dual impulses for integration and distinctiveness. The course will include a significant examination of issues of regional identity, with particular focus upon the Southern Jewish experience. We will explore Jewish relationships with black and white gentile southerners, as well as southern Jews’ embrace of southern culture and southern identity. This course will also familiarize students with the excellent resources on Atlanta Jewish history available at local archives.

HIST 4450 History of Crime in America
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

An examination of crime from the colonial period to the present. Specific topics include piracy in the eighteenth-century Atlantic world, outlaws in the U.S. West after the Civil War, the Mafia during the twentieth century. Emphasis on the relation between crime, capitalism, the state, and race.

HIST 4460 Bills of Rights
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The Bill of Rights is central to the American constitutional experience. This course examines the historical origins of rights claims in Anglo-American law and the intellectual problem of how best to balance authority and liberty that accompanied revolutionary thinking. It also appraises the development of rights consciousness and the Bill of Rights throughout American history, from the anti-slavery movement to the Civil Rights struggle to the War on Terror.

HIST 4470 The Founders’ Constitution
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The Founders’ world was one vastly different from our own, but they produced a Constitution revered as timeless and immutable. This course examines the political and social world of George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and other Founders. We will also critically examine the intellectual, political, and cultural origins of the Constitution, the Founders’ intentions, and the process of Ratification. The Course will examine the Founders’ Constitution in its operation up through the constitutional crisis precipitated by secession and the Civil War.

HIST 4480 Special Topics in History, Northumbria
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

Advanced studies in history at University of Northumbria in Newcastle; topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated if topic differs. Restricted to students in the GSU-Northumbria Exchange Program in British and American Cultural Studies.

HIST 4490 Topics in American History
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

Advanced studies in American history; topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated if topic differs.

HIST 4510 Origins and Collapse Ancient Near Eastern Societies
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as MES 4140.) History of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Iran, the Levant, Anatolia and Central Asia from 3500 BCE to 323 BCE. Areas of exploration will include the origins of the state; the development of Egyptian and Mesopotamian kingship; the collapses of the Early and late Bronze Age; human environment interactions; nomads and settled societies; Mesopotamian literature; women’s legal status; the Hittite Empire; daily life in an Egyptian village; the invention of the alphabet; Assyrian imperial terrorism; the rise of monotheism; the Persian empire.

HIST 4520 Ancient Persia, Greece, and Rome
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as MES 4150.) History of Persia, Greece, and Rome from 1800 BCE to 500 CE. Areas of exploration will include Bronze Age Greece in Near Eastern context; the 12th century BCE “Catastrophe”; Archaic Greek religion; the polis; Greek drinking parties and politics; the Persian conquest; the rise of Zoroastrianism; Hellenic syncretism; Parthia and Rome as the heirs of Hellenism; the metropolitan Roman empire; disease and demography in Late Antiquity; and the rise of Christianity.

HIST 4530 Religion and Society in Early Modern Europe
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Political, intellectual, cultural, scientific, religious, economic, and military developments in Europe from ca. 1300 to ca. 1650. The development of humanistic studies, of print culture, of religious revolt, of the “nation-state,” and the importance of the “global discovery” revolution.

HIST 4532 Crime, Law and Society in Early Modern Europe
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Social and cultural history of crime in early modern Europe. Topics include witchcraft and heresy, the criminalization of sexuality and sexual taboos, poverty and vagrancy, the construction and subversion of social and gender norms, political rebellion, court procedures, torture and methods of punishment.

HIST 4540 Britain and the World, 1500–1700
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The history of the early modern British Isles and their interaction with the wider world. Special attention to the Reformation; changes in governance; civil war; society, gender, and the preindustrial economy. Also includes emphasis on interactions between the different countries of the British Isles, and to contact between Britain and the wider world though imperialism, trade, and travel.

HIST 4550 Britain and the World since 1700
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Exploration of the interconnected histories of the British isles, the British empire, and the wider world since the eighteenth century; rise of British economic, political, and cultural power on a world scale; politics of class, gender, race, and nation in metropole, colonies, and diasporas; vicissitudes of global hegemony and imperial rivalry; decline, decolonization, and globalization.

HIST 4570 France Since 1715
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Considers major themes in French History since the eighteenth century. Topics include old regime society and politics; the Enlightenment; Revolution and Napoleon; class and gender in bourgeois society; nationalism, imperialism, fascism, and the world wars; decolonization; the European Union, new social movements, and immigration.

HIST 4575 German History to 1900
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Considers major themes in German history to 1900. Topics include the Reformation, state formation, Baroque statecraft and the Thirty Years War, the mechanics of the Holy roman Empire, the German enlightenment of Romanticism, the consequences of the Napoleonic wars, the 1848 revolutions, national unification, industrialization, and German imperialism.

HIST 4580 German History since 1900
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Intellectual, social, economic, cultural, and political history of Germany since 1900. Special attention to nationalism, effects of WWI, the Weimar Republic, Nazism and WWII, the divided Germanies and reunification. Themes include consumerism, the mass media, and relationships between state, society, and the individual.

HIST 4590 Russia to 1861
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Steppe nomads, Vikings, Kievans, Byzantines, and Mongols; the tribute collecting hierarchy; the Muscovite God and the Tsar; peasant society; emergence of Russia as a Eurasian power; “Westernization” and opposition to it; the Great Reforms.

HIST 4600 Russia and the Soviet Union Since 1861
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

The challenge of the West and governmental and social reform; populism, socialism, and peasant tradition; the 1917 and “Stalin” Revolutions; emergence of the Soviet Union as a world power and the challenge to the West; de-Stalinization, “Stagnation,” and Perestroika; Post-Soviet society.

HIST 4615 Scientific Revolutions
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Examination of the histories of different scientific disciplines, their methodologies, practices, forms of knowledge and interrelations, integrating tranformations in the sciences with broader historical changes. Topics include the histories of scientific revolutions, the relationship between science and technology, the social and political uses of science, and criticisms of science.

HIST 4620 Europe: Culture and Ideas
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Selected themes in European cultural and intellectual history; themes vary according to instructor.

HIST 4630 European Intellectual History I: From Medieval to Marx
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Considers major themes in European intellectual history from the late medieval to the mid-19th century. Special focus on important thinkers, methods of intellectual history, and significant trends and movements.

HIST 4635 European Intellectual History II: From Marx to Postmodernism
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Explores the social-cultural history of European thought from the late nineteenth century to the 1980s. Major topics/thinkers may include but are not limited to Marx and Marxism, Nietzsche, the turn-of-the-century avant-garde, Freud and Psychoanalysis, Modernism, Existentialism, Fascism, Second Wave Feminism, the counter culture, and postmodernism.

HIST 4640 The Holocaust
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as SOCI 3228.)
Historical and social analysis of the mass deprivation and murder of Jews and other people under the policies and auspices of National Socialist Germany, 1933-1945.

HIST 4650 Gender and Sexuality in European History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as WGSS 4650.) Explores changing views of men’s and women’s roles in society, politics, and the economy. Topics include changing ideas about masculinity and femininity; the evolution in ideas about sex and sexuality; the invention of homosexuality; and the “sexual revolution” of the twentieth century.

HIST 4690 Topics in European History
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

Advanced studies in European history; topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated if the topic differs.

HIST 4730 History of Haiti
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course studies the history of Haiti, both before and after independence, and highlights the key themes and events in the countrys history. We will study the faltering beginnings of the colony under Spanish and then French control; the development of a lucrative economy based on slave labor and the export of agricultural commodities; the socio-racial hierarchy that this system produced; the worlds only successful slave revolution; the development of the second independent country in the Americas; the development of Haitian Voodoo and the Creole language; the invasion of Haiti by the American Marines in the twentieth century; the rise of the Duvalier dictatorships; the rise of poverty and foreign aid; and the devastating earthquake in 2010.

HIST 4740 Latin American Revolutions
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Socio-political and economic revolutions in Latin America with comparisons to other twentieth-century revolutions.

HIST 4745 Modern Cuba: History, Politics and Society
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course introduces students to the major factors that shaped Modern Cuba. Moving chronologically from the late nineteenth to the late twentieth century, the readings highlight the historical, political, cultural, and social transformations within the Cuban republic and the challenges of revolutionary society after 1959. Particular emphasis will be placed on political affairs, national identity, race and gender relations, and immigration. Daily reading, active class discussion, and written assignments, along with images and music, are designed to focus student inquiry and analysis of Cuba’s complex history.

HIST 4750 Eastern Africa and the Horn of Africa
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4765.) Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the region from the origins of the human race to the present, including ancient civilizations; Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; international trade; European colonialism; and independence.

HIST 4760 Central and Southern Africa
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4760.) Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the region from the earliest times to the present, including indigenous African civilizations, European colonialism, African nationalism, and independence.

HIST 4770 Western Africa
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4770.) Social, political, cultural, and economic history of Western Africa, dealing with the early civilizations, the coming of Islam, European colonialism, and independence.

HIST 4772 Women in Africa
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4772 and WGSS 4772.) An examination of African women’s roles in domestic production, their relationship to the state, and the effect of social change on women from the pre-colonial period to the contemporary era.

HIST 4774 African Rebellions
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

(Same as AAS 4774.) An examination of African resistance in the colonial and post-colonial contexts.

HIST 4776 Africa and Hollywood: Myth, Romance, and Savage Imagery
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course explores the image of Africa projected into American mass culture through the vehicle of commercial films produced about Africa.

HIST 4805 The Middle East and the Americas
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Relationship between the Middle East and the Americas. Explores the use of literature and mass media as well as the impact of the Cold War on present US/Middle East relations. Explores also questions of race, migration to the Americas and political Islam.

HIST 4815 Palestine and Modern Middle East
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Social, economic, cultural and political history of Palestine and its relation to the larger Middle East. Starting from the expansion of European power in the nineteenth century at the expense of the Ottoman Empire, the course charts the developments in Palestine during the modern era. Explores history through the prism of violence, state formation, identity politics, nationalism and migration and its larger impact on the Middle East.

HIST 4820 Cross-Cultural Encounters in World History
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Contexts, impulses, and implications of encounters among cultures/civilizations in world history; testing of theoretical models of cross-cultural interplay with specific case studies (e.g., the diffusion of Buddhism along the Silk Roads, the Mongol integration of Eurasia, and the ecological dimension of European imperialism); emphasis on exchanges both before and after 1500 AD.

HIST 4840 History of Global Urbanization
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Origins of urbanization, regional trends in urban change throughout the world, the construction of a world-wide system of trade after the thirteenth century, the expansion of European cities and colonialism, the rise of the American city, trends in modern urbanization and globalization.

HIST 4855 Transnational Social Movements in Historical Perspective
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Exploration of the historical development and interplay of transnational social movements and advocacy networks since the eighteenth century. Topics may include, but are not limited to, abolitionism, anticolonialism, environmentalism, feminism, pacifism, Pan Africanism, and socialism. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 4860 Empires
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

Exploration of the historical experience of empires; topics may include pre-modern and early modern empires in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas; economics and politics of modern imperialism; interactions between metropole and colonies; gender, race, culture, and empire: anticolonialism, decolonization, and imperial legacies in a postcolonial world. May be repeated if topics vary.

HIST 4870 Honors Thesis: Research
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites Good standing with the Honors College and consent of instructor
Description

Readings or research preparatory to honors thesis or project. This course may include a Signature Experience component.

HIST 4880 Honors Thesis: Writing
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites HIST 4870 with grade of C or higher, good standing with the Honors College and consent of instructor
Description

Writing or production of honors thesis or project. This course may include a Signature Experience component.

HIST 4885 Special Topics in Heritage Preservation
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

Analysis of selected topics in public history or historic preservation such as cultural resource management historic site management, museum management or curatorial studies. May be repeated if topics differ.

HIST 4890 Topics in World History
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

Advanced studies in the history of Africa, Asia, Latin America, or the Middle East; topics vary according to instructor. May be repeated if the topic differs.

HIST 4960 British American Culture Seminar I
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites British and American Cultures Program concentration, or permission of English or History program advisor
Description

(Same as ENGL 3265.) Analyzes literary and historical themes from the perspectives of American and British authors, historical figures, and literatures. Offered by the English and History departments.

HIST 4961 British American Cultural Seminar II
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites British and American Cultures Program concentration, or permission of English or History program advisor
Description

(Same as ENGL 3266.) Analyzes literary and historical themes from the perspectives of American and British authors, historical figures, and literatures. Offered by the English and History departments.

HIST 4970 Independent Study
Credit Hours 4.0
Prerequisites HIST 3000 with grade of C or higher and at least five upper-division history courses
Description

Consent of the department is required for non majors. By invitation only. For history majors with a grade point average of 3.5 or better in major courses and all course work. No more than four credit hours may be applied toward the major.

HIST 4975 Study Abroad
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites Consent of the department and the faculty leading the study abroad trip
Description

Through international travel, students are given an opportunity to participate in on-site study of the historical, intellectual and cultural past of various societies. May be repeated for credit if topics vary. This course may include a Signature Experience component.

HIST 4980 Internship
Credit Hours 1.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites consent of department
Description

Through a prescribed field experience, students are given the opportunity to apply knowledge, theory, and understanding gained from courses. This course may include a Signature Experience component.

HIST 4990 Historical Research-CTW
Credit Hours 4.0
Prerequisites HIST 3000 with grade of C or higher and at least four upper-division history courses, including at least two at the 4000-level
Description

Varies in topic and theme. A specialist guides students in the design of individual research topics, the collection and analysis of evidence from primary sources, and composition of a coherent research paper with depth. Serves as one of the two Critical Thinking Through Writing (CTW) courses required of all History majors. This course may include a Signature Experience component.

HIST 4995 Directed Readings B.I.S.-CTW
Credit Hours 3.0 - 4.0
Description

Directed Readings designed for Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies students. This course may satisfy the junior and/or senior-level Critical Thinking Through Writing requirements.