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8000 School of Public Health

Graduate programs in the School of Public Health are described in detail in this chapter. See subsections for specific program information as well as policies and procedures. Information about the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in public health is available in the School of Public Health section of the undergraduate catalog. Interested students should visit the School of Public Health website at publichealth.gsu.edu for updates on our degree offerings.

About the School of Public Health

The School of Public Health (SPH) is a multi-disciplinary, research-based unit, drawing upon partnerships with community members and organizations, dedicated to the mission of providing the high quality and relevant teaching, research, and service needed to evolve public health practice in a changing world. By investigating the contemporary problems that challenge diverse urban communities, the SPH is preparing the next generation of public health professionals to make a difference through leadership, scholarship, and practice in Georgia communities and around the globe. The School of Public Health achieves this mission by applying existing scholarship within Georgia State University to priority public health problems, particularly those that are aimed at reducing health disparities in urban settings. Training and research programs focus on both building the science base that underlies public health practice, as well as applying effective interventions that have been demonstrated to improve the public health. Academic and training efforts emphasize the basic prevention sciences (e.g., emerging infectious diseases, immunology, virology, bioinformatics, genomics, and geographic sciences), as well as applied public health efforts (e.g., chronic disease prevention, health promotion, environmental health, program evaluation, health policy, public health ethics and law, health communications, community-based participatory research, and global health).

School of Public Health Main Office
400 Urban Life Building
404-413-1130
publichealth.gsu.edu

Rodney Lyn, Interim Dean and Senior Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Initiatives
Daniel J. Whitaker, Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Affairs
Lindy Parker, Assistant Dean for Academic Programs
Travis J. Chambers, College Administrative Officer
Gerardo Chowell-Puente, Chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences
Shannon Self-Brown, Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences
Harry Heiman, Director of the Doctor of Public Health Program (DrPH)
Kim Ramsey-White, Director of the Undergraduate Program (BSPH)
Laura Salazar, Director of the Doctor of Philosophy Program (PhD)

Department of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences
Shannon Self-Brown, Department Chair
Theresa Glasheen, Department Coordinator

Core Faculty: Collins Airhihenbuwa, Elizabeth Armstrong-Mensah, Kathleen Baggett, Jacques-Corey Cormier, Daniel Crimmins, Michael Eriksen, Xiangming Fang, Amanda Gilmore, Emily Graybill, Harry Heiman, Jidong Huang, Rodney Lyn, Sarah McCool, Lee Mobley, Julia Neighbors, Ashli Owen-Smith, Lindy Parker, Carlos Pavao, Terry Pechacek, Lucy Popova, Jessica Pratt, Kim Ramsey-White, Dennis Reidy, Laura Salazar, Shannon Self- Brown, Colin Smith, Donna Smith, Susan Snyder, Claire Spears, Sheryl Strasser, Erin Vinoski Thomas, Daniel Whitaker

Department of Population Health Sciences
Gerardo Chowell-Puente, Department Chair
Gerrell Johnson, Department Coordinator

Core Faculty: David Ashley, Brian Barger, Heather Bradley, Lisa Casanova, Gerardo Chowell-Puente, Shanta Dube, Christina Fuller, Roby Greenwald, Matt Hayat, Adrienne King, Alexander Kirpich, Justin Luningham, Ruiyan Luo, Katherine Masyn, Ike Okosun, Terri Pigott, Richard Rothenberg, Christine Stauber, John Steward, Monica Swahn, Scott Weaver, Christa Wright, Barbara Yankey

8000.10 Accreditation

In June 2016, The Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH) Board of Councilors accredited the SPH at Georgia State University. The school received a ‘met’ finding, the highest possible, on all criteria evaluated and the school’s initial school-level accreditation is for a five-year term, extending through July 1, 2021.

CEPH is an independent agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education to accredit schools of public health and public health programs outside schools of public health.

8000.20 Mission, Vision, Values, and Goals

Mission. The School of Public Health provides the high quality and relevant teaching, research and service needed to evolve public health practice in a changing world. By investigating the contemporary problems that challenge diverse urban communities, the School is preparing the next generation of public health professionals to make a difference through leadership, scholarship and practice in Georgia communities and around the globe. The School’s mission is strengthened by the objective of the University System of Georgia, through its Strategic Plan for Public Health Education, Research and Service, “to ensure that the System becomes one of the national leaders in public health education, research and service.”

Vision. The School’s vision is to be a leading public health research institution dedicated to understanding and solving contemporary health problems. The School will be the destination of choice for students seeking an affordable and meaningful public health education.

Values. Six values were determined in a School-wide review process. All values were developed with input from the administration, faculty, staff and students and are reaffirmed or revised during each subsequent review process. The values are succinct and specific in nature and are reflected in faculty, staff and students’ instruction, service and learning activities. The values are:

  1. Integrity, accountability, and transparency in our operations
  2. Scholarship and inquiry
  3. Respect for all aspects of diversity
  4. Health as a human right
  5. Prioritizing health in all policy decisions
  6. Sustainable healthy environments
  7. Student Success

Goals. The goals of the School of Public Health are to:

Research

  1. Exceed $20 million annually in in sponsor-funded research.
  2. Establish a new Center to promote interdisciplinary research and training around non-communicable diseases (NCD) and other contemporary global health problems.
  3. Receive University-wide recognition for our ability to contribute to excellence in interdisciplinary research methodologies.
  4. All junior tenure track faculty to obtain sponsored funding within their first three academic years of service; lead the University in career development awards.
  5. Double the number of our peer-reviewed publications.

Education

  1. Attract and retain a diverse student body, staff, and faculty.
  2. Successfully graduate 70% of our bachelor’s students within six years, 80% of our MPH students within four years, and 60% of our doctoral students within seven years.
  3. Double the number of our online and hybrid course offerings.
  4. Increase external support for graduate students by emphasizing training grants, student fellowships and graduate student support through our faculty’s grant-seeking activities.
  5. Develop and offer a professional doctoral program (DrPH) and targeted executive education offerings for public health workers hoping to increase their knowledge and skills.

Service

  1. Promote and expand the involvement of faculty and staff in university, community-based and professional education projects so that service activities will be greater than 3 times the number of faculty.
  2. Better recognize those who contribute to public health practice and education communities through service.
  3. Offer at least 2 continuing education activities for the workforce each year, aligned with needs identified in our communities’ workforce.

8000.30 Degrees and Certificates Offered

The School of Public Health offers the following graduate programs:

  • Graduate Certificate in Public Health
  • Master of Public Health
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health
  • Doctor of Public Health

8000.40 Research Centers, Collectives, and Initiatives

The Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development
14 Marietta Street NW, 2nd Floor
404-413-1281
families.publichealth.gsu.edu/

The Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development (CHD) was established in August 2008 to house the National SafeCare® Training and Research Center (NSTRC) and the Center for Leadership in Disability (CLD), a University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD).  In 2011 CHD welcomed Prevent Child Abuse Georgia, a state chapter of Prevent Child Abuse America, which will provide a statewide direction to promote healthy children and develop strong families through community resources, public awareness, prevention programs, research, and advocacy activities. The center was designated a university-level research center in 2015, and its name honors and memorializes Dr. Mark Chaffin (1952 – 2015), a pre-eminent scholar in child maltreatment, parenting, implementation science and services for disadvantaged people and populations with disabilities.

The NSTRC is funded by a number of private and public service and research grants and contracts.  It was created in 2007 with a center grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation.  The CLD is primarily funded by a center grant from the Administration on Developmental Disabilities (ADD) of the Administration on Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS).  PCA Georgia is funded by a grant from the Governor’s Office for Children and Families, the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, and other sources. The general mission of the CHD is to promote the health, safety, well-being, and quality of life of children, adults, and families with and without disabilities through research, service, advocacy, and to prevent child maltreatment.

Biostatistics Research Collaborative
400 Urban Life Building
404-413-9513
publichealth.gsu.edu/research/biostatistics-research-collaborative/

The collaborative generates collaborations between Georgia State investigators for high-quality health-related research. Biostatistics Research Collaborative (BRC) team members collaborate with investigators on grant development, study design, statistical analysis, interpretation of results and manuscript preparation.

Center for Research on Interpersonal Violence
1104 Urban Life Building
404-413-6200
violence.gsu.edu/

In the third year of its Next Generation Program, Georgia State University identified interpersonal violence as an interdisciplinary area in which it seeks to become an internationally recognized resource and authority. As a result of this Interpersonal Violence Initiative, the Center for Research on Interpersonal Violence was established, and the Center aims to (1) understand the causes and consequences of interpersonal violence, (2) emphasize the development, refinement, and evaluation of interventions to reduce or prevent the perpetration of interpersonal violence and address the impact of victimization, and (3) inform public policy. Researchers in the center come from multiple disciplines at Georgia State: Psychology, Criminal Justice, Public Health, Sociology, Social Work, and Neuroscience.”

Center for Resilient Youth
1112 Urban Life Building
404-413-6287
resy.gsu.edu/

The Resilient Youth (ResY) was funded by the Next Generation Program and is an initiative that seeks to build interdisciplinary scholarship that uses the concept of resilience as a framework for addressing health disparities among urban youth. ResY builds on existing strengths among current senior and supporting GSU faculty in Psychology, Public Health, and Sociology that have established, externally funded, and nationally/internationally recognized research programs. The initiative will attract new faculty and seed a new postdoctoral fellowship program that will collaborate with current faculty to build an internationally recognized Center of Excellence focused on scholarship focused specifically on urban drivers among youth in Atlanta and other major urban centers in the U.S. and across the globe.

8000.50 Academic Resources and Services

Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services

140 Decatur Street, Suite 300
404-413-1452
publichealthadvising@gsu.edu

Contacts:

Denise Gouveia, Director
Vanessa Thomas-Meikle, Assistant Director
Lynette Reid, Graduate Admissions Coordinator
Jessica Pratt, Practice and Career Coordinator
Gina Sample, MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator
Jonathan Key, Undergraduate Advisor
Anthony Still, Undergraduate Advisor
Esther Singh, Administrative Coordinator

The Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) provides the SPH current and prospective students with comprehensive student support services to promote academic and career success.

Advising and Academic Assistance

publichealth.gsu.edu/students/academic-advising/

For students in the Master of Public Health (MPH) program, academic advisement is provided using a two -pronged approach. The MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in OAA provides guidance on administrative matters such as program of study advisement, degree petition process, thesis/capstone registration, graduation, and referral to other student support services on campus. The School of Public Health faculty serve as faculty mentors, and students are encouraged to talk to their mentors about how to select a concentration, determining which course electives make sense for future career goals, exploring research interests and opportunities, developing professional networks, and serving on thesis or capstone committees. MPH and Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) students are not assigned a faculty advisor but are instead encouraged to develop multiple mentoring relationships with SPH faculty.

Doctoral students are assigned (PhD), or supported in selecting (DrPH),  a Faculty Advisor and build a Doctoral Advisory Committee; however, they are also encouraged to develop multiple mentoring relationships with other SPH faculty, their doctoral program director, and even the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator as they navigate doctoral program administrative matters.

Career Services

publichealth.gsu.edu/students/career-resources/

The School of Public Health provides public health specific career support and leadership development services to all current SPH graduate students and alumni.  Students are invited to attend our career events and workshops as well as meet with our SPH Practice and Career Coordinator to discuss individual career questions.  Career Services can help students with resume writing, interviewing, job searching, internship development, and networking.

Biostatistics Student Lab

Location: Room 645, Urban Life Building, 140 Decatur Street

The purpose of the Biostatistics Computer Lab is to provide Georgia State University SPH students with computer access and statistical software needed for class and research activities. All computers are equipped with standard statistical software, including SAS, STATA, SPSS and Mplus, as well as Microsoft Office tools and internet access. The computer lab is supervised by a Graduate Assistant (GA), and is generally open Monday thru Friday, 9am-5pm. The GA is available to assist students with questions related to [PH 7017] Fundamentals of Biostatistics I, [PH 7027] Fundamentals of Biostatistics II, and [PH 7525] Statistical Computing, as well as basic computer assistance and questions related to the use of SAS. publichealth.gsu.edu/academics-student-life/graduate-biostatistics-computer-lab/

8000.60 Student Organizations

The OAA also supports all SPH student clubs and organizations – students are encouraged to read about the various groups within the college, and join one while being enrolled in the SPH: publichealth.gsu.edu/academics-student-life/.

Public Health Student Association (PHSA)

The Public Health Student Association (PHSA) is the student organization of the School of Public Health at Georgia State University. PHSA seeks to develop well-rounded public health professionals and promote meaningful interactions between students, faculty and staff, and public health professionals. Throughout the school year, PHSA organizes social events, professional development opportunities, and public service events for students, faculty, and staff. For more information: publichealth.gsu.edu/students/student-association-phisa/.

8000.70 Study Abroad

SPH Study Abroad Website: publichealth.gsu.edu/academic/study-abroad/

Contact: SPHstudyabroad@gsu.edu

Study abroad is one of the ways the School provides a learning environment that prepares students with broad skills regarding diversity and cultural competence. Opportunities to earn graduate degree and certificate applicable credits abroad are available in most years, and opportunities increase as student interest increases. Previously planned study abroad opportunity cities include: Salvador, Brazil; Kampala, Uganda; Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; and Shanghai, China. Students should check the above-linked study abroad website for future opportunities.

8010 Graduate Admissions

The School of Public Health accepts students into the Master of Public Health (MPH) and Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) programs for both the fall and spring semesters. The doctoral programs in Public Health only accepts students in the Fall semester.  The application deadlines are as follows:

Program Fall Spring Summer
DrPH December 1 N/A N/A
Ph.D. December 1 N/A N/A
MPH February 15 (Priority)
March 15 (Final)
October 1 N/A
Graduate Certificate March 15 October 1 N/A

8010.10 Master of Public Health (MPH) Application Requirements

For complete application materials instructions, visit the following School of Public Health website: publichealth.gsu.edu/academic/apply/.

The following materials are required for admission to the MPH program. GRE scores are submitted directly to Georgia State University. All other application materials are submitted through SOPHAS (portal.sophas.org/):

  1. SOPHAS application – $135 fee (sophas.org) This fee is nonrefundable.
  2. Georgia State University Graduate Supplemental application (GSU/CAS-Liaison Program) – $50 (gradapply.gsu.edu/apply/) This fee is nonrefundable.
  3. A resume or curriculum vitae – uploaded to SOPHAS application.
  4. One official transcript from each college and/or university attended (including Georgia State University). Transcripts are required regardless of length of stay or if the grades are listed on another school’s transcript. Applicants must have a bachelor’s degree or its equivalent at the time of enrollment from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are sent directly to SOPHAS.
  5. Note: Any applicant who has completed all or part of their education outside the United States is required to have foreign credentials evaluated by World Education Services (WES).  Study abroad credit is exempt from evaluation. WES is the only evaluation service accepted by SOPHAS.
  6. Three references from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s academic, professional and intellectual abilities. References are processed via SOPHAS application.
  7. A statement of purpose and objectives – upload to SOPHAS application.
  8. Official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Please note that GRE, GMAT, and MCAT scores over five years old cannot be accepted. (Applicants with an earned doctorate or J.D. from a regionally accredited institution may not be required to take the GRE, GMAT, or MCAT examination. Those applicants should check with the School well before the admission deadline to see if this examination requirement may be waived. The School reserves the right to require the GRE, GMAT, or MCAT examination for applicants with an earned doctoral or J.D.
  9.  Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or via the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), for applicants whose native language is not English. Please note that TOEFL and IELTS scores over two years old cannot be accepted. The TOEFL and IELTS may not be required of international applicants who have received a degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. See section 8010.40 for more information.
  10. Verification of Lawful Presence may be required if accepted – see sections 1110 and 1120 for more information.
  11. A Certificate of Immunization (after acceptance)

8010.20 Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) Application Requirements

For complete GCPH application materials instructions, visit the following School of Public Health website: publichealth.gsu.edu/academic/apply/

The following materials are required for admission to the GCPH.  All application materials are submitted through SLATE:

  1. Application for Graduate Programs, submitted through gradapply.gsu.edu/apply/
  2. A $50.00 application fee. This fee is nonrefundable.
  3. A resume or curriculum vitae
  4. One official transcript from each college and/or university attended, except from Georgia State University. Transcripts are required regardless of length of stay or if the grades are listed on another school’s transcript. You will collect and submit all unopened official transcripts.  Transcripts can be submitted directly to Georgia State University electronically, by express delivery service,  or by U.S. postal mail. If you are enrolled in another graduate program at Georgia State University, you may complete a Request for Transfer of Records in your current colleges graduate admissions office. If you attended Georgia State University as an undergraduate, we will be able to pull your records, so your undergraduate transcripts from Georgia State University do not need to be sent.
  5. Three references from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s academic, professional and intellectual abilities.
  6. A statement of interest and professional intent.
  7. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or via the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), for applicants whose native language is not English. Please note that TOEFL and IELTS scores over two years old cannot be accepted. The TOEFL and IELTS may not be required of international applicants who have received a degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. See section 8010.40 for more information.
  8. Verification of Lawful Presence may be required if accepted – see sections 1110 and 1120 for more information.
  9. A Certificate of Immunization (after acceptance).
  10. OPTIONAL: Official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), or the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). Test scores older than five years cannot be accepted. Send to Georgia State University via school code 5251.  Applicants to the GCPH only are not required to submit GRE, GMAT, or MCAT test scores. However, an applicant may voluntarily submit test scores if they feel those scores will better support their application.

Completed application materials must be sent to the address below by the deadline date:

Electronic Transcripts
Electronic transcripts must be submitted directly from the institution, either by email or through the use of a transcript ordering site:
Email: gradapplytranscripts@gsu.edu
Order Site Institution Name: Georgia State University – Graduate Programs

Mailing Address (U.S. Postal Service)
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4018
Atlanta, GA 30302

Delivery Address (FedEx, DHL, UPS, etc.)
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University – Sparks Hall 200
33 Gilmer Street SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

A Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) student may apply a maximum of sixteen (16) semester hours of applicable Georgia State University course credit earned while completing the GCPH and prior to MPH program admission toward fulfilling MPH degree requirements. Courses that satisfy the MPH core courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better, and courses that satisfy a concentration required or elective course must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.  Credits are processed by the School—petition is not required, but students should confirm their previously completed courses are applicable. Students may work with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance to confirm applicability.  Approval of applicable courses is at the discretion of the Department Chair of the student’s home department and concentration—it is not guaranteed.  All Georgia State University credits presented for the MPH degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral.

8010.30 Doctoral Programs in Public Health Application Requirements

For complete DrPH and/or Ph.D. application materials instructions, visit the following School of Public Health website: publichealth.gsu.edu/academic/apply/

The following materials are required for admission to the DrPH and/or Ph.D. program. GRE scores are submitted directly to Georgia State University. All other application materials are submitted through SOPHAS (portal.sophas.org):

  1. SOHAS application – $135 fee (sophas.org) This fee is nonrefundable.
  2. Georgia State University Graduate Supplemental application (GSU/CAS-Liaison Program) – $50 (gradapply.gsu.edu/apply/) This fee is nonrefundable.
  3. A resume or curriculum vitae
  4. One official transcript from each college and/or university attended (including Georgia State University). Transcripts are required regardless of length of stay or if the grades are listed on another school’s transcript. Applicants must have a master’s degree or its equivalent at the time of enrollment from a regionally accredited institution. All transcripts are sent directly to SOPHAS. Note: Any applicant who has completed all or part of their education outside the United States is required to have foreign credentials evaluated by World Education Services (WES).  Study abroad credit is exempt from evaluation. WES is the only evaluation service accepted by SOPHAS.
  5. Three references from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s academic, professional and intellectual abilities. References are processed via SOPHAS application.
  6. A statement of purpose and objectives – upload to SOPHAS application.
  7. Official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Test scores older than five years cannot be accepted. Send to Georgia State University via school code 5251. (Applicants with an earned doctorate or J.D. from a regionally accredited institution located in the United States may not be required to take the GRE or GMAT examination. Those applicants should check with the School well before the admission deadline to see if this examination requirement may be waived. The School reserves the right to require the GRE or GMAT examination for applicants with an earned doctorate or J.D.) Please note that the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) cannot be accepted in lieu of GRE or GMAT scores for DrPH or Ph.D. applicants.
  8.  Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or via the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), for applicants whose native language is not English. Please note that TOEFL and IELTS scores over two years old cannot be accepted. The TOEFL and IELTS may not be required of international applicants who have received a degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. See section 8010.40 for more information.
  9. Verification of Lawful Presence may be required if accepted – see sections 1110 and 1120 for more information.
  10. DrPH applicants only: Applicants invited to the DrPH admissions interview must provide documentation of successful completion of a minimum of three years of verifiable, applied public health professional experience. Applicants with five or more years of applied work experience will be given preference.
  11. A Certificate of Immunization (after acceptance)

8010.40 International Student Admission

It is the policy of Georgia State University to encourage the enrollment of students from other countries. The University subscribes to the principles of international education and to the basic concept that only through education and understanding can mutual respect, appreciation and tolerance of others be accomplished. The recognition of the values of cultural exchange is inherent in our philosophy of education and is predicated on an awareness of the need to foster better cooperation, friendship, and understanding among the peoples of the world. In this regard, we welcome international students to our campus because we believe in a cultural exchange program which will be beneficial to our own student body, to the international students involved, and to metropolitan Atlanta.

  • Academic Credentials: An applicant who has completed all or part of his/her education outside the United States is required to have his/her foreign credentials evaluated by World Education Services (http://www.wes.org/sophas/). WES is the only evaluation service accepted by SOPHAS. Foreign credential evaluation: (course by course, GPA calculations, and include copies of documents evaluated).
  • English Proficiency: Applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores, not more than two years old, on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS). Official scores must be reported from the Educational Testing Service to SOPHAS prior to the application deadline. The TOEFL is not required of international applicants who have received a degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution. TOEFL information can be found at toefl.org. IELTS information can be found at ielts.org. Note: Applicants to all SPH degree and certificate programs may petition the Academic Affairs Committee Chair and/or members to waive TOEFL and/or IELTS after achieving a USG Intensive English Program certificate (iep.gsu.edu); however, petitions are considered individually and the Chair and/or committee members may still require the TOEFL and/or IELTS from IEP certificate completers. Therefore, Petitions should be submitted well in advance of application deadlines so that if their petition is denied, applicants will still have ample time to submit TOEFL and/or IELTS scores prior to application deadlines. A denied Petition—and subsequent requirement to complete the TOEFL and/or IELTS—does not waive or extend the application deadline; the TOEFL and/or IELTS scores must be submitted by the application deadline.
  • Financial Resources: Applicants who have been accepted and plan to attend Georgia State University on an F-1 or J-1 visa must submit a Financial Statement showing the financial support necessary for the cost associated with the first year of study. This verification does not need to be submitted with your application but will be required by International Student and Scholar Services before you can enroll if you are accepted.
  • Course Load: An international student with a student visa is required to carry a full course of study in the fall and spring semesters. A full course of study for graduate students at Georgia State University is 9 semester hours in the fall and spring semesters and 6 semester hours in the summer semester. International students cannot be admitted as non-degree students.

For additional information pertaining to international applicants and students at Georgia State University, please refer to the Office of International Student and Scholar Services on the Georgia State University website at isss.gsu.edu.

8010.50 Transient Student Admission

A student enrolled in a graduate degree program at another accredited institution may seek admission as a transient (or visiting) student in the School of Public Health.

Program Fall Spring Summer
Transient/Visiting Student July 15 December 1 May 1

The Office of Academic Assistance & Career Services uses a self-managed application for admission to its graduate programs. It is the applicant’s responsibility to prepare or collect all credentials and submit them on time.

The following items should be e-submitted to gradapply.gsu.edu/apply:

  1. Transient/Visiting students can apply online via gradapply.gsu.edu/apply.
  2. $50.00 Application Fee: e-submit and pay application fee online. This fee is nonrefundable.
  3. Transient Letter. This letter, from your home institution, must state that you are in good academic standing and that you have permission to attend Georgia State University. It should also contain a listing of the courses you plan to take. This letter should be a in a sealed, official envelope from the home institution and mailed to or delivered in person to one of the addresses below.
  4. Your offer of admission is contingent upon completing or opting-out of the verification of lawful presence process– see sections 1110 and 1120 for more information.
  5. Certificate of Immunization: this form is required for accepted applicants who have never attended Georgia State University. If admitted, you must submit this form to Georgia State University Health Services (address on form) prior to registration.

You can collect and submit all unopened official transient letters. Transient letters can be submitted directly to Georgia State University via express delivery service or U.S. postal mail.

Mailing Address (U.S. Postal Service)
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4018
Atlanta, GA 30302

In-Person and Express Delivery Address (FedEx, DHL, UPS, etc.)
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University – Sparks Hall 200
33 Gilmer Street SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

Admission to transient status is normally for one semester only. A transient student who wishes to enroll for a subsequent semester at Georgia State must file an Application for Re-entry with the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Career Services in the School of Public Health. Students must be in good Academic Standing at Georgia State University in order to continue as transient students at the University. Transient students who are not in good academic standing will not be allowed to continue taking courses as transient students per the University’s re-entry definition. If the student wishes to enroll in courses other than those listed in the original letter of good standing, the home institution must submit a new letter indicating approval of those courses. Application deadlines are sometimes extended provided there is space available.  Contact OAA at 404-413-1452 or publichealthadvising@gsu.edu for additional information.

Although the university cannot guarantee the availability of space in desired courses, every effort will be made to assist students in the registration process. The student is responsible for requesting that transcripts of grades earned at Georgia State are sent to the home institution. Transient students who do not remain in good academic standing at Georgia State University may not be allowed to continue taking courses in the School of Public Health.

Students who wish to change from transient-status enrollment to graduate degree seeking status must file an application for the graduate program desired and provide all supporting documents by the appropriate deadline for the semester for which admission is sought. Further information on application procedures for admission to degree programs in the School of Public Health may be obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance: publichealth.gsu.edu/academic/apply/.

Up to nine (9) transient-status credit hours may apply to School of Public Health graduate degree or certificate programs. However, all credits, including transient-status-earned credits, presented for the Master’s degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of Master’s degree conferral, and all credits presented for the DrPH or Ph.D. degrees must have been earned within nine calendar years of the date of DrPH or Ph.D. degree conferral. Grades from all attempts at all Georgia State University courses that are taken at the graduate level will become part of the student’s GPA.

8010.60 Non-Degree Student Admission

The School of Public Health accepts non-degree students based on course availability. Non-degree students are admitted for a maximum of nine credit hours.

Applicants applying for non-degree status should hold a graduate degree or have been accepted into a graduate program but are no longer actively enrolled. If you are actively enrolled in another graduate program, please apply as a transient/visiting student. Contact the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) at 404-413-1452 or publichealthadvising@gsu.edu for approval to submit a non-degree application. Application deadlines are sometimes extended provided there is space available. The application deadlines are as follows:

Program Fall Spring Summer
Non-degree July 15 December 1 May 1

The following items should be e-submitted to gradapply.gsu.edu/apply:

  • Non-Degree students can apply online via gradapply.gsu.edu/apply.
  • $50.00 Application Fee: e-submit and pay application fee online. This fee is nonrefundable.
  • One official transcript from each college and/or university attended (including Georgia State University, if you attended Georgia State University while earning a different degree). Transcripts are required from all previously attended institutions regardless of length of stay or if the grades are listed on another school’s transcript. (See mailing/delivery address below or send electronically.)
  • Statement of Intent, where you describe your goals and why completing coursework in the School of Public Health will help you attain those goals. Please limit your statement to two typed, double-spaced pages.
  • Your offer of admission is contingent upon completing or opting-out of the verification of lawful presence process– see sections 1110 and 1120 for more information.
  • Certificate of Immunization: this form is required for accepted applicants who have never attended Georgia State University. If admitted, you must submit this form to Georgia State University Health Services (address on form) prior to registration.

You can collect and submit all unopened official transcripts. Transcripts can be submitted directly to Georgia State University electronically, by express delivery service,  or U.S. postal mail.

Electronic Transcripts
Electronic transcripts must be submitted directly from the institution, either by email or through the use of a transcript ordering site:
Email: gradapplytranscripts@gsu.edu
Order Site Institution Name: Georgia State University – Graduate Programs

Mailing Address (U.S. Postal Service)
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4018
Atlanta, GA 30302

In-Person and Express Delivery Address (FedEx, DHL, UPS, etc.)
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University – Sparks Hall 200
33 Gilmer Street SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

Students who wish to change from non-degree enrollment to graduate degree seeking status must file an application for the graduate program desired and all supporting documents by the appropriate deadline for the semester for which admission is sought. Further information on application procedures for admission to degree programs in the School of Public Health may be obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance: publichealth.gsu.edu/academic/apply/.

A student may apply a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of applicable Georgia State University course credit earned prior to MPH program admission (while taking public health courses as either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree status) toward fulfilling MPH degree requirements. Courses that satisfy the MPH core courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0)or better, and courses that satisfy a concentration required or elective course must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better.  Credits are processed by the School — petition is not required, but students should confirm their previously completed courses are applicable. Students may work with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance to confirm applicability.  Approval of applicable courses is at the discretion of the Department Chair of the student’s home department and concentration — it is not guaranteed. All Georgia State University credits presented for the MPH degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral.

8010.70 Re-entry Students

A re-entry student is a student who has been enrolled at Georgia State University and who:

  1. Has not maintained an enrollment totaling 6 hours (or more) of degree applicable courses over three consecutive semesters (including summer) until degree completion; or
  2. Attended any semester as a transient student and wishes to attend an additional semester as a transient student.

Re-entry is approved by application and is not guaranteed. The application deadlines are as follows:

Program Fall Spring Summer
Re-entry July 15 December 1 May 1

Graduate students previously enrolled in the School of Public Health may only re-enter the same graduate program or status in which they were last enrolled and they may be required to satisfy the degree requirements of the graduate catalog in effect at the time of re-entry — the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services will notify the student of their requirements and update their program of study. Students will be required to change to the graduate catalog in effect at the time of re-entry when they re-enter the university after a period of two or more consecutive years in which they have earned no academic credit at Georgia State University. Students must be approved for reentry through the School — re-entry is not guaranteed, even for students previously enrolled in School of Public Health graduate programs.

The following items should be e-submitted to gradapply.gsu.edu/apply:

  • Non-Degree students can apply online via gradapply.gsu.edu/apply.
  • $25.00 Application Fee: e-submit and pay application fee online. This fee is nonrefundable.
  • Your offer of admission is contingent upon completing or opting-out of the verification of lawful presence process– see sections 1110 and 1120 for more information.
  • If applicable, submit an official transcript from each college and/or university attended (since you last attended Georgia State University).

You can collect and submit all unopened official transcripts. Transcripts can be submitted directly to Georgia State University electronically, by express delivery service, or by U.S. postal mail.

Electronic Transcripts
Electronic transcripts must be submitted directly from the institution, either by email or through the use of a transcript ordering site:
Email: gradapplytranscripts@gsu.edu
Order Site Institution Name: Georgia State University – Graduate Programs

In-Person and Express Delivery Address (FedEx, DHL, UPS, etc.)
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University – Sparks Hall 200
33 Gilmer Street SE
Atlanta, GA 30303

U.S. Postal Service
Office of Graduate Admissions
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4018
Atlanta, GA 30302

8010.80 Tuition Deposit for MPH Program

The School of Public Health requires newly accepted applicants into their Master of Public Health program to submit a portion of their first semester’s tuition at the time of acceptance. The advanced tuition, which is nonrefundable, guarantees the student’s place in the class.

8020 Graduate Enrollment

Graduate degree and certificate students in the School of Public Health are responsible for knowledge of all regulations and procedures of the program and the university. Enrollment in a program constitutes a student’s acknowledgment that they are obligated to comply with all academic and administrative regulations and degree requirements. Students are encouraged to read carefully regulations related to the public health program.

Summary of Georgia State University Policy on Responsible Conduct of Research Training:

Georgia State University is committed to promoting research ethics within the University community and modeling integrity across all disciplines and areas of empirical research. As research has become more complex, collaborative, and costly, issues of research ethics similarly have become complex, extensive and important. The federally mandated training of all levels of research students at Georgia State University in the Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) must prepare them to face these issues in their professional lives. The Scholarship and Research Integrity (SARI) program at Georgia State University, developed in response to the America Competes Act requirements, is designed to offer students enrolled in undergraduate research, research graduate degree programs, and post-doctoral research programs comprehensive training in the RCR in a manner that is tailored to address the issues faced by students in their respective programs. As part of the commitment and policy, graduate research students and post-doctoral research fellows will be required to complete an online RCR training program provided by the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) and will also be required to engage in at least 5 hours of additional discussion-based RCR education.

ursa.research.gsu.edu/ursa/responsible-conduct-in-research/

The Georgia State University SPH has devised a RCR education program plan to be in compliance with Georgia State University’s RCR policy and to ensure SPH students graduating from our MPH and Ph.D. programs complete the required CITI RCR training program and receive the additional 5 hours of RCR education. In the MPH program, all students enrolled in PHPH 7011 Epidemiology for Public Health/ PHPH 7711 Epidemiologic Methods I (MPH required course) will be required to complete the CITI RCR training and will receive 5 additional hours as part of in-class discussions during the PHPH 7011/PHPH 7711 course. In the Ph.D. program, all students enrolled in PHPB 9140 Advanced Research Methods (a Ph.D. required course) will be required to complete the CITI RCR training and will receive 5 additional hours as part of in-class discussions during the PHPB 9140 course. Doctoral level students enrolled in PHPB 9150 Public Health Ethics will also receive additional 1-5 hours of in-class discussion.

8020.10 Time Limit for Completion of Degree/Graduate Certificates

Before deciding to enroll in a graduate program of this school, students must examine seriously and realistically their abilities to adjust their personal and professional schedules to accommodate the challenge of graduate study. The maximum time limits set by the faculty for completing a graduate degree program are: six years from the first semester of admission for the master’s programs; three years from the first semester of admission for the certificate programs and nine years from the first semester of admission for the doctoral programs. Students or applicants with questions about the commitment needed to complete the graduate programs should schedule an appointment with the school’s Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services.

8020.20 Catalog Editions

Normally, students will be permitted to graduate under the provisions of the graduate catalog in effect at the time of first enrollment. Students may choose to graduate under the provisions of a subsequent graduate catalog; that is, they may choose to change their “catalog edition.” Students who choose to do this must meet all provisions of the subsequent graduate catalog.

Students are required to change to the current catalog edition when they change programs/statuses or after certain absences from the program, as explained below in section 8020.30. The School reserves the right to require students who wish to change their program of study concentration to update to the most recent catalog edition of their newly selected concentration.

8020.30 Continuous Enrollment Requirement and Requests to Reenter

Students in all graduate degree and graduate certificate programs must maintain an enrollment totaling six (6) hours or more of degree applicable courses over any consecutive three (3) semester period (including summers) until degree completion. In other words, the total enrollment of the current term plus the two terms preceding it must add to six (6) hours or more at all times. The status of all students will be checked by the midpoint of each term for compliance with the Continuous Enrollment Requirement. Any student whose enrollment is out of compliance will receive a continuous enrollment registration hold preventing all current and future registration. Those students will be notified by an email message sent to their official Georgia State University email account. To resume their programs of study, students with continuous enrollment registration holds must apply for re-entry admission by the published deadline (see section 8010.70), must be granted re-entry admission, and must enroll at a credit hour level sufficient to satisfy the continuous enrollment requirement. For more information on the re-entry process, see section 8010.70 or contact the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA).

Students who do not attend the semester for which re-entry was originally required must complete a new re-entry form for subsequent semesters.

All students who wish to reenter one of the graduate level programs or non-degree status after an absence of one year must meet the degree requirements and academic regulations of the graduate catalog current upon return, along with other reentry provisions that may be in effect.

All students who are approved for re-entry will be eligible to retain all Georgia State course credit (and already approved transfer credit, if any) earned previously if their program can be completed within the time limit that was applicable to their program before the absence. The cumulative graduate GPA calculations will include all attempts in all courses at Georgia State University. Time limits would apply.

Students who plan not to register for a particular semester but who intend to continue the program at some later semester should discuss such plans with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in order to facilitate reentry at a subsequent time. Failure to comply with this request may complicate reentry in the semester preferred. An absence from the program, whether planned or unplanned, does not exempt students from the requirement to complete the program within the appropriate time limit.

8020.35 Enrollment in Approved Courses

Students must enroll for courses that are part of the approved curriculum for the program to which they have been accepted. Students who do otherwise are subject to loss of credit and/or loss of eligibility to continue to register. Failure to register for degree applicable courses over the course of three consecutive semesters will result in unsatisfactory progress and the rules of Continuous Enrollment Requirement will apply.

8020.40 Course Load

The course load of a master’s student may vary with the circumstances of the individual student each semester. A graduate student may enroll in 1 to 12 credit hours. Enrolling in more than 12 credit hours is not recommended and students should seek advisement with the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services prior to registration unless employed as a Graduate Assistant (GA) with the university. A full-time course of study for graduate students at Georgia State University is nine (9) credit hours in fall and spring semesters, and six (6) credit hours in summer semesters.

In determining each semester’s course load, a student must balance other time constraints (work, family, civic, and other responsibilities) with the need to make reasonable and timely progress toward completion of the program.

8020.50 Grade Point Average and Course Grade Requirements

For Master’s level students, an overall institutional grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better must be earned to receive the MPH degree. All core courses in the MPH degree must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better, and any student earning a grade of B- or below must repeat the core course. No more than six semester hours of grades less than B (3.0) will be accepted for the degree in all other MPH program of study courses. No grade below a C will be accepted toward the degree. The records of students who fall below the 3.00 GPA requirement for all course attempts will be reviewed for continuation in the MPH program, and students may receive a scholastic warning or be scholastically dismissed from the MPH program.

For Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) students, an overall institutional grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better must be earned to receive the Graduate Certificate. The three core courses in the GCPH must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better any student earning a grade of B- or below must repeat the core course. No grade below a C will be accepted in the two Graduate Certificate program elective courses. The records of students who fall below the 3.00 GPA requirement for all course attempts will be reviewed for continuation in the GCPH program, and students may receive a scholastic warning or be scholastically dismissed from the GCPH program.

Transient students must maintain an overall institutional grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better in order to continue enrolling as a transient student. Transient students who do not maintain a 3.0 GPA or better may receive a scholastic warning or be scholastically dismissed.

Any doctoral student completing the prerequisite MPH core courses must earn a grade of B (3.0) or better in those MPH core courses; any doctoral student earning a grade of B- or below must repeat the prerequisite MPH core course. Doctoral students should refer to section 8060.40 Grade Point Average and Course Grade Requirements for Doctoral Students for more information regarding doctoral program grade point average requirements.

8020.60 Final Course Grades

Most public health faculty and instructors follow the following course grading scale:

  • A 90-100
  • B 80-89
  • C 70-79
  • D 60-69
  • F below 60

Any deviations — including the availability of plus/minus grading — will be at the discretion of the individual public health faculty member or instructor, and specifically stated in the course syllabus. Throughout this Catalog, there are noted grade requirements for certain courses in each program. It is important to note that if the grade requirement is a “B (3.0) or better,” then a B- (2.7) grade does NOT meet that “B (3.0) or better” grade requirement. Likewise, if the grade requirement is a “C (2.0) or better,” then a C- (1.7) grade does NOT meet that “C (2.0) or better” grade requirement.

8020.70 Transfer of Credit for MPH Program

Transfer Credits from another institution: A student may apply a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of approved course credit transferred from other institution(s) toward fulfilling MPH degree requirements. In order to transfer, the course grade must be a grade of B (3.0) or better.  Transfer credits are processed by the School and must be approved by petition. Students requesting to petition for transfer of credits must work with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance.  Approval is at the discretion of the Department Chair of the student’s home department and concentration.  All credits, including transfer credits, presented for the MPH degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral from a program or school accredited by CEPH at the time of completion. With the exception of university-approved dual degree programs, if the course to be transferred in was used to satisfy another degree program either at Georgia State or elsewhere, the department chair reserves the right to require the student to complete a different graduate-level course prescribed by the department chair. That course will be substituted into the student’s MPH program, so that the student completes the forty-two (42) unique total credit hours for their MPH degree.

Credits earned at Georgia State University in either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree status: A student may apply a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of applicable Georgia State University course credit earned prior to MPH program admission (while taking public health courses as either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree status) toward fulfilling MPH degree requirements. Courses that satisfy the MPH core courses must be completed with a grade of B or better, and courses that satisfy a concentration required or elective course must be completed with a grade of C or better.  Credits are processed by the School — petition is not required, but students should confirm their previously completed courses are applicable. Students may work with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance to confirm applicability.  Approval of applicable courses is at the discretion of the Department Chair of the student’s home department and concentration — it is not guaranteed. All Georgia State University credits presented for the MPH degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral.

Credits earned at Georgia State University in GCPH enrollment status: A Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) student may apply a maximum of sixteen (16) semester hours of applicable Georgia State University course credit earned while completing the GCPH and prior to MPH program admission toward fulfilling MPH degree requirements. Courses that satisfy the MPH core courses must be completed with a grade of B (3.0) or better, and courses that satisfy a concentration required or elective course must be completed with a grade of C (2.0) or better. Credits are processed by the School — petition is not required, but students should confirm their previously completed courses are applicable. Students may work with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance to confirm applicability. Approval of applicable courses is at the discretion of the Department Chair of the student’s home department and concentration — it is not guaranteed. All Georgia State University credits presented for the MPH degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral. With the exception of university-approved dual degree programs, if the course to be transferred in was used to satisfy another degree program either at Georgia State or elsewhere, the department chair reserves the right to require the student to complete a different graduate-level course prescribed by the department chair. That course will be substituted into the student’s MPH program, so that the student completes forty-two (42) unique total credit hours for their MPH degree. An exception is made for students completing a Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) prior to MPH admission—please see that exception detailed below.

Credits earned from another institution while currently enrolled: Students who have been accepted into a School of Public Health program and who wish to take courses at another institution for credit must first obtain written approval via the graduate petition process.  The first step in this approval process is to meet with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services. All credits, including transfer credits, presented for the Master’s degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral, all credits presented for the graduate certificate must have been earned within three calendar years of graduate certificate completion, and all credits presented for the DrPH or Ph.D. must have been earned within nine calendar years of the date of degree conferral. Courses transferred-in for the doctoral degree may not be used in fulfilling the Doctoral Public Health Core Courses requirements or the doctoral residency requirement for either doctoral degree.

JD/MPH Dual Degree Credits earned at Georgia State University just prior to dual degree (JD/MPH) status: A student may apply MPH-applicable Georgia State University College of Law course credit (earned for the JD degree) toward fulfilling MPH degree requirements if the JD/MPH dual degree student is admitted and enrolled into both degree programs prior to completion of 30 credit hours of MPH coursework and 60 hours of JD coursework. JD credits applied to the MPH degree are processed by the SPH—petition is not required, but students should confirm (in advance) with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator that their planned JD courses are applicable to the MPH, and are correctly populating in their PAWS electronic MPH program of study. Approval of applicable courses is at the discretion of the SPH OAA and the Department Chair of the student’s home MPH department and concentration—it is not guaranteed. All Georgia State University credits presented for the MPH degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral.

Ph.D. Community Psychology/MPH Dual Degree Credits earned at Georgia State University just prior to dual degree (Ph.D. Community Psychology/MPH) status: A student may apply MPH-applicable Georgia State University Community Psychology course credit (earned for the Ph.D. Community Psychology degree) toward fulfilling MPH degree requirements if the Ph.D. Community Psychology/MPH dual degree student is admitted and enrolled into both degree programs prior to completion of 30 credit hours of MPH coursework and 30 hours of Ph.D. Community Psychology coursework. Ph.D. Community Psychology credits applied to the MPH degree are processed by the SPH OAA – a petition is not required, but students should confirm (in advance) with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator that their planned Ph.D. Community Psychology courses are applicable to the MPH, and are correctly populating in their PAWS electronic MPH program of study. Approval of applicable courses is at the discretion of the SPH OAA and the Department Chair of the student’s home MPH department and concentration — it is not guaranteed. All Georgia State University credits presented for the MPH degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of degree conferral.

8020.75 Out-of-Residence Credit and Graduation

Students who wish to take graduate courses at another institution to complete the coursework for their Georgia State University degree should provide the information listed above (except the transcript) to the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services before enrolling at the other institution. Advance approval will ensure that the transfer credit can be granted if a grade of “B” or higher is earned in the course(s) and the coursework is completed within the time limit allowed for the student’s degree program. Such students should plan to graduate at least one semester after the Out-of-Residence quarter/semester in which the last course to be transferred has been taken. This will allow adequate time for the necessary transcript to be received and for the transfer credit to be processed. Please refer to the graduation office website for complete instructions and information concerning applying for graduation and the graduation fee: registrar.gsu.edu/graduation/. A letter certifying completion of degree requirements and stating the date the degree will be conferred can be furnished to the student by the OAA.

8020.80 Application for Graduation

All candidates for the MPH, DrPH, and Ph.D. degrees must file a formal application for graduation with the University’s Graduation Office at least two semesters in advance of the expected semester of graduation. Deadlines are published on the Georgia State website: registrar.gsu.edu/graduation/. The Graduation Office will inform the School when the application is filed by the student. The School of Public Health will then conduct an audit and inform the student of any remaining requirements — these items will include any graduation clearance requirements. A degree will be awarded only to a student who meets the university academic, residence, and graduation clearance requirements as well as the standards of performance and academic requirements for the MPH, DrPH, or Ph.D. degree.

All candidates for the GCPH must file a formal application for completion: publichealth.gsu.edu/students/program/ with the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) in the School of Public Health during the semester in which the student plans to complete the GCPH. OAA will conduct an audit to confirm completion of the requirements and inform the student of any remaining requirements — these items will include any graduation clearance requirements. A graduate certificate will be awarded only to a student who meets the university academic, residence, and/or graduation clearance requirements as well as the standards of performance and academic requirements for the GCPH.

8020.90 Scholastic Warning and Suspension for MPH, GCPH, and Transient Students

Each student admitted into the MPH or GCPH program in the School of Public Health must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. A student whose cumulative institutional grade point average falls below 3.00 at the end of a semester will be placed on Scholastic Warning. The student will be notified of this standing by the School of Public Health. If a 3.00 cumulative grade point average is not achieved by the end of the next twelve semester hours or two semesters, whichever is longer, of completed course work approved by the SPH faculty, the student will be suspended from the graduate program. Transient students must maintain a 3.00 cumulative grade point average in order to continue in that status. Transient students who do not maintain a 3.00 cumulative grade point average may be subject to scholastic exclusion.

A student may apply for reinstatement after one semester as a suspended student. Application for reinstatement must be made no later than six weeks prior to the first day of classes for the semester in which reinstatement is sought.

8030 Student Appeals Procedures

The appeals procedure for graduate students in the School of Public Health will follow different paths, depending on the nature of the student’s appeal. The various types of situations and the appropriate appeals avenues are as follows:

8030.10 Admissions Appeals

At the graduate level, a person who wishes to appeal an admission decision first discusses the matter with the Director of the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) within 5 working days of the date of the denial. If the question is not settled there, a written appeal must be submitted to the OAA Director within 10 working days of the date of the denial or the date of the denial discussion with the OAA Director. (Workdays are counted as Monday through Friday except university holidays and closures.) The director will present the appeal to the appropriate Admissions Committee, which will examine the facts presented. The OAA Director, on behalf of the committee, will make a recommendation to the Senior Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Initiatives and/or the Academic Affairs Committee Chair will render a written decision to the applicant normally within 10 workdays of the date the applicant’s letter was received by the OAA Director. See Section 1100 of the Graduate Catalog for University level appeals of admission decisions.

8030.20 Petitions for Policy Waivers and Variances, and Appeals, and Student Complaints, Concerns, or Grievances

Petitions for Policy Waivers and Variances, and Appeals Procedure

The petitions for policy waivers and variances, and appeals procedure for students will follow different courses depending on the nature of the student’s appeal. Please refer to University Information Section 1050.80 under Polices and Disclosures in this catalog or visit enrollment.gsu.edu/assistance/  or the Student Code of Conduct online: codeofconduct.gsu.edu/ for details.

Student Complaints, Concerns, or Grievances

Similarly, the student complaints, concerns, or grievance procedure for students will follow different courses depending on the nature of the student’s appeal. Please refer to University Information Section 1050.80 under Polices and Disclosures in this catalog or visit enrollment.gsu.edu/assistance/.

8030.30 Appeal of Exclusions, Dismissals and Terminations

Terminated, dismissed or excluded graduate students with questions about their status should first discuss their situation with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA). Following this discussion, students who believe they have extenuating circumstances may submit a written appeal of their termination or exclusion to the Director of OAA. The director will review the information submitted in support of the appeal and the student’s total record. The Director will then make a recommendation to the Senior Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Initiatives, who will make the decision regarding acceptance or denial of the appeal. The student will receive a written response from the school normally within 10 workdays of the date the appeal is received. (Workdays are counted as Monday through Friday except university holidays and closures.)

Requests for such consideration must be submitted, in writing, to the director of OAA within 10 workdays (defined as Monday through Friday except university holidays and closures). Students should write their appeals completely, but concisely, and include all facts germane to their case. Documentation should be provided, where possible, to substantiate statements made. Specific dates of the beginning and ending of particular problems should be included. Only circumstances described in the written and signed appeal as initially submitted will be accepted from the student; oral appeals are not permitted, nor are requests to submit additional information after the appeal has been reviewed. Appeals must be dated, signed, and include the student’s home address and telephone numbers (work and home).

Having been enrolled in too many courses relative to job requirements or other responsibilities or having continued to enroll while experiencing personal, work, or health-related problems very rarely constitutes such extenuating circumstances.

8040 Master Degree Programs

8040.10 Master in Public Health (MPH)

Contacts:

Gerardo Chowell-Puente, Chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences

  • Biostatistics MPH Concentration
  • Environmental Health MPH Concentration
  • Environmental Epidemiology MPH Concentration
  • Epidemiology MPH Concentration

Shannon Self-Brown, Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Behavioral Sciences

  • Health Management and Policy MPH Concentration
  • Health Promotion and Behavior MPH Concentration

The faculty and staff of the School of Public Health (SPH) are committed to providing a supportive academic environment that promotes the growth and progress of students engaged in graduate studies.

The Master of Public Health (MPH) program includes a minimum of forty-two (42) semester credit hours of study at the master’s level beyond the bachelor’s degree.

All MPH graduates are grounded in the following foundational public health knowledge learning objectives (and the course where the learning objective is assessed is noted in parenthesis):

Profession & Science of Public Health

  1. Explain public health history, philosophy and values. (PHPH 7010)
  2. Identify the core functions of public health and the 10 Essential Services. (PHPH 7010)
  3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  4. List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US or other community relevant to the school or program. (PHPH 7010)
  5. Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc. (PHPH 7010)
  6. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge. (PHPH 7010)

Factors Related to Human Health

  1. Explain effects of environmental factors on a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  2. Explain biological and genetic factors that affect a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  3. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  4. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities. (PHPH 7010)
  5. Explain how globalization affects global burdens of disease. (PHPH 7010)
  6. Explain an ecological perspective on the connections among human health, animal health and ecosystem health (eg, One Health). (PHPH 7010)

All MPH graduates demonstrate the following MPH foundational competencies (and the course where the competency is assessed is noted in parenthesis):

Evidence-based Approaches to Public Health

  • MPH Foundational Core 1. Apply epidemiological methods to the breadth of settings and situations in public health practice. (PHPH 7011/PHPH 7711)
  • MPH Foundational Core 2. Select quantitative and qualitative data collection methods appropriate for a given public health context. (PHPH 7011/PHPH 7711 and PHPH 7017)
  • MPH Foundational Core 3. Analyze quantitative and qualitative data using biostatistics, informatics, computer-based programming and software, as appropriate. (PHPH 7011/PHPH 7711 and PHPH 7017)
  • MPH Foundational Core 4. Interpret results of data analysis for public health research, policy or practice. (PHPH 7017)
    Public Health & Health Care Systems
  • MPH Foundational Core 5. Compare the organization, structure and function of health care, public health and regulatory systems across national and international settings. (PHPB 7160)
  • MPH Foundational Core 6. Discuss the means by which structural bias, social inequities and racism undermine health and create challenges to achieving health equity at organizational, community and societal levels. (PHPB 7160)
    Planning & Management to Promote Health
  • MPH Foundational Core 7. Assess population needs, assets and capacities that affect communities’ health. (PHPB 7140)
  • MPH Foundational Core 8. Apply awareness of cultural values and practices to the design or implementation of public health policies or programs. ([PH 7140])
  • MPH Foundational Core 9. Design a population-based policy, program, project or intervention. (PHPB 7140)
  • MPH Foundational Core 10. Explain basic principles and tools of budget and resource management. (PHPB 7140)
  • MPH Foundational Core 11. Select methods to evaluate public health programs. (PHPB 7140)
    Policy in Public Health
  • MPH Foundational Core 12. Discuss multiple dimensions of the policy-making process, including the roles of ethics and evidence. (PHPB 7160)
  • MPH Foundational Core 13. Propose strategies to identify stakeholders and build coalitions and partnerships for influencing public health outcomes. (PHPB 7160)
  • MPH Foundational Core 14. Advocate for political, social or economic policies and programs that will improve health in diverse populations. (PHPB 7160)
  • MPH Foundational Core 15. Evaluate policies for their impact on public health and health equity. (PHPB 7160)
    Leadership
  • MPH Foundational Core 16. Apply principles of leadership, governance and management, which include creating a vision, empowering others, fostering collaboration and guiding decision making. (PHPB 7160)
  • MPH Foundational Core 17. Apply negotiation and mediation skills to address organizational or community challenges. (PHPB 7160)
    Communication
  • MPH Foundational Core 18. Select communication strategies for different audiences and sectors. (PHPB 7140)
  • MPH Foundational Core 19. Communicate audience-appropriate public health content, both in writing and through oral presentation. (PHPB 7140)
  • MPH Foundational Core 20. Describe the importance of cultural competence in communicating public health content. (PHPB 7140)
    Interprofessional Practice
  • MPH Foundational Core 21. Perform effectively on interprofessional teams. (PHPB 7140)
    Systems Thinking
  • MPH Foundational Core 22. Apply systems thinking tools to a public health issue. (PHPB 7160)

Additional GSU Content
• MPH Foundational Core 23. Recognize the ways diversity influences public health education and training, policies, programs, services, and the health of the nearby community. (PHPB 7160)

MPH DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

1. Required MPH Core Courses (16 hours):

  • PHPH 7010 Foundations in Public Health (3) MPH students who have completed a CEPH-accredited bachelor’s degree may replace this PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health course with three (3) credit hours of concentration-approved elective course(s) from their chosen concentration.
  • PHPH 7011 Epidemiology for Public Health (3) (required for Environmental Health, Health Management and Policy, and Health Promotion and Behavior concentrations or PHPH 7711 Epidemiologic Methods I (3) (required for Environmental Epidemiology, Epidemiology, and Biostatistics concentrations, and dual degree MPH/PhD Community Psychology students).  Note:  Students changing their concentration from   Environmental Epidemiology, Epidemiology, or Biostatistics to Environmental Health, Health Management and Policy, or Health Promotion and Behavior will be able to substitute PHPH 7011 with PHPH 7711 if already completed.
  • PHPH 7017 Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (4)
  • PHPB 7140 Health Promotion Planning, Administration, and Evaluation (3)
  • PHPB 7160 Fundamentals of Health Systems, Leadership, and Policy (3)

2. Required MPH Concentration Courses (21 credit hours)
See “MPH CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS” section below

3. Required MPH Applied Practice Experience Course (2 credit hours)
     PHPH 7960 or PHPB 7960 Public Health Applied Practice Experience (2)
     Students will take two (2) credit hours of a required Applied Practice Experience in the students’ specialty field of study, which equals 240 clock hours. The Applied Practice Experience is a planned, supervised and evaluated practice experience where graduate professional public health degree students develop skills in basic public health concepts and demonstrate the application of these concepts through a practice experience that is relevant to students’ areas of specialization and/or concentration. These opportunities can take place in a variety of governmental or non-governmental agencies and organizations and include local, state, national and international public health agencies to the extent possible and appropriate.

4. Required MPH Thesis or Capstone Project Course (3 credit hours)

  • PHPH 7990 or [PHPB] Thesis (3)
  • PHPH 7991 or PHPB 7991 Capstone (3)
  • PHPH 7992 or PHPB 7992 Integrative Learning Experience (3) (For students concentrating in Environmental Epidemiology, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Health Management and Policy, or Health Promotion and Behavior only)

Following completion of all coursework, students must complete three (3) credit hours for a culminating experience in the form of a master’s thesis or a capstone project. All students in the School of Public Health who are involved in writing or defending a master’s thesis/capstone project shall register for at least three credit hours of thesis/capstone project credit each semester from the time they finish their course work until the time all requirements for the degree are completed. Students concentrating in Environmental Epidemiology, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Health Management and Policy, or Health Promotion and Behavior have the option to register for PHPB/PHPH 7992 – Integrative Learning Experience, to complete their capstone as part of a course-based experience, rather than the more individualized PHPB/PHPH 7991 Capstone experience.

MPH CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS

In addition to the MPH foundational competencies taught and mastered in the MPH core courses, each of the distinct MPH concentrations (Biostatistics, Environmental Epidemiology, Environmental Health, Epidemiology, Health Promotion and Behavior, and Health Management and Policy) have their own program competencies that define what a graduate from that MPH concentration will know and be able to do upon degree program completion. These MPH program competencies are made available in the MPH student handbook, and appear on public health course syllabi. The SPH will only recommend the award of an MPH degree when the student has demonstrated mastery of necessary theories, concepts and content, and demonstrated competence in the skills defined in the competencies for the student’s chosen MPH program and concentration.

MPH Biostatistics Concentration

The following MPH Biostatistics (BSTP) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this MPH concentration (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • MPH BSTP 1. Describe basic concepts of probability, random variation and commonly used statistical probability distributions. (PHPH 7017)
  • MPH BSTP 2. Apply basic (univariate and bivariate) descriptive and inferential techniques commonly used with public health data. (PHPH 7017)
  • MPH BSTP 3. Apply advanced (multivariate) descriptive and inferential techniques used with public health data. (PHPH 7027)
  • MPH BSTP 4. Describe preferred methodological alternatives to commonly used statistical methods when assumptions are not met. (PHPH 8820)
  • MPH BSTP 5. Distinguish among the different measurement scales and the implications for selection of statistical methods to be used based on these distinctions. (PHPH 8820)
  • MPH BSTP 6. Apply basic informatics techniques (storage, access, management, organization, visualization, and evaluation of public health data) in public health research. (PHPH 7525)
  • MPH BSTP 7. Describe different public health study designs, measures, and the appropriate statistical analyses for answering particular research questions. (PHPH 8830)
  • MPH BSTP 8. Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies. (PHPH 8830)
  • MPH BSTP 9. Develop written and oral presentations based on statistical analyses for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences. (PHPH 8830)

Required MPH BSTP Concentration Courses (12 hours):

MPH BSTP Concentration Elective Courses (9 hours):
Select at least three (3) pre-approved* courses focusing on advanced statistical techniques and quantitative research methods.  Pre-approved BSTP elective courses include:

  • PHPH 7019 Research Methods (3)
  • PHPH 7150 Environmental Health (3)
  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • PHPH 8721 Epidemiologic Methods II (3)
  • PHPH 8840 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables I: Structural Equation Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8850 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables II: Finite Mixture Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8860 Multilevel Models in Public Health (3)
  • PHPH 8885 Fundamentals of Clinical Trials (3)
  • PHPH 8890 Special Topics in Biostatistics (3) (may be repeated)

*The above listed pre-approved BSTP elective courses do not need further approval to satisfy the BSTP elective requirement. However, there are other academic departments at the university that may offer satisfying courses including, but not limited to the following departments: Math/Statistics, Decision Sciences, Marketing, Sociology, Policy Studies, Psychology, and Educational Policy Studies Research.  Other courses that may be approved to satisfy this elective requirement generally have course titles including, but not limited to: Structural Equation Modeling, Finite Mixture Modeling, Hierarchical Linear Modeling, Longitudinal Modeling, Survival Analysis, Bayesian Inference, Survey Sampling, Causal Inference, Missing Data, or Nonparametric Statistics. Students should seek written, pre-approval of any course(s) — beyond the above listed pre-approved BSTP elective courses — to count toward the BSTP elective requirement. Approval must come from both the Department Chair and OAA.

MPH Environmental Epidemiology Concentration

The following MPH Environmental Epidemiology (ENEP) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this MPH concentration (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • MPH ENEP 1. Interpret the implications of regulations, laws, standards, and various types of policy on activities aimed at protecting environmental health. (PHPH 7150)
  • MPH ENEP 2. Evaluate how human health is impacted by exposure to environmental and occupational contaminants that interact with the environment. (PHPH 7294)
  • MPH ENEP 3. Evaluate key sources of data for epidemiologic purposes and their strengths and limitations. (PHPH 7525)
  • MPH ENEP 4. Assess risk factors and their relationship to health outcomes. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH ENEP 5. Demonstrate the application of advanced epidemiologic methods to the design of epidemiologic studies of both infectious and noninfectious disease. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH ENEP 6. Assess, synthesize and critically evaluate epidemiologic literature for strengths and weaknesses. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH ENEP 7. Evaluate interventions to reduce prevalence of major public health problems. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH ENEP 8. Identify and weigh ethical dilemmas in epidemiologic research. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH ENEP 9. Explain policy implications of epidemiologic research findings. (PHPH 8721)

Required MPH ENEP Concentration Courses (12 hours):

MPH ENEP Concentration Elective Courses (9 hours):
Select at least one (1) course from the following List A of ENEP concentration approved elective courses:

  • PHPH 7027 Fundamentals of Biostatistics II (3)
  • PHPH 7293 Environmental Health Toxicology (3)
  • PHPH 7345 Introduction to Risk Assessment (3)

Select at least two (2) courses from the following List B of ENEP concentration approved elective courses:

  • PHPH 7019 Research Methods (3)
  • PHPH 7155 Air Quality and the Environment (3)
  • PHPH 7265 Epidemiology and the Prevention of Violence (3)
  • PHPH 7275 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7280 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7297 Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (3)
  • PHPH 7300 Urban Health (3)
  • PHPH 7340 Built Environment and Health (3)
  • PHPB 7460 Forced Migration and Health (3)
  • PHPH 8310 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 8350 Biological Basis for Disease (3)
  • PHPH 8690 Special Topics in Environmental Health (3)
  • PHPH 8790 Special Topics in Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 8880 or PHPB 8880 Public Health Study Abroad (3)
  • Any course from the above ENEP list A of approved elective courses not used to satisfy ENEP list A requirements (6)

MPH Environmental Health Concentration

The following MPH Environmental Health (EVHT) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this MPH concentration (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • MPH EVHT 1. Interpret the implications of regulations, laws, standards, and various types of policy on activities aimed at protecting environmental health. (PHPH 7150)
  • MPH EVHT 2. Describe approaches to risk assessment for a wide variety of environmental hazards. (PHPH 7345)
  • MPH EVHT 3. Evaluate how human health is impacted by exposure to environmental and occupational contaminants that interact with the environment. (PHPH 7294)
  • MPH EVHT 4. Apply biological, chemical, physical and public health principles to develop approaches for designing and maintaining health-promoting physical environments, and for assessing, preventing and controlling environmental hazards that pose risks to human health. (PHPH 7293)
  • MPH EVHT 5. Identify important susceptible human sub-populations with respect to environmental exposures and the sources of variability. (PHPH 7345)

Required MPH EVHT Concentration Courses (12 hours):

MPH EVHT Concentration Elective Courses (9 hours):
Select at least 3 courses from the following list of EVHT concentration approved elective courses:

MPH Epidemiology Concentration

The following MPH Epidemiology (EPID) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this MPH concentration (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  •  MPH EPID 1. Assess risk factors and their relationship to health outcomes. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH EPID 2. Demonstrate the application of advanced epidemiologic methods to the design of epidemiologic studies of both infectious and noninfectious disease. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH EPID 3. Assess, synthesize and critically evaluate epidemiologic literature for strengths and weaknesses. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH EPID 4. Evaluate key sources of data for epidemiologic purposes and their strengths and limitations. (PHPH 7525)
  • MPH EPID 5. Demonstrate the application of data analysis techniques and appropriate interpretation of results. (PHPH 7027)
  • MPH EPID 6. Design, analyze, and evaluate an epidemiologic study. (PHPH 7027)
  • MPH EPID 7. Evaluate interventions to reduce prevalence of major public health problems. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH EPID 8. Identify and weigh ethical dilemmas in epidemiologic research. (PHPH 8721)
  • MPH EPID 9. Explain policy implications of epidemiologic research findings. (PHPH 8721)

Required MPH EPID Concentration Courses (9 hours):

MPH EPID Concentration Elective Courses (12 hours):

Select at least 1 course from the following List A of EPID concentration approved elective courses:

  • PHPH 7265 Epidemiology and the Prevention of Violence (3)
  • PHPH 7275 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7280 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7365 Epidemiology of Adolescent and Young Adult Health Risk Behaviors (3)

Select at least 3 courses from the following List B of elective EPID concentration approved elective courses (the course satisfying List A cannot also satisfy List B requirements):

  • PHPH 7014 Epidemiology of STDs and HIV (3)
  • PHPH 7019 Research Methods (3)
  • PHPH 7150 Environmental Health (3)
  • PHPH 7019 Research Methods (3)
  • PHPH 7265 Epidemiology and the Prevention of Violence (3)
  • PHPH 7275 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7280 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7290 Case Studies in Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7355 Prevention Methods (3)
  • PHPH 7365 Epidemiology of Adolescent and Young Adult Health Risk Behaviors (3)
  • PHPB 7460 Forced Migration and Health (3)
  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
  • PHPB 8285 Social Determinants of Health (3)
  • PHPH 8860 Multilevel Models in Public Health (3)
  • PHPH 8790 Special Topics in Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPB 8880 or PHPH 8880 Public Health Study Abroad (3) (up to 3 credits of PHPB/PHPH 8880 may count here)

MPH Health Management and Policy Concentration

The following MPH Health Management and Policy (HMGP) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this MPH concentration (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • MPH HMGP 1. Demonstrate application of economic principles to analyze public health issues. (PHPB 8250)
  • MPH HMGP 2. Understand the market structure and the underlying sources of market power in the context of interlocking market segments in the health care system. (PHPB 8250)
  • MPH HMGP 3. Apply the principles of program and financial management across the health care and public health systems. (PHPB 7330)
  • MPH HMGP 4. Use strategic and business planning principles to develop and align the mission, vision, goals, and objectives for operating a public health or health care organization, and assure that plans align with evidenced-based approaches to improve population health. (PHPB 7330)
  • MPH HMGP 5. Explain key elements of human resource management in the public health and health care contexts. (PHPB 7330)
  • MPH HMGP 6. Describe public health and health care financing in the U.S., including revenue sources and reimbursement methods, historical origins and current policy, and their impact on health service delivery and population health. (PHPB 7330)
  • MPH HMGP 7. Describe and demonstrate the attributes of effective leadership and the skills of effective leadership including decision making, vision setting, team building, conflict management, and strategic collaboration. (PHPB 7170)
  • MPH HMGP 8. Evaluate the challenges and opportunities for health policy leadership to improve population health and advance health equity. (PHPB 7170)
  • MPH HMGP 9. Utilize commonly used frameworks and theories of policymaking to develop policy proposals that address public health challenges, health equity, and improve population health. (PHPB 7170)
  • MPH HMGP 10. Apply strategies for analyzing, evaluating, and advocating for public health and health care policies and programs. (PHPB 7170)

Required MPH HMGP Concentration Courses (9 hours):

  • PHPB 7170 Public Health Leadership and Policy (3)
  • PHPB 7330 Health Care Management and Finance (3)
  • PHPB 8250 Health Economics and Policy (3)

MPH HMGP Concentration Elective Courses (12 hours):
Select at least one (1) course from the following List A of HMGP concentration approved elective courses (3 hours):

  • PHPB 7521 Evaluation Research (3)
  • PHPB 7522 Qualitative Research (3)
  • PHPB 8410 Economic Evaluation (3)
  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • Other appropriate research methods/statistics courses may be approved by the Department Chair on the Master of Public Health Graduate Petition form. Students should receive approval from the Department Chair prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Select at least two (2) course from the following List B of HMGP concentration approved elective courses (6 hours):

  • PHPB 7635 Health Policy and Health Equity (3)
  • PHPB 7640 Comparative Health Systems (3)
  • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
  • PHPB 8290 Population Health Informatics (3)
  • Any course(s) from the above HMGP list A of approved elective courses not used to satisfy HMGP list A requirements (3-6)

Select at least one (1) course from the following List C of HMGP concentration approved elective courses (3 hours)

  • PHPH 7019 Research Methods (3)
  • PHPB 7025 Health Disparities (3)
  • PHPH 7150 Environmental Health (3)
  • PHPH 7300 Urban Health (3)
  • PHPH 7325 Urban Health Seminar (1)
  • PHPH 7340 Built Environment and Health (3)
  • PHPH 7425 Maternal and Child Health (3)
  • PHPB 7460 Forced Migration and Health (3)
  • PHPH 7525 Statistical Computing (3)
  • PHPB 7535 Dissemination and Implementation Science (3)
  • PHPB 7555 Disability and Public Health (3)
  • PHPB 7565 Disability Policy (3)
  • PHPB 7570 Childhood Obesity Prevention (3)
  • PHPB 7600 Global Health (3)
  • PHPB 8255 Health Communication (3)
  • PHPB 8880 or PHPH 8880 Public Health Study Abroad (3) (up to 3 credits of PHPB/PHPH 8880 may count here)
  • Any course from the above HMGP list A of approved elective courses not used to satisfy HMGP list A requirements (3)
  • Any course from the above HMGP list B of approved elective courses not used to satisfy HMGP list B requirements (3)

MPH Health Promotion and Behavior Concentration

The following MPH Health Promotion and Behavior (HPMB) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this MPH concentration (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • MPH HPMB 1. Identify basic theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavioral disciplines that are used in public health research and practice. (PHPB 7022)
  • MPH HPMB 2. Describe how social and behavioral risk factors contribute to health outcomes. (PHPB 7022)
  • MPH HPMB 3. Describe steps and procedures for the developing, planning, implementing and evaluating public health programs, policies and interventions. (PHPB 7410)
  • MPH HPMB 4. Apply evidence-based principles and the scientific knowledge base to critical evaluation and decision making in public health. (PHPB 7535)
  • MPH HPMB 5. Develop a logic model for use in program development, implementation, and evaluation. (PHPB 7521)
  • MPH HPMB 6. Differentiate among goals, measurable objectives, related activities, and expected outcomes for a public health program. (PHPB 7521)
  • MPH HPMB 7. Differentiate the purposes of formative, process, and outcome evaluation, and explain how findings from each are used. (PHPB 7521)
  • MPH HPMB 8. Collaboratively assess individual, organizational, and community concerns and resources for public health programs. (PHPB 7521)
  • MPH HPMB 9. Assess evaluation reports in relation to their quality, utility, and impact on public health. (PHPB 7521)

Required MPH HPMB Concentration Courses (12 hours):

  • PHPB 7022 Health Behavior Theory for Public Health Research (3)
  • PHPB 7410 Intervention Development for Public Health (3)
  • PHPB 7521 Evaluation Research (3)
  • PHPB 7535 Dissemination and Implementation Science (3)

MPH HPMB Concentration Elective Courses (9 hours):
Select at least 3 courses from the following list of HPMB concentration approved elective courses:

  • PHPH 7014 Epidemiology of STDs and HIV (3)
  • PHPH 7019 Research Methods (3)
  • PHPB 7020 Principles of Tobacco Control (3)
  • PHPB 7025 Health Disparities (3)
  • PHPH 7027 Fundamentals of Biostatistics II (3)
  • [PHPH 7150 Environmental Health (3)
  • PHPB 7170 Public Health Leadership and Policy (3)
  • PHPH 7265 Epidemiology and the Prevention of Violence (3)
  • PHPH 7275 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7300 Urban Health (3)
  • PHPH 7340 Built Environment and Health (3)
  • PHPH 7365 Epidemiology of Adolescent and Young Adult Health Risk Behaviors (3)
  • PHPH 7425 Maternal and Child Health (3)
  • [PHPB 7460] Forced Migration and Health (3)
  • PHPB 7522 Qualitative Research (3)
  • PHPH 7525 Statistical Computing (3)
  • PHPB 7555 Disabilities and Public Health (3)
  • PHPB 7565 Disability Policy (3)
  • PHPB 7570 Childhood Obesity Prevention (3)
  • PHPB 7600 Global Health (3)
  • PHPB 8255 Health Communication (3)
  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
  • PHPB 8275 Health Literacy (3)
  • PHPB 8285 Social Determinants of Public Health (3)
  • PHPB 8880 or PHPH 8880 Public Health Study Abroad (3) (up to 3 credits of PHPB/PHPH 8880 may count here)

8040.15 MPH Degree Progression

Critical milestones are assessed based on credit hours and semesters completed within the MPH degree program.

  • Milestone #1:  Students are expected to have their thesis/capstone (culminating experience) proposal accepted by their thesis/capstone chair and committee by no later than the completion of 36 credit hours in the MPH program.  The approved thesis proposal form must be submitted to the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services within the same 36 credit hours.  Waivers to this credit rule are for students planning to complete PHPB/PHPH 7992 Integrative Learning Experience, or by petition only and may be adjusted for approved leaves of absence, medical leave or disability as detailed elsewhere in school or university policies.  Failure to submit an approved thesis/capstone proposal by the conclusion of 36 credit hours, with no intentions to complete PHPB/PHPH 7992 Integrative Learning Experience, will place the student on scholastic probation.
  •  Milestone #2: Once a student initially enrolls in their thesis/capstone course, students are expected to successfully defend and publish (upload to Georgia State University) their thesis/capstone within two academic semesters (including summer).  Failure to complete the thesis/capstone within two academic semesters will place the student on scholastic probation.  Failure to complete the thesis/capstone by the end of the 3rd semester will result in a scholastic exclusion from the MPH program.
  • Milestone #3:  The maximum time limit set by the faculty for completing the MPH graduate degree program is six (6) years from the first semester of admission to the MPH.  After six years, courses will begin to expire in order of first completed, and may require re-enrollment or replacement with advanced coursework to satisfy degree requirements.

If a student’s progress indicates scholastic probation, the student will receive a notice of this from the Director of the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA), and the notice will be sent by e-mail message to their official Georgia State University e-mail account. Within fifteen (15) working days of receipt of this notice, the student should submit a memo to the Director of OAA (from the student’s Georgia State University e-mail account) documenting how the student intends to achieve the relevant milestone before reaching the criterion for initiating a dismissal action. If a student’s progress indicates initiation of a scholastic exclusion action or if a student fails to submit a memo, the student will receive a scholastic exclusion action notice from the Director of OAA.

Students may appeal the pending exclusion action by petitioning the Dean of the School of Public Health but they must do so before the end of the semester in which their progress first indicated initiation of an exclusion action. If they appeal, students are required to submit as part of their appeal an individualized plan, approved by their thesis/capstone chair, detailing dates by which they intend to meet any milestones yet unachieved.

At any time the student believes they may have difficulty meeting the critical milestones, they should immediately consult with their advisor in the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services.

8040.20 Master of Public Health /Juris Doctor Dual Degree

The College of Law and the School of Public Health offer a Juris Doctor (JD)/ Master of Public Health (MPH) in the Health Management and Policy (HMGP) concentration dual degree program. This dual program provides an opportunity to pursue studies in law and public health concurrently. The JD/MPH-HMGP enables students to earn both degrees in a shorter time than would be possible if students pursued each degree separately. Dual degree programs include separate, but affiliated degree programs that are linked through shared curricular offerings and collaborative administrative processes.

Credit hours earned in one degree program satisfy some requirements of the other degree program. No credit hours for the MPH courses will be applied toward the JD requirements until a student has completed the MPH; similarly, no credit hours for the JD courses will be applied toward the MPH requirements until completion of the JD. In other words, a student cannot graduate from the JD and MPH in the same semester—a student must graduate from either program in a given semester, and then the second program in a subsequent semester. Students interested in pursuing a JD/MPH must be admitted into and enroll in both degree programs prior to completion of 30 credit hours of MPH coursework and 60 hours of JD coursework in order to qualify for the dual degree program. When admitted to the JD/MPH program, students must complete the first 30 hours of required courses in the JD program as soon as possible (immediately upon JD admission). After completion of these 30 hours of law courses, course enrollment in either college or both colleges concurrently is permitted and may resume. Students must complete the dual degree program within six years of the initial semester of enrollment. Students should be able to complete both degrees in four years.

JD/MPH Dual Degree Admissions

To participate in the JD/MPH dual degree program, students must apply separately for admission to the College of Law and the School of Public Health. Students are strongly encouraged to apply to both programs simultaneously. However, there is some opportunity to apply and enroll in the dual degree program after admission to only one of the schools, if a student has not proceeded too far in that school’s program. Students interested in pursuing a JD/MPH must be admitted into and enroll in both degree programs prior to completion of 30 credit hours of MPH coursework and 60 hours of JD coursework in order to qualify for the dual degree program.

Students must take the LSAT to apply to the College of Law. The School of Public Health will accept the LSAT in lieu of the GRE if a student is admitted into the College of Law first. If a student applies concurrently to the College of Law and School of Public Health, or if a student is admitted to the College of Law after they are admitted to the School of Public Health, that student will need to provide a GRE score as well. Admission into one program does not presume admission into the other. Students who gain admission into both programs and become dual degree JD/MPH students should self-disclose their dual degree status to the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator at the School of Public Health and the Associate Director of the Center for Law, Health and Society at the College of Law immediately upon admission into their second program of study (either JD or MPH). An email from the student to both the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator and CLHS Associate Director is preferred. Failure to send this notification to their two advisors may result in the student having to complete both programs in their entirety and become ineligible for the dual JD/MPH degree program opportunity.

What can I do with a dual degree in law and public health?

  • Private law practices specializing in healthcare, pharmaceuticals, and food and drug policy
  • Legal counsel in federal, state, and local government agencies
  • Government affairs and advocacy
  • Research institutions and higher education
  • Non-profit organizations

Resources like the CDC’s Public Health Law Program, Network for Public Health Law, APHA Law Section, and the American Health Lawyers Association provide connections to similarly trained individuals throughout the country through conferences, training, and networking. Read more information in the findings from the Network for Public Health Law’s interactive tool.

JD/MPH HMGP DUAL DEGREE REQUIREMENTS (106 hours)

MPH – minimum 28 School of Public Health credit hours (+ 14 or more public health-related College of Law credit hours, taken for the JD)

Required MPH Core Courses (16 hours):

  • PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health (3) MPH students who have completed a CEPH-accredited bachelor’s degree may replace this PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health course with three (3) credit hours of health management and policy concentration-approved elective course(s).
  • PHPH 7011 Epidemiology for Public Health (3) or PHPH 7711 Epidemiologic Methods I (3)
  • PHPH 7017 Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (4)
  • PHPB 7140 Health Promotion Planning, Administration, and Evaluation (3)
  • PHPB 7160 Fundamentals of Health Systems, Leadership, and Policy (3)

Required MPH HMGP Concentration Courses (9 hours):

  • PHPB 7170 Public Health Leadership and Policy (3)
  • PHPB 7330 Health Care Management and Finance (3)
  • [LAW 7240] Health Law: Finance and Delivery (3) (in lieu of PH 8250 Health Economics and Policy (3)

Required MPH HMGP Concentration-related College of Law Elective Courses (12 hours):
Select at least one (1) course from the following List A of HMGP concentration approved elective courses (3 hours):

  • PHPB 8410 Economic Evaluation (3)
  • PHPB 7521 Evaluation Research (3)
  • PHPB 7522 Qualitative Research (3)
  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • Other appropriate research methods/statistics courses may be approved by the Department Chair on the Master of Public Health Graduate Petition form. Students should receive approval from the Department Chair prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Select at least three (3) courses from the following HMGP List B of approved MPH HMGP/JD elective courses (9 hours):

  • [LAW 7239] Health Law: Quality and Access (3)
  • [LAW 7244] Public Health Law (3)
  • Other SPH approved Health law electives with “B”grade (3.0) or better– counted below (3-9 hours)

Required MPH Applied Practice Experience Course (2 credit hours) or (2 credit hours minimum) of public health-related Lawyering Skills Course:

Public Health-Related Lawyering skills course, such as clinic or externship, and must specifically be HeLP, a health law related externship, or HLA (in lieu of PHPB 7960 MPH Applied Practice Experience) (2)
*Standard MPH HMGP students complete two (2) credit hours of PH 7960 MPH Applied Practice Experience; however, JD/MPH HMGP dual degree students may satisfy this PHPB 7960 requirement by completing 3-6 credit hours of a College of Law lawyering skills course: specifically in the Health Law Partnership (HeLP) Legal Services Clinic at Georgia State University [law.gsu.edu/clinics/help-legal-services-clinic/], a health law related externship [law.gsu.edu/experiential-learning/externships/], or Health Legislation and Advocacy clinical program [law.gsu.edu/clinics/]. For either a traditional PHPB 7960 MPH Applied Practice Experience or for a lawyering skills course in lieu of a MPH Applied Practice Experience, the student must FIRST complete all MPH core courses, LAW 7240, and LAW 7244 before beginning the MPH Applied Practice Experience or lawyering skills course. If a lawyering skills course is taken prior to completing those required MPH core courses, it will not count for the PHPB 7960 MPH Applied Practice Experience requirement. This is simply because the MPH curriculum design requires the MPH Applied Practice Experience to be an opportunity for students to demonstrate the specific MPH knowledge and skills they learned in their MPH courses; therefore, students cannot apply the knowledge and skills acquired through their MPH courses of study in the MPH Applied Practice Experience until after they have completed those MPH courses. Students must submit a Waiver/Substitution form to the School of Public Health for the lawyering skills course to be counted in lieu of the PHPB 7960 MPH Applied Practice Experience requirement [publichealth.gsu.edu/students/practicum/practicum-forms/], and the form must indicate how the student will demonstrate attainment of at least five public health competencies, of which at least three must be foundational competencies, in at least two products. The School of Public Health will make the final decision on if a completed lawyering skills course fulfills the PHPB 7960 requirement. Alternatively, JD/MPH student may elect to complete the standard public health Applied Practice Experience course.

Required MPH Thesis or Capstone Project Course (3 credit hours):

JD – minimum 78 College of Law hours (+12 or more law-related School of Public Health credit hours, taken for the MPH)

Students should refer to the College of Law for the specific JD requirements of this dual degree program.

8040.20 Master of Public Health/Doctor of Philosophy in Community Psychology Dual Degree

The Department of Psychology and the School of Public Health offer a joint Master of Public Health/Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Psychology. Students enroll in either the Health Promotion and Behavior or the Epidemiology concentrations of the MPH program in the School of Public Health and in the Community Psychology concentration of the Department of Psychology. This dual program provides an opportunity to pursue studies in public health and community psychology concurrently. The MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology enables students to earn both degrees in a shorter time than would be possible if they pursued each degree separately.

Admissions

To participate in the MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology dual degree program, prospective students are strongly encouraged to apply separately for admission to the College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology (Community Concentration) and the School of Public Health, but are not required to do so. Applicants may complete a single application to the College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology (Community Concentration) and indicate on the application their interest in the dual degree program on their Ph.D. Community Psychology application — if admitted into the Ph.D. Community Psychology program, applicants should email their assigned Ph.D. Community Psychology advisor to ensure their interest in the dual degree program has been noted, and their application is now being considered by the other program of interest (the MPH in the School of Public Health).

Prospective students are strongly encouraged to apply to both programs simultaneously for the same entry term/semester. This gives students the best opportunity to apply the maximum number of dual degree (having credit hours earned in one degree program satisfy some requirements of the other degree program). Still, there is some opportunity to apply and enroll in the dual degree program after admission to only one of the schools, if a student has not proceeded too far in that school’s program. If interested in pursuing a MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology, students must be admitted into both programs and enroll in the dual degree program prior to completion of 30 hours of MPH coursework or 30 hours of Ph.D. Community Psychology coursework.

Applicants must take the GRE to apply to both programs. Admission into one program does not presume admission to the other. Students who gain admission into both programs and become dual degree MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology students should self-disclose their dual degree status to their Ph.D. Community Psychology advisor and the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator immediately upon admission into their second program of study (either Ph.D. Community Psychology or MPH). A joint email from the student to both their Ph.D. Community Psychology advisor and the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator is preferred. Failure to send this notification to their advisors may result in the student having to complete both programs in their entirety and become ineligible for the dual MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology degree program opportunity.

Once admitted to the dual program students will be enrolled in both the School of Public Health and the College of Arts and Sciences concurrently. A student cannot graduate from the Ph.D. Community Psychology and MPH programs in the same semester—a student must graduate from either program in a given semester, and then the second program in a subsequent semester. Students are expected to complete your dual degree program within six years of the initial semester of enrollment (and must complete it in no longer than 8 years). The MPH program must be completed within 6 years of initial enrollment. Students should be able to complete both degrees in five to six years.

What can a graduate do with a dual degree in public health and psychology?

  • University/College appointments in higher education in public health, psychology, or allied disciplines
  • Research, evaluation, and/or program roles in international, federal, state, and local government agencies
  • Research, evaluation, and/or program roles in public and private research and evaluation firms, foundations, and advocacy organizations
  • Variety of roles in policy and advocacy organizations
  • Independent consulting

In addition to major organizations in Public Health (e.g., American Public Health Association, APHA) and Community Psychology (Society for Community Research and Action, SCRA), several interdisciplinary professional organizations like the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE), American Evaluation Association (AEA), and the Society for Prevention Research (SPR) provide links to similarly trained individuals throughout the country through conferences, training, and networking.

Degree Requirements for Dual MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology Program
(98-104 for Students in MPH Health Promotion and Behavior and 101-107 hours for Students in MPH Epidemiology Concentration)

MPH HPMB Concentration– 42 hours
16 hours of MPH core courses

  • PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health (3) MPH students who have completed a CEPH-accredited bachelor’s degree may replace this PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health course with three (3) credit hours of health promotion and behavior concentration-approved elective course(s). 
  • PHPH 7711 Epidemiologic Methods I (3) Dual MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology students should complete PHPH 7711 so that they are prepared for the doctoral-level psychology statistics and methods courses.
  • PHPH 7017 Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (4)
  • PHPB 7140 Health Promotion Planning, Administration, and Evaluation (3)
  • PHPB 7160 Fundamentals of Health Systems, Leadership, and Policy (3)

12 hours of MPH HPMB concentration courses

  • PHPB 7022 Health Behavior Theory for Public Health Research (3) (possibly satisfies Ph.D Community Psychology elective)
  • PHPB 7410 Intervention Development for Public Health (3)
  • PHPB 7521 Evaluation Research (3)
  • PHPB 7535 Dissemination and Implementation Science (3)

9 hours of Psychology Core/Community Psychology (possibly satisfies MPH electives)

  • PSYC 8200 Introduction to Community Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 8420 Psychological Research Statistics II (3)

Choose one (3):

  • PSYC 8220 Community Interventions, Social Change, and Prevention (3)
  • PSYC 8060 Issues of Human Diversity (3)
  • PSYC 8230 Assessment, Consultation, and Evaluation I (ACE I)
  • PSYC 8260 Assessment, Consultation, and Evaluation in Community Psychology II (ACE II)
  • PSYC 8280 Psychology, Advocacy, and Organizing (3)
  • PSYC 9900 Qualitative Methods (3)
  • PHPB 7522 Qualitative Research (3)

2 hours of MPH Applied Practice Experience

PHPB 7960 MPH Applied Practice Experience (2)

3 hours of MPH thesis
PHPB 7990 Thesis (3)

Note: Students should simultaneously register for PSYC 8999 Master’s Thesis Research (3) to fulfill psychology thesis requirements; however, this PSYC 8999 course does not count towards the MPH thesis requirement or MPH degree program.

Note: MPH/Ph.D. dual degree students must complete PHPB 7990 Public Thesis (3): Capstones or other MPH culminating experiences are not permitted for MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology dual degree students.

MPH EPID Concentration – 42 hours
16 hours of MPH core courses

  • PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health (3) MPH students who have completed a CEPH-accredited bachelor’s degree may replace this PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health course with three (3) credit hours of health promotion and behavior concentration-approved elective course(s). 
  • PHPH 7711  Epidemiologic Methods I (3)
  • PHPH 7017 Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (4)
  • PHPB 7140 Program Planning, Administration, and Evaluation (3)
  • PHPB 7160 Fundamentals of Health Systems, Leadership, and Policy (3).

12 hours of MPH EPID concentration courses and elective

Select at least one (1) course from the following List A of EPID concentration-approved elective courses:

  • PHPH 7265 Epidemiology and the Prevention of Violence (3)
  • PHPH 7275 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7280 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7365 Epidemiology of Adolescent and Young Adult Health Risk Behaviors (3)

9 hours of Psychology Core/Community Psychology (possibly satisfies MPH electives)

  • PSYC 8200 Introduction to Community Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 8420 Psychological Research Statistics II (3)

Choose one (3):

  • PSYC 8220 Community Interventions, Social Change, and Prevention (3)
  • PSYC 8060 Issues of Human Diversity (3)
  • PSYC 8230 Assessment, Consultation, and Evaluation I (ACE I)
  • [PSCY 8260] Assessment, Consultation, and Evaluation in Community Psychology II (ACE II)
  • PSYC 8280 Psychology, Advocacy, and Organizing (3)
  • PSYC 9900 Qualitative Methods (3)
  • PHPB 7522 Qualitative Research (3)

2 hours of MPH Applied Practice Experience
PHPH 7960 MPH Applied Practice Experience (2)

3 hours of MPH thesis
PHPH 7990 Thesis (3)

Note: Students should simultaneously register for PSYC 8999 Master’s Thesis Research (3) to fulfill psychology thesis requirements; however, this PSYC 8999 course does not count towards the MPH thesis requirement or MPH degree program.

Note: MPH/Ph.D. dual degree students must complete PHPH 7990 Thesis (3): Capstones or other MPH culminating experiences are not permitted for MPH/Ph.D. Community Psychology dual degree students.

Ph.D. Community Psychology—53-59 hours for most students, depending on their unique Ph.D. program of study. Students should consult the Department of Psychology.

8050 Graduate Certificate in Public Health

8050 Graduate Certificate in Public Health

The Graduate Certificate in Public Health (GCPH) is a 16-credit hour program of study. The content includes three core courses taught in the Master of Public Health degree program and two electives. All courses have been specially designed and developed for students currently working in public health or related field who seek to maintain, upgrade, or advance their public health knowledge and skills.

The Graduate Certificate in Public Health will offer strong foundations in public health theory, research, and practice, for example:

  • Community Health Practice and Research
  • Program Planning, Management, and Evaluation
  • Human Communication
  • Health Promotion and Education
  • Environmental Health
  • Health and Human Rights
  • Health Policies

Graduate Certificate in Public Health Requirements (16 hours):

  1. Required GCPH Core Courses (10 hours)
    • PHPH 7011 Epidemiology for Public Health (3) or PHPH 7711 Epidemiologic Methods I (3)
    • PHPH 7017 Fundamentals of Biostatistics I (4)
    • PHPB 7160 Fundamentals of Health Systems, Leadership, and Policy (3)
  2. Required GCPH Elective Courses (6 hours):
    • Select at least two electives in consultation with either the SPH Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) or a faculty mentor. Electives must be approved, in writing, by OAA and should be geared toward maintaining, upgrading, or advancing public health knowledge and skills related to the student’s current or future career. Students considering in pursuing the Master of Public Health (MPH) degree at GSU should select the following courses as their GCPH electives:
      • PHPH 7010 Foundations in Public Health (3)
      • PHPB 7140 Health Promotion Planning, Administration, and Evaluation (3)

Transfer credits and the time limit on enrollment in the Graduate Certificate program

A student may apply a maximum of four (4) semester credit hours transferred from another institution or used in another graduate program toward fulfilling the GCPH requirements. Transfer credits are approved by the corresponding Department Chair that houses the Georgia State University-equivalent course and processed by the OAA.

Credits earned at Georgia State University in either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree status:  A student may apply a maximum of four (4) semester hours of applicable Georgia State University course credit earned prior to GCPH program admission (while taking public health courses as either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree or program status) toward fulfilling GCPH degree requirements. All Georgia State University credits presented for the GCPH degree must have been earned within three calendar years of the date of certificate conferral. Courses taken at Georgia State University that were applied to another Georgia State University graduate certificate or degree program may not be applied to the GCPH degree; instead, a student should seek a GCPH course waiver for these courses already applied to another Georgia State University graduate certificate or degree program.

GCPH Course Waivers: GCPH students may be granted a course waiver for any GCPH course already completed as part of another Georgia State University graduate certificate or degree program. Students are still expected to take the minimum number of credit hours expected for the GCPH program at Georgia State University (sixteen (16) credit hours), but when granted a course waiver, the student may complete a different graduate level course (usually higher-level), substituted into their GCPH program in order to complete the total sixteen (16) credit hour requirement of their GCPH program. Waivers and course replacements are decided by the corresponding Department Chair that houses the GCPH course being requested for replacement.

Time Limits. The time limit for completing the GCPH program is three (3) years from the term of entry.

Applying GCPH credit hours to Public Health Graduate degree programs.

Students who wish to change from GCPH enrollment to graduate degree seeking status must file an application for the graduate program desired and provide all supporting documents by the appropriate deadline for the semester for which admission is sought. Further information on application procedures for admission to degree programs in the School of Public Health may be obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Career Services: publichealth.gsu.edu/academic/apply/.

GCPH credit hours may apply to School of Public Health graduate degree programs. However, all credits, including GCPH-earned credits, presented for the Master’s degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of Master’s degree conferral, and all credits presented for the Doctoral degrees must have been earned within nine calendar years of the date of Doctoral degree conferral. Grades from all attempts at all Georgia State University courses that are taken at the graduate level will become part of the student’s GPA.

8060 Doctor of Philosophy in Public Health

Laura Salazar
Professor and PhD Program Director

Approved by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents in March 2011, the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Public Health academic degree in the School of Public Health was the first Georgia Board of Regent’s approved public health Doctor of Philosophy degree based in the metropolitan Atlanta area.  The degree requirements will serve to educate the next generation of prevention scientists conducting public health research in academia, governmental public health, health care organizations and the private sector. Within the doctoral degree, students choose between distinct doctoral concentrations, or programs of study, offered by the School. They include: Epidemiology (EPID), Environmental Health (EVHT), Health Promotion and Behavior (HPMB), or Health Services and Policy Research (HSRP).  While the Georgia State University School of Public Health offers four distinct Ph.D. programs in four different concentrations—EPID, EVHT, HPMB, and HSRP—this catalog will occasionally refer to a singular Ph.D. degree when discussing requirements that pertain to all School of Public Health Ph.D. programs of study and students.

8060.10 Ph.D. Degree Requirements

The Ph.D. degree requires completion of a minimum of sixty-two (62) credit hours of coursework and a declared concentration in a public health core area. Students are also required to complete a dissertation. The candidates must satisfy the course requirements and credit hours in the following areas:

Required Prerequisites – MPH Core Courses (3 – 13 hours):

All Ph.D. graduates are grounded in the following foundational public health knowledge learning objectives (and the course where the learning objective is assessed is noted in parenthesis):

Profession & Science of Public Health

  1. Explain public health history, philosophy and values. (PHPH 7010)
  2. Identify the core functions of public health and the 10 Essential Services. (PHPH 7010)
  3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  4. List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US or other community relevant to the school or program. (PHPH 7010)
  5. Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc. (PHPH 7010)
  6. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge. (PHPH 7010)

Factors Related to Human Health

  1. Explain effects of environmental factors on a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  2. Explain biological and genetic factors that affect a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  3. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
  4. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities. (PHPH 7010)
  5. Explain how globalization affects global burdens of disease. (PHPH 7010)
  6. Explain an ecological perspective on the connections among human health, animal health and ecosystem health (eg, One Health). (PHPH 7010)

For students admitted to the PhD program who have not completed a CEPH-accredited bachelor’s degree in public health or MPH degree, the following course will be required as prerequisite to the PhD program:

Two additional courses may be required upon review of the student’s completed graduate coursework by the PhD Director and Faculty Advisor.

Based upon the PhD program concentration area declared by the incoming student, the following courses will be required:

  • For students declaring Health Promotion and Behavior as a concentration: PHPB 7140 Health Promotion  Planning, Administration, and Evaluation
  • For students declaring Environmental Health as a concentration: PHPH 7150 Environmental Health
  • For students declaring Health Services and Policy Research as a concentration: PHPB 7160 Fundamentals of Health Systems, Leadership, and Policy

Doctoral students may waive these prerequisite MPH Core Courses if they:

  • enter the Ph.D. program with a CEPH accredited MPH degree that included “B” grades or better in their MPH courses related to the MPH Foundational Public Health Knowledge learning objectives and MPH Foundational Competencies, as documented by an official university transcript. Syllabi for courses may also be requested.
  • and/or have completed employment or other training(s) that enable them to demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired in the MPH core courses listed above. Note: PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health cannot be waived by employment or other training(s). PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health is only waived after the School verifies a students’ previous completion of a CEPH-accredited bachelor’s degree in public health or MPH degree.

Students meeting the above criteria should provide a petitions for waiver for each of the five courses being requested for waiver. The Petition for Waiver is a written statement, along with any evidentiary documentation, that assures the School that the doctoral student has mastered one (or more) of the MPH Foundational Public Health Knowledge learning objectives and/or MPH Foundational Competencies through another manner (i.e. MPH degree, career experience, etc.). This Petition must be approved by the Doctoral Program Director. The Doctoral Program Director may defer to the Department Chair in which the petitioned course is offered. Upon approval by the Doctoral Program or Department Chair, the Petition is then forwarded to the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) for their approval. OAA may request the input of the Senior Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Initiatives and/or the Academic Affairs Committee Chair and/or members, but that is not required. Once the Director of OAA notes OAA’s approval, the student’s file and PAWS electronic program of study is updated to note satisfaction of the required prerequisite(s).

Doctoral Degree Requirements (62 hours):

  1. Required Ph.D. Core Courses (18 hours): 
      The following courses constitute the Public Health Doctoral Degree Core:

  2. Required Ph.D. Concentration Courses (27 hours):
    Twenty seven (27) hours of required coursework and electives have been established to ensure that students achieve proficiency in the competencies and skills related to each Ph.D. program of study: Environmental Health (EVHT), Epidemiology (EPID), Health Promotion and Behavior (HPMB), or Health Services and Policy Research (HSRP). Each student selects a program concentration upon application to the Ph.D. degree. To meet the individualized, in-depth training needs of doctoral students, many concentration research methods and/or elective areas have multiple course options that doctoral students may choose from to satisfy their unique learning needs and future career paths. All choices should be made in consultation with the student’s Faculty Advisor, and Faculty Advisor agreement with the course choices is noted on the Faculty Advisor and Doctoral Advisory Committee approved Doctoral Program of Study form (see Section 8060.60 Doctoral Program of Study Form for more information). Students should seek Faculty Advisor consultation well before concentration research methods and/or elective course registration.
  3. Required Ph.D. Professional Seminar Courses (5 hours):
  4. Required Comprehensive Ph.D. Examination:
    Students will be expected to pass a doctoral comprehensive exam where the student demonstrates mastery of the program competencies and proficiency in the doctoral program body of knowledge. Students will have two opportunities to pass this exam, which is graded Pass/Fail by at least two faculty members in the School of Public Health. Please see the doctoral student handbook for more details about the doctoral comprehensive exam.
  5. Required Ph.D. Teaching Practicum (3 hours):

PHPB 9960 or PHPH 9960 Public Health Doctoral Practicum (3)

               6. Required Ph.D. Culminating Experience (9 hours):

PHPB 9990 or PHPH 9990 Dissertation (9)

The dissertation will provide the student with an educational experience that enables the student to make a significant contribution to the field of public health and to apply the doctoral program knowledge and skills that allow him or her to contribute to the theoretical, conceptual, empirical, or practice base in the field of public health. Enrollment for dissertation credit is permitted only after successful completion of the comprehensive examination. Students must register for a minimum of nine (9) credit hours of PH 9990. Please see the doctoral student handbook for more details about the doctoral dissertation.

Ph.D. Environmental Health Concentration

The following Ph.D. Environmental (EVHT) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this doctoral program (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • Ph.D. EVHT 1: Effectively communicate the concepts of source to receptor of environmental and occupational hazards and the differentiation of the concepts of exposure from dose. (PHPH 8310)
  • Ph.D. EVHT 2: Critically analyze alternate routes of entry of toxins into the body including inhalation, ingestion (both dietary and non-dietary) and dermal and the importance of integration of routes with regards to total dose. (PHPH 9270)
  • Ph.D. EVHT 3: Demonstrate expertise with instrumentation and their underlying constructs employed for the measurement of chemical, physical and biologic hazards in air, water, soil, and dust. (PHPH 9270)
  • Ph.D. EVHT 4: Understand health effects of chemical, physical and biologic agents and the interrelationship of toxicity and dose in defining levels of risk. (PHPH 8310)
  • Ph.D. EVHT 5: Critically review, synthesize, and evaluate community and governmental agency conduct of environmental research and interventions and present appropriate implications for public health practice, public policy, and further research. (PHPH 8320)
  • Ph.D. EVHT 6: Incorporate ethical standards of practice as the basis of interactions with organizations, communities, and individuals. (PHPB 9150)

Required Ph.D. EVHT Concentration Courses (9 hours)

  • PHPH 9270 Environmental Exposure Analysis (3)
  • PHPH 8310 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 8320 Human Health and Global Environmental Change (3)

Required Ph.D. EVHT Advanced Research Methods and Statistics Courses (12 hours)

Select at least 4 courses in consultation with the Faculty Advisor.

  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
  • PHPH 8690 Special Topics in Environmental Health (3)
  • PHPH 8830 Advanced Statistical Topics (3)
  • PHPH 8840 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables I: Structural Equation Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8850 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables II: Finite Mixture Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8860 Multilevel Models in Public Health (3)
  • PHPH 8890 Special Topics in Biostatistics (3)
  • PHPH 9731 Epidemiologic Methods III (3)
  • PHPH 9741 Advanced Topics in Epidemiologic Methods (3)
  • PHPH 9890 Doctoral Seminar in Advanced Statistical Modeling (3)
  • Other appropriate research methods/statistics courses may be approved by the Faculty Advisor on the Doctoral Program of Study form. There are a number of departments at the university that offer relevant courses including, but not limited to, Mathematics and Statistics, Managerial Sciences (Decision Sciences unit), Economics, Marketing, Sociology, Public Management and Policy Studies, Psychology, and Educational Policy Studies (Research unit). Other courses that may be approved to satisfy this elective requirement include, but are not limited to, Structural Equation Modeling, Finite Mixture Modeling, Hierarchical Linear Modeling, Longitudinal Modeling, Survival Analysis, Bayesian Inference, Survey Sampling, Causal Inference, Missing Data, or Nonparametric Statistics. Students are recommended to receive approval from their Faculty Advisor prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Required Ph.D. EVHT Concentration Elective Courses (6 hours):

Select at least 2 courses in consultation with the Faculty Advisor.

  • PHPB 8285 Social Determinants of Health (3)
  • PHPH 8330 Environmental Factors in Maternal and Child Health (3)
  • PHPH 8340 Genetic Susceptibilities and Environmental Health (3)
  • Other appropriate Ph.D. EVHT elective courses may be approved by the Faculty Advisor on the Doctoral Program of Study form. Students are recommended to receive approval from their Faculty Advisor prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Ph.D. Epidemiology Concentration

The following Ph.D. Epidemiology (EPID) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this doctoral program (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • Ph.D. EPID 1: Understand the strengths and weaknesses of various epidemiologic study designs and research methods. (PHPH 9741)
  • Ph.D. EPID 2: Demonstrate expertise in the ethical conduct of human subjects research, including confidentiality and vulnerable populations. (PHPB 9150)
  • Ph.D. EPID 3: Critically review, synthesize, and evaluate the scientific literature and present appropriate implications for public health practice, public policy, and further research. (PHPH 9731)
  • Ph.D. EPID 4: Demonstrate proficiency in epidemiological research by: (1) formulating a research question and/or corresponding hypotheses, (2) developing the study design, (3) participating in data collection, (4) conducting statistical analyses, and (5) interpreting scientific results. (PHPH 9741)
  • Ph.D. EPID 5: Demonstrate mastery and independence as a researcher by pursuing and completing a specialized area of epidemiologic research. (PHPH 9741)
  • Ph.D. EPID 6: Effectively present and disseminate findings from epidemiologic research to scientific and lay audiences. (PHPH 8830)

Required Ph.D. EPID Concentration Courses (9 hours)

  • PHPH 9731 Epidemiologic Methods III (3)
  • PHPH 9741 Advanced Topics in Epidemiologic Methods (3)
  • PHPH 8830 Advanced Statistical Topics (3)

Required Ph.D. EPID Advanced Research Methods and Statistics Courses (6 hours)

Select at least 2 courses in consultation with the Faculty Advisor.

  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
  • PHPH 8840 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables I: Structural Equation Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8850 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables II: Finite Mixture Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8860 Multilevel Models in Public Health (3)
  • PHPH 8885 Fundamentals of Clinical Trials (3)
  • PHPH 8890 Special Topics in Biostatistics (3)
  • PHPH 9890 Doctoral Seminar in Advanced Statistical Modeling (3)
  • Other appropriate research methods/statistics courses may be approved by the Faculty Advisor on the Doctoral Program of Study form. There are a number of departments at the university that offer relevant courses including, but not limited to, Mathematics and Statistics, Managerial Sciences (Decision Sciences unit), Economics, Marketing, Sociology, Public Management and Policy Studies, Psychology, and Educational Policy Studies (Research unit). Other courses that may be approved to satisfy this elective requirement include, but are not limited to, Structural Equation Modeling, Finite Mixture Modeling, Hierarchical Linear Modeling, Longitudinal Modeling, Survival Analysis, Bayesian Inference, Survey Sampling, Causal Inference, Missing Data, or Nonparametric Statistics. Students are recommended to receive approval from their Faculty Advisor prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Required Ph.D. EPID Concentration Elective Courses (12 hours):

Select at least 4 courses in consultation with the Faculty Advisor.

  • PHPH 7265 Epidemiology and the Prevention of Violence (3)
  • PHPH 7275 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7280 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7290 Case Studies in Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 7365 Epidemiology of Adolescent and Young Adult Risk Behaviors (3)
  • PHPB 8285 Social Determinants of Health (3)
  • PHPH 8790 Special Topics in Epidemiology (3)
  • Other appropriate Ph.D. EPID elective courses may be approved by the Faculty Advisor on the Doctoral Program of Study form. Students are recommended to receive approval from their Faculty Advisor prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Ph.D. Health Promotion and Behavior Concentration

The following Ph.D. Health Promotion and Behavior (HPMB) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this doctoral program (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • Ph.D. HPMB 1: Develop expertise in social and behavioral theory, and application of theory to address public health problems at the individual, community or population level. (PHPB 9120)
  • Ph.D. HPMB 2: Critically analyze research in terms of the appropriateness of the study design, sample, measures, data analysis, results, and interpretation and critically evaluate the potential impact of the new knowledge gained on public health practices and policies. (PHPB 9095)
  • Ph.D. HPMB 3: Develop expertise in research methods and the ethical conduct of research to address scientific questions regarding health promotion research and practice. (PHPB 9130)
  • Ph.D. HPMB 4: Develop expertise in statistical and analytic methods used in health promotion research and practice. (PHPB 9140)
  • Ph.D. HPMB 5: Develop expertise in planning, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of social and behavior interventions and/or policies that address public health and health behavior, especially around social-ecological interventions and interventions that address health disparities. (PHPB 7535)
  • Ph.D. HPMB 6: Develop expertise in the communication of scientific findings, both writing and oral presentations, for both scientific and lay audiences. (PHPB 7535)

Required Ph.D. HPMB Concentration Courses (9 hours):

  • PHPB 7535 Dissemination and Implementation Science (3)
  • PHPB 9130 Intervention and Evaluation of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3)
  • PHPB 9095 Measurement and Outcomes in Social and Behavioral Health (3)

Required Ph.D. HPMB Advanced Research Methods and Statistics Courses (12 hours):

Select at least 4 courses in consultation with the Faculty Advisor:

  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
  • PHPH 8830 Advanced Statistical Topics (3)
  • PHPH 8840 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables I: Structural Equation Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8850 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables II: Finite Mixture Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8860 Multilevel Models in Public Health (3)
  • PHPH 8885 Fundamentals of Clinical Trials (3)
  • PHPH 8890 Special Topics in Biostatistics (3)
  • PHPH 9731 Epidemiologic Methods III (3)
  • PHPH 9741 Advanced Topics in Epidemiologic Methods (3)
  • PHPH 9890 Doctoral Seminar in Advanced Statistical Modeling (3)
  • Other appropriate research methods/statistics courses may be approved by the Faculty Advisor on the Doctoral Program of Study form. There are a number of departments at the university that offer relevant courses including, but not limited to, Mathematics and Statistics, Managerial Sciences (Decision Sciences unit), Economics, Marketing, Sociology, Public Management and Policy Studies, Psychology, and Educational Policy Studies (Research unit). Other courses that may be approved to satisfy this elective requirement include, but are not limited to, Structural Equation Modeling, Finite Mixture Modeling, Hierarchical Linear Modeling, Longitudinal Modeling, Survival Analysis, Bayesian Inference, Survey Sampling, Causal Inference, Missing Data, or Nonparametric Statistics. Students are recommended to receive approval from their Faculty Advisor prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Ph.D. HPMB Concentration Electives courses (6 hours) 

Select at least 2 courses in public health or other graduate-level programs in consultation with the Faculty Advisor and approved by the Faculty Advisor on the Doctoral Program of Study form. Students are recommended to receive approval from their Faculty Advisor prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

Ph.D. Health Services and Policy Research Concentration 

The following Ph.D. Health Services and Policy Research (HSRP) competencies describe the knowledge, skills, and abilities a successful graduate will demonstrate the conclusion of this doctoral program (and the course where the competency is mastered and assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  • Ph.D. HSRP 1: Apply social science (economics, political science, sociology, etc.) concepts, theories and methods to the framing and analysis of research questions in health services delivery and health care policy. (PHPB 9240)
  • Ph.D. HSRP 2: Describe major problems in health services delivery and health care policy that are currently the subject of empirical investigations. (PHPB 9220)
  • Ph.D. HSRP 3: Apply advanced methods of analysis and research design to describe policy-relevant issues in contemporary health care, such as: access to health care, health care financing, insurance market functioning, physician and hospital performance, healthcare management and organization, patient safety and quality of care, and health care workforce. (PHPB 9240)
  • Ph.D. HSRP 4: Effectively teach concepts and methods of health services and health policy research to students. (PHPB 9240)
  • Ph.D. HSRP 5: Design a health services or health policy research proposal involving qualitative, quantitative, or mixed methods approaches. (PHPB 9220)
  • Ph.D. HSRP 6: Conduct a health services or health policy research activity investigation suitable for peer-reviewed publication as an independent researcher. (PHPB 8250)
  • Ph.D. HSRP 7: Function as a collaborative team member in the design and conduct of a health services or health policy investigation. (PHPB 8250)

Required Ph.D. HSRP Concentration Courses (9 hours):

  • PHPB 9220 Principles of Health Service Research I: Themes (3)
  • PHPB 9240 Principles of Health Service Research II: Methods (3)
  • PHPB 8250 Health Economics and Policy (3)

Ph.D. HSRP Concentration Advanced Research Methods, Statistics and Electives Courses (18 hours)

Select at least 6 pre-approved courses in consultation with the Faculty Advisor.

  • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
  • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
  • PHPB 8285 Social Determinants of Health (3)
  • PHPB 8290 Population Health Informatics (3)
  • PHPH 8830 Advanced Statistical Topics (3)
  • PHPH 8840 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables I: Structural Equation Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8850 Statistical Modeling with Latent Variables II: Finite Mixture Modeling (3)
  • PHPH 8860 Multilevel Models in Public Health (3)
  • PHPH 8885 Fundamentals of Clinical Trials (3)
  • PHPH 8890 Special Topics in Biostatistics (3)
  • PHPH 9890 Doctoral Seminar in Advanced Statistical Modeling (3)
  • ECON 8220 Human Resources and Labor Markets (3)
  • PMAP 8141 Microeconomics for Public Policy (3)
  • PMAP 9211 Applying Research to Policymaking: Examples from Health Care Policy (3)
  • SOCI 8118 Aging, Health, and Disability (3)
  • SOCI 8234 Race-Ethnicity and Health (3)
  • Other appropriate Ph.D. HSRP research methods/statistics and elective courses may be approved by the Faculty Advisor on the Doctoral Program of Study form. There are a number of departments at the university that offer relevant courses including, but not limited to, Mathematics and Statistics, Managerial Sciences (Decision Sciences unit), Economics, Marketing, Sociology, Public Management and Policy Studies, Psychology, and Educational Policy Studies (Research unit). Other courses that may be approved to satisfy this elective requirement include, but are not limited to, Structural Equation Modeling, Finite Mixture Modeling, Hierarchical Linear Modeling, Longitudinal Modeling, Survival Analysis, Bayesian Inference, Survey Sampling, Causal Inference, Missing Data, or Nonparametric Statistics. Students are recommended to receive approval from their Faculty Advisor prior to enrolling in, paying for, and completing the course.

8060.20 Faculty Advisor and Ph.D. Advisory Committee Requirements

Upon admission to the Ph.D. degree in Public Health programs, a student is assigned a Faculty Advisor from the SPH faculty. The Faculty Advisor serves as the primary advisor, and mentors the student throughout the program and assists the student in choosing courses, signing off on official documents, and chairing the student’s doctoral advisory committee (and dissertation).

Annual Review of Ph.D. Students

Ph.D. students will be given feedback from their Faculty Advisor on an annual basis. Students are required to:

  1. Set up an appointment with the Faculty Advisor by June 1st each year.
  2. One week prior to the scheduled appointment students must submit:
    • summary of the courses and grades taken since beginning the program,
    • a summary of professional scholarship in the last year,
    • a course paper/assignment or another product that demonstrates scientific writing skills, and proficiency with statistics.
    • a self-assessment of mastery of the doctoral competencies to date.

Faculty Advisors will use this portfolio to evaluate student progress in several areas: coursework progress and demonstrated mastery of doctoral competencies, professional scholarship, scientific writing including dissertation writing, statistical proficiency, and overall professionalism. Ph.D. milestones and goals for the next academic year should also be discussed.

If progress is unsatisfactory, the student will plan a course of action with their advisor and the Ph.D. Program Director to improve his/her progress.  If the student demonstrates unsatisfactory progress on the plan, or during more than one annual review, the student may be scholastically excluded from the doctoral program.

8060.30 Continuous Enrollment Policy and Degree Completion for PhD

Students in all graduate programs, including doctoral programs, must maintain enrollment totaling six hours (or more) over three consecutive semesters, including summers.  In other words, the total enrollment of the current term plus the two terms preceding it must add up to six hours or more.  The status of all students will be checked by the midpoint of each term for compliance with the continuous enrollment requirement.  Any student whose enrollment is noncompliant will receive a hold on their registration, which would prevent registering for all current and future classes.  Those students will be notified by an e-mail message sent to their official Georgia State University e-mail account.  To resume their programs, students with continuous holds on their enrollment must file for re-entry by the published deadline and must enroll at a level sufficient to satisfy the continuous enrollment criterion.  That is, their enrollment in the re-entry term plus the two terms preceding it must total six hours or more.  The maximum required enrollment level for the re-entry term is six hours.  For more information on the re-entry process, contact the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services.

8060.40 Grade Point Average and Course Grade Requirements for PhD Students

PhD students must maintain a 3.2 or better overall institutional grade point average (GPA) to progress from one semester to the next, and must receive a grade of “B” (3.0) or better for each School of Public Health based course (courses with prefix “PH” in front of the course number).  Any PhD student earning a grade of B- or below must repeat the public health course or not count the course towards their PhD program of study.  PhD students whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.2 at the end of a semester will receive a scholastic warning from the School.  If at the end of the following six semester hours of enrollment, the student has not achieved a 3.2 cumulative GPA, the student will be scholastically excluded from the doctoral program.  Any student who is scholastically excluded from the program may apply for readmission after a period of one year. Time Limitations for PhD Students (see section 8060.50) will still apply.

8060.50 Residency Requirements and Time Limitations for PhD Students

The purpose of requiring completion of all degree requirements within a fixed period is to ensure currency, continuity, and coherence in the academic experiences leading to the degree.  Within nine (9) years of the student’s term of first matriculation, it is required that the student complete all degree requirements.  Moreover, all requirements for doctoral candidacy (coursework, comprehensive examination, prospectus approval) must be completed within seven years (7) of the student’s first term of matriculation.  No coursework completed more than seven years before admission to candidacy may be used to meet any doctoral degree requirement.  Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three-term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until graduation.  This enrollment must include a minimum of nine semester hours of dissertation (PH 9990) credit but may also include other coursework.  The student must be enrolled in and successfully complete three semester hours of graduate credit (typically dissertation hours) during the final academic term in which all degree requirements are completed and the student graduates.  Additional information about time limits and expected doctoral program completion milestones may be distributed by the Doctoral Program Coordinator, Department Chairs, or a designated faculty member to doctoral students in the School of Public Health Doctoral Student Handbooks. Doctoral students will be subject to all the doctoral program completion milestone requirements, details and policies distributed in the School of Public Health Doctoral Student Handbooks. Failure to meet any of these doctoral program completion milestones may result in scholastic dismissal from the doctoral program.

8060.60 Doctoral Program of Study Form for PhD

The Doctoral Program of Study form must be submitted to OAA following successful completion of the comprehensive exam. The Program of Study must be approved by the Faculty Advisor (who will serve as the dissertation chair), and the Doctoral Program Director in order for the student to be successfully admitted to candidacy. OAA will use this form for degree-audit and final approval of the student’s academic evaluation before placing in the student’s file. The Doctoral Program of Study form must show all courses relevant to the doctoral program (including master-level prerequisite courses and any courses approved from other universities), in addition to Georgia State University courses satisfying the minimum doctoral degree requirements.

Transfer credits from another institution: A student may apply a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of approved course credit transferred from another sufficiently accredited institution toward fulfilling Ph.D. degree requirements. Transfer credits are processed by the School and must be approved by petition. Students requesting to petition for transfer of credits must work with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance.  Approval is at the discretion of the PhD Program Coordinator—approval is not guaranteed. The PhD Program Director may defer to the Department Chair in which the petitioned course is offered. All credits, including transfer credits, presented for the PhD degree must have been earned within nine calendar years of the date of degree conferral from a program or school accredited by CEPH at the time of completion. No previously taken course with a grade of “B-” or below may be transferred into the doctoral program. Courses transferred-in for the doctoral degree may not be used in fulfilling the PhD Public Health Core Courses requirements or the doctoral credit-hour residency requirement. OAA will update the student’s electronic PAWS program of study form at that time. With the exception of university-approved dual degree programs, if the course to be transferred in was used to satisfy another degree program either at Georgia State University or elsewhere, the PhD Program Director or department chair reserves the right to require the student to complete a different graduate-level course prescribed by the department chair. That course will be substituted into the student’s PhD program, so that the student completes the sixty-two (62) unique total credit hours for their PhD degree.

Credits earned at Georgia State University in either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree status: A student may apply a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of applicable Georgia State University course credit earned prior to PhD program admission (while taking public health courses as either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree or program status) toward fulfilling PhD degree requirements. Credits are processed by the School—petition is not required, but students should confirm their previously completed Georgia State University courses are applicable. Students may work with the PhD Program Director and the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance to confirm applicability.  Approval is at the discretion of the PhD Program Coordinator—approval is not guaranteed. The PhD Program Director may defer to the Department Chair in which the course is offered. All Georgia State University credits presented for the PhD degree must have been earned within nine calendar years of the date of public health doctoral degree conferral. Courses taken at Georgia State University that were applied to another Georgia State University graduate certificate degree or degree program may not be applied to the PhD degree; instead, a student should seek a doctoral course waiver for these courses already applied to another Georgia State University degree program.

Doctoral Course Waivers: Doctoral students may receive a course waiver for any doctoral course already completed as part of another Georgia State University graduate certificate or degree program (including the MPH degree program), or if the course content was already learned at another institution or training area, but was not eligible for transfer credit. Students are still expected to take the minimum number of credit hours expected for the Ph.D. degree at Georgia State University (sixty-two (62) credit hours), but when granted a course waiver, the student may complete a different graduate level course, substituted into their doctoral program in order to complete the total sixty-two (62) credit hour requirement of their doctoral degree.

No previously taken course with a grade of “B-” or below may be used for course waiver. Courses waived for the doctoral degree may not be used in fulfilling the PhD Public Health Core Course requirements or the doctoral credit-hour residency requirement.

Students hoping to waive a course and substitute it with another should provide a Petition for Waiver noting each doctoral course they hope to waive, and which course they would like to substitute in its place. The Petition for Waiver is a written statement, along with any evidentiary documentation, that assures the School that the doctoral student has mastered the course material in the course to be waived through another manner (i.e. MPH degree, another Georgia State University degree, etc.).

This Petition must be approved by the student’s Faculty Advisor and the PhD Program Director. The PhD Program Director may defer to the Department Chair in which the petitioned course is typically offered.

Upon approval by the student’s Faculty Advisor and the PhD Program Director (or Department Chair), the Petition is then forwarded to the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) for their approval. OAA may request the input of the Senior Associate Dean for for Academic and Strategic Initiatives and/or the Academic Affairs Committee Chair and/or members, but that is not required. Once the Director of OAA notes OAA’s approval, the student’s file and program of study is updated to note a waiver of the required course(s) and the substitution of another course taking its place. (MPH-Level Core Course prerequisite requirements for the doctoral program are exempt from this rule, since these prerequisite course do not count toward the sixty-two (62) credit hour minimum requirement for PhD programs).

8060.70 Doctoral Comprehensive Examination for PhD

Doctoral students must pass a comprehensive examination before being admitted to candidacy. The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to assess each student’s mastery of the doctoral program core curriculum and to determine the student’s readiness to proceed to the dissertation. To be eligible to take the comprehensive examination, the student must have completed all doctoral program prerequisites (MPH Core/Foundational Courses), all Ph.D. core courses (18 credit hours), and achieved a B (3.0) or better in all courses and 3.2 or greater cumulative grade-point average in the Ph.D. program of study.  Any doctoral student earning a grade of B- or below must repeat the public health course or not count the course towards their doctoral program of study. Once approved to take the exam, the Ph.D. Director will provide a study guide for the exam.

Examination content and structure varies between concentrations, between students, and from year-to-year to ensure relevance to the student’s training and integrity in the testing procedure. Information about the comprehensive exam structure and requirements, evaluation and scoring, and the polices governing the testing procedures are in the PhD Handbook and distributed by the PhD Program Director or designated SPH faculty member to comprehensive exam eligible students immediately prior to their comprehensive examination date. Ph.D. students are subject to the comprehensive exam requirements and policies distributed at that time.

8060.80 Admission to Candidacy for PhD

Admission to candidacy for a PhD student is requested immediately after the successful completion of the comprehensive examination.  The following is a complete list of requirements for admission to candidacy:

  1. All prerequisites set as a condition to admission to candidacy have been satisfactorily completed.
  2. The Doctoral Advisory Committee, the PhD Program Director, and OAA have approved the final program of study.
  3. A GPA of 3.2 has been maintained for all graduate courses taken and for all completed courses on the program of study. A grade of “B” (3.0) or better for each School of Public Health based course (courses with prefix “PH” in front of the course number) must be earned, and no course with a grade below B- may be placed on the final program of study.
  4. Written and oral comprehensive examinations have been passed and reported to the School.
  5. The Doctoral Advisory Committee, including any necessary changes in the membership, is confirmed and all its members have been notified of their appointment.
  6. The residency requirement has been met.

Application for Admission to Candidacy for PhD

This form must be submitted to OAA as soon as possible following the completion of the Admission to Candidacy requirements.  Candidacy begins on the date the form is received by the School.  After admission to candidacy, a student must register for at least nine (9) hours of dissertation credit during the completion of the degree program.  Students planning to graduate the same semester they enter candidacy must be admitted by the published deadline for candidacy during that semester and register for nine (9) hours of dissertation credit.  The student must also meet all other deadlines for graduation in that semester.  A student must register for a minimum of three (3) dissertation credit hours in any semester when using University facilities, and/or faculty or staff time. The School shall not accept a dissertation if the student has not been admitted to candidacy for the degree.

Time Limit on Candidacy

All doctoral program degree requirements must be successfully completed within nine (9) years of a student’s first term of matriculation.  The dissertation must be completed within four (4) years following admission to candidacy to qualify for graduation.  If a doctoral student’s candidacy expires after the first week of classes in the final semester, the student is granted the remainder of the semester to complete degree requirements without special permission of the School. Additional information about time limits and expected dissertation completion milestones may be distributed by the Doctoral Program Coordinator, Department Chairs, or a designated faculty member to candidacy eligible students immediately prior to their admission to candidacy. Doctoral students will be subject to all the dissertation completion milestone requirements, policies and procedures distributed at that time. Failure to meet any of these dissertation completion milestones may result in scholastic dismissal from the doctoral program.

8060.90 Dissertation for PhD

Enrollment for dissertation credit (PHPB/PHPH 9990) is permitted only after successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Doctoral Advisory Committee

It is most important that the persons who serve on the Doctoral Advisory Committee (occasionally referred to as the Doctoral Dissertation Committee), at the time the dissertation research is undertaken, be those faculty members most knowledgeable in the areas of the student’s research. Within the guidelines for committee membership, they should be selected regardless of their concentration affiliation. The Doctoral Advisory Committee consists of a minimum of three members: Two members must be within the School of Public Health and hold graduate faculty status. The third member may be from the School of Public Health or outside the School/Georgia State University, but he/she must have a Ph.D., MD, or other terminal degree and must have expertise in the content area or methodology used in the proposal that can be demonstrated upon review of a curriculum vita by the Doctoral Program Director or student’s Faculty Advisor.

Dissertation Planning

Students pursuing a Ph.D. must complete a dissertation on a subject connected with their major field of study/concentration. The dissertation must present original research, independent thinking, scholarly ability, and technical mastery of a field of study.  Its conclusions must be logical, its literary form must be acceptable, and its contribution to the field of public health should merit publication.

The dissertation must provide the student with an educational experience that enables the student to make a significant contribution to the field of public health and to apply the doctoral program knowledge and skills that allow him or her to contribute to the theoretical, conceptual, empirical, or practice base in the field of public health.  At a minimum, the dissertation should contribute to at least one of these knowledge bases, as related to the student’s concentration.  These activities must take place under the direction of the student’s dissertation committee.  The study must include all of the following:

  • Identifying an appropriate theory to inform the study.
  • Conceptualizing the research questions and hypotheses.
  • Developing the research design.
  • Applying the appropriate methodology.
  • Interpreting the study results.

Note: These guidelines do allow for secondary data analysis.

The School of Public Health accepts either the traditional dissertation form or the European (manuscript) dissertation format. The European (manuscript) dissertation format contains a first chapter that consists of a thorough synthetic review of the literature for the content area of the student dissertation. The next chapters consist of copies of three (a) published papers, (b) manuscripts in press, (c) manuscripts submitted. Because the manuscripts may have been published, submitted, or targeted for different journals with different journal styles, the chapters may not all be formatted in the same style. As is found in published papers, each chapter would have an Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion section, unless one paper is a review paper, which may be approved as an option by the Doctoral Advisory Committee (dissertation committee). The final chapter should include a global perspective summary that ties together the findings in the three papers and concludes with the future directions for the student’s line of research. This final chapter is not a recapitulation of the middle chapters. This chapter offers the author the unique opportunity to speculate without the fetters that constrain typical research papers.

The School of Public Health requires that the student submitting the dissertation must be listed as the first author of each article used as a chapter. One first-author manuscript that is submitted prior to the dissertation proposal meeting (no more than 1 year in advance) and is linked to the overall theme of the dissertation can be included as one of the three chapters upon approval of the major advisor. The inclusion of any articles that are previously published or accepted for publication requires permission from the copyright holder. Articles not yet copyrighted by another party will be covered under the copyright of the dissertation.

Student dissertation progress will be reviewed as part of the annual evaluation procedures, beginning in the student’s third year of the doctoral program. If a student is not making expected progress on the dissertation, this will be noted on the faculty rated student annual evaluation form as not meeting expectations. Failure to make adequate progress on the dissertation in two consecutive annual evaluations will result in scholastic dismissal from the doctoral program.

Dissertation Proposal/Prospectus and Meeting

Prior to beginning the dissertation, the student must present a dissertation proposal (prospectus) to his/her Faculty Advisor. When the Faculty Advisor certifies that the written proposal for the dissertation is satisfactory, the student should schedule a meeting with the Doctoral Advisory committee to present the proposal (prospectus meeting and defense) and receive approval from the committee before moving forward with dissertation development. Specifically:

  1. The student will provide a complete copy of the proposal (printed hard-copy and electronic) to all members of the Doctoral Advisory committee at least two weeks before the prospectus meeting.  The proposal must be formatted according to the APA Manual of Style (latest edition).
  2. The proposal will include all elements of either the Traditional proposal or European (manuscript) Proposal (Note: Deviations from the chapter approach may be approved by the student’s Faculty Advisor and Doctoral Program Director):
      Traditional proposal:

      1. Chapter 1: Introduction and Statement of Purpose
      2. Chapter 2: Review of the Literature
      3. Chapter 3: Methods
      4. Reference Section
      5. Appendices Section
      European (manuscript) proposal must include:

      1. Chapter 1: Introduction and Statement of purpose
      2. Chapter 2: Description and Outline of three studies that will be developed and submitted during the dissertation process.  NOTE: if one study has already been developed and submitted, please include a copy of that study and describe how the next two studies will build on this work
      3. Reference Section
      4. Appendices Section
  3. Approval of the proposal signifies that members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee believe that the student has proposed a satisfactory dissertation plan.  Approval of the proposal requires the agreement of all members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee except one, as endorsed by their signatures on the appropriate form that, together with this approved prospectus, is filed with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA).
  4. Before starting the data collection for the dissertation, the student must request approval from the Georgia State University Institutional Review Board (IRB) if human subjects are involved in the research project.

The Faculty Advisor has the primary responsibility for guiding research, but the student should consult all members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee to draw upon their expertise in relevant areas.

Note: Each concentration may have specific, additional requirements for the student during the dissertation process, including at the time of the dissertation proposal/prospectus meeting. This may include a Ph.D. core and concentration exam, such as faculty posing questions to the student at the dissertation proposal meeting that extend beyond the dissertation proposal itself and include assessing the students’ knowledge and skills related to Ph.D. core and concentration competencies, based on student Ph.D. core and concentration coursework and learning experiences. Please meet with your Faculty Advisor and/or Department Chair to discuss the specific expectations for your concentration’s proposal meeting, as well as the full dissertation process. This is simply to ensure that faculty are able to assess student mastery on all introductory public health learning objectives and concentration competencies, regardless of dissertation topic.

Dissertation Approval and Defense

When the Faculty Advisor is satisfied with the completed dissertation, the Faculty Advisor will certify that it has approval and is ready to be read by the other members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee.  The Faculty Advisor will then distribute copies of the dissertation to the other members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee and will schedule a final oral defense and notify the SPH.

Subsequently, the SPH will announce the time and place of the defense of the dissertation to the University community. The committee members will have three weeks to read and evaluate the completed dissertation.  Written assent of all committee members except one is required before a dissertation is approved as ready for a final defense. If the Doctoral Advisory Committee declines to approve the dissertation as ready for the final defense, the Faculty Advisor will notify the student and the School in writing and the defense date will be cancelled.

The Faculty Advisor will chair the dissertation defense.  All members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee, except one, must approve the dissertation and the defense, and must certify their approval in writing.  The SPH will only recommend the award of a doctoral degree when the student has demonstrated mastery of necessary theories, concepts and content, and demonstrated competence in the knowledge and skills defined in the competencies for the student’s chosen doctoral program concentration. The results of the defense of the dissertation must be reported to the School of Public Health at least two weeks prior to graduation—students should consult the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator for the absolute deadline in a given semester.  The date (year) on the title page of the dissertation shall be the same as the date (year) on which the dissertation is approved by the School, following approval by the Doctoral Advisory Committee.  The final dissertation document must conform to all format and content requirements specified by the School of Public Health.

8070 Doctor of Public Health

Harry J. Heiman
Professor and DrPH Program Director

Approved by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents in April 2018, the Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) degree in the School of Public Health is a doctoral degree designed to prepare public health professionals for positions in leadership, applied research, and other practice-based roles.

8070.10 DrPH Degree Requirements

The DrPH degree requires completion of a minimum of fifty-four (54) credit hours of coursework, including an applied practice experience and integrative learning experience or dissertation. The candidates must satisfy the course requirements and credit hours in the following areas:

Required Prerequisites – MPH Core Courses (3 – 13 hours):

All DrPH graduates are grounded in the following foundational public health knowledge learning objectives (and the course where the learning objective is assessed is noted in parenthesis):

  1. Profession & Science of Public Health
    1. Explain public health history, philosophy and values. (PHPH 7010)
    2. Identify the core functions of public health and the 10 Essential Services. (PHPH 7010)
    3. Explain the role of quantitative and qualitative methods and sciences in describing and assessing a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
    4. List major causes and trends of morbidity and mortality in the US or other community relevant to the school or program. (PHPH 7010)
    5. Discuss the science of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention in population health, including health promotion, screening, etc. (PHPH 7010)
    6. Explain the critical importance of evidence in advancing public health knowledge. (PHPH 7010)
  2. Factors Related to Human Health
    7. Explain effects of environmental factors on a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
    8. Explain biological and genetic factors that affect a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
    9. Explain behavioral and psychological factors that affect a population’s health. (PHPH 7010)
    10. Explain the social, political and economic determinants of health and how they contribute to population health and health inequities. (PHPH 7010)
    11. Explain how globalization affects global burdens of disease. (PHPH 7010)
    12. Explain an ecological perspective on the connections among human health, animal health and ecosystem health (eg, One Health). (PHPH 7010)

For students admitted to the DrPH program who have not completed comparable courses as part of a CEPH-accredited MPH degree, the following courses will be required as prerequisite to the DrPH program:

  • PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health (This course may be waived with a CEPH-accredited Bachelor’s degree)
  • PHPH 7011 Epidemiology for Public Health or PHPH 7711 Epidemiologic Methods I (DrPH students are encouraged to complete PHPH 7711 if they have not already completed [PH 7011])
  • PHPH 7150 Environmental Health

Two additional courses may be required upon review of the student’s completed graduate coursework and/or professional experience by the Admissions Committee, Program Director and/or Faculty Advisor.

  • PHPH 7017 Fundamentals of Biostatistics I
  • PHPB 7140 Health Promotion Planning, Administration, and Evaluation
  • PHPB 7160 Fundamentals of Health Systems, Leadership, and Policy

Doctoral students may waive these MPH Core Courses if they:

  • enter the DrPH program with a CEPH accredited MPH degree that included “B” (3.0) grades or better in their MPH courses related to the MPH Foundational Public Health Knowledge learning objectives and MPH Foundational Competencies, as documented by an official university transcript. Syllabi for courses may also be requested.
  • and/or have successfully completed a comparable course(s) with a grade of “B” or better, as documented by an official university transcript. Syllabi for courses may be requested. Note: [PH 7010] Foundations of Public Health cannot be waived by employment or other training(s). PHPH 7010 Foundations of Public Health is only waived after the School verifies a students’ previous completion of a CEPH-accredited bachelor’s degree in public health or MPH degree.

DrPH students who have not completed a CEPH-accredited MPH program must provide a Petition for Waiver form for each of the courses being requested for waiver. The Petition for Waiver is a written statement, along with any evidentiary documentation, that assures the School that the doctoral student has mastered one (or more) of the areas of core knowledge in public health through another manner (e.g. MPH degree, career experience, advanced or seminar coursework that included mastery of core knowledge in public health, etc.). This Petition must be approved by the DrPH Program Director.

Upon approval by the DrPH Program Director, the Petition is then forwarded to the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services (OAA) for review and approval. OAA may request the input of the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs, the Senior Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Initiatives, and/or the Academic Affairs Committee. Upon approval by OAA, the student’s file and program of study is updated to note satisfaction of the required doctoral program prerequisite(s). Doctoral students are responsible for ensuring their program of study is updated to note satisfaction of the required doctoral program prerequisite courses.

All DrPH graduates demonstrate the following DrPH foundational and concentration competencies (and the course where the competency is assessed is noted in parenthesis):

Data & Analysis

  • DrPH 1. Explain qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods and policy analysis research and evaluation methods to address health issues at multiple (individual, group, organization, community and population) levels. (PHPB 9140)
  • DrPH 2. Design a qualitative, quantitative, mixed methods, policy analysis or evaluation project to address a public health issue. (PHPB 9140)
  • DrPH 3. Explain the use and limitations of surveillance systems and national surveys in assessing, monitoring and evaluating policies and programs and to address a population’s health. (PHPB 9140)

Leadership, Management & Governance

  • DrPH 4. Propose strategies for health improvement and elimination of health inequities by organizing stakeholders, including researchers, practitioners, community leaders and other partners. (PHPB 9300)
  • DrPH 5. Communicate public health science to diverse stakeholders, including individuals at all levels of health literacy, for purposes of influencing behavior and policies. (PHPB 9005)
  • DrPH 6. Integrate knowledge, approaches, methods, values and potential contributions from multiple professions and systems in addressing public health problems. (PHPB 9010)
  • DrPH 7. Create a strategic plan. (PHPB 9300)
  • DrPH 8. Facilitate shared decision making through negotiation and consensus-building methods. (PHPB 9300)
  • DrPH 9. Create organizational change strategies. (PHPB 9300)
  • DrPH 10. Propose strategies to promote inclusion and equity within public health programs, policies and systems. (PHPB 9010)
  • DrPH 11. Assess one’s own strengths and weaknesses in leadership capacities, including cultural proficiency. (PHPB 9300)
  • DrPH 12. Propose human, fiscal and other resources to achieve a strategic goal. (PHPB 9310)
  • DrPH 13. Cultivate new resources and revenue streams to achieve a strategic goal. (PHPB 9310)

Policy & Programs

  • DrPH 14. Design a system-level intervention to address a public health issue. (PHPB 9130)
  • DrPH 15. Integrate knowledge of cultural values and practices in the design of public health policies and programs. (PHPB 9130)
  • DrPH 16. Integrate scientific information, legal and regulatory approaches, ethical frameworks and varied stakeholder interests in policy development and analysis. (PHPB 9005)
  • DrPH 17. Propose interprofessional team approaches to improving public health. (PHPB 9310)

Education & Workforce Development

  • DrPH 18. Assess an audience’s knowledge and learning needs. (PHPB 9320)
  • DrPH 19. Deliver training or educational experiences that promote learning in academic, organizational or community settings. (PHPB 9320)
  • DrPH 20. Use best practice modalities in pedagogical practices. (PHPB 9320)

Georgia State University-Authored DrPH Competencies

  • DrPH 21. Critically review, synthesize, and evaluate the scientific literature and present appropriate implications for public health practice, public policy, and further research. (PHPH 8721)
  • DrPH 22. Establish culturally appropriate goals, policies, and communication strategies — recognizing that cultural differences affect all aspects of health and health systems — and infuse them throughout public health planning, operations, and interventions. (PHPB 9010)
  • DrPH 23. Develop expertise in research methods and the ethical conduct of research to address scientific questions regarding health promotion research and practice. (PHPB 9150)
  • DrPH 24. Demonstrate proficiency in epidemiological research by: (1) formulating a research question and/or corresponding hypotheses, (2) developing the study design, (3) participating in data collection, (4) conducting statistical analyses, and (5) interpreting scientific results. (PHPH 8271)
  • DrPH 25. Understand health effects of chemical, physical and biologic agents and the interrelationship of toxicity and dose in defining levels of risk. (PHPH 8310)

Doctoral Degree Requirements (54 hours):

  • Required DrPH Foundational Core and Major Curriculum Courses (33 hours):

The following courses constitute the Public Health DrPH Degree Core:

  • PHPH 8310 Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology (3)
  • PHPH 8721 Epidemiologic Methods II (3)
  • PHPB 9005 Doctoral Seminar: Public Health Policy, Analysis and Advocacy for Leaders (3)
  • PHPB 9010 Doctoral Seminar: Urban Health, Diversity and Cultural Competency (3)
  • PHPH 9017 Applied Statistical Methods in Public Health (3)
  • PHPB 9130 Intervention and Evaluation of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (3)
  • PHPB 9140 Advanced Research Methods (3)
  • PHPB 9150 Public Health Ethics (3)
  • PHPB 9300 Public Health Leadership and Practice (3)
  • PHPB 9310 Public Health Management and Finance (3)
  • PHPB 9320 Public Health Education & Workforce Development (3)
  •  DrPH Applied Practice Experience (3 hours):
    • PHPB 9970: DrPH Applied Practice Experience (3)
  • DrPH Approved Electives (9 hours):
    Select at least 3 courses from pre-approved list below:

    • PHPH 7265 Epidemiology & the Prevention of Violence (3)
    • PHPH 7275 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)
    • PHPH 7280 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)
    • PHPH 7290 Case Studies in Epidemiology (3)
    • PHPH 7365 Epidemiology of Adolescent and Young Adult Health Risk Behaviors (3)
    • PHPB 7535 Dissemination and Implementation Science (3)
    • PHPB 8250 Health Economics and Policy (3)
    • PHPB 8260 Spatial Population Health I (3)
    • PHPB 8261 Spatial Population Health II (3)
    • PHPB 8285 Social Determinants of Health (3)
    • PHPB 8290 Population Health Informatics (3)
    • PHPH 8320 Human Health and Global Environmental Change (3)
    • PHPH 8330 Environmental Factors in Maternal and Child Health (3)
    • PHPH 8340 Genetic Susceptibilities and Environmental Health (3)
    • PHPB 8410 Economic Evaluation (3)
    • PHPH 8690 Special Topics in Environmental Health (3)
    • PHPH 8790 Special Topics in Epidemiology (3)
    • PHPH 8830 Advanced Statistical Topics (3)
    • PHPH 8885 Fundamentals of Clinical Trials (3)
    • PHPH 8890 Special Topics in Biostatistics (3)
    • PHPB 9095 Measurement and Outcomes in Social and Behavioral Health (3)
    • PHPB 9120 Theory and Practice in Health and Prevention (3)
    • PHPB 9220 Principles of Health Service Research I: Thematic Background (3)
    • PHPB 9240 Principles of Health Service Research II: Basic Methods (3)
    • PHPH 9270 Environmental Exposure Analysis (3)
    • PHPH 9731 Epidemiologic Methods III (3)
    • PHPH 9741 Advanced Topics in Epidemiologic Methods (3)
    • PHPH 9810 Biostatistical Methods I (3)
    • PHPH 9820 Biostatistical Methods II (3)

Other appropriate DrPH elective courses may be approved by the Faculty Advisor or DrPH Program Director through the Petition for Waiver form found in the SPH Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services.

Required DrPH Comprehensive Examination:
Upon completion of the core DrPH curriculum, students will be required to pass a doctoral comprehensive exam where they demonstrate mastery of the DrPH foundational competencies and the ability to perform high-level applied public health problem solving. Successful completion of the exam is required before moving forward with the integrated learning experience/dissertation. Additional information is provided in the DrPH Student Handbook. Please see the DrPH student handbook for more details about the doctoral comprehensive exam.

  • Required DrPH Culminating Experience (9 hours):
    • PHPB 9980 DrPH Integrated Learning Experience/Dissertation (3)

8070.20 Faculty Advisor

As soon as possible after beginning the DrPH Program, students should schedule a meeting with the DrPH Program Director to receive guidance on selecting a Faculty Advisor from the SPH faculty as well as other potential mentors in and outside of GSU. The Faculty Advisor serves as the primary advisor, mentoring the student throughout the program and assisting the student in choosing courses, signing off on official documents, and with overall program and institutional navigation. In the majority of cases, the Faculty Advisor remains unchanged during the student’s entire doctoral program; however, changes in the Faculty Advisor are occasionally necessary and are accommodated on an individual basis by the DrPH Program Director. Usually the Faculty Advisor serves as the chair of the dissertation committee, but students may choose a different faculty member as dissertation chair, based on their subject matter expertise, when appropriate. More information may be found in the DrPH Student Handbook.

Annual Review of DrPH Students

DrPH students will meet with their Faculty Advisor for an annual evaluation, each year they are enrolled in the DrPH program. Faculty Advisors will use this evaluation to assess student progress in several areas: coursework progress and demonstrated mastery of doctoral competencies, professional scholarship, scientific writing, and overall professionalism. DrPH milestones and goals for the next academic year should also be discussed. More information about the annual evaluation process may be found in the DrPH Student Handbook.

8070.30 Continuous Enrollment Policy and Degree Completion

Students in all graduate programs, including doctoral programs, must maintain enrollment totaling six hours (or more) over three consecutive semesters, including summers. In other words, the total enrollment of the current term plus the two terms preceding it must add up to six hours or more. The status of all students will be checked by the midpoint of each term for compliance with the continuous enrollment requirement. Any student whose enrollment is noncompliant will receive a hold on their registration, which would prevent registering for all current and future classes. Those students will be notified by an e-mail message sent to their official Georgia State University e-mail account. To resume their programs, students with continuous holds on their enrollment must file for re-entry by the published deadline and must enroll at a level sufficient to satisfy the continuous enrollment criterion. That is, their enrollment in the re-entry term plus the two terms preceding it must total six hours or more. The maximum required enrollment level for the re-entry term is six hours. For more information on the re-entry process, contact the Office of Academic Assistance and Career Services.

8070.40 Grade Point Average and Course Grade Requirements for DrPH Students

DrPH students must maintain a 3.0 or better overall institutional grade point average (GPA) to progress from one semester to the next, and must receive a grade of “B” or better for each School of Public Health based course (courses with prefix “PH” in front of the course number). Any DrPH student earning a grade of B- or below must repeat the public health course or not count the course towards their doctoral program of study. Doctoral students whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 at the end of a semester will receive a scholastic warning from the School. If at the end of the following six semester hours of enrollment, the student has not achieved a 3.0 cumulative GPA, he or she will be scholastically excluded from the doctoral program. Any student who is scholastically excluded from the program may apply for readmission after a period of one year. Time Limitations for DrPH Students (see section 8070.50) will still apply.

8070.50 Residency Requirements and Time Limitations for DrPH Students

The purpose of requiring completion of all degree requirements within a fixed period is to ensure currency, continuity, and coherence in the academic experiences leading to the degree. Within nine (9) years of the student’s term of first matriculation, it is required that the student complete all degree requirements. Moreover, all requirements for doctoral candidacy (coursework, comprehensive examination, prospectus approval) must be completed within nine years (9) of the student’s first term of matriculation. No coursework completed more than seven years before admission to candidacy may be used to meet any doctoral degree requirement. Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three-term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until graduation. This enrollment must include a minimum of nine semester hours of dissertation (PHPB 9980) credit but may also include other coursework. The student must be enrolled in and successfully complete three semester hours of graduate credit (typically dissertation hours) during the final academic term in which all degree requirements are completed and the student graduates. Additional information about time limits and expected doctoral program completion milestones may be distributed by the DrPH Program Director, Department Chairs, or a designated faculty member to doctoral students in the School of Public Health DrPH Student Handbook. Doctoral students will be subject to all the doctoral program completion milestone requirements, details and policies distributed in the School of Public Health DrPH Student Handbooks. Failure to meet any of these doctoral program completion milestones may result in scholastic dismissal from the doctoral program.

8070.60 Doctoral Program of Study Form for DrPH

The final DrPH Program of Study form is completed following the successful completion of the comprehensive exam, and must be approved by the Faculty Advisor , and the DrPH Program Director and OAA when the student applies for admission to candidacy. OAA uses the form for degree-audit and final approval. The DrPH Program of Study form must show all courses relevant to the doctoral program (including master-level prerequisite courses and any courses approved as transfer credit from other universities), in addition to Georgia State University courses satisfying the minimum DrPH degree requirements. OAA notes the completed courses in the student’s electronic academic evaluation (in PAWS). Students may log in to PAWS, view, and confirm OAA’s to-date notations on their electronic program of study at any time.

Transfer credits from another institution: A student may apply a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of approved course credit transferred from another sufficiently accredited institution toward fulfilling DrPH degree requirements. Transfer credits are processed by the School and must be approved by petition. Students requesting to petition for transfer of credits must work with the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance. Approval is at the discretion of the DrPH Program Director — approval is not guaranteed. The Doctoral Program Director may defer to the Department Chair in which the petitioned course is offered. All credits, including transfer credits, presented for the DrPH degree must have been earned within nine calendar years of the date of degree conferral from a program or school accredited by CEPH at the time of completion. No previously taken course with a grade of “B-” or below may be transferred into the doctoral program. Courses transferred-in for the doctoral degree may not be used in fulfilling the DrPH Public Health Core Courses requirements or the doctoral credit-hour residency requirement. OAA will update the student’s electronic PAWS program of study form at that time. With the exception of university-approved dual degree programs, if the course to be transferred in was used to satisfy another degree program either at GSU or elsewhere, the DrPH Program Director reserves the right to require the student to complete a different graduate-level course prescribed by the DrPH Program Director. That course will be substituted into the student’s DrPH program, so that the student completes the fifty-four (54) unique total credit hours for their DrPH degree.

Credits earned at Georgia State University in either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree status: A student may apply a maximum of nine (9) semester hours of applicable Georgia State University course credit earned prior to DrPH program admission (while taking public health courses as either transient, non-degree, or other-Georgia State University-degree or program status) toward fulfilling DrPH degree requirements. Credits are processed by the School — petition is not required, but students should confirm their previously completed Georgia State University courses are applicable. Students may work with the Doctoral Program Director and the MPH Curriculum and Advisement Coordinator in the Office of Academic Assistance to confirm applicability. Approval is at the discretion of the Doctoral Program Coordinator — approval is not guaranteed. The Doctoral Program Director may defer to the Department Chair in which the course is offered. All Georgia State University credits presented for the DrPH degree must have been earned within nine calendar years of the date of public health doctoral degree conferral. Courses taken at Georgia State University that were applied to another Georgia State University degree program may not be applied to the DrPH degree; instead, a student should seek a doctoral course waiver for these courses already applied to another Georgia State University degree program.

Doctoral Course Waivers: DrPH

students may receive a course waiver for any doctoral course already completed as part of another GSU degree program (including the MPH degree program), or if the course content was already learned at another institution or training area, but was not eligible for transfer credit. Students are still expected to take the minimum number of credit hours expected for the DrPH degree at GSU (fifty-four credit hours), but when granted a course waiver, the student may substitute a different graduate level course in order to complete the total fifty-four credit hour requirement of the DrPH program.

No previously taken course with a grade of “B-” or below may be used for course waiver. Courses waived for the doctoral degree may not be used in fulfilling the DrPH Public Health Core Course requirements or the doctoral credit-hour residency requirement.

Students hoping to waive a course and substitute it with another should provide a Petition for Waiver noting each doctoral course they hope to waive, and which course they would like to substitute in its place. The Petition for Waiver is a written statement, along with any evidentiary documentation, that assures the School that the doctoral student has mastered the course material in the course to be waived through another manner (i.e. MPH degree, another GSU degree, etc.). This Petition must be approved by the student’s Faculty Advisor and the DrPH Program Director.

Upon approval by the student’s Faculty Advisor and the DrPH Program Division Director, the Petition is then forwarded to the OAA for their approval. OAA may request the input of the Assistant Dean for Academic Programs, the Senior Associate Dean for Academic and Strategic Initiatives, and/or the Academic Affairs Committee, but that is not required. Once the Director of OAA notes OAA’s approval, the student’s file and program of study is updated to note a waiver of the required course(s) and the substitution of another course taking its place. (MPH-Level Core Course prerequisite requirements for the doctoral program are exempt from this rule, since these prerequisite courses do not count toward the fifty-four (54) credit hour minimum requirement for the DrPH program).

8070.70 Doctoral Comprehensive Examination for DrPH

All DrPH students must take a comprehensive exam following successful completion of all foundational core courses with a minimum 3.0 cumulative grade point average. The purpose of the comprehensive exam is to demonstrate mastery of the DrPH foundational competencies delivered through the core curricular content and the ability to perform high-level applied public health problem solving. Successful completion of the exam is necessary before moving forward with the Integrated Learning Experience/Dissertation. More information about the DrPH comprehensive examination is in the DrPH Student Handbook, and will be provided by the DrPH Program Director. Students who do not pass the exam are subject to dismissal from the DrPH program.

8070.80 Admission to Candidacy for DrPH

Admission to candidacy for a DrPH student is possible after the successful completion of the comprehensive exam. The following is a complete list of requirements for admission to candidacy:

  • The Faculty Advisor, the DrPH Program Director, and OAA have approved the final program of study.
  • A GPA of 3.0 has been maintained for all graduate courses taken and for all completed courses on the program of study (no course with a grade below B- may be placed on the final program of study).
  • The DrPH comprehensive exam has been passed, and passing scores have been reported to OAA.
  • The Doctoral Dissertation Committee, including any necessary changes in the membership, is confirmed and all its members have been notified of their appointment.
  • The residency requirement has been met.

Application for Admission to DrPH Candidacy

This form must be submitted to OAA as soon as possible following the completion of the Admission to Candidacy requirements. Candidacy begins on the date the form is received by the OAA. After admission to candidacy, a student must register for at least nine (9) hours of dissertation credit during the completion of the degree program. Students planning to graduate the same semester they enter candidacy must be admitted by the published deadline for candidacy during that semester and register for nine (9) hours of dissertation credit. The student must also meet all other deadlines for graduation in that semester. A student must register for a minimum of three (3) dissertation credit hours in any semester when using University facilities, and/or faculty or staff time. The School shall not accept a dissertation if the student has not been admitted to candidacy for the degree.

Time Limit on DrPH Candidacy

All doctoral program degree requirements must be successfully completed within nine (9) years of a student’s first term of matriculation. The dissertation must be completed within four (4) years following admission to candidacy to qualify for graduation. If a doctoral student’s candidacy expires after the first week of classes in the final semester, the student is granted the remainder of the semester to complete degree requirements without special permission of the School. Additional information about time limits and expected dissertation completion milestones may be distributed by the DrPH Program Director, or a designated faculty member to candidacy eligible students immediately prior to their admission to candidacy. DrPH students will be subject to all the dissertation completion milestone requirements, details and policies distributed at that time. Failure to meet any of these dissertation completion milestones may result in scholastic dismissal from the doctoral program.

8070.90 DrPH Integrated Learning Experience (ILE)/Dissertation

The dissertation process is intended to engage the DrPH student in a project that will significantly contribute to the existing public health practice knowledge base. The dissertation must present independent thinking, scholarly ability, and a systematic approach to addressing a contemporary public health issue. While the dissertation format will be determined in large part by the nature of the public health problem being addressed, it should reflect the variety of perspectives and approaches needed to analyze and ameliorate major public health problems and include assessment of both policy and practice implications. The DrPH dissertation must demonstrate meaningful synthesis and application of DrPH foundational competencies. For full details about the dissertation processes and procedures, please see the DrPH Student Handbook. Enrollment for dissertation credit (PHPB 9980) is permitted only after successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Doctoral Advisory Committee (or Doctoral Dissertation Committee)

DrPH students must establish a Doctoral Advisory Committee, usually referred to as the Doctoral Dissertation Committee (DDC) in the DrPH program, following the completion of their comprehensive exam, but some establish the committee earlier in their program of study. The Doctoral Dissertation Committee primarily aids the student in the dissertation process. Additional criteria for the dissertation committee membership may be found in the DrPH Student Handbook

Dissertation Planning

Students should see the DrPH Student Handbook for this information.

Dissertation Proposal/Prospectus and Meeting

Students should see the DrPH Student Handbook for this information.

Dissertation Approval and Defense

The final dissertation document must conform to all format and content requirements specified by the SPH. When the Dissertation Chair is satisfied with the completed dissertation, he or she will certify that it has his or her approval and is ready to be read by members of the Doctoral Dissertation Committee. The student will then distribute copies of the dissertation to the remaining members of the Doctoral Dissertation Committee and will schedule a final oral defense and notify the school. Scheduling of the oral presentation of the dissertation is by mutual agreement of the student and the Doctoral Dissertation Committee. Students should see the DrPH Student Handbook for more information.