7000 J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Undergraduate programs in the Robinson College of Business are described in detail in this chapter. See subsections for specific program information as well as policies and procedures.

7010 General Information

7010.10 Office of the Dean

7th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
35 Broad Street
404/413-7000
robinson.gsu.edu

Richard Phillips, Dean
Nathan Bennett, Associate Dean for Faculty and Research
Harley E. (Chip) Ryan, Associate Dean for Curriculum and Teaching
Sanjay Srivastava, Associate Dean for Strategy and Special Projects
Todd Maurer, Associate Dean for Sponsored Research
Ralph E. Kahlan, Assistant Dean for Administration and Finance
Toby McChesney, Assistant Dean of Graduate Recruiting and Student Services
Dave R. Forquer, Assistant Dean for Executive Programs
Jacobus Boers, Assistant Dean for International Engagement
Tracy A. Widman, Assistant Dean for Accreditation and Faculty Data Management
William C. Bogner, Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs

 

7010.20 Mission of the J. Mack Robinson College of Business

The J. Mack Robinson College of Business of Georgia State University is committed to academic excellence through advancing the creation and dissemination of knowledge in business and management. Moreover, the college seeks to prepare its students for the practice of management with the knowledge and skills needed to remain effective in a global, culturally diverse, and technologically advanced world that is characterized by rapid change and complex interdependencies. As an academic unit of Georgia State University, the Robinson College seeks to add value to private, public, and not-for-profit organizations through excellence in its research, education, and outreach programs. The college enjoys a location that is distinctive among business schools and is committed to taking full advantage of its proximity to multinational corporations, entrepreneurial enterprises, federal, state, and city agencies, and not-for-profit organizations.

7010.21 Mission of the B.B.A. Program

The mission of the Bachelor of Business Administration (B.B.A.) program is to provide a broad general education and the core business knowledge and skills to prepare both traditional and nontraditional students for entry-level positions in private, public, and not-for-profit organizations and to stimulate in students a desire for lifelong learning. The program relies on a complement of full-time and part-time faculty using the most effective educational methods and technology to meet this mission.

7010.22 Objectives of the B.B.A. Program

The faculty seeks to fulfill the mission of the B.B.A. program by accomplishing the following objectives:

  • Students will demonstrate effective communication skills.
  • Students will effectively and efficiently use computer technology.
  • Students will effectively and efficiently analyze and solve business problems.
  • Students will function effectively as team members.
  • Students will demonstrate a desire for lifelong learning.

7010.30 Accreditation

The J. Mack Robinson College of Business is accredited by the AACSB International, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The accounting programs of the college also hold accounting accreditation granted by the AACSB. The Institute of Health Administration is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education. The program in hospitality administration is accredited by the Accreditation Commission on Programs in Hospitality Administration.

7010.40 Bachelor’s Degree Offered

The Robinson College of Business offers the Bachelor of Business Administration with ten majors. The requirements for the B.B.A. degree are shown later in this chapter. A degree is awarded only after admission to and completion of the prescribed program in accordance with the specific degree requirements and academic regulations of the college and the university.

7010.50 Tutorial Facilities

Tutorial facilities are available to students who may need assistance with writing or mathematics and are described in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this catalog.

7020 Academic Regulations

Students seeking a degree in the Robinson College of Business are encouraged to become familiar with the academic regulations of the university that are given elsewhere in this catalog. The sections concerning transfer requirements and the university degree policies, including the residence requirement, the core curriculum, the constitutions and histories requirement, application for graduation, academic recognitions, withdrawal from classes, incomplete grades, and scholastic discipline, are of particular importance. (Consult the index for the page numbers of these sections.) The college regulations discussed below should also be read carefully.

7020.10 Credit Transferred from Other Institutions

Some majors require that transfer credit for upper-level major courses be no more than five years old at the time the student enrolls in the B.B.A. program. Contact the Office of Undergraduate Academic Assistance for further information.

Course credit transferred from two-year colleges shall apply only toward freshman- or sophomore-level credit.

No more than 27 semester credit hours of course work earned through correspondence or extension will be accepted toward the B.B.A. degree. Courses completed through correspondence or extension may not apply toward junior- or senior-level credit.

Reenrollment after Transferring Elsewhere: Undergraduate students who enroll at another institution as regular students (as opposed to transient- or visiting-student status) will be considered as having transferred to that institution. If such students later reenroll in the B.B.A. program, regardless of the length of the absence, they will be subject to the curricular degree requirements in effect at the time of their return. Such students are encouraged to discuss their transfer to the other institution with their academic advisor in advance if they intend to apply this work toward a degree of the Robinson College of Business. Students may not take courses for degree credit at another institution during the semester they expect to graduate from Georgia State University.

7020.20 Policy on Allowing Undergraduates to Take Graduate Courses

Students with a cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or higher who have at least 18 semester hours of credit at Georgia State University and who are in their senior year may petition to take up to two graduate courses in the Robinson College of Business in lieu of undergraduate courses. Students interested in petitioning should contact the Office of Undergraduate Academic Assistance for a statement of restrictions and procedures pertaining to this policy.

7020.30 Minimum Grade Requirements for B.B.A. Students

A grade of C- or higher is necessary to receive degree credit in the following required courses in the B.B.A. degree program: Acct 2101-2102, Econ 2105-2106, CIS 2010, BusA 2106; all the courses in the junior-year business core; the junior-year communication requirement; all the courses in the major; BusA 4980; the junior/senior RCB electives.

In addition to the minimum grade requirements in these courses, a grade of C- or higher must be earned by actuarial science majors in Math 2215.

7020.40 Minimum GPA Requirement for All Students Enrolled in RCB Courses

Students may not register for any 3000/4000-level course taught by the Robinson College of Business unless they meet eligibility requirements.

7020.41 Initial Eligibility Requirements for Students Admitted to Georgia State University as Freshman (i.e. a native GSU student with no transfer credit)

Students in this category, regardless of degree program or status, may not enroll in upper-level courses (those numbered 3000-4999) offered by the Robinson College of Business unless they meet the following requirements:

  • Earned at least 45 semester hours of college-level credit.
  • Completed RCB’s Area F: Business Foundation with an Area F GPA of 2.8 or better.   In attempting to satisfy this requirement each Area F course may be attempted only twice.  The Area F GPA will be computed using the last attempt in each course.  A WF counts as an attempt.

7020.42 Initial Eligibility Requirements for Students Admitted to Georgia State University as Transfer Students (i.e. has been given transfer credit by Georgia State for course work completed at another academic institution, regardless of class standing)

Students in this category, regardless of degree program or status, may not enroll in upper-level courses (those numbered 3000-4999) offered by the Robinson College of Business unless they meet the following requirements:

  • Earned at least 45 semester hours of college-level credit.
  • Completed RCB’s Area F: Business Foundation with an area F GPA of 2.8 or better.  The grades in Area F courses transferred to GSU or taken in residence will be used to compute the Area F GPA.    Each Area F course may be attempted only twice at Georgia State regardless of previous attempts at other institutions.  The Area F GPA will be computed using the last attempt in each course.  A WF counts as an attempt

7020.43 Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Students

Once a student is eligible to take 3000/4000 RCB courses under either section 7020.41 or 7020.42 of this catalog they may remain eligible to take 3000/4000 level RCB courses as long as they maintain a GPA of 2.0 or higher and remain in good standing. If the student’s GPA falls below the 2.0 required he or she will remain one semester to raise the GPA to the standard. If unable they will be ineligible to enroll in additional 3000/4000 level RCB courses and will be advised into another degree program.

7020.50 Course Sequencing Requirements

Students are expected to proceed through the B.B.A. program in proper sequence to receive maximum benefit from their studies. Courses that are intended for the freshman through senior years are indicated by the course numbering system (1000 level through 4000 level, respectively). The lower-level courses taken in the freshman and sophomore years provide a foundation of general education on which the junior and senior years are based.

Sequencing requirements for all students and specifically for B.B.A. students follow. Students who violate any of the course sequencing requirements are subject to disenrollment by the college regardless of performance or time lapse and will be allowed a tuition refund in accordance with the university’s refund schedule.

7020.60 Sequencing for All Students Enrolled in RCB Courses

Students may not register for any 3000/4000-level course taught by the Robinson College of Business until they have earned at least 45 semester hours of college-level credit.

 

7020.80 Business Residence Requirement

At least 50 percent of the business credit hours required for the B.B.A. degree must be taken in residence at Georgia State University. This regulation is a requirement of the college’s accrediting body. These are the courses in the B.B.A. program that are considered “business credit hours:” ACCT 2101, ACCT 2102, BUSA 2106, CIS 2010, FI 3300, MGS 3100, MGS 3400, MK 3010, BUSA 4980, courses in the major (18-21 semester hours, depending on the major chosen), RCB electives (9-12 hours).

7020.90 Core Curriculum

As stated in the “Core Curriculum” section (1410) of the “University Degree Requirements and Graduation” section of this catalog, the university complies with the requirements of the core curriculum of the University System of Georgia. The 60 semester hours of course work for the freshman and sophomore years of the B.B.A. program are designed to conform to that core.

Transfer students from institutions in the University System of Georgia who followed the core curriculum at their previous institution and earned sufficient grades in courses listed in areas A through E of the core curriculum will be granted transfer credit for those relevant courses. This may mean that credit will be granted for courses that differ from those which would be taken at Georgia State University, as shown in the curriculum listed below.

Transfer credit will be given in Core Area F of the B.B.A. program for students who were following the business transfer program at a two-year college or the business curriculum for a bachelor’s degree at a four-year college or university in the University System of Georgia.

If a portion of a core area has been completed, then transfer credit for the corresponding portion at Georgia State will be granted.

7030 B.B.A. Degree Requirements

Areas A through E of the undergraduate core curriculum make up the first 42 semester hours of the freshman and sophomore years of the Bachelor of Business Administration degree program. These requirements are listed in the “University Degree Requirements and Graduation” chapter of this catalog as part of the description of the university’s core curriculum. Courses in the core curriculum that are recommended by the Robinson College of Business faculty are given in that description. These suggestions reflect choices that will be particularly helpful in providing B.B.A. students with a strong foundation for Core Area F and the junior and senior years of the program.

The hours and course requirements for Core Area F, Business Foundation, and the junior and senior years are listed in this chapter. Please note the following information:

Refer to the “Business Residence Requirement” section, listed previously in this chapter, for information on the business credit hours that must be completed in residence at Georgia State University.

Students must have completed no fewer than 45 semester hours of college-level course work before taking 3000/4000-level courses in the Robinson College. Refer to the heading “Sequencing for All Students Enrolled in RCB Courses,” listed previously in this chapter.

Consult the course descriptions section for prerequisites and descriptions of courses listed below.

7030.10 Bachelor of Business Administration

Program Summary

Semester
Hours

Lower-Division (Freshman/Sophomore) Years
Core Areas A-E

42

Core Area F, Business Foundation

18

Subtotal

60

Upper-Division (Junior/Senior) Years
Junior Business Core

15

Junior Communication Course

3

Major

18 – 21

Junior/Senior RCB Electives

6 – 12

Junior/Senior Electives Outside RCB

9 – 12

Business Policy

3

Subtotal

60

Total Semester Hours Required for the B.B.A. Degree: 120

B.B.A. Program Information

Lower-Division (Freshman/Sophomore) Years

Core Areas A through E. For courses that satisfy these requirements, refer to “University Degree Requirements and Graduation” of this catalog. The Robinson College of Business requires MATH 1070 and MATH 1111 to satisfy degree requirements. It recommends that students take MATH 1111 in Area A and MATH 1070 in Area D. If not taken in Area A or Area D, they must be taken later in the program.

Core Area F: Business Foundation. (Minimum of grade of C- or higher is required in each course.)

Upper-Division (Junior/Senior) Years.

Junior Business Core (Minimum of grade of C- or higher is required in each course.)

Junior Communication Course. (Minimum of grade of C- or higher is required in this course.)

  • BCOM 3950 Business Communication and Professionalism

Major. (Minimum of grade of C- or higher is required in each course.) The following major requires 18 semester hours in this portion of the curriculum:

Finance***

The following majors require 21 semester hours in this portion of the curriculum:

  • Accounting
  • Actuarial Science
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Economics
  • Hospitality Administration
  • Managerial Sciences
  • Marketing
  • Real Estate
  • Risk Management and Insurance

Courses for each major should be selected after reviewing the appropriate school or department descriptions for each major that follow and, if needed, after consultation with a faculty adviser in the school or department that offers the major. The catalog describes each major and, if applicable, lists possible areas of specialization within the major. The required courses in each major, if any, are also listed in the school or department descriptions. The college reserves the right to amend this list of majors at the end of any semester.

Junior/Senior RCB Electives. (Minimum of grade of C- or higher is required in each course.)

Major requiring six semester hours of RCB electives: Actuarial Science, RMI 3750 and RMI 4350 must be taken as the RCB electives for actuarial science majors.

Major requiring nine semester hours of RCB electives: Accounting, Actuarial Science**, Computer Information Systems, Economics, Finance***, Hospitality Administration****, Managerial Sciences, Marketing, Real Estate, Risk Management and Insurance.

These electives must be selected from 3000/4000-level courses in the Robinson College of Business that are outside the student’s major and are not cross-listed with courses in the student’s major. Majors other than economics may also select from the 3000/4000-level courses in the Department of Economics in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. Refer to the online course listing at www.gosolar.gsu.edu/webforstudent.htm to determine the Georgia state college that teaches a course. Do not refer only to the course title. For example, course titles with the words “business,” “management,” or “administration” in them are not necessarily RCB courses.

A cross-listed course is indicated by the parenthetical statement “Same as . . .” after the title in the course descriptions.

Junior/Senior Electives Outside RCB. These electives must be selected from the 3000/4000-level courses taught by Georgia State colleges other than the Robinson College of Business. These electives enable the B.B.A. program to meet the breath requirement of the college’s accrediting body and cannot be taken in the Robinson College. Economics majors may not choose any economics courses for these electives.

Exceptions to the requirement that non-RCB electives be 3000- or 4000-level courses: Math 1070, 1111, 2211, 2212, 2215, and 2420 may be taken to satisfy all or part of the non-RCB elective requirement if the student will still have a minimum of 39 upper-level semester hours to complete at Georgia State. This provision ensures that the student will meet the university’s academic residence requirement.

For the following two specific majors, these required 2000-level mathematics courses may be used to satisfy part of the non-RCB elective requirement:

Actuarial Science: Mathematics 2211, Mathematics 2212, and Mathematics 2215 (grade of C- or higher required in Math 2215). These courses carry four semester hours of credit each. If the student’s mathematics background permits beginning this calculus sequence in Core Area A or D (in place of college algebra and/or precalculus), three-semester-hour courses that meet the requirements for non-RCB electives will replace Mathematics 2211 and/or Mathematics 2212. Thus, this portion of the curriculum can range from 10 to 12 semester hours.

Business Policy. (Minimum of grade of C- or higher is required in this course.)

BUSA 4980 Strategic Management Policy .  Minimum of grade of C- or higher is required in this course.  Students must take BUSA 4990 concurrently.  Prerequisites for both BUSA 4980 and BUSA 4990 are completion of all of the following with a grade of C- or better: All courses  in Core Area F: Business Foundations, the Junior Business Core as listed in this section above, BCOM 3950, and three upper-level major courses.

BUSA 4980 Strategic Management Policy

* Students who transfer from other institutions in the University System of Georgia and have taken other approved courses in the Core Area F for business will take CIS 2010 and/or BUSA 2106, as appropriate, in the Junior/Senior RCB electives section.

** Actuarial Science majors must take RMI 3750 and RMI 4350 as the RCB electives.

** Finance majors must take ACCT 4210 as one of the RCB electives. The finance major requires an additional three semester hours that are either an RCB elective or a 4000-level finance course.

***Hospitality majors must take all RCB electives (9 credit hours) in hospitality to support the development of industry specialization(s)

7030.20 Information Technology Access and Skill Requirements

Access Requirements: Because information technology is an integral part of business decision-making, courses in the Robinson College of Business frequently incorporate assignments that require computing skills. Consistent with university policy available at www.gsu.edu/ist/policies.html, the Robinson College requires students to be responsible for providing computer and Internet access for all RCB courses and programs.

Hardware and Software Requirements: Georgia State has standardized on the Microsoft Office Suite in the student computer labs. Students may consult the university’s Office of Student Financial Aid for information about possible funding opportunities for computer and Internet access expenses.

Skill Requirements: Although students can expect to enhance their information technology skills as they work toward their degrees, the college expects all students to have certain basic skills before enrolling in any business course. These skills are defined as Basic Microcomputing Skills and are described below in the CSP 1 skills definition.

When courses require additional computing skills, these Computing Skill Prerequisites (CSP’s) are listed by number in the catalog course description.

7030.30 Computing Skills Prerequisites(CSPs)/Definitions

CSP 1. Basic Microcomputing Skills: Understand the PC and its components; turn on the PC; use command-oriented, windows-based, and LAN operating environments to accomplish tasks such as formatting floppy disks, creating and navigating through directories and subdirectories, creating and deleting files, copying and renaming files, using help screens, loading application software, exiting from application programs and operating environments in an orderly manner, and using appropriate measures to check for and prevent the spread of computer viruses.

CSP 2. Basic Microcomputing Spreadsheet Skills: Load the spreadsheet software; create, organize, and navigate through spreadsheets; format the spreadsheet or a block of cells; enter and edit formulas, values, and text; copy, move, and protect cells; insert and delete columns and rows; save and retrieve files; print spreadsheets; use financial, statistical, and mathematical functions such as totaling and averaging of rows and columns; create and print charts and graphs, create data tables, invoke existing macros, and use help screens.

CSP 3. Advanced Microcomputer Spreadsheet Skills: Use advanced spreadsheet features such as database commands and functions; create macros; create menu systems; and develop customized applications.

CSP 4. Basic Microcomputer Database Skills: Load database software, create databases; enter and edit data; add and delete records; list, query, and generate reports using the database; and use help screens.

CSP 5. Advanced Microcomputer Database Skills: Link databases through keys; create input screens; and develop customized applications.

CSP 6. Word Processing and Presentation Skills: For word processing: Load the word processing software; create, format, edit, and save documents; copy and move text; adjust margins, indents, and line space; adjust fonts and styles. For presentation graphics: Load the presentation graphics software; choose and modify templates; choose and modify slide layouts; insert slides; modify slide, handout, and note masters; change color schemes; apply effects, animation, and multimedia to slides; run a slide show. For both: Import tables, clip art, and graphs from other applications; use spell-checking; load additional toolbars; use help screens.

CSP 7. Basic Internet Usage: Send and receive Email messages including attachments of files; transfer files with FTP, compress and uncompress files with utility programs; use search engines to locate documents and find information on the web; navigate the web with a browser including copying/pasting/saving web information; download and set up web browser plug-in programs such as electronic document readers and audio/video players; use web-based clients such as library catalog systems to find specific information.

CSP 8. Advanced Internet Usage: Create formatted *.html pages with tags including links within and between pages; publish pages to a website; create image files and embed them in *.html pages.

7040 Office of Undergraduate Academic Assistance

315 Robinson College of Business Building
35 Broad Street, 404-413-7115, Fax: 404-413-7119
robinson.gsu.edu/students/undergraduate-resources/ouaa/

M. Colleen Joyce, Director
Joyce A. Cox, Assistant Director
Carmen Owens, Senior Academic Advisor
Lisa Raines, Senior Academic Advisor

Students should regularly consult the website for updates and changes to the B.B.A. program and college regulations that occur after publication of this catalog and for other notices of interest to undergraduate students.

The Robinson College of Business provides the Office of Undergraduate Academic Assistance for the benefit of its students.

Mission: This office supports the college’s mission of and commitment to academic excellence by assisting enrolled students in the development of meaningful educational plans that are compatible with their life goals. The office helps undergraduate students become knowledgeable about academic programs, pertinent regulations, and services available throughout the university.

Areas of responsibility: To support the undergraduate aspects of its mission, the Office of Undergraduate Academic Assistance and the University Advisement Center work with B.B.A. students in these areas:

  • to provide programs of study for each major offer
  • red by the college;
  • to indicate to transfer students the specific credits for work done at other institutions which can be applied toward the B.B.A. degree;
  • to assist students in course selections and schedule revisions each semester;
  • to explain catalog regulations;
  • to administer policies for the college and the university;
  • to refer students to other sources of help in the university.

Students advised by the Office of Undergraduate Academic Advisement are seen by appointment except during walk-in times that are provided for brief questions that can be resolved in ten or fewer minutes. Walk-in advisement is 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday and 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday. Additional walk-in hours are available during some phases of registration. Contact the Office of Undergraduate Academic Assistance for dates and times. Appointment hours are 8:30 a.m. – 4 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday and 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. on Thursday.

7040.10 Advisement

To ensure orderly progression through the degree program, students are urged to keep their catalogs and evaluations of credits readily available and to refer to them frequently as they schedule courses each semester. Students’ familiarity with their degree requirements is the foundation for advisement provided by the college.

B.B.A. students can be advised by academic advisers in the Office of Undergraduate Academic Assistance and the University Advisement Center as described in the preceding section. Advisement from these offices is not mandatory for the B.B.A. program, but the college encourages students with questions about their degree requirements or the academic regulations of the college or university to contact their adviser.

All students also may consult faculty members in the academic units of the college with questions about course content or for help in selecting major courses after reviewing the description of the major in the catalog. Students should contact the academic unit in advance to arrange a conference with a faculty adviser.

7045 Robinson Career Management Center

The Robinson Career Management Center
35 Broad St, 6th floor
404-413-7155
www.robinson.gsu.edu/career/

The Robinson Career Advancement Center is committed to pro-actively helping Robinson College of Business students and alumni manage their career, develop excellent job search skills and connect with high quality job opportunities, while providing employers with an outstanding recruiting experience. In addition, we provide employers with a central gateway for recruiting out current students and alumni

Jason Aldrich, Ed.D, Executive Director
404-413-7156, jaldrich@gsu.edu
Leads Career Advancement Center

Sharry Conroy, Associate Director, Undergraduate Career Management
404-413-7160, sconroy2@gsu.edu
BBA Career Advancement Programming, BBA Recruiting Liaison, Program Manager for Panthers on Wall Street and Panthers in London

Ben Harris, Career Counselor,
404-413-7164, BHarris55@gsu.edu
BBA contact for career exploration and development, including but not limited to, resumes, interviewing skills, offer negotiation, CareerLeader assessments, and job search. Mr Harris supports BBA students majoring in: Accounting, Business Economics, CIS, Finance and Real Estate. Also serves as a BCOM 3950 Lab Instructor.

La’Kesha Hughes, Senior Career Counselor
404-413-7161, LHughes@gsu.edu
BBA contact for career exploration and development, including but not limited to, resumes, interviewing skills, offer negotiation, CareerLeader assessments, and job search. Ms Hughes supports BBA students majoring in: Actuarial Science, Hospitality, Marketing, Managerial Sciences and Risk Management and Insucrance. Aslo serves as a BCOM 3950 Lab Instructor.

Marilyn Santiago, Director, Graduate Career Advancement
404-413-7165, msantiago@gsu.edu
MBA/MS Recruitment Liaison, Executive Career Coaching, Partnership Programs, Career EXPO

Brent Winner, Assistant Director, Employer Relations
404-413-7157, bwinner@gsu.edu
Contact for employer recruiting events at Robinson including but not limited to: On Campus Interviews and Student Information sessions. Point of contact for technical infastructure (including RCC) and point person for alumni seeking assistnce who have graduated more than one year ago.

Mission

The mission of Robinson Career Management is to help students in the Robinson College of Business effectively evaluate and implement their career plans. In addition, we help students and alumni manage their on-going career development. Fulfilling this mission includes offering students high-quality, individual services and information designed to help them meet their career objectives.

Services

The following services are available to undergraduates in the Robinson College of Business:

  • Individual career advising and assessment
  • Resume and cover letter critiques
  • Mock interviews
  • Job and internship postings
  • Campus interviews
  • Workshops pertaining to all aspects of the job search process.
  • RCC –  Robinson Career Connection – Our online career management system provides Robinson students with access to hundreds of internship, part time and full, time job opportunities.
  • We also offer a wealth of on-line resources. Contact your Career Counselor  for information and access codes.  Annual career fairs and networking events are sponsored to give students exposure to employers. These events offer an excellent opportunity to make personal contact and gather information concerning specific companies, internship programs, staffing needs, and industry trends.

7060 College Honors Day

Each spring semester a College Honors Day is observed to recognize students in the Robinson College of Business for their academic excellence.

7070 Beta Gamma Sigma

Membership in Beta Gamma Sigma is the highest general scholastic honor a business student can receive at Georgia State University, and it is recognized as such throughout the academic and business communities. Nominations for membership in this national honorary business fraternity occur early in spring semester. Second-semester juniors who are in the upper seven percent of their class and seniors in the upper ten percent of their class are eligible for nomination.

7080 Business Learning Community

Robinson College of Business

Suite 1100

404-413-7555

Dr. Marta Szabo White, Director

The Robinson College of Business offers a special Business Learning Community (BLC) for sophomore students in the fall and spring semesters. The BLC builds on the successful model of the Freshman Learning Community, giving students an integrated business curriculum and providing them with an introduction to the many programs offered in the Robinson College of Business. (See the Freshman Learning Community heading in a later chapter of this catalog.) Enrollment in the BLC is on a first-come/first-serve basis and requires a minimum 3.00 Georgia State GPA.

Students who are not a declared major in the Robinson College may be interested in the BLC program as the basis for a business minor. For students who are undecided about their major but have an interest in business, the BLC is a good way to get exposure to some business disciplines with required courses in the B.B.A. program. One of the major benefits of the BLC program is that its structure allows students to take multiple classes with a group of classmates, providing opportunities to work and learn together. The classes in the learning community are limited to 40 students, providing opportunities for more interaction with professors.

The Business Learning Community consists of the following grouping of courses:

Fall Semester:

  • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics
  • ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I
  • CIS 2010 Introduction to Computer Based Information Systems
  • Plus two additional three-hour courses of the student’s choice.

Spring Semester:

  • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ACCT 2102 Principles of Accounting II
  • BUSA 2106 Legal Environment of Business
  • Plus two additional three-hour courses of the student’s choice.

 

7090 Departments and Faculty

School of Accountancy

5th floor, Robinson College of Business Building,
404/413-7200

http://accountancy.robinson.gsu.edu

Galen R. Sevcik, Director
Faculty: Blunck, Borthick, Cao, Clark, D’Augusta, DeAngelis, Fang, Fenn, Lill, Majerczy, Moon, Mullis, Nathan, Park, Partridge, Ransopher,  Sevcik, Smeal, Smith, Stevens, Swanquist, Tafkov, Zhou

Department of Computer Information Systems

9th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7360
http://cis.robinson.gsu.edu

Bala Ramesh, Chair
Faculty: Akhlaghi, Baskerville, Faziollahi,Gimpel, Hsieh, Hong, Jabr, Keil, Maruping, Mathiassen, McDonald, McLean, Oh, Rai, Ramesh, , Robinson, Schmitz, Shim, Storey, Truex, Varshney, Welke, Xue

Department of Economics

5th floor, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies
404/413-0141
aysps.gsu.edu/econ/

Sally Wallace, Chair
Shelby Frost, Director of Undergraduate Studies
Undergraduate Program Advisors:
Shelby Frost (for students with last names A-I)
Paul Kagundu (for students with last names J – Q)
Glen Ross (for students with last names R – Z)

Department of Finance

12th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7310, Fax: 404/413-7312

Gerald D. Gay, Chair
Faculty: Agarwal, Ashraf, Aslan, Beard, Brown, Chen, Fendler, Gay, Godbey, Huang, Kadyrzhanova, Kini, Li, Mettler, Murray, Ruff, Ryan, Shi, Shrikhande, Yang, Yates

Institute of Health Administration

805 Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7630

Andrew T. Sumner, Director
Faculty: Baird, Cameron, Custer,  Ketsche, Mishra, Montanera, Sumner

Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration

210 Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7615

hospitality.robinson.gsu.edu

Debra F. Cannon, Director
Faculty: Barber, Cannon, Jackson, Kim, Poisson, Robbe

Institute of International Business

14th Floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7275

iib.robinson.gsu.edu

Daniel Bello, Director
Faculty: Bello, Boers, Bruce, Carrillo, Cavusgil, Dakhli, Doria, Gu, Kim, Liu, Loch, Nifadkar, Prime

Department of Managerial Sciences

10th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7525

mgmt.robinson.gsu.edu

Pamela S. Barr, Chair
Faculty: Alvarez-Garrido, Barr, Bogner, Bunch, Butler, Buysman, Byron, Choo, Conklin, Dimotakis, Dionne, Duhaime, Forquer, Grace, Gu, Hartnell, Lambert, Lim, Liu, Matherne, Maurer, Miles,Nargundkar,  O’Toole, Palladi, Ray, Roth, Samaddar, Verhaal, Wallace, White, Xia, Zhang

Department of Marketing

13th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7650

marketing.robinson.gsu.edu

Naveen Donthu, Chair
Bruce Pilling, Associate Chair
Faculty: Barksdale, Cobb-Walgren, Cosguner, Costello, Curasi, Dadzie, Donthu, Ellen, Eroglu, Hawley, Johnston, Kumar,  Lemley, Lohtia, Luo, Moschis, Nasser, Parker, Pilling, Rigdon, Saboo, Shah, Thornton, Umashankar, Verhage, Willis, Young, Zhao

Department of Real Estate

14th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7720

realestate.robinson.gsu.edu

Gerald D. Gay, Interim Chair
Faculty: Gibler, Wiley,  Yao

Department of Risk Management and Insurance

11th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7500
rmi.robinson.gsu.edu

Martin F. Grace, Chair
Faculty: Alexander, Bauer, Bidian, Binder, Ciccotello, del Valle, Grace, Grelecki, Harrison, Klein, Palmer, Peivandi, Peng, Phillips, Sherman, Shore, Subramanian, Thielman, Ulm, Varadarajan, Weston, Willey, Wood, Woodcock, Zanjani

7100 School of Accountancy

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Accounting

5th floor, Robinson College of Business Building,
404/413-7200

accountancy.robinson.gsu.edu

Course prefix: Acct

The undergraduate accounting program is designed to provide the foundation-level technical and analytical accounting knowledge and skills needed to become a professional in the accounting field and to pursue a fifth (graduate) year of accounting study. The primary emphasis of the program is preparation for students who wish to apply for admission to the Master of Professional Accountancy program. In addition, the program is designed to provide appropriate preparation for entry-level positions in business and for graduate study in law or other business fields. The B.B.A. in accounting focuses on broad business and accounting exposure based on a sound foundation of general education.

Accountants today are expected to participate extensively in the general area of business management. The profession of accountancy is becoming increasingly divergent, encompassing such areas as financial and operational auditing, operations research, information systems development and assurance, financial reporting, corporate tax planning, and cost analysis and control.

In recognition of the advisability of acquiring a broadly based education in liberal arts and general business subjects, as well as the necessity of a thorough foundation in the highly specialized and diversified fields of accounting, a person desiring a career in accounting is encouraged to complete the entire professional program of study leading to the Master of Professional Accountancy degree.

7100.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Accounting program. However, Accounting students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7100.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Accounting. However, Accounting majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7100.30 Program Academic Regulations

Minimum Grade Requirement to Satisfy Prerequisites to any Acct Course:

  • A Minimum of Grade of C- is required to satisfy the prerequisites to any accounting course.
  • Minimum Grade Requirement to enroll in ACCT 4111, and ACCT 4210: Students need a grade of B or higher in both ACCT 2101 and ACCT 2102, in order to enroll in ACCT 4111, and ACCT 4210.
  • Required Major Courses (credit hours): ACCT 4111(3), ACCT 4112(3), ACCT 4113 (3), ACCT 4210(3), ACCT 4310(3), ACCT 4510(3), and ACCT 4610(3), for a total of 21 credit hours.
  • Recommended Courses: PSYC 1101 or SOCI 1101 as the Core Area E social science electives; LGLS 4050 as an RCB elective; and PHIL 3730 as a non-RCB elective. Recommended courses for students planning to enter the Master of Professional Accountancy’s accounting systems specialization: MATH 2420 as a non-RCB elective; CIS 3260 as an RCB elective.
  • Other Requirement: Transfer credit toward the accounting major courses may not be more than five years old at the time the student enrolls. Students who reenroll after an absence of more than two years may retain major credit only for course work that is less than five years old at the time of reenrollment; this includes Georgia State credit and transfer credit.

7100.40 Certified Public Accountant (CPA) Examination

Taking the Uniform Certified Public Accountant (CPA) examination in the state of Georgia: Beginning with the November 2003 administration of the Uniform CPA Examination, candidates may qualify to take the examination based on having earned a baccalaureate degree with a concentration in accounting. A concentration in accounting is defined as completion of 20 semester hours in accounting subjects above the principles level at a 4-year accredited college or university that offers a baccalaureate degree.

Obtaining a license to practice as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) in the state of Georgia: A candidate must pass the CPA Exam and meet additional educational and work experience requirements, to obtain a license to practice as a CPA. Students must have completed no fewer than 150 semester hours of college credit, of which 30 semester hours have to be in accounting above the principles level and 24 semester hours in general business subjects. An applicant who meets the general, educational, and examination requirements will be issued a license to practice as a CPA upon presenting evidence that such applicant has attained two years, including 4,000 hours, of continuous experience in public accounting, under the supervision of a person licensed to practice public accounting, immediately preceding the date of application for the certificate. Five years, including 10,000 hours, of continuous employment in the accounting field in business or industry, under the supervision of a person licensed to practice public accounting, or in government or college teaching, may be accepted in lieu of the aforementioned experience requirement. Part-time experience is permitted if it is continuous.

Students may take the CPA Exam after obtaining their undergraduate degree in accounting from Georgia State University. However, the School of Accountancy recommends that students meet the licensing requirements of the law by being admitted to either the Master of Professional Accountancy or Master of Taxation degree programs after completing an undergraduate degree. Students who plan to enroll at the master’s level should become aware of the admission requirements early in their undergraduate studies; a strong academic record and satisfactory scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test are important factors in master’s-level admission.

7110 Department of Computer Information Systems

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Computer Information Systems
  2. Minor in Computer Information Systems

 

9th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7360

cis.robinson.gsu.edu

Bala Ramesh, Chair
Course prefix: CIS

In today’s highly competitive global environment, the effective deployment of information technology has become the key to organizational success. There is a continuing shortage of individuals with the combination of business and technology skills needed to develop and manage information systems that provide competitive advantage in the global marketplace. The mission of the CIS major in the B.B.A. program is to produce graduates able to fill this need. Students will learn how to combine their general business knowledge with the latest software engineering tools and techniques to create information systems needed by today’s organizations. Graduates will be prepared for careers in a variety of areas such as consulting, systems development, business process analysis, cyber security, IT project management, database administration, process architecture, and programming.

The Department of Computer Information Systems cooperates with the Department of Health Administration to offer a specialization in Health Informatics of the CIS major. The purpose of this specialization is to produce graduates that know how to effectively deploy information technology to innovate medical services and administrative processes within the healthcare industry. For more information, see Health Informatics below and robinson.gsu.edu/cis/health-informatics.html. The Department of Computer Information Systems cooperates with the Department of Mathematics and Statistics in offering a concentration in computer information systems associated with the degree Bachelor of Science with a major in mathematics. This program is described under the offerings of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics in the “College of Arts and Sciences” chapter of this catalog.

7110.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Computer Information Systems program. However, Computer Information Systems students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7110.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Computer Information Systems. However, Computer Information Systems majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7110.30 Program Academic Regulations

Required Major Courses: All undergraduate CIS majors must complete CIS 3001 Managing Information Technology Projects, CIS 3260 Introduction to Programming, CIS 3300 Analyzing Business Systems (Systems Analysis), CIS 3730 Designing and Managing Data (Database Management), and either CIS 4970 Internship in an IT organization or CIS 4980 Practicing Real-World IT Skills. Majors must take two additional CIS courses (not including CIS 2010). The requirement for CIS 3260 may be met with no credit hours awarded upon successful completion of approved online courses and exams in programming as directed by the CIS chair. CIS majors who excercise this CIS 3260 exam option must take additional CIS course (for a total of three CIS courses beyond the other three required CIS courses) to complete the 21 credit hour requirement.

Required Sets of Electives: The CIS Department required that students develop particular expertise in at least one Information Systems field as shown below. Please see the current version on the web at http://robinson.gsu.edu/resources2/files/cis/academic/cis-ug-curriculum-diagram.pdf for any changes in the IS field (track) required courses.

Additional information about individual courses appears at  http://robinson.gsu.edu/cis/courses.html

Other Requirements: (1) Students may take CIS 4970 or CIS 4980 only after completion of all required 3000-level business core and CIS courses. In addition, CIS 4980 may only be taken after completion of 15 credit hours of CIS courses beyond CIS 2010. (2) Transfer credit toward the CIS major courses may not be more than five years old at the time the student enrolls. Students who reenroll after an absence of more than two years may retain major credit only for course work that is less than five years old at the time of reenrollment; this includes Georgia State credit and transfer credit.

All CIS students must be proficient in the series of Computing Skills Prerequisites (CSP 1-8) listed in this catalog.

CIS Internship Program: The CIS department encourages internships for undergraduate CIS majors. Forthe overall internship process including identifying and getting approval for internships, please visit  http://robinson.gsu.edu/cis/internships.html

Health Informatics

The healthcare sector plays an increasingly important role in the US society and there is growing pressure to implement innovations that make it possible to deliver health services of higher quality and at lower costs. Healthcare institutions and processes are information-intensive in nature and the use of information technology (IT) to enable innovations has therefore been, and continues to be, in focus. On this background, there is a strong need for graduates that know how to effectively deploy information technology to innovate medical services and administrative processes within the healthcare industry. To graduate with a specialization in Health Informatics, students are required to complement a CIS major with the following RCB electives in Health Administration (9 hours): The Health Care System (HA 3900); Health Policy in the U.S. (HA 3910); Health Information Systems (HA 3970). For more information, seehttp://robinson.gsu.edu/cis/health-informatics.html.

7110.40 Minor in Information Systems

This IS minor is designed for undergraduate students who want to participate in the digital revolution that is transforming organizations and society. Information systems have become increasingly important in most fields including accounting, biology, communications, health, psychology, music, art & design, political science, sociology, and education. Students seeking a minor in Information Systems must complete 15 hours in upper-level CIS-prefixed courses. Non-business majors may substitute CIS 2010 for one CIS upper-level course.

All students pursuing a minor in Information Systems must maintain a 2.5 or higher GPA, and must earn a grade of C- or better in all courses counting toward the major. Please see http://robinson.gsu.edu/cis/minor.html for more information.

7120 Department of Economics

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Business Economics

5th floor, AYSPS Building
404/413-0141

Shiferaw Gurmu, Chair

Course Prefix: Econ

The Department of Economics is part of the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. For economics faculty listing, see the Department of Economics heading in the “Andrew Young School of Policy Studies” chapter of this catalog.

Economics examines the material prosperity of countries and their citizens in an interdependent world of limited resources and technological change. In doing so, it studies how decisions are made by private businesses, governments, and households in producing, consuming, and distributing goods. In general, economics is concerned with how society can obtain the greatest output from its limited resources. Economics is also concerned with monetary arrangements and their impact upon purchasing power and economic performance.

Economic principles yield basic insights into the workings of the market system and the national and international environment within which business operates. These principles provide analysis that is fundamental to understanding the organization and decisions of the government, business, and financial sectors. Economics also develops criteria for assessing the performance of the market systems and of governments regarding their efficiency and their impact upon the well being of consumers and workers.

Recent graduates with majors in economics have accepted positions as financial analysts for a real-estate financing firm and a major bank and as general manager for a recording studio, as well as having been accepted to prominent graduate programs in law and economics.

7120.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Economics program. However, Economics students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7120.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Economics. However, Economics majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7120.30 Program Academic Regulations

Required Major Courses: Econ 3900, 3910, 4999, and four other 4000-level economics courses approved by a B.B.A. faculty adviser. Econ 3900 and 3910 provide theoretical background for 4000-level courses and should be taken as soon as possible. Econ 4999 is only offered during the Fall and Spring semester of the academic year. The pre-requisites for Econ 4999 are Econ 3900, Econ 3910, and two 4000-level economics courses with a grade of C or better. Students are to plan accordingly with regard to the course pre-requisites and graduation.

Advisement for Major Courses: Economics majors must contact a faculty adviser in the department to discuss their selection of major courses. See economics.gsu.edu for more information about economics advisement.

7130 Department of Finance

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Finance
  2. Minor in Finance

12th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7310, Fax: 404/413-7312
http://finance.robinson.gsu.edu

Gerald D. Gay, Chairman

Course Prefix: Fi

The goal of the undergraduate finance program is to prepare graduates to succeed in entry-level positions in finance and elsewhere in business. Careers in finance are available in nearly every organization ranging from the small entrepreneurial firm to the large corporate organization as well as in the financial services industry including commercial and investment banking, investment management, insurance organizations and securities firms. Students completing the finance program will possess a number of proficiencies including a strong technical knowledge of finance, the ability to critically analyze and solve problems associated with the financial operations of a firm, and to prepare and present business reports of a financial perspective.

7130.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Finance program. However, Finance students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7130.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Finance. However, Finance majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7130.30 Program Academic Regulations

Notice to all students: A minimum grade of C- is required to satisfy the prerequisites to any finance course.

Required Major Courses: FI 4000 (six semester hours), FI 4020, and three additional 4000-level finance courses. See the recommended sequence below.

Recommended Sequence: The Department of Finance encourages all students pursuing a major in finance to take FI 4000 and FI 4020 early in their program of study. FI 4000 is a prerequisite to all 4000-level finance courses except FI 4020. Students may take FI 4000 and FI 4020 in any order or concurrently.

The following sets of electives in the major are suggested for those students who wish to develop particular expertise in various fields of finance. These are simply suggestions.

Honors Track in Finance

The Department of Finance also offers a two-semester, 18 credit hour Honors Track in Finance designed to provide Robinson’s most accomplished undergraduate finance majors with a deeper understanding of the discipline, a distinguished skill set, and a strategic advantage throughout their careers. For additional information, please see the Honor’s track website http://finance.robinson.gsu.edu/academic-programs/bba/honors/

7140 Institute of Health Administration

805 Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7630

Andrew T. Sumner, Director

Course Prefix: HA

Health care represents the largest single sector of the economy, and many students will ultimately assume professional roles in fields that interact with health care in some manner. Health administration careers are available in many businesses and health care organizations in areas such as hospital and health system administration, physician practice management, consulting, research, marketing, information systems, managed care administration, finance, accounting, compliance, and human resources management. Since all consumers are part of an increasingly complex health care system, health administration courses are relevant and appropriate for all undergraduate majors.

Upper-level elective courses in health administration, perspectives courses in the core curriculum, and freshman learning communities are offered for those interested in acquiring general knowledge of the health care system, particularly those considering careers related to health care such as physicians, nurses, or other providers. Specifically, HA 3900, Introduction to the U.S. Health Care System, which offers introduction to the organization of health care delivery in the U.S., HA 3910, Health Policy in the United States, which examines how health care policy is developed, and HA 3970, Health Information Systems, which provides an overview of information systems in healthcare, are three elective courses . A health informatics specialization is available in the BBA computer information systems major. Although no BBA major is available in health administration, graduate degree programs are offered: Master of Business Administration/Master of Health Administration joint programs, Master of Science in Health Administration, and the MBA with a concentration in health administration.

The Institute of Health Administration at Georgia State University has a primary mission to prepare future executives to assume responsible managerial positions in health services and business organizations. It is the only program in North Georgia accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education and is a full member of the Association of University Programs in Health Administration. Over 1000 graduates hold numerous executive positions in health care and business throughout the nation.

7150 Honors Program

Robinson College of Business
Suite 1001
404/413-7555

http://robinson.gsu.edu/programs/undergraduate-programs/honors-program/

Dr. Marta Szabo White, Director

Purpose

The Honors Program provides a cohort learning experience for top undergraduate Robinson College of Business (RCB) majors who strive to excel academically and accept the challenge of becoming strong, exemplary global business leaders. Honors classes are required for the junior business core courses, junior communications course, RCB (2) electives, and Business Policy (capstone). A total of 27 hours of honors classes must be taken to graduate with RCB honors. The RCB Mentoring program is the cornerstone of the college’s signature program, where honors students are paired with experience professionals who share their expertise and guidance through individual mentoring sessions. Students are also strongly encouraged to participate in a study abroad program. In addition, at least one professional/social event for the RCB Honors students will be offered each semester. Honors students will also have the opportunity to network with Atlanta business professionals by serving as RCB student ambassadors at both the RCB Hall of Fame dinner and RCB Alumni Awards program. The RCB Honors Program presents students with a forum for unique opportunities, special recognitions and enhanced career prospects, while enriching the quality of their education.

Admission

Full-time students majoring in business who have completed at least 45 hours with a GSU grade point average of 3.5, or junior transfers who have a transfer GPA of 3.5  may apply. An interview with the faculty director of the RCB Honors Program is required for admission into the program. Students who have participated in the Freshman and/or Business (sophomore) Learning Communities are encouraged to apply.

Scholastic Standards

Students must maintain a 3.5 grade point average (GPA) in order to remain in the honors program. A student whose GPA falls below 3.5 will be given one academic semester (fall, spring or summer) in which to attain a 3.5 GPA again.

Honors Recognition

Students who successfully complete the RCB Honors program will receive special recognition in the commencement program, on their transcript and their diploma will be distinguished with an honors seal. In addition, RCB honors students will be recognized at the RCB Honors/Awards program.

 

7160 Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Hospitality Administration
  2. Minor in Hospitality Administration
  3. Certificates in Hospitality Administration
  4. Masters in Global Hospitality Management

210 Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7615

http://hospitality.robinson.gsu.edu

Debra F. Cannon, Director

Course Prefix: HADM

The mission of the Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration is to develop hospitality leaders in a global society.

The primary goal is to provide a well-integrated curriculum incorporating courses in the arts, sciences, general business theory, and hospitality applications that will prepare our students for management and leadership positions in the hospitality industry.

The Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration was named in honor of the late founder of the Days Inn Hotel chain. Cecil B. Day is remembered as an astute businessman who developed Days Inn to national prominence. He was equally respected because he gave freely of his time and wealth to worthy organizations. His legacy of excellence is the foundation upon which the program bases its philosophy for preparing future generations of hospitality executives.

The Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration prepares its graduates for management careers in numerous hospitality industry segments including: hotels and lodging, resorts, restaurants, private clubs, food service, tourism, event planning, meeting planning, festivals, trade shows and airline and airport management. Graduates are awarded a bachelor of business administration degree with a major in hospitality administration.

Students majoring in hospitality administration will take 21 semester hours of required hospitality courses and 9semester hours of elective hospitality courses. These core courses will give the student a general knowledge of all segments of the hospitality industry. Specialized elective courses and industry field study allow students to gain additional insight regarding specific industry segments.

The school has the support of local, regional, and national hospitality executives. Georgia State University was the first institution of higher education to offer specialized courses in fair and trade show management. The school was chosen in 1986 by the Club Managers Association of America to develop, produce, and direct their Business Management Institute for certification of club managers across the United States and this program continues today. The School of Hospitality works closely with leading professional associations such as the Georgia Hotel and Lodging Association and the Georgia Restaurant Association. Student organizations are tied to these professional organizations and offer excellent leadership opportunities for students interested in the hospitality field. The School of Hospitality has student chapters of the American Hotel and Lodging Association, the Club Managers Association of America, the International Association of Events and Expositions and the National Society of Minorities in Hospitality.

The program was accredited in 1992 by the Accreditation Commission on Programs in Hospitality Administration, a specialized accrediting body and reaccredited in 2000 and 2007. The program is an institutional member of the International Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Education, the principle academic and professional association for hospitality education programs.

The School of Hospitality has unique state-of-the-art facilities. The School’s Hospitality Learning Center is the first dedicated classroom in the nation located within a major convention center, the Georgia World Congress Center. The School’s Culinary Learning Center features a new food production kitchen lab.

The faculty of the program call upon practitioners to lecture on specialized industry topics. Industry managers and executives work with faculty and college administration to maintain a program relevant to industry needs. The school offers scholarships which are awarded annually.

7160.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Hospitality Administration program. However, Hospitality Administration students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7160.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Hospitality Administration. However, Hospitality Administration majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7160.30 Program Academic Regulations

Required Major Courses: HADM 3010, HADM 3401, HADM 3402, HADM 3720, HADM 3750, HADM 3760, HADM 4100, HADM 4800.

Robinson College of Business (RCB) Electives: As an exception to normal degree requirements, hospitality majors are required to select RCB electives from courses in the hospitality major. This exception is provided to fulfill the requirements of the hospitality administration accrediting body that hospitality majors specialize in more than one area of the discipline.

Faculty Advisement: All new hospitality administration majors are invited to initially contact the department.  The school offers orientation  materials at the beginning of each semester for new hospitality majors. Majors should call the school office to schedule appointments 404-413-7615

Industry Field Study Requirement: All students majoring in hospitality administration must have practical industry experience in order to be approved for graduation. Each student is given the opportunity to apply career objectives and gain exposure to the work environment as it actually exists in the hospitality industry. This experience assists in developing professional work habits, provides for a smooth transition into full-time employment, helps develop self-confidence, and provides exposure to the different components of the hospitality industry. Students who have full-time jobs in nonhospitality occupations do not have to quit their jobs; however, in order to satisfy the requirements for the work-study experience, students are advised to begin working part-time in an adviser-approved hospitality position as soon as possible.

A required noncredit course, HADM 4900, is offered each semester to assist students in meeting this work-study requirement. Students must register for this course during their senior year. They should obtain a course description packet from the school office and contact the Work Study Coordinator in the school for more detailed information.

7160.40 Certificate in Hospitality Administration

The Certificate in Hospitality Administration (CHAD) program is designed for nonhospitality majors. Admission to the CHAD program is subject to the minimum Georgia State cumulative GPA required for entrance into RCB upper-level classes. Obtaining the Certificate of Hospitality Administration is based on completion of at least four stipulated undergraduate hospitality courses with a combined GPA of 3.0 for these courses.

The certificate option is available for undergraduate, graduate, and postbaccalaureate students who are not current hospitality majors. Certificates are awarded by the Cecil B. Day School of Hospitality Administration to undergraduate and graduate students upon graduation from Georgia State University. For postbaccalaureate students, the certificates are awarded upon completion of the four courses with a cumulative GPA of 3.0.

This certificate focuses on operational aspects of hotels, restaurants, private clubs; meeting, special-event, and trade show management; and managerial functional areas in hospitality such as human resources, marketing, law, and financial analysis.

Specialization options within the certificate program are available. These specialty areas include hospitality operations, aviation management, culinary management, event management and meeting and tradeshow management. Please visit the School’s website (www.hospitality.robinson.gsu.edu) to find out about specific requirements for each type of certificate.

Certificate Applications and Fees. Interested students should apply for the certificate program through the School of Hospitality Administration. There are no additional fees required for the Certificate in Hospitality Administration.

7170 Institute of International Business

14th Floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7275

Daniel Bello, Director

The explosion of technological advances coupled with the rapid expansion of world trade means that business managers function in an economic environment where a local decision can have implications around the world almost immediately. An understanding of the global aspects of business is vital to success in today’s world.

Any BBA major or undergraduate GSU student may obtain a minor in international business.  The institute offers several upper-level electives that can enhance the program of any student.  IB 3090, International Business Operations; IB 4020, International Trade Management; IB 4080, Legal Issues in International Business, IB 4100, Introduction to International Entrepreneurship and IB 4410, Study Abroad: Analysis of Regional International Business Practices, which can be repeated for different world regions and focus on different disciplines. The Institute of International Business participates in the undergraduate program in several ways. An integral part of the Business Learning Community described earlier in section 7110 is BUSA 3000, Globalization and Business Practices. BUSA 3000 is also offered in Spanish.

Certificate in International Business

The minor in International Business, open to all Georgia State University undergraduates, is designed to increase students’ knowledge and develop the necessary skills in order to function effectively in today’s dynamic global environment. Students who are seeking opportunities with a firm that has existing international operations, or one that plans to internationalize and/or expand its global footprint, will benefit from completing their major area concentration with a minor in international business. Hands-on experiences can be an integral part of the Minor in International Business. The Minor prepares students to extend functional area knowledge with internationally-oriented skills that will give a competitive edge in today’s competitive job market. For additional information about the minor, please consult the website: http://iib.robinson.gsu.edu/academic-programs/minor/

Study Abroad Programs

The Institute promotes international learning experiences through a strong portfolio offering of study abroad programs. The study abroad programs range from two-to-three week intensive experiences to semester- and year-long programs. The programs span disciplines and geographic regions, affording students in all business disciplines the rich rewards of an international study experience. RCB currently offers programs in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, Hungary/Czech Republic, Italy, South Africa, Turkey, and Switzerland. Semester- and/or year-long options are available in Germany, France, Mexico, and Italy. Other locations are possible through our partner institutions. Students must be in good standing with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. Additional requirements vary by program. For individual program descriptions and application information, consult the Institute of International Business website at http://iib.robinson.gsu.edu/study-abroad/

 

 

GSU AIESEC

AIESEC is an international non-profit organization that strives for spreading cultural understanding by means of international exchange. Being the world’s largest student organization, AIESEC serves as an “international platform for young people to discover and develop their potential so as to have a positive impact on society”. Currently, AIESEC occupies over 1,100 universities spanning across more than 100 countries and territories AIESEC encourages and helps students to discover both their social and professional potentials. Through AIESEC, students have access to leadership positions, traineeship abroad opportunities, and conferences.

AIESEC offers unparalleled leadership development experiences to its members and creates a network of global change agents that have a positive impact on our society. The AIESEC Experience includes international internships, leadership opportunities, and a global learning environment. AIESEC also offers regional, national, and international conferences where members can network with people from around the globe and discuss international issues

For additional information and announcements, consult the website at http://iib.robinson.gsu.edu/student-resources/aiesec-gsu/.

7180 Department of Managerial Sciences

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Managerial Sciences

10th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7525

Pamela S. Barr, Chair

Course Prefix: MGS

Skilled management is the backbone of successful enterprise. Career specialties in the managerial sciences, such as business analysis, human resource management, operations management, and entrepreneurship provide students with highly coveted qualifications to advance their careers quickly. Students receiving a degree in managerial sciences will be poised to assume leadership positions in their organizations and industries, with entry-level positions available in such diverse areas as human resource management, business analysis, regional management, general management, operations management, and entrepreneurial ventures, reflecting a growing market for talented, well-trained specialists in the managerial sciences.

7180.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Managerial Sciences program. However, Managerial Sciences students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7180.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Managerial Sciences. However, Managerial Sciences majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7180.30 Program Academic Regulations

Required Major Courses: MGS 4000, MGS 4300, MGS 4700, and four additional 4000-level managerial sciences courses. The faculty strongly urges students wanting to maximize career opportunities to focus the majority of those four additional courses in one of four career tracks.

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT*

BUSINESS ANALYSIS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP*

OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

*Students following one of these tracks would choose a fourth elective course (any course with a MGS prefix, including courses from the other three career tracks).

 

7190 Department of Marketing

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Marketing
  2. Minor in Marketing
  3. Certificate in Professional Sales

13th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7650

Naveen Donthu, Chair
Bruce Pilling, Associate Chair

Course Prefix: MK

Marketing is an exciting, dynamic process through which customer needs and wants are determined and satisfied through the conception, development, promotion, exchange, and distribution of goods and services. The undergraduate program in marketing provides students with fundamental preparation in general marketing and an understanding of markets and customers, product development, pricing strategies, advertising and promotion, and methods of distribution. The program also develops the student’s capacity to solve managerial problems in marketing and prepares men and women to enter careers in the field. A wide range of career opportunities is available to marketing graduates. Marketing management is often the path to the top of the business organization. Entry-level positions are available in selling, product development, advertising, promotion, physical distribution, industrial marketing, marketing research, customer service, and many other specialties. The challenges of marketing require men and women with creative ability, intelligence, and analytical skill that are prepared to fill an ever-increasing number of senior staff and executive positions.

7190.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Marketing program. However, Marketing students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7190.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Marketing. However, Marketing majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7190.25 Program Academic Regulations

Required Major Courses: MK 4010, MK 4100, MK 4200, MK 4900 and three additional 4000-level courses in marketing. MK 3010 (required for all BBA students) is not included in the 21 hour course requirement for the marketing major.

Recommended Sequence: Take MK 4100 as early as possible. MK 4900 should be taken during the last semester of the senior year.

The following sets of major courses are suggested by the faculty for those students who wish to specialize in various fields. These are simply suggestions:

All students pursuing a minor in Marketing must maintain a 2.5 or higher GPA. Students must have 45 hours of college credit before enrolling for upper-level Marketing courses. Students seeking a minor in Marketing should consult the recommended sets of MK courses for Marketing majors, according to their individual interests.

7190.30 Minor in Marketing

Students seeking a minor in Marketing must complete 15 hours in upper-level MK-prefixed courses. A minor in Marketing must include MK 3010 (Basic Marketing) and MK 4100 (Buyer Behavior). Students must take ECON 2106 (Principles of Microeconomics) as a prerequisite for MK 3010, but the course may also be used to partially satisfy Area E requirements. Students pursuing a BBA with a minor in Marketing must take BCOM 3950 as a co-requisite for MK 4100 and a prerequisite for other 4000-level MK courses. Non-business majors may substitute one of the following courses, or a comparable upper-level course that emphasizes effective oral / written communication, for BCOM 3950:

  • ENGL 3130 Business Writing
  • [SPCH 3010] Advanced Public Speaking
  • [SPCH 3210] Business and Professional Communication
  • JOUR 3500 Public Relations

All students pursuing a minor in Marketing must maintain a 2.5 or higher GPA, and must earn a grade of C- or better in all courses counting toward the major. Students must have 45 hours of college credit before enrolling for upper-level Marketing courses.

7190.35 Certificate in Professional Sales

Robinson’s certificate program is unique among sales programs offered by universities across the United States. The curriculum is designed to produce well-rounded business people who have specialized skills in the important aspects of selling. The instructors are not only some of the most prominent research faculty in the science and art of selling in the country but are also accomplished. successful practitioners with real world experience.

The Benefits of Receiving a Certificate in Professional Sales

Perhaps the most important benefit you will receive from this rigorous program is knowledge and skill development to help you be successful in actual sales situations. Additionally, you will receive special recognition for extraordinary success in the are of sales. Moreover, the faculty and staff of the program work with the business community to expose job opportunities to you that are outstanding. In short, when you are successful in attaining this certificate, you will be prepared and platformed well for your  job after graduation.

 

Required Sales Courses

Required Non-Marketing Electives

* In order to receive the Certificate in Professional Sales in addition to your BBA with a major in Marketing, you must earn a minimum of a B-or better in the above courses

Application Process

  1. Apply to : Christopher Lemley, The Professional Sales and Leadership Program, Department of Marketing, Georgia State University. The application email must include contact information, reasons why you want to be in the program and the reason why you should be admitted to the program.
  2. After review of the application and grades to date, the faculty and staff of the program will notify you of your tentative acceptance. If you are tentatively accepted, you will interview with a panel of the faculty and professionals from the business community for final acceptance into the program
  3. When you are accepted into the program, you must sign a letter of agreement between yourself and the faculty in the program agreeing to the terms to which you will hold yourself accountable to successfully complete the program and earn the certificate in Professional Sales.

For more information, ask your instructor or contact Chris Lemley at clemley@gsu.edu or 404-413-7668

 

7190.40 Business Communication Programs

Beverly Y. Langford, Coordinator

Course Prefix: BCOM
Effective communication allows individuals to understand each other, encourages people to take action, and motivates others to think creatively and critically. Business Communication Programs offer undergraduate and graduate classes that prepare students to effectively handle the demanding communication tasks of the twenty-first century. Students develop professional communication skills and learn how culture, ethics, and technology affect communication. Faculty members bring experience to Business Communication Programs from academic disciplines, as well as corporations, and address communication issues based on diversity and globalization. Strong communication skills are vital for all disciplines today. The program continues to evolve to meet the advanced communication requirements of business students at Georgia State University.

7200 Department of Real Estate

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Real Estate
  2. Minor in Real Estate

14th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7720

Gerald D. Gay, Interim Chair

Course Prefix: RE

Individuals who deal in land assets, as investors, brokers, appraisers, analysts, financiers, or developers, require substantial awareness of the community’s political and economic characteristics plus a thorough knowledge of the economics involved in each investment situation. The curriculum in real estate is designed to provide the student with an understanding of (1) the various phases of real estate activity, (2) the economic and social services relating to land use that are performed by individuals and institutions, and (3) the forms of business and professional services necessary to support real estate activity.

7200.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Real Estate program. However, Real Estate students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7200.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Real Estate. However, Real Estate majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7200.30 Program Academic Regulations

Required Major Courses: RE 3010, RE 4050, RE 4150, RE 4160,  and three additional 4000-level courses in real estate.

7200.40 Minor in Real Estate

Students seeking a minor in Real Estate must complete 15 hours in Real Estate: RE 3010, RE 4050, RE 4150, and two Real Estate-prefix elective course. All students pursuing a minor in Real Estate must maintain a 2.5 or higher GPA in the minor, and must earn a grade of C- or better in all courses counting toward the minor. Prerequisites for courses are required unless consent of the instructor is given. Students must have 45 hours of college credit before enrolling in Real Estate courses.

7210 Department of Risk Management and Insurance

Programs Offered:

  1. B.B.A. in Actuarial Science
  2. Minor in Actuarial Science
  3. B.B.A. in Risk Management and Insurance
  4. Minor in Risk Management and Insurance

11th floor, Robinson College of Business Building
404/413-7500
rmi.robinson.gsu.edu

Conrad S. Ciccotello, Interim Chair

The Department of Risk Management and Insurance is an interdisciplinary academic unit. It offers undergraduate majors in actuarial science and in risk management and insurance, together with courses in the areas of legal studies and personal financial planning.

7220 Actuarial Science

Eric Ulm, Faculty Adviser

Course Prefix: AS

Actuaries have been called financial architects and social mathematicians because of their unique blend of analytical and business skills in the insurance and financial services industry, as consultants in firms that specialize in employee benefits and pensions, in the government sector, and in a variety of other roles. To be recognized as a qualified actuary, a person should become a member of the Society of Actuaries or the Casualty Actuarial Society. Admission to membership is obtained by passing a series of examinations given by the societies. Completion of the actuarial science program at Georgia State University greatly enhances the possibility of passing the examinations given by the actuarial societies.

The tremendous demand for such highly trained persons makes a career in this area very rewarding financially and in providing the satisfaction that comes from membership in a well-recognized profession.

In order to meet the critical shortage of actuarial personnel in this region, the Southeastern Actuaries Club endorsed the establishment of the actuarial program at Georgia State University as part of the university’s comprehensive insurance educational activity. The program continues to have the strong support of the actuarial profession. Inquiries concerning the actuarial profession or the details of the program at Georgia State University should be directed to the department.

7220.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Actuarial Science program. However, Actuarial Science students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7220.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Actuarial Science. However, Actuarial Science majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7220.30 Program Academic Regulations

Required Major Courses: FI 4000: AS 4140, AS 4230, AS 4350 and pick two out of three from AS 4320, AS 4350, and AS 4510

Other Required Courses: MATH 2212, MATH 2215, as well as MATH 4752 or ECON 4950  must be taken in place of the non-RCB electives. For students with appropriate mathematics background, MATH 2211 should be taken in core area A in place of MATH 1111 (college algebra) or in place of MATH 1113 (precalculus) in core Area D. Students who make one or both of these substitutions will choose one or two non-RCB electives, as appropriate.  MATH 4751 should be taken in place of MGS 3100 in the junior business core.  MATH 2215 must be completed with a grade of C or higher.

MATH 2215 must be completed with a grade of C or higher.

RMI 3750 and RMI 4350 must be taken in place of RCB electives; grades of C or higher are required.

It is highly recommended that new actuarial science majors consult with their major adviser at their earliest convenience so that an efficient program can be constructed in accordance with the unique nature of the actuarial science major and course scheduling requirements.

7230 Legal Studies

Course Prefix: LGLS

The Legal Studies Courses offered through the Department of Risk Management and Insurance afford a base for scholarship and teaching at the intersection of law and business. Legal Studies courses provide non-professional legal education open to business students in both the J. Mack Robinson College Business and those in the broader university community.

Students can receive a minor in the BBA-RMI program that emphasizes legal transactions and risk. Doing so provides non-major students the opportunity to examine legal approaches to the management of risk exposures in corporate and personal settings.  All business majors may find the minor attractive but specific majors that should find the minor especially attractive include accounting and managerial sciences, economics, political science and pre-law students,

The Legal Studies course offerings are among the most popular at the undergraduate level in the college.

BUSA 2106 Legal Environment of Business

This course provides the business student with a study of the interrelationship of law, ethics, and business.

LGLS 3020 Introduction to the Law

This course is an introduction to the law, a multifaceted and broad discipline which affects every aspect of our society. The course provides an overview of the legal system and legal analytical models.

LGLS 4030 The Legal Process

The course gives students a better understanding of the legal process, the role of the primary actors in the process, how they think and act, and why.

LGLS 4050 Legal Transactions and Risk

This course examines legal transactions in the corporate environment and provides a conceptual framework for examining contracts and other transactions to enable students to minimize and/or allocate risk to produce more legal certainty in business.

LGLS 4060 Internet Law

This course examines how the U.S. legal system is evolving to accommodate the Internet’s impact on business practices, society and values. The course covers a wide range of Internet-related legal issues including technology and the law, court jurisdiction over Internet-related business activities, intellectual property, e-commerce, taxation of Internet sales, privacy in cyberspace, on-line defamation, information security, cyber-crimes, and government regulation of Internet services.

7240 Risk Management and Insurance

Harold Weston, Adviser

Course Prefix: RMI

The program in risk management and insurance strives to prepare qualified and motivated students for positions of leadership and responsibility in risk management, insurance, and other financial services businesses and in general business and government. The Bachelor of Business Administration in Risk Management and Insurance challenges the student both quantitatively and qualitatively as it emphasizes critical thinking for decision making under uncertainty. Qualified students can find excellent opportunities for creative work, professional recognition, financial reward, and public service within this degree program.

The major has two tracks of study.  The first track is for those who desire to work in the insurance industry or in risk management in general.  The required courses introduce students to the business of insurance and risk management from a corporate perspective.  Elective course can allow the student a degree of specialization in life insurance, property liability insurance, or risk management. Graduates of the risk management and insurance track find employment as brokers/agents providing professional risk management counseling and market placement services for clients, as consultants and personal financial planners, and in the underwriting, marketing, claims adjusting, planning, governmental relations, and financial management activities of insurers.

The second track is for those with an interest in risk analysis.  This track is for those who are interested in the understanding how to model risk, how to assess risk, and how to communicate risk in a business or governmental setting.  Students will take courses in risk modeling, legal risk analysis, regulation, economics, and policy. Graduates in the risk analysis track find a variety of career opportunities open to them as risk analysts within the risk management and insurance business, in other financial institutions, and  in community and government agencies.

7240.10 Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Risk Management and Insurance program. However, Risk Management and Insurance students are required to meet all University and College admission requirements.

7240.20 Program Financial Information

There are no special fees associated with majoring in Risk Management and Insurance. However, Risk Management and Insurance majors must pay all tuition and fees charged by the University and the College.

7240.30 Program Academic Regulations

Focus on Risk Management & Insurance Required Major Courses

and pick three of the following:

RMI 3500, RMI 4010, RMI 4020, RMI 4530, RMI 4700, RMI 4391, RMI 4530, FI 4020, LGLS 4050, or PFP 4000.

Students who lack broad knowledge of insurance principles, markets, and institutions are strongly encouraged to begin their course of studies with RMI 3500.

Focus on Risk Analysis Suggested Major Courses

These courses should be taken in the following order, but please speak to the Departmental Advisor to obtain advise about sequencing.

and pick one from the following:

RMI 3500, RMI 4010, RMI 4020, RMI 4530, RMI 4700, FI 4020, LGLS 4050, or PFP 4000.

Other Required Courses for Risk Analysis Track: Math 1220 must be taken in place of the non-RCB electives. For students with appropriate mathematics background, MATH 1220 should be taken in core area A in place of MATH 1111 (college algebra) or in place of MATH 1113 (precalculus) in core Area D. Students who make one or both of these substitutions will choose one or two non-RCB electives, as appropriate.  RMI 3750 must be completed with a grade of C or higher. ECON 4950 is a prerequisite to RMI 4050 and should be included as a Non-RCB elective.

It is highly recommended that new RMI majors with an interest in risk analysis consult with their major adviser at their earliest convenience so that an efficient program can be constructed in accordance with the unique nature of the track and course scheduling requirements.

If students cannot take the Risk Analysis Clinic due to timing or availability issues, the Department Advisor will suggest an acceptable substitute elective

Obtaining a letter of completion for the Risk Analysis track is based on completion of all the recommended courses.

7250 Minor in Entrepreneurship

7251 Program Description and Objectives

The Minor in Entrepreneurship, open to all Georgia State University undergraduates, is designed to impart the enthusiasm, skills, knowledge, passion and commitment necessary to develop entrepreneurs among the diverse Georgia State University undergraduate student population. It will provide the basic skills necessary for students to turn creative ideas into business ventures. Students successfully completing this minor will have an understanding of effective entrepreneurial thinking, the ability to recognize entrepreneurial opportunities, and basic capabilities in the core skills needed to launch new ventures.

7252 Program Curriculum

7252.1 Program Requirements

Thirty (30) credit hours and permission of an authorized advisor for this minor are required to declare a Minor in Entrepreneurship. Pre-requisites for specific courses within the minor are required unless consent of the instructor is given. Courses that count toward a student’s major cannot also count toward this minor.

Satisfactory completion of the following courses is suggested prior to declaring this minor.

ACCT 2101  Principles of Accounting I
BUSA 2106  Legal Environment of Business (3)
ECON 2100  Global Economy (3 credit hours)
ECON 2105  Principles of Macroeconomics (3) or
ECON 2106  Principles of Microeconomics (3)
ENGL 1102  English Composition II (3)
MATH 1070  Elementary Statistics (3)
SOCI 1160  Introduction to Social Problems (3)

7252.2 Required Courses for the Minor in Entrepreneurship (15 hours)

Students pursuing the Minor in Entrepreneurship must take five (5) courses in one of the two sequences below; courses that count toward a student’s major cannot also count toward this minor.

Students graduating with a degree not offered by the Robinson College of Business; for example the Bachelor of Interdisciplinary Studies degrees:

BUSA 3090  Survey of Business Principles for Non-Business Students
ENI 3101  Entrepreneurial Thinking for Startups
ENI 3102  The Startup Venture
ENI 3103  Commercializing the Startup

and one course from the list of Minor in Entrepreneurship Electives below.

Students graduating with a degree offered by the Robinson College of Business, including dual degree students where one degree is from the Robinson College of Business:

ENI 3101  Entrepreneurial Thinking for Startups
ENI 3102  The Startup Venture
ENI 3103  Commercializing the Startup

and two courses from the list of Minor in Entrepreneurship Electives below.

Minor in Entrepreneurship Electives

Note that these courses may have prerequisites that must be satisfied separately unless consent of the instructor is given.

ENI 4100  From Startup to Growth Company
MGS 4500  Entrepreneurship/New Venture Management
MGS 4550  Managing a Family Business
MGS 4560  Small Business Management
MGS 4590  Entrepreneurship Field Study
MK 3010  Marketing Management
MK 4305  Social Media Marketing
MK 4330  Principles of Professional Sales
MK 4850  Marketing for Entrepreneurs

Other courses can be substituted by permission of the program advisor.

Process of Admission

Students wishing to declare a Minor in Entrepreneurship must file the proper paperwork with the Undergraduate Student Advisement Center or their College’s Office of Academic Assistance. The student’s advisor will determine the student’s eligibility and process the paperwork accordingly.

7260 Graduate Programs Offered by the J. Mack Robinson College of Business

Georgia State University offers through the J. Mack Robinson College of Business graduate programs leading to the following degrees:

  1. Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration
  2. Master of Business Administration
  3. Master of Business Administration/Juris Doctor
  4. Master of Business Administration/Master of Health Administration
  5. Master of Actuarial Science
  6. Master of Science in Risk Management and Insurance
  7. Master of International Business
  8. Master of Global Hospitality Management
  9. Master of Professional Accountancy
  10. Master of Professional Accountancy/Juris Doctor
  11. Master of Science in Business Economics
  12. Master of Science in Managerial Science
  13. Master of Science in Marketing
  14. Master of Science in Health Administration
  15. Master of Science in Information Systems
  16. Master of Science in Information Systems Audit and Control
  17. Master of Science on Managing Information Technology
  18. Master of Science in Real Estate
  19. Master of Science in Wealth Management
  20. Master of Taxation

Information concerning the programs leading to the graduate degrees is contained in the university’s graduate catalog. Inquiries concerning masters’ programs should be directed to the Office of Graduate Recruiting and Student Services of the J. Mack Robinson College of Business (605 RCB Building, 404/413-7167) at least six months in advance of the desired time of entry. Inquiries concerning the doctoral program should be directed to the Doctoral Program Office, 831 RCB Building, 404/413-7070.

The J. Mack Robinson College of Business also offers graduate certificate programs in accounting, enterprise risk management, information systems, brand and customer management, and strategic sales leadership.