You are viewing an archived Georgia State catalog. For the current catalog, please visit catalog.gsu.edu.
GLOS 6040 Race, Class and Gender in Global Perspective
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Exploration of the various ways that perceptions and designations of race, class, and gender intersect with each other and shape the human experience. This includes an analysis how categories of class, ethnicity, and gender affect daily life for people in multiethnic, stratified societies, particularly in terms of how inequities of access to wealth, power, and resources have emerged on global and local levels. Structural violence is an important theme of many of the readings in the class. The idea of race as a social construct rather than a biological phenomenon is another key topic. We will examine how gender identity and gender roles are shaped by culture. Globalization and immigration, and their relationship to gender, race, and class, are foci of the latter part of the course.

GLOS 6114 Language and Social Justice
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course focuses on the linguistic anthropological study of inequality and questions of social justice that arise. From the work of translation in institutional settings that often falls to bilingual children of immigrants to the marked evaluation of African-American English, students will explore how language is integral in processes of exclusion, stigma, and oppression.

GLOS 6210 Global Issues in Social Psychology
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

A survey course that covers topics in social psychology from a cross-cultural lens, focusing on global issues. Topics include cultural values, methodological equivalences, inter-cultural group conflict, self and identity, aggression and violence, attitudes about immigration and refugees, and altruism. The course is suitable for undergraduate students majoring in sociology, psychology, and the social and behavioral sciences. Same as GLOS 8210. May not be repeated for credit.

GLOS 6211 Psychology of Terrorism
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Terrorism describes both a set of tactics and a broader strategy that can have overwhelming personal, social, and political consequences. The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the psychology of terrorist behavior for students in psychology, the social sciences, public policy, and criminology.

GLOS 6212 International Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Introduction to the key concepts, frameworks, theories, techniques, and policies of international conflict resolution. Considers the theory and practice of international conflict resolution as it applies to interstate conflicts and intrastate conflicts. Students practice techniques of negotiation, mediation and conflict mapping through simulations. Signature Experience course.

GLOS 6220 Refugees and Forced Migration
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

This graduate seminar provides an understanding of forced migration processes (the complex causes, characteristics, and consequences of displacement) and of the “refugee problem” (how international policymakers and scholars have constructed displacement as an object for analysis and action—and some of the consequences of this construction). The course will pay particular attention to the ways social relations and identities at various intersecting levels are influenced by displacement.

GLOS 6230 Global Water Policy and Governance
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Availability of water is becoming a critical social issue in the 21st century. Aimed at providing students with a holistic and comprehensive understanding of multi-scalar/multidimensional nature of human-water interactions, this graduate seminar explores the complex relationship between humans and water at local, regional, and international scales with an emphasis on governance and policy. Appropriate for graduate students from across the university. Same as GEOG 6230. Global Perspectives Course.

GLOS 6490 The Anthropology of Globalization
Credit Hours 4.0
Description

This course critically analyzes the concept of globalization by examining the various components that are often invoked in defining/discussing the concept and the current world structure. We will explicitly examine the anthropological components of globalization and determine the manner in which it shapes culture, constructions of identity, restrictions of the body, distributions of economic and natural resources, intercultural contact, and patterns of global inequality. Same as ANTH 6490.

GLOS 6560 International Field Experience in Global Studies
Credit Hours 1.0 - 9.0
Description

This variable credit course provides participating students with an opportunity to gain practical experience in global studies in another country through an organized study abroad trip.

GLOS 6650 Special Topics in Global Studies
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Intensive treatment of specified topics in global studies. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

GLOS 6761 Directed Study in Global Studies
Credit Hours 1.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites At least 9 hours of graduate credit completed, good academic standing, and permission of instructor
Description

This variable credit hour course allows students to design a directed study on a special topic with a faculty member.

GLOS 6990 Topics in International Development Methods
Credit Hours 1.0 - 3.0
Description

Special topics in international development methods. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Global Perspectives.

GLOS 8010 Policy in Global Affairs
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Introduces graduate students in global studies, public policy, or the social sciences to the major approaches, actors, and challenges in global affairs, from a variety of social science perspectives. Designed to help students think analytically and assess policy and practice on issues with an international and transnational dimension, through an examination of contemporary problems and challenges.

GLOS 8210 Global Issues in Social Psychology
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

A survey course that covers topics in social psychology from a cross-cultural lens, focusing on global issues. Topics include cultural values, methodological equivalences, inter-cultural group conflict, self and identity, aggression and violence, attitudes about immigration and refugees, and altruism. The course is suitable for undergraduate students majoring in sociology, psychology, and the social and behavioral sciences. Global Perspectives Course.

GLOS 8211 Psychology of Terrorism
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Terrorism describes both a set of tactics and a broader strategy that can have overwhelming personal, social, and political consequences. The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the psychology of terrorist behavior for students in psychology, the social sciences, public policy, and criminology.

GLOS 8212 International Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Introduction to the key concepts, frameworks, theories, techniques, and policies of international conflict resolution. Considers the theory and practice of international conflict resolution as it applies to interstate conflicts and intrastate conflicts. Students practice techniques of negotiation, mediation and conflict mapping through simulations. Signature Experience course.

GLOS 8220 Refugee and Forced Migration
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

This graduate seminar provides an understanding of forced migration processes (the complex causes, characteristics, and consequences of displacement) and of the “refugee problem” (how international policymakers and scholars have constructed displacement as an object for analysis and action—and some of the consequences of this construction). The course will pay particular attention to the ways social relations and identities at various intersecting levels are influenced by displacement.

GLOS 8225 Development and Conflict
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Examines the challenges of political and economic development the impact of foreign aid and intervention in contexts affected by civil war, terrorism, crime and violence in contexts affected by civil war, terrorism, crime and violence. Drawing from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, the course explores the impact of conflict and development, the organization and practice of foreign aid and
intervention, and the tensions and trade-offs involved in external involvement in conflict-prone settings. It examines theory, evidence and practice for addressing specific policy challenges including economic development, democratization and
governance, justice and the rule of law, security sector reform, urban and rural development, public health and the environment.

GLOS 8230 Global Water Policy and Governance
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Availability of water is becoming a critical social issue in the 21st century. Aimed at providing students with a holistic and comprehensive understanding of multi-scalar/multidimensional nature of human-water interactions, this graduate seminar explores the complex relationship between humans and water at local, regional, and international scales with an emphasis on governance and policy. Appropriate for graduate students from across the university. Same as GLOS 6230 and GEOG 6230.

GLOS 8560 International Field Experience in Global Studies
Credit Hours 1.0 - 9.0
Description

This variable credit course provides participating students with an opportunity to gain practical experience in global studies in another country through an organized study abroad trip.

GLOS 8650 Special Topics in Global Studies
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Intensive treatment of specified topics in global studies. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

GLOS 8761 Directed Study in Global Studies
Credit Hours 1.0 - 4.0
Prerequisites At least 9 hours of graduate credit completed, good academic standing, and permission of instructor
Description

This variable credit hour course allows students to design a directed study on a special topic with a faculty member.

GLOS 8990 Topics in International Development Methods
Credit Hours 1.0 - 3.0
Description

Special topics in international development methods. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Global Perspectives.