B.A. in Philosophy

Program Information

Philosophy is the study of what exists, how we know, and how to live. Students of philosophy consider questions about the scientific method, human nature, justice, God, art, and the meaning of life. Philosophy majors develop the intellectual abilities to think critically and write effectively. They learn to apply these valuable skills in other disciplines, in their career, and in their life. Because philosophy deals with fundamental questions and explores methods for answering them, it is interdisciplinary, connecting to every other discipline in the university curriculum. Hence, philosophy is an ideal double major or minor. Philosophy prepares students for careers or graduate programs that value the abilities to solve problems, to communicate clearly, to learn new skills, and to use new knowledge. It is an excellent major for a wide range of careers, including law, government, the sciences, medicine, public service, education, religion, and business.

The Department of Philosophy offers a B.A. in Philosophy and B.A. in Philosophy with a Pre-Law Concentration, as well as minors in Philosophy and in Ethics. Majors are urged to consult with their advisers in order to prepare the course of study most appropriate to their individual interests and needs.

Major in Philosophy with a Pre-Law Concentration

The study of philosophy is excellent preparation for law school. The critical thinking skills, clarity in writing and argumentative rigor required in philosophy provide students with the tools they need to be successful in law school and as lawyers. Moreover, philosophy majors have among the highest average scores on the LSAT and the highest admission rates to law school of any major.

For more information, visit the department’s website, including the pages: Why Philosophy?, Majors in Their Own Words, and the Major in a Minute video.

Suggested Schedule of Courses

This is a suggested 4-year schedule of courses based on degree requirements in the current catalog.  This guide is not a substitute for academic advisement — contact your advisement office or the Philosophy Department’s Advisor if you have any questions about scheduling or about your degree requirements.  Also see the Undergraduate Catalog for a complete list of requirements and electives to choose from. 

Students may choose to attend a summer term to reduce their load during fall or spring semesters but still stay on track to graduate in four years.

If considering this major, PHIL 2010 will allow you to explore this option before making a decision.

For information about the Pre-law concentration, visit this website. Some Area G electives below would be replaced with required courses (see the Philosophy Advisor).


Year 1

Term 1

Course Hours

ENGL 1101

3

MATH 1101

3

POLS 1101

3

PHIL 1010 (Satisfies Area B)

2

*Area D Science Sequence “A”

4
Total Hours 15

Term 2

Course Hours

ENGL 1102

3

LANG 1002

3

PHIL 2010

3

Area D Science Sequence “B”

4

Area B Elective

2
Total Hours 15

Notes

*This course is not included in Freshman Learning Communities.

Apply and enhance your philosophical skills by finding your own internship for credit (PHIL 4960).

Be sure to work toward some of the many undergraduate awards in philosophy, such as the Troy Moore Undergraduate Essay Contest in Ethics, or the Robert Almeder Award for best paper at the Georgia State Student Philosophy Symposium.


Year 2

Term 1

Course Hours

HIST 2110

3

*PHIL 3000

3

Area E Elective

3

Area C Elective (RELS 2001 suggested)

3

PHIL 3010

3
Total Hours 15

Term 2

Course Hours

PHIL 2500

3

PHIL 3020

3

Area C Elective

3

Area E Elective

3

Area F Elective

3
Total Hours 15

Notes

*This course fulfills the CTW requirement.

Apply and enhance your philosophical skills by finding your own internship for credit (PHIL 4960).

Be sure to work toward some of the many undergraduate awards in philosophy, such as the Troy Moore Undergraduate Essay Contest in Ethics, or the Robert Almeder Award for best paper at the Georgia State Student Philosophy Symposium.


Year 3

Term 1

Course Hours

Area G Elective

3

Area G Elective

3

Area F Elective

3

Area H Elective

3

Area H Elective

3
Total Hours 15

Term 2

Course Hours

Area G Ethics Requirement

3

Area G Elective

3

Area H Elective

3

Area H Elective

3

Area H Elective

3
Total Hours 15

Notes

Click here for courses that fulfill Area G and H and may also include a Signature Experience component.

Apply and enhance your philosophical skills by finding your own internship for credit (PHIL 4960).

Be sure to work toward some of the many undergraduate awards in philosophy, such as the Troy Moore Undergraduate Essay Contest in Ethics, or the Robert Almeder Award for best paper at the Georgia State Student Philosophy Symposium.


Year 4

Term 1

Course Hours

Area G M&E Requirement

3

Area G Elective

3

Area H Elective

3

Area H Elective

3

Area H Elective

3
Total Hours 15

Term 2

Course Hours

Area G Elective

3

Area G Elective

3

Area H Elective

3

Area H Elective

3

Area H Elective

3
Total Hours 15

Notes

Click here for courses that fulfill Area G and H and may also include a Signature Experience component.

Apply and enhance your philosophical skills by finding your own internship for credit (PHIL 4960).

Be sure to work toward some of the many undergraduate awards in philosophy, such as the Troy Moore Undergraduate Essay Contest in Ethics, or the Robert Almeder Award for best paper at the Georgia State Student Philosophy Symposium.