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3000 College of Arts and Sciences

Graduate programs in the College of Arts and Sciences are described in detail in this chapter. See subsections for specific program information as well as policies and procedures.

3010 General Information

The College of Arts and Sciences consists of 23 departments and institutes within the areas of the humanities, the natural and computational sciences, and the social and behavioral sciences. The college has approximately 12,000 undergraduate and 1,800 graduate students.

Graduate programs offered by the College of Arts and Sciences prepare students for professional careers and provide them with the foundation for meeting the challenges of career development. For these purposes, the College of Arts and Sciences offers the Master of Arts, the Master of Science, the Master of Fine Arts, the Master of Heritage Preservation, and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Within the framework of the various degree offerings, specific programs have been designed for students who wish to pursue a career in teaching.

3020 Office of the Dean

25th Floor, 25 Park Place Building
404-413-5114
cas.gsu.edu

Sara Rosen, Dean
John Augusto, Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives
Amber Amari, Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies
Dan Deocampo, Associate Dean for Research, Graduate Studies, and Innovation
Chad Dillard, Assistant Vice President for Development
Kathryn McClymond, Associate Dean for Faculty Development
John Medlock, Assistant Dean for Academic Success
Fred Mote, Assistant Dean for Administration and Finance
Shelly-Ann Williams, Director, Undergraduate Academic Assistance

3020.10 Office of Graduate Services

3rd floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5040
Fax: 404-413-5036

cas.gsu.edu/graduate-services/

3030 Academic Programs

The College of Arts and Sciences offers the following graduate degrees:

  • Master of Arts in African-American Studies; Anthropology; Applied Linguistics; Communication; English; French; Gerontology; History; Philosophy; Political Science; Psychology; Religious Studies; Sociology; Spanish; and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
  • Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing
  • Master of Heritage Preservation
  • Master of Science in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Geosciences, Mathematics, Neuroscience, and Physics
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Linguistics, Astronomy, Biological Sciences, Chemistry, Communication, Computer Science, English, History, Mathematics and Statistics, Neuroscience, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, and Sociology

Specialist in Education Degree

A Specialist in Education degree with a major in Teaching and Learning and a concentration in foreign language education is offered by the College of Education and Human Development in conjunction with the Department of World Languages and Cultures in the College of Arts and Sciences. Descriptions of admission and program requirements are outlined in the College of Education and Human Development section of this catalog.

Dual Degrees

The College of Arts and Sciences offers dual degree programs within departments and the college and with other colleges within the university. These programs enable approved students from one degree program to fulfill requirements of another. For more details on dual degrees, please visit cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/ and program information in this catalog.

Certificate Programs

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a number of professional certificates in addition to traditional graduate degrees. Each certificate is outlined in the department section of this catalog and on the individual department websites. The college offers graduate certificates offered in the following areas:

  • Advanced Language and Literacy Science (Communication)
  • African-American Studies
  • Ethnography (Anthropology)
  • Geographic Information Sciences (Geosciences)
  • Gerontology
  • Historic Preservation (History)
  • Interpretation (World Languages and Cultures)
  • Latin American Studies (World Languages and Cultures)
  • Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (Applied Linguistics and ESL)
  • Translation (World Languages and Cultures)
  • Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Applicants not currently in a degree program in the College of Arts and Sciences must apply according to the general application instructions. Currently active degree-seeking students who wish to add to their academic curriculum one of the certificate programs must apply for the certificate but are exempt from the standard admissions fee. Such qualified students should submit an application to the Office of Graduate Services.

3040 Admission Policies

A person seeking to pursue any of the programs of graduate study described in this section of this catalog must be admitted to Georgia State University through the College of Arts and Sciences. The requirements for admission stated in the following sections are those established by the University and the College. Additional requirements, if any, established by the separate departments/schools can be found in the descriptions of their programs and on their respective websites.

There are four categories of admission to graduate study in the College of Arts and Sciences: Full Status, Special Status, Non-Degree Status, and Transient Status. A student must achieve Full Status in order to be eligible for a graduate degree. The category of Special Status is designed to accommodate, when practical, applicants with promise who may have certain limited deficiencies in admission requirements. Non-Degree Status is provided for non-degree seeking students who wish to take a limited number of graduate courses. Transient Status is available for graduate students in good standing attending another institution.

The Office of Admissions – Graduate Programs reserves the right to require prerequisites as conditions of admission. Visit the admissions section of the Graduate Programs website for detailed information and application at graduate.gsu.edu/ .

Application Completion Deadlines

The Office of Admissions – Graduate Programs lists on its website the dates by which an application to degree programs must be completed. These are the dates that all materials required for admission must be collected in the Office of Admissions – Graduate Programs. Departments have different application completion deadlines, especially for applicants wishing to receive financial assistance. Applicants should check the Office of Admissions – Graduate Programs website at graduate.gsu.edu/ and with the department to which they plan to apply for specific application instructions and deadlines.

International applicants must have all application materials in the Office of Admissions – Graduate Programs, College of Arts and Sciences, as early as possible in order to allow sufficient time for the application materials to be reviewed by the department and, if appropriate, for the preparation of necessary visa documents.

Application and Admission

The selection of applicants for admission to graduate study is competitive. Given limited university resources, even applicants with strong credentials may not gain admission to a specific graduate program. Admission is based upon a variety of factors among which is the quality of the applicant’s undergraduate record, achievement on required admissions tests, the degree of preparation for the specific academic program to be pursued, and available space in the program. In addition to these general criteria, individual departments may consider additional factors in making admission decisions. Applicants should be aware that exceptional performance in an undergraduate or a graduate program in one discipline does not guarantee acceptance into another graduate program. Following initial recommendation by the department, the assistant dean for Graduate Programs of the college shall make the final decision concerning the acceptance or rejection of an applicant.

A prospective student seeking admission must be a graduate of an accredited college with a four-year baccalaureate degree or the equivalent that reflects superior quality work at the undergraduate level. Each applicant must complete and submit the application for admission to graduate study, any required application materials and the application fee.  The College of Arts and Sciences requires all prospective students to submit applications and supporting documents electronically. The online graduate application can be found at graduate.gsu.edu/.

Application materials required for admission to graduate study include the following:

  1. A copy of a transcript from each and every college or university, domestic or overseas, from which applicants received a degree, or where they were enrolled in a degree program for more than a single semester, will need to be uploaded by the applicant to the application. In addition, applicants should send transcripts from all institutions where they were enrolled in coursework relevant to the degree program for which they are applying. This may include courses taken in non-degree status, in transient status, or in post-baccalaureate status and is regardless of whether or not the courses led to a degree. Separate transcripts are not required for AP credit given for high school courses. As well, separate transcripts are not required for enrichment activities (e.g., summer abroad, summer internship, etc.) that did not involve enrollment in a degree program unless the work is relevant to the program for which they are applying. If offered admission, students are required to send one official transcript from each institution directly to the Office of Graduate Services. Transcripts should be received no later than the first day of the semester of entry. Admission will be conditioned upon submission of official transcripts that confirm the information provided on unofficial transcripts during the application process.
  2. For many programs, official records of scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or similar national examination (see specific departmental requirements) must be directed specifically to Georgia State University from the relevant testing agency. Review the detailed admission process at graduate.gsu.edu/ for complete instructions. Please see specific program sections to determine if submission of national test scores is required.
  3. Any supplemental materials required by the major department beyond transcripts and test scores must be submitted via the online graduate application.  These materials may include but are not limited to a statement of purpose, writing sample, cv/resume, letters of recommendation and creative portfolios.  Required supplemental materials vary greatly by program.  Applicants should visit cas.gsu.edu/graduate-services/admissions/graduate-admissions-college-requirements/ for a full list of the materials required and application instructions specific to their department/program of interest.

Admission to the College of Arts and Sciences can only be granted by an Assistant Dean of Graduate Programs. Correspondence from individual departments, professors, or outside agents does not constitute official admission.

Special Status Admission

The use of Special Status admission is solely the prerogative of the department to which application has been made. Special Status admission may be given to applicants who show promise but are not able to fulfill all the requirements for admission to Full Status at the time they apply. Students admitted under the Special Status category are informed of expectations or conditions in the letter of admission. Students admitted to Special Status may be dismissed from their programs if their departments feel that they are not making satisfactory progress toward promotion to Full Status.

A student must be in Full Status in order to earn a degree. At least 20 semester hours of graduate coursework must be completed after the student is admitted to full status to qualify for graduation.

Non-Degree Admission

Non-Degree Status is provided for students who wish to take a limited number of graduate courses (typically not more than two) that relate to their academic or professional backgrounds but do not lead to an advanced degree. A student seeking admission to Non-Degree Status should complete the online application form at cas.gsu.edu/non-degree-transient-admission/ and submit the $50 application fee, transcripts from all colleges or universities attended, and a list of courses he or she wishes to take.

A student is admitted to this status at the option of the department and when adequate resources are available. Applicants for the Non-Degree Status should consult the departmental director of graduate studies to learn about any additional requirements or policies that pertain to non-degree admission.

Admission to Non-Degree Status does not warrant or secure admission to any degree program. Some departments do not accept non-degree students. Please contact the departmental director of graduate studies for further information.

Transient Admission

An applicant seeking admission as a transient student must be a graduate student in good standing at another institution. Admission requirements include completed application forms, application fee, a list of courses the applicant wishes to take, and a letter of good standing from either the graduate dean or the registrar of the student’s institution.

Admission to transient status is for one semester only on a space-available basis. A student who is not in good standing or who is ineligible to return to his or her institution will not be admitted. No guarantee is made that a transient student will be able to secure the courses desired. The reporting of grades earned to the student’s institution is the responsibility of the student.

The College of Arts and Sciences does not allow transient students to reenter. A complete application form, fee, list of courses, and letter of good standing must be sent to the Office of Graduate Admissions – Graduate Programs for every semester the transient student wishes to attend Georgia State University.

Deadlines for transient applications are as follows: Summer – May 15; Fall – June 15; Spring – December 1.

Changing Semester of Entry

Admission to a graduate program is valid only for the semester, degree, and major specified in the letter of acceptance. An applicant who is admitted and does not intend to enroll should notify the Office of Graduate Services in writing of this decision as soon as possible. If an accepted applicant wishes to defer entry within one year, the admitting department/school reserves the right to review the application materials again and decide if postponement is appropriate. Applicants wanting to change their date of matriculation must notify the department with this request.

Re-entry Students

Students of Georgia State University who are on inactive status, or who have received registration holds due to violation of the continuous enrollment policy, must file a re-entry application and $25 fee in the Office of Graduate Services by the appropriate deadline for the semester they wish to re-enter. The complete re-entry application can be downloaded at cas.gsu.edu/graduate-studies/admissions/reentry/. Students who have attended other colleges and/or universities since last registering at Georgia State must have official transcripts of all coursework sent to the Office of Graduate Services, prior to the re-entry deadline for the appropriate semester. Degree programs must approve all re-entry applications and may deny re-entry for a variety of reasons such as a student’s previous academic performance, a student’s progress in the program, the length of time not enrolled, and availability of space in the program. Re-entry applications from students whose cumulative grade-point average is below 3.0 require a plan from the program’s graduate director describing how the grade-point average can be improved to 3.0 or better within 18 hours of graded coursework over the next three consecutive terms.

Reentering students are subject to the regulations of the Graduate Bulletin and the degree program current at the time of re-entry.

Deadlines for re-entry applications are as follows: Summer – April 1; Fall – June 1; Spring – November 1.

3050 International Students

Georgia State University encourages the enrollment of students from other countries. Applicants needing a student visa are required to provide proof of financial support for at least the first year of their degree program. International students with a student visa are required to carry a full course of study during every semester except the summer semester. Applicants requesting a student visa may not be considered for Non-Degree Status.

In addition to meeting the regular admission requirements, prospective international applicants must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by taking either the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).  In addition, applicants may either show proficiency in the English language by showing the completion of a University System of Georgia approved ESL program or show proof of a baccalaureate or graduate degree completion inside (from an accredited institution) or outside the U.S. where English is the official language of academic instruction. Applicants with a score under 550 on the paper-based TOEFL, 213 on the computer-based TOEFL, 80 on the internet-based TOEFL, or 6.5 on the IELTS cannot be considered for Full Graduate Status; they may, however, be considered for Special Status admission.

Additional testing of skills in English can be required of all newly-admitted international students who come from non-English speaking countries. Prior to registration for the first semester, international students are required to attend a special orientation, held by the Office of International Student and Scholar Services, where they must take the Georgia State Test of English Proficiency (GSTEP) offered by the Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language. Students who miss the orientation should arrange with the department to take the GSTEP before classes begin or as soon as possible thereafter. Students with acceptable scores on the examination may proceed with their regular academic coursework. GSTEP will not be required if the student obtains a minimum score of 100 on the internet-based TOEFL or 7.5 on the IELTS.  Students whose scores indicate a lack of English proficiency will be required to take ESL course or courses as a regular part of their graduate coursework. Any ESL courses required under this provision will be considered part of the student’s normal course load but will not count toward the total hours of coursework a student must take in order to obtain a degree.

GSTEP scores for each student will be sent by the Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language to the Office of Graduate Services along with a recommendation regarding the additional language course(s) that the student should take. The Office of Graduate Services will then send the information to the appropriate departmental director of graduate studies, who will ensure that the student takes the recommended ESL course(s). Graduate Services will monitor the implementation of this procedure.

Academic credentials must be original documents with authorized signatures, seals, stamps, etc. Whenever possible, these should be sent by the institution responsible for issuing such documents. In cases where it is impossible for an applicant to have these credentials sent from such institutions, the applicant should forward a duly “notarized” or “attested to” copy. The notarization should be done by the proper institutional official or by the Ministry of Education in the home country. Documents in a language other than English must be accompanied by translations. Translations should be made by the home country embassy or an appropriate official, and the original copies of the translations, acceptably notarized as described above, must be provided. As a general rule, documents translated by the Office of the American Friends of the Middle East (AFME), the Institute of International Education (IIE), the student’s home embassy, the American embassy, or the language faculty of a regionally accredited U.S. college or university will be acceptable. Students who already attend school in the U.S. can arrange to have their institutions certify photocopies of original documents, and students in the Atlanta area can arrange for the Office of Graduate Admissions – Graduate Programs to certify photocopies of required foreign academic credentials.

3060 Graduate Teaching and Research Assistantships

Each academic department in the College of Arts and Sciences offers opportunities for qualified students who have been accepted into one of the graduate degree programs to work as laboratory, research, or teaching assistants. Graduate assistants work as tutors, aid faculty members in research projects, supervise laboratories, and teach undergraduate courses. Assistantships normally are awarded only to students enrolled full time in their degree programs. For the expected level of enrollment, see “Courses and Course Load” in section 3100 below. Students interested in graduate assistantships should contact the directors of graduate studies in their departments for specific information.

Students receiving assistantships as well as financial aid should be aware that receiving an assistantship can reduce the amount of financial aid awarded.

Graduate Assistantship Deadlines

Most departments/schools have early deadlines for graduate teaching or research assistantships. If you would like to be considered for an assistantship, please consult the appropriate departmental section of this catalog or departmental websites to obtain the deadline for the program to which you plan to apply.

Graduate Study Funding

In addition to graduate assistantships, the college and university offer a variety of fellowships, scholarships, and other sources of financial support for graduate education. Information about many of these offerings is available at cas.gsu.edu/funding-education.

3070 Calculation of Grade-Point Average

In departments where a new application is required from the master’s to the doctoral program, master’s and doctoral cumulative GPAs will be calculated separately. In departments where only one application is required for entry into a continuous graduate program, the cumulative GPA will remain combined. All credits earned while a student is in non-degree status that are approved for, and used to fulfill requirements to the master’s degree will be calculated into the cumulative master’s GPA. In order to qualify for graduation with a degree from the College of Arts and Sciences, a student must have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

3080 Scholastic Warning and Scholastic Termination

Scholastic Warning

Graduate students are personally responsible for knowing and maintaining department and College academic standards. A graduate student whose cumulative grade-point average falls below 3.0 at the end of a semester or who fails to maintain the level of academic performance required by the major department will be sent a letter of scholastic warning from the associate dean for Graduate Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. Some departments have additional requirements for academic performance and progress. In these instances, the departmental graduate director will attempt to warn the student. However, the receipt or non-receipt of academic warning does not exempt the student from stated requirements. Students in Warning Status must achieve a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average within 18 hours of graded coursework over the next three consecutive terms.

Scholastic Termination

A graduate student is subject to scholastic termination from the degree program for the following reasons:

  1. Failure to achieve a 3.0 cumulative grade-point average by the end of the next 18 semester hours of enrollment or next three consecutive terms in letter-graded courses after the GPA has fallen below a 3.0;
  2. Failure to maintain the level of academic performance and progress required by the major department;
  3. A second failure on the General Examination in the M.A., M.S., or Ph.D. degree programs.

The student who may be subject to scholastic termination will be notified of termination by the assistant dean for Graduate Programs of the College of Arts and Sciences.

3090 World Language or Equivalent Research Skill Requirement

Some departments in the College of Arts and Sciences require students to demonstrate proficiency in either one or two world languages, in an alternative research skill, or in a combination of the two. An alternative research skill is a proficiency obtained in an adjunct area that is ordinarily not a degree requirement in the student’s degree program. Students should consult their individual directors of graduate studies for specific departmental requirements.

An international student whose native language is not English and who demonstrates proficiency in English to the Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language may be exempted from one world language requirement. Exceptions to this policy may be allowed only with departmental approval and by means of approved substitutions of equivalent research skills. The English for Foreign Language Requirement Exam (EFLRE) requires students to perform satisfactorily on the GSTEP, including the oral interview.

International students who will be using English to satisfy the world language requirement will take the EFLRE, and the result will be sent to the student’s academic department. Because GSTEP results are considered by the Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language to be current for two years, students who wish to satisfy the foreign language requirement within the first two years of their arrival at Georgia State may use the GSTEP results already on file in the Department of AL/ESL if those results are satisfactory. If students were not required to take the oral interview section of the GSTEP when they arrived, they will need to contact the Department of AL/ESL to take it to fulfill the EFLRE requirement. Students who wait longer than the two year period will be required to take the complete EFLRE, which means retaking all sections of the GSTEP.

Courses taken to satisfy the world language requirement will not count toward the total hours of coursework a student must take in order to obtain a degree.

3100 Requirements and Time Limits

Program requirements are established based on the Graduate Catalog active at the time of the student’s initial acceptance and matriculation (first registration). All credits presented for the master’s degree must have been earned within seven calendar years of the date of the degree. All credits presented for the doctoral degree must have been earned within ten years of the date of the degree.

Continuous Enrollment

Students in all graduate programs must maintain enrollment totaling 6 hrs (or more) over all consecutive three semester periods (including summers). In other words, the total enrollment of the current term plus the two terms preceding it must add to 6 hrs or more at all times. The status of all students will be checked by the midpoint of each term for compliance with the continuous enrollment requirement. Any student whose enrollment is out of compliance will receive a registration hold preventing all current and future registration. Those students will be notified by an e-mail message sent to their official GSU e-mail account.

To resume their programs, students with continuous enrollment holds must file for reentry by the published deadline and must enroll at a level sufficient to satisfy the continuous enrollment criterion. That is, their enrollment in the reentry term plus the two terms preceding it must total to 6 hrs or more. The maximum required enrollment level for the reentry term is 6 hours. For more information on the reentry process, see section 3400.

Limits to Financial Aid

For purposes of financial aid and compliance with Federal regulations, graduates students may receive aid for a maximum of 90 hours unless they are receiving a graduate assistantship. Ph.D. students are exempted from the Satisfactory Academic Progress process. Students receiving financial aid and receiving graduate assistantships may be subject to reduced financial aid awards.

Students’ Responsibility

Graduate students must assume full responsibility for knowledge of the rules and regulations of the college, the university, and those departmental requirements concerning their individual curricula. Enrollment in a graduate program in the College of Arts and Sciences constitutes students’ acknowledgement that they are obligated to comply with all academic and administrative regulations and degree requirements.

Academic Advisement

It is the responsibility of the student to know and to satisfy any and all conditions that pertain to admission and to the satisfactory completion of degree requirements. Students may obtain advisement from the appropriate graduate faculty adviser or from the director of graduate studies of their departments. A complete listing of department directors and advisors is available at cas.gsu.edu/graduate-services/admissions/graduate-admissions-college-requirements/. Advisors are also available in Graduate Services in order to assist with admissions and other administrative actions related to admission and graduation. A list of office contacts is available at cas.gsu.edu/department/graduate-services/.

Courses and Course Load

Courses numbered 6000 and above are normally open only to graduate students (see exceptions below). Each graduate course will carry three semester hours of academic credit unless otherwise indicated. Twenty-five semester hours is the maximum student load per semester; eighteen semester hours is considered to be the normal load for graduate students with graduate assistantships in the College of Arts and Sciences, while nine semester hours is the load for defining a full-residence semester for most financial aid and loans. Students who wish to register for more than twenty-five hours of course work must obtain the approval of the department director of graduate studies.

Policy on Allowing Undergraduates to Take Graduate Courses

Under one of the following conditions, an undergraduate student may be permitted to take a graduate course:

  1. Dual Degree Enrollment: The student has been formally accepted into an official university dual degree program that links an undergraduate degree program with a graduate degree program. Students in dual degree programs are granted permission to enroll in specified graduate courses when they reach a designated program milestone. Students who are accepted into the affiliated graduate program upon completion of the undergraduate degree may count specified course work toward fulfillment of the graduate degree requirements. A current listing of official undergraduate/graduate dual degree programs is available at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.
  2. College Approval of Enrollment: The dean’s office of the college will determine a student’s eligibility for admission into a graduate course. To be eligible, an undergraduate student generally must have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.5 or higher and be within 18 semester hours of graduation, and be enrolled in an undergraduate degree program. Eligibility does not guarantee permission to take a course. Once a student’s eligibility is determined, permission must be granted by the instructor for the course, the department’s/school’s director of graduate studies, the chair/director of the department/school offering the course, and the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. The request form is located at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/. Please note, graduate courses taken by an undergraduate student cannot be applied toward fulfillment of graduate degree requirements unless the student has been formally accepted into an official university dual degree program.

(This approval process does not apply to postbaccalaureate students. Postbaccalaureate students wishing to take graduate courses must be admitted as non-degree seeking students. See cas.gsu.edu/non-degree-transient-admission/or additional information.)

Transfer Credit

A maximum of six semester hours of approved graduate credit from other institutions may be accepted toward a master’s degree program, a maximum of 30 semester hours may be accepted toward a doctoral degree and a maximum of three semester hours of approved graduate credit from other institutions may be accepted toward a graduate certificate program.  Transfer credit must be approved no later than the end of the second semester in Full Status. Transferred credits will be included in the time limitations placed on credits applicable to graduate degrees. For the policy concerning application of work taken at other institutions in the doctoral program, see the departmental requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

Please note that the acceptance of transfer credit is not automatic; it must be approved and documented by the departmental director of graduate studies and the appropriate associate dean.

Curriculum Adjustment

Course 6999 in any department that offers graduate work is designed only to assist the graduate student with a particular curriculum problem. Credit of one to a maximum of four semester hours may be earned. To be eligible, a student must have Full Status and must have the approvals of the instructor, the chair of the department, and the appropriate associate dean of the college. Application forms for Course 6999 may be obtained from either the academic department or the Dean’s Office and must be submitted for approval prior to the close of registration for the semester in which the credit is to be earned. Registration for Course 6999 will be permitted only when an alternative course is not available.

Research Requirements

Most departments that offer graduate degrees also offer Course 8999, Research, for which credit from one to a maximum of 15 hours per semester may be earned. In some departments, 8999 may be taken to a maximum of 25 hours per semester. These courses generally are acceptable to reach minimal continuous enrollment standards.

Responsible Conduct in Research

All undergraduates, graduate students, and post-docs involved in empirical research at Georgia State University are required to undertake Responsible Conduct in Research (RCR) education and training as part of their requirements for graduation or employment.  As part of this educational requirement, web-based training thru the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) has been made available to meet this requirement.  More information on the university’s RCR training requirement can be found at ursa.research.gsu.edu/responsible-conduct-in-research/.

3110 Degree Requirements

Candidates for graduation in a degree program offered by the College of Arts and Sciences must be officially registered for classes the semester of completing all academic requirements, including all noncourse milestones. Departments may determine the extent and type of hours that must be taken by the candidate during the concluding semester. Every candidate for completion must apply at least two semesters in advance of expected graduation with the Graduation Office of Enrollment Services/Registrar’s Office. These regulations are explained in the general university-wide section of this catalog. The semester of completion is defined as extending until the last day of the semester on the academic calendar as published by Enrollment Services.

While the provisions set forth in this catalog will ordinarily be applied as stated, Georgia State University and the College of Arts and Sciences have the right to change any provision, including, but not limited to, academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice to individual students. Every effort will be made to advise students of any such changes. It is especially important that each student note that it is the individual student’s responsibility to keep apprised of current degree requirements for his or her particular program.

Graduation Requirement

All students must be enrolled in the term in which they complete the requirements for their degree. Normally, this is the term in which they will graduate. However, if the requirements are completed after the deadline for graduation in a term, but before the first day of classes in the subsequent term, then it is not necessary to enroll in the subsequent term. If the continuous enrollment criterion is not met in the term in which degree requirements are completed, then it must be met in the term of graduation.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is awarded in recognition of the attainment of independent and comprehensive scholarship in a selected field. The Ph.D. emphasizes research in conjunction with the mastery of a substantial body of knowledge. Specific degree requirements may be tailored by the faculty to meet the needs of the individual student.

In order to qualify for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the student must fulfill the following general requirements:

  • Residence: Four semesters of residence are required, two of which must be consecutive; during all four semesters the student must register for at least six hours of coursework. A Doctor of Philosophy degree shall be conferred only on that student who holds a distinguished record of academic achievement and has maintained a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.0 for a minimum period of three academic years of post baccalaureate study. On the recommendation of the major department and with the approval of the appropriate associate dean, up to one-half of the residence requirement may be waived on the basis of competence obtained through coursework completed elsewhere.
  • World Language Requirement: Some departments require students to demonstrate proficiency in either one or two world languages, in an alternative research skill, or in a combination of the two. For specific departmental requirements, students should consult their departmental director of graduate studies.
  • General Examination: Students must pass a departmentally administered general examination. An Examination Committee shall be appointed by the chair of the major department. The committee shall consist of a minimum of three members, at least two of whom shall be on the faculty of the major department. The general examination shall be written or oral, or both. The examination may be repeated once following a minimum interval of six months either with the original committee or a duly constituted new committee. The examination must be passed at least one academic year prior to the conferral of the degree. The student who fails the examination for the second time will be subject to termination.
  • Admission to Candidacy: In order to be admitted to candidacy, the student must have met the language or equivalent research skill requirement, if any; must have passed the general examination; and must have a departmentally approved dissertation proposal. Graduate students who have completed these requirements except for their dissertation and related defenses or oral exams may be admitted into ABD (all but dissertation) status. This title will be based on the positive recommendation of the graduate program director and following successful review and certification of other doctoral program requirements by the Office of Graduate Services. This designation does not change any time limits or registration requirements for completion of the degree program.
  • Dissertation: A dissertation is required of all candidates for the doctoral degree. A Dissertation Committee, of which the dissertation adviser shall be chair, shall pass on the acceptability of each dissertation. The committee shall be nominated by the student and appointed by the chair of the major department. Two-thirds of the committee must approve the dissertation in order for it to be acceptable as a fulfillment of degree requirements. Currently, dissertations must be uploaded to Scholarworks.  A student may also choose to have the dissertation embargoed. The deadlines and procedures for submitting dissertations are available at cas.gsu.edu/current-grad-student-resources/ . Research Hours: Each student must register for a minimum of 20 semester hours of dissertation research.
  • Final Examination: There shall be a final oral examination that should be directed primarily to the defense of the dissertation. This examination shall be administered by a committee appointed by the chair of the department.

Master of Arts/Master of Science

The requirements stated below are the minimum requirements established by the College of Arts and Sciences for the awarding of the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees. In addition to any other departmental requirements, the student seeking either of these degrees must fulfill the following general requirements.

  • Coursework: A minimum of 27 semester hours of graduate coursework with a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 is required. At least 20 hours of graduate coursework must be completed after admission to Full Graduate Status. In addition, students taking the thesis option must successfully complete at least six semester hours in Course 8999 in the major department. If desired, up to 6 semester hours of the 27-hour requirements may be taken in a related field or fields of study. Foreign Language: Some departments require students to demonstrate a reading proficiency in a foreign language or an approved equivalent research skill.
  • Comprehensive Examination: Some departments require students to pass a departmentally administered comprehensive examination.
  • Demonstration of Research Competence.
  • Thesis: Ordinarily a thesis is required of all candidates for a master’s degree. A Thesis Committee, of which the thesis adviser shall be chair, shall pass on the acceptability of the thesis. The committee consisting of at least two members shall be nominated by the student and appointed by the chair of the major department. Two-thirds of the committee must approve the thesis in order for it to be acceptable to the Office of Graduate Services. The deadlines and procedures for submission of a thesis are available on the web at cas.gsu.edu/current-grad-student-resources/.
  • Non-thesis: A non-thesis option is available in some departments. In lieu of the thesis, research competence must be demonstrated on the basis of a research paper or a creative project. A committee of at least three members of the faculty, of which the student’s adviser will serve as chair, will pass on the acceptability of the paper or project. Two-thirds of the committee must indicate approval. This approval must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Services by the appropriate deadline (cas.gsu.edu/current-grad-student-resources/).

Master of Fine Arts

The Department of English offers a Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing. Applicants should submit strong portfolios of poetry or fiction. Details for degree requirements and application procedures are listed under the “English” section of this catalog and on the department website.

Master of Heritage Preservation

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a Master of Heritage Preservation degree program. This program is interdisciplinary in nature, but currently is housed in the Department of History. For further information, refer to the description in the “Heritage Preservation Program” section of this catalog or the program website at heritagepreservation.gsu.edu/.

3120 Student Exceptions Procedure

The grievance and appeals procedure for students enrolled in courses or academic programs in the College of Arts and Sciences is available in the departmental and administrative offices of the college and on the university website at enrollment.gsu.edu/assistance/.

Students may request deviations from the regulations in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog by applying for approval to the Graduate Petitions Board. Students considering such a petition should consult the Office of Graduate Services to determine procedures and to obtain appropriate forms or download them from cas.gsu.edu/current-grad-student-resources/. This petition procedure does not apply to department-based regulations.

3125 Departments and Institutes

Department Main Office Catalog Sections
Department of African-American Studies 962 One Park Place South; 404-413-5135 3130
Department of Anthropology 335 Sparks Hall; 404-413-5156 3140
Department of Applied Linguistics
and English as a Second Language
15th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5200 3150
Department of Biology 495 Petit Science Center; 404-413-5300 3180
Department of Chemistry 380 Petit Science Center; 404-413-5500 3190
Department of Communication 8th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5600 32003126
Department of Computer Science 7th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5700 3175, 3210
Creative Media Industries Institute 2nd Floor, 25 Park Place
Department of English 23rd Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5800 3220
Department of Geosciences 730 Langdale Hall; 404-413-5750 3240
Gerontology Institute 605 One Park Place; 404-413-5210 3260
Global Studies Institute 19th floor, 25 Park Place
Department of History 20th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6385 3270, 3280
Department of Mathematics and Statistics 14th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6400 3175, 3300
Neuroscience Institute 800 Petit Science Center; 404-413-5445 3320
Department of Philosophy 16th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6100 3300
Department of Physics and Astronomy 6th Floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-4033 3170, 3340
Department of Political Science 1005 Langdale Hall; 404-413-6159 3350
Department of Psychology 11th floor, Urban Life; 404-413-6200 3360
Department of Religious Studies 17th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6110 3370
Department of Sociology 1041 Langdale Hall; 404-413-6500 3380
Institute for Women’s, Gender,
and Sexuality Studies
22nd floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-6587 3410
World Languages and Cultures 19th floor, 25 Park Place; 404-413-5980 3230, 3290, 3390, 3400

3126 Advanced Language and Literacy Science

Program Offered:

  • Graduate Certificate in Advanced Language and Literacy Science

The objective of the Advanced Language and Literacy Science (ALLS) graduate certificate is to develop specialized knowledge in advanced language and literacy science with a specific focus on populations who have difficulty with the acquisition of language and literacy skills. These populations include, but not are not limited to: children growing up in poverty in urban contexts, children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities, autism, and other neurodevelopmental disorders, children with learning disabilities, children and adults who are deaf and hard of hearing, children and adults with communication impairments, and children and adults developing language and literacy in multilingual environments.

Program Requirements:

The certificate will consist of 18 credit hours. There will be four required courses for a total of 12 credit hours and two electives for a total of 6 credit hours.

  1. Required courses (12)
    • PSYC 9930/EPY 9930 Measurement and Assessment in Advanced Language and Literacy Science (3)
    • PSYC 9920/EPY 9920 Language Development, Disorders and Intervention Research (3)
    • PSYC 9910/EPY 9910 Reading Development, Disorders, and Intervention Research (3)
    • PSYC 9900/EPY 9900 Special Topics: Research in Challenges of Acquiring Language and Literacy (1) (can be taken up to three times)
  2. Select two electives from among the following list (6):
    • AL 8530 Issues in Second Language Writing (3)
    • AL 8550 Second Language Evaluation (3)
    • AL 8570 Second Language Reading-Writing Relation (3)
    • AL 8520 Psycholinguistics (3)
    • AL 8980 Current Issues in Secondary Language Acquisition (3)
    • AL 8490 Second Language Reading: Theory and Practice (3)
    • EDRD 8310 Theoretical Models and Processes of Literacy Learning (language, reading, and writing) (3)
    • EPY 8180 Learning in the School Age Child (3)
    • EPY 8960 Adult Literacy (3)
    • EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
    • PSYC 6400 Atypical Development (3)
    • PSYC 8551 Cognitive and Linguistic Development (3)
    • PSYC 9900: Language and the Brain (3)
    • PHIL 6530 Philosophy of Language (3)
    • PHIL 8530 Seminar in Philosophy of Language (3)

Scholastic Discipline Policy

After completing six credit hours and at the end of each term thereafter, certificate students are evaluated for continuation in the program. Evaluation will include meeting academic milestones in their doctoral programs. Unless exceptional circumstances are present, students with a GPA below 3.0 in graduate-level classes will be scholastically terminated from the certificate program.

3130 African-American Studies

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in African-American Studies
    • Concentration in Community Empowerment
    • Concentration in Culture and Aesthetics
  • Graduate Certificate in African-American Studies

Department of African-American Studies
962 One Park Place South
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4109
Atlanta, Georgia 30302
404-413-5135
aas.gsu.edu

Jonathan Gayles, Chair
Sarita Davis, Graduate Director

The Department of African-American Studies offers a vibrant and highly competitive graduate program. The department’s Master of Arts degree is designed to provide students with a rigorous interdisciplinary training in the scholarly investigation of people of African descent. The faculty and the courses of the graduate program are drawn from the department and other academic units throughout the university.

The Master of Arts degree in African-American Studies offers two areas of concentrations: the Community Empowerment track and the Culture and Aesthetics track. The Community Empowerment concentration focuses on the historical and contemporary strategies to empower people of African descent. This track exposes the student to the political, economic, and policy responses to the impediments of African/African-American community development. The Culture and Aesthetics concentration focuses on the understandings and the interpretations of the philosophical, literary, and artistic contributions of people of African descent.

Students are prepared to pursue a doctorate in African-American Studies or other related disciplines in the social-sciences or the humanities. The M.A. degree in African-American Studies also enhances a career in government, education, the professional fields, and the non-profit sector.

Students seeking admission to the graduate program are admitted once a year to begin in the fall semester. All application materials are due by March 15th. Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of African-American Studies by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general admission requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of African-American Studies has the following admission requirements:

  1. Although an undergraduate degree in African-American Studies is not required, applicants are expected to have taken extensive coursework in African-American Studies.
  2. Applicants must have a 3.0 cumulative undergraduate grade point average.
  3. Applicants must submit a career goals statement (2-3 pages).
  4. Applicants must submit a writing sample of their previous scholarly work (10-20 pages)
  5. Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation which assess the ability of the student to undertake graduate study.

Degree Requirements

In order to earn a Master of Arts degree in African-American Studies, a student must complete 36 credit hours of graduate coursework:

  1. Students must complete fifteen(15) hours of core requirements
    • AAS 6000 Proseminar in African-American Studies (3)
    • AAS 6005 Theories in African-American Studies (3)
    • AAS 6007 Black Feminist Thought (3)
    • AAS 6010 Research Methods in African-American Studies (3)
    • AAS 6012 Qualitative Research Methods (3)
    • AAS 6052 African Women and Social Political Changes (3)
  2. Students must complete three (3) hours of global competency by completing either
    • AAS 6050 African Social Movements (3), or
    • AAS 6052 African Women and Social Movements (3)
  3. Students must complete twelve (12) credit hours of coursework in one of two areas of concentrations: Community Empowerment or Culture and Aesthetics:
    • Community Empowerment: (12 credit hours)
      Students who select the Community Empowerment concentration must complete at least twelve (12) credit hours of designated Community Empowerment coursework:

      • AAS 6015 Methods in African American Oral History (3)
      • AAS 6016 Critical Pedagogy and African American Education (3)
      • AAS 6020 African-American Social Movements (3)
      • AAS 6022 The New African American Urban History and the Intervention of the Black Southern Diaspora (3)
      • AAS 6025 Seminar in African-American History (4)
      • AAS 6027 Seminar in Southern Black Freedom Struggle (4)
      • AAS 6029 African-American Political Participation (3)
      • AAS 6030 Dynamics of the African American Family (3)
      • AAS 6032 African-American Masculinity (3)
      • AAS 6034 African-American Women in the U.S. (3)
      • AAS 6040 African-American Community Empowerment (3)
      • AAS 6042 Diversity and Aging (3)
      • AAS 6044 African-American Anthropology (3)
      • AAS 6050 African Social Movements (3)
      • AAS 6052 Africana Women and Social Political Change (3)
      • AAS 6055 African Politics (3)
      • AAS 6056 Geography of Africa (3)
      • AAS 6095 Race, Class and Gender in Contemporary South Africa (3)
    • Culture and Aesthetics: (12 credit hours)
      Students who select the Culture and Aesthetics concentration must complete at least twelve (12) credit hours of designated Culture and Aesthetics coursework:

      • AAS 6060 African Art (3)
      • AAS 6062 Contemporary African Art (3)
      • AAS 6070 African-American Literary Theory (3)
      • AAS 6073 19th Century African-American Literature (3)
      • AAS 6079 African American Language (3)
      • AAS 6080 The Black Arts Movements (3)
      • AAS 6082 African-American Art (3)
      • AAS 6090 African-American Religion (3)
      • AAS 6065 Black Visual Representation: The Iconography of the African Diaspora (3)
  4. Students non-designated African-American Studies coursework requires prior approval from the graduate director.
  5. Students must complete at least six (6) credit hours of AAS 8999 Thesis Research.
  6. Students will have the option of completing a thesis or non-thesis option.
  7. Students must submit an approved thesis or approved non-thesis capstone experience for a community service project or creative works.
  8. Students must satisfactorily pass an oral thesis defense.

Graduate Certificate in African-American Studies

The certificate consists of 15 credit hours.

  1. Required course. Select one of the following (3):
    • AAS 6000 Proseminar in African-American Studies (3)
    • AAS 6005 Theories in African-American Studies (3)
  2. Select 12 hours in 6000-level AAS courses from the following list (12):
    • AAS 6000 Proseminar in African-American Studies (3) (if not taken above)
    • AAS 6005 Theories in African-American Studies (3) (if not taken above)
    • AAS 6007 Black Feminist Thought (3)
    • AAS 6010 Research Methods in African-American Studies (3)
    • AAS 6012 Qualitative Research Methods (3)
    • AAS 6052 African Women and Social Political Changes (3)
    • AAS 6020 African-American Social Movements (3)
    • AAS 6025 Seminar in African-American History (4)
    • AAS 6027 Seminar in Southern Modern Civil Rights Movement (4)
    • AAS 6029 African-American Political Participation (3)
    • AAS 6030 Dynamics of the African American Family (3)
    • AAS 6032 African-American Masculinity (3)
    • AAS 6034 African-American Women in the U.S. (3)
    • AAS 6040 African-American Community Empowerment (3)
    • AAS 6042 Ethnicity and Aging (3)
    • AAS 6044 African-American Anthropology (3)
    • AAS 6050 African Social Movements (3)
    • AAS 6052 Africana Women and Social Political Change (3)
    • AAS 6055 African Politics (3)
    • AAS 6056 Geography of Africa (3)
    • AAS 6060 African Art (3)
    • AAS 6062 Contemporary African Art (3)
    • AAS 6070 African-American Literary Theory (3)
    • AAS 6073 19th Century African-American Literature (3)
    • AAS 6079 African American Language (3)
    • AAS 6080 The Black Arts Movements (3)
    • AAS 6082 African-American Art (3)
    • AAS 6090 African-American Religion (3)

3140 Anthropology

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Anthropology
    • Concentration in Museum Anthropology
  • Graduate Certificate in Ethnology

Department of Anthropology
33 Gilmer Street
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 3998
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
404-413-5156
anthropology.gsu.edu

Kathryn A. Kozaitis, Chair
Jennifer Patico, Director of Graduate Studies

The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree program in anthropology provides rigorous training in anthropological theories, methods, and skills. The program is dedicated to the investigation of a broad range of social, cultural, political-economic, and biological issues, processes, and problems pertaining to the human experience in its past and present dimensions. The Department of Anthropology program utilizes resources in metropolitan Atlanta to promote student learning.

Students may seek comprehensive training in anthropological methods and theory in anticipation of pursuing an academic career in anthropology or enhancing their education in another discipline. Alternatively, they may pursue specialized training in methods, problems, and theories for a career beyond the academy, applying anthropological knowledge to assess and help meet community needs, identify and help solve social problems, or write and help to implement public policy.

To provide graduate students with training specific to their career goals, the program offers a Thesis Option and a Capstone Option. Students may choose either option in consultation with the Graduate Director and their advisor. The Thesis Option requires primary research, whether basic or applied, on an issue relative to the student’s subdiscipline of concentration, e.g. archaeological, biological, cultural, or linguistic anthropology. This option is particularly well suited for those who plan to pursue doctoral training in anthropology or another field. Students complete this work under the guidance of a primary advisor and two additional committee members. The Capstone Option focuses the student’s time more in coursework, prioritizing topical content and professionalization through means other than independent research. Students who opt for the Capstone Option are encouraged strongly to take at least one, if not two, courses in fields outside of Anthropology that pertain to their professional goals, for example in public health, education, law, business, or public policy. With guidance from their advisor, Capstone students complete a capstone paper (25-30 pp.) in the final semester that may build upon previous coursework and should be oriented towards defining their professional goals and illustrating their developing expertise.

All students have the option to complete an internship for academic credit as part of their curriculum in such agencies as CARE, the Carter Center, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation, and at any of the multiple human service organization that serve immigrants and refugees in metropolitan Atlanta. For example, students who seek training in applied sociocultural anthropology conduct participatory action research in urban domains of policy and practice, including medical, educational, and other social service settings. Students with career interests in public archaeology study within cultural resource management (CRM) firms and museums.

The M.A. program is designed to be completed in two years. During the first year, all students are required to demonstrate competence in topics, theories, and methods of anthropology through completion of a four-course core curriculum. Additional coursework is completed in consultation with the faculty. During their second year, students are expected to develop their own areas of interest and expertise within the broader framework of the program. Students are encouraged to take advantage of resources in other departments and schools at Georgia State University, and of neighboring institutions such as Emory University, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Spelman College, Morehouse University, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the University of Georgia, and the Georgia Regents University in Augusta. Students can also choose to participate in our department’s collaborative programs with the Fernbank Museum of Natural History, the Atlanta History Center, the Georgia State University’s Heritage Preservation Program, the Atlanta Zoo, and a number of local museums and CRM firms.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Anthropology by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Anthropology has the following requirements:

  • Two letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in anthropology
  • Curriculum vitae or resume
  • Writing sample

Degree Requirements

  • Thesis Option (33 hours)
  • Capstone Option (36 hours)

The following courses are required:

  1.  ANTH 8000 Anthropological Theory and Praxis (3)
    • ANTH 8040 Seminar in Anthropology (3) or ANTH 8050 Seminar in Applied Anthropology (3)
    • One course at the 6000 or 8000 level in Biological Anthropology
    • One course at the 6000 or 8000 level in Archaeology
    • ANTH 8020 Professionalization Seminar (1)
  2. One of the following methods courses (as relevant to the student’s MA concentration):
    • ANTH 6670 Methods in Sociocultural Anthropology (3) or ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 6360 Methods and Theories in Biological Anthropology (4) or ANTH 6370 Forensic Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 6590 Archaeological Methods (4)
  3. Additional 6000/8000-level anthropology courses in area of specialization to achieve a total of 33 semester hours for the thesis option and 36 semester hours for the Capstone option. Up to six hours of graduate courses may be taken outside the anthropology program
  4. Proficiency in a foreign language or approved research skill
  5. Thesis option: a thesis prospectus must be completed during the third semester. In the final semester, either six credit hours of ANTH 8999* Thesis Research, or three credit hours of ANTH 8999* plus ANTH 8060 Writing Seminar in Anthropology
  6. Capstone option: a capstone project must be completed in the final semester.
  7. Thesis option: oral defense of thesis. Capstone option: public presentation of capstone project

* Indicates courses graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Grades do not affect GPA.


Museum Anthropology Concentration

Students who are working towards an MA in Anthropology may also elect to complete a concentration in Museum Anthropology. This concentration provides students with experiences in analyzing the representation, exhibition, and curation of material culture. Museums are integral to establishing authority over knowledge with respect to what is displayed and how it is exhibited. Cultural patrimony, nationalism, identity, and cultural meaning are not only represented, but also created in the materials shown to the general public. Therefore, museums are contested places where knowledge is available for consumption, where peoples and objects are viewed, and where ideas about the world are formulated. In adopting an anthropological approach to museums, this concentration is distinct from generalized museum studies; museum anthropologists examine curation, exhibition, and museum practice from a comparative and global perspective that interrogates museums as dynamic institutions embedded in particular social and cultural contexts. Emphasis is on both the role of museums in producing anthropological knowledge and the use of anthropological theory to contextualize and critique museum practices in diverse settings. Options for the concentration are four-field and include independent fieldwork in osteology, paleoanthropology, archaeology or bioarchaeology using museum or laboratory collections, an internship at a museum, analyses of visual, aural, and/or material culture at a museum, cultural resource management, NAGPRA compliance, and studies of identity, cultural patrimony, nationalism, and the production of knowledge at one or more museums.

Students complete the concentration by undertaking a focused course of study within their overall MA program. In addition to completing the required courses listed above for the MA degree, Museum Anthropology students must devote 18 of their total course credits to the concentration. Both thesis and curriculum-intensive students may elect the concentration. There is no special application process other than that for the MA program, but students should declare their intention to complete this program of study upon entry to the MA program.

  1. Required courses (6):
  2. Elective courses (12):
    • ANTH 6080 Consumption and Material Culture (3)
    • ANTH 6112 Modernity and Identity (4)
    • ANTH 6170 Mesoamerican Archaeology (3)
    • ANTH 6180 Archaeology of the Southeastern United States (4)
    • ANTH 6190 Archaeological Practice and the Public (3)
    • ANTH 6300 Human Evolution (3)
    • ANTH 6360 Methods and Theories in Biological Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 6370 Forensic Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 6470 Visual Culture (4)
    • ANTH 6520 Anthropology of Public Culture (4)
    • ANTH 6530 The Archaeology of Ancient Cities (3)
    • ANTH 6590 Archaeological Methods (4)
    • ANTH 6750 Film Culture, Morality and Modernity (3)
    • ANTH 6740 Cultures of Display: Archaeology, Museums and Nationalism (3)
    • ANTH 6760 Archaeology of the Olympics (3)
    • ANTH 6980 The Anthropology of Europe (3)
    • Up to two graduate level courses outside of the unit pertaining to the interests of the student (6)

* ANTH 6190 Archaeological Practice and the Public (3) may be substituted for ANTH 6150 Museum Anthropology (3) contingent on the career aspirations and professional interests of the student. ANTH 6190 can be used as a required or elective course, but not both.

Graduate Certificate in Ethnography

The Department of Anthropology offers a Graduate Certificate in Ethnography. Current anthropology MA students, graduate students in other departments, and other interested individuals holding at least a bachelor’s degree may apply to the certificate program. This program provides specialized knowledge and skills training in ethnographic research, focusing on research design, data collection and analysis, communication of results for diverse audiences, and policy analysis and writing. Ethnography is a field-based research methodology for the study of social and cultural patterns and practices. Ethnographers utilize participant-observation, direct observation and interaction, focus group interviews, and other qualitative and quantitative data collection techniques to uncover detailed patterns of human behavior in their cultural context. Ethnographic data are also relevant and useful in assessing community needs, addressing concerns of personnel, and enhancing cross-cultural communication. Ethnographic data analysis is especially productive in clarifying complex issues, informing policy, and designing data-driven innovative and effective solutions to organizational problems. As such, this signature methodology of cultural anthropology has broad application in a variety of academic disciplines, creative industries, professional fields, and employment settings. Ethnographic interviewing is a core skill that attorneys, therapists, social workers, administrators, and journalists adopt to understand and to serve an increasingly diverse population of colleagues, clients, interlocutors, and stakeholders. Ethnography encompasses basic and applied research, informs project planning and implementation, and illuminates assessment and impact analysis in areas that range from public health, education, and the arts to product design, user experience and marketing. The Certificate in Ethnography is ideal for MA and Ph.D. students in such fields as sociology, community psychology, education, nursing, linguistics, communication, business, and area studies who pursue qualitative research. For students who wish to pursue careers in academia, private business or the public sector, the Certificate offers applied and marketable skills in culture- and people-focused knowledge production and communication.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Graduate Certificate in Ethnography by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

Students must apply to the certificate program during either Fall or Spring semester. In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Anthropology has the following requirements for application for the Graduate Certificate in Ethnography program:

  1. Two letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in anthropology
  2. Curriculum vitae or resume
  3. Writing sample

Certificate Requirements

  1. Required courses (9):
    • ANTH 6670 Methods in Sociocultural Anthropology (3)
    • ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
    • Select one of the following:
      • ANTH 6480 Ethnography into the 21st Century (3)
      • ANTH 8000 Anthropological Theory and Praxis (3)
  2. Elective courses. Select two courses from the following (6):
    • Anthropology:
      • ANTH 6040 Race, Class, and Gender in Global Perspective (3)
      • ANTH 6080 Consumption and Material Culture (3)
      • ANTH 6111 Anthropology of Self and Emotion (3)
      • ANTH 6112 Modernity and Identity (3)
      • ANTH 6114 Language and Social Justice (3)
      • ANTH 6190 Archaeological Practice and the Public (3)
      • ANTH 6200 Urban Anthropology (3)
      • ANTH 6340 Applied Anthropology (3)
      • ANTH 6460 Health and Culture (3)
      • ANTH 6470 Visual Culture (3)
      • ANTH 6480 Ethnography into the 21st Century (3) (if not taken in section 1 above)
      • ANTH 6500 Work and Culture (3)
      • ANTH 6550 Field School in Anthropology (3)
      • ANTH 6560 Advanced Field School in Anthropology (3)
      • ANTH 8000 Anthropological Theory and Praxis (3) (if not taken in section 1 above)
    • Educational Policy Studies—Research, Measurement, and Statistics
    •  Geosciences
      • GEOS 6515 Qualitative Methods in Geography (3)
    • Sociology
    • Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

3150 Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics
    • Concentration in Adult Language Instruction
    • Concentration in Research
  • Dual B.A./M.A. in Applied Linguistics
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Linguistics
  • Graduate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language
15th Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5200
alesl.gsu.edu

Diane Belcher, Chair
YouJin Kim, Director of Graduate Studies
Email: ykim39@gsu.edu

The department offers a Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in applied linguistics that integrates the study of second language acquisition theory with practical applications. Both the theoretical and practical aspects of the program focus on the language acquisition needs of adolescent and adult learners of English as a second language or English as a foreign language. The department offers two concentrations: one in Adult Language Instruction and one in Research.

Students can also receive a Graduate TESOL Certificate during their course of study after completing the required coursework for the graduate certificate program.

Students may obtain additional information about the Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language have the following requirements:

  1. A copy of official transcripts from all colleges attended.
  2. A typed statement of professional and academic goals that is at least two to three pages in length.
  3. Three letters of recommendation, preferably from academic references.
  4. For non-native speakers of English, official scores on the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or IELTS (International English Language Testing System) .

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts (36)

  1. The following core courses (both concentrations):
    • AL 8240 General Linguistics (3)
    • AL 8250 Second Language Acquisition (3)
    • AL 8450 Approaches to Teaching Second/Foreign Languages (3)
    • AL 8460 English Grammar for ESL/EFL Teachers (3)
    • Select one course:
      • AL 8330 Intercultural Communication (3)
      • AL 8470 Sociolinguistics (3)
  2. Required courses (6):
    • Adult Language Instruction Concentration:
      1. AL 8320 The Sound System of English (3)
      2. Select one course:
        • AL 8900 Practicum in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3)
        • AL 8480 Classroom Practices in Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language (3)
    • Research Concentration:
      1. AL 8550 L2 Evaluation and Assessment (3)
      2. AL 8710 Research Design (3)
  3. Select 5 courses of elective courses from within the department (15)
  4. Portfolio that includes:
    • Table of Contents
    • Résumé
    • Documentation of 90 hours of Instructional Service (Adult Language Instruction Track) or 45 hours of Instructional Service and 45 hours of Research Experience (Research Track)
    • Master’s Paper/Project
    • Professional Development Documentation.
  5. Language Requirement that is intended to ensure that all graduates have had the experience of studying a second or foreign language. The requirement can be met in one of the following ways:
    • Successful completion of one academic year of a university-level foreign language sequence (three quarters or two semesters of the same language), or
    • Successful completion of two quarters or one semester of a non-Western language, or
    • One year living/studying abroad as an adult, or
    • Acquisition of English as a second language for international students.

Ph.D. Program in Applied Linguistics

The Department offers a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) program in response to societal needs resulting from the current status of English as the language of international communication. This worldwide use of English in programs and institutions of higher education has created a need in two areas. The first urgent need is research on an assortment of interrelated topics: language learning by adults who will use English for academic purposes, effective teaching of adult language learners, and the nature of English as an academic language. The second need is for doctoral faculty who can teach in educational programs that prepare master’s level teachers of English as a Second/Foreign Language.

Ph.D. students may focus on a range of topics. Research, for example, may be related to issues in second language writing, reading, listening, or speaking; analysis of academic language; assessment; teacher cognition; classroom dynamics; sociolinguistics; or the role of culture in second language acquisition.

Admission to the Ph.D. Program

Requirements for admission include (1) a master’s degree in applied linguistics or a related field, (2) teaching experience in a second or foreign language, and (3) GRE scores appropriate for doctoral level work. Non-native speakers of English must submit TOEFL scores of at least 600 on the paper-based test or 250 on the computer-based test and a score of at least 5 on the Test of Written English or the TOEFL Writing Test, or if the Internet-based TOEFL is taken, a composite score of 97 and writing score of 22 and speaking score of 24 are required. At the master’s level, successful Ph.D. applicants would have had at least a GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0 scale with the strength of the M.A. program taken into consideration. Students who demonstrate prior experience with adult language learners and/or English for Academic Purposes will be preferred. In addition, students who demonstrate research potential based on an M.A. thesis or research papers submitted as part of the application process will be preferred. New students will be admitted only in the fall semester.

Applicants must submit the following materials:

  1. Completed graduate program application form;
  2. Two copies of official transcripts from all colleges attended;
  3. Official verbal, qualitative and analytic scores on the GRE and, if applicable, official scores on the TOEFL or IELTS;
  4. Three letters from academic references;
  5. Sample of academic writing (published or unpublished);
  6. Statement of professional and academic goals that includes a response to the following: Why are you seeking a Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics (specifically in the Department of Applied Linguistics and ESL at Georgia State University)? What are your research interests? With what faculty member are you interested in studying?
  7. Current C.V.

Ph.D. Program: Components and Requirements

The Ph.D. program in applied linguistics consists of five main components and requirements:

  1. Required and elective coursework, with a GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. Language requirement
  3. Qualifying paper
  4. Comprehensive exams
  5. Dissertation

Coursework

In the first two years of doctoral study, students will take three required core courses (9 semester hours) in conjunction with an additional 21 semester hours of coursework and 21 semester hours of dissertation credit. For students whose M.A. is not in Applied Linguistics, check the website for prerequisite courses.

The courses in the program over three content areas include the following:

  • Area I: Research Methods
  • Area II: Language Analysis and Use
  • Area III: Language Learning and Teaching

The required core courses fall in Areas I and II and are the following:

Area I:

  • AL 8960 Quantitative Research Methods (3)
  • AL 8961 Qualitative Research Methods (3)

Area II:

  • AL 8970 Linguistic Analysis (phonetics-phonology topic)* (3)
  • AL 8970 Linguistic Analysis (morphology-syntax-semantics topic)* (3)

*Students are required to fulfill breadth and depth requirements in linguistic theory. The preferred way to do this is by taking both versions of AL 8970. However, students may be exempted from one of the AL 8970 courses if they have taken AL 8240 General Linguistics or an equivalent course from another institution. (General Linguistics itself does not count toward the 30-hour requirement.) Those who wish to teach Introduction to Linguistics need to have taken both Linguistic Theory courses.

Additionally, all PhD students must have taken a course comparable to AL 8550 Second Language Evaluation and Assessment either at the MA level or while in the PhD program in AL/ESL. If it is taken during the PhD program, it counts as 3 of the 6 hours that can be taken in courses that are aimed at both MA and PhD students (see below).

Language Requirement

Teacher-scholars who work in the field of applied linguistics need to experience second language study and use. This experience may take different forms.

  • Successful completion (a grade of “B” or higher) in a minimum of four semesters of university language study, or
  • A minimum of one year living in a country where English is not the primary language and learning and using a language of the country, or
  • The acquisition of additional language(s) as a child or adult.

Students whose language study does not fit one of these three categories are required to successfully complete four semesters of language study or an intensive program that covers at least four semesters of work.

Qualifying Exam

The purpose of the Qualifying Exam is for the PhD student to demonstrate theory and content knowledge, research and methodology competence, and communication skills, as well as to develop a plan of study. It consists of a Qualifying Paper and a meeting with a faculty committee (the “exam” proper).

The Qualifying Paper is an empirical paper that is completed in a course during their first year in the program. The goals of the meeting with the faculty are to discuss the paper and to advise the student on a plan for the rest of their program.

Comprehensive Examination

After students complete their coursework, they take comprehensive exams. Students receive three topics and have two weeks to write responses to all three. The questions will require the student to address issues in theory, research methodology, research topics of importance in the field, and/or topics related to the student’s intended dissertation research. At least one of the topics will require consideration of issues that overlap the boundaries between language, cognition & communication and language teaching & language teacher development.

Dissertation

When students have passed their comprehensive exams, they officially begin work on their dissertation. The dissertation process consists of three stages: a proposal, research and writing, and an oral defense.

Dual B.A./M.A. Program in Applied Linguistics

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Graduate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

The Graduate Certificate in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) will be awarded to students who successfully complete a series of five graduate courses (15 hours) offered by the Department of AL/ESL. The Graduate TESOL Certificate is an entry-level credential for those who plan short-term stays overseas or who are interested in employment in adult schools, private language institutes, or non-profit organizations that offer adult English language courses.

Through this certificate program, students will:

  • Learn language teaching methodology and principles of second language acquisition
  • Study the nature of language and the structure of English
  • Gain practical experience in language classrooms

Program Requirements:

  • Required foundational courses: 9 hours of the following courses
    • AL 8450 Approaches to Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (3)
    • AL 8240 General Linguistics (3)
    • Select one:
  • Elective courses: 6 credit hours from the following courses
    • AL 8250 Second Language Acquisition (3)
    • AL 8320 Sound System of English (3)
    • AL 8460 English Grammar for ESL/EFL Teachers (3)

3170 Astronomy

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science
    • Physics Master of Science with a Concentration in Astronomy (see section 3340)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Astronomy

Department of Physics and Astronomy
Room 605, 25 Park Place
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-4106
404-413-6033
phy-astr.gsu.edu
Email (Administrative Coordinator): kwright14@gsu.edu
Email (Director of Graduate Studies): white@astro.gsu.edu

Sebastien Lepine, Chair
Russel White, Director of Graduate Studies, Astronomy

The Department of Physics and Astronomy works closely with the graduate students on theoretical and experimental research in the following areas: atomic physics, biophysics, molecular physics, nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, astronomy, and astrophysics. See the Physics degree section for studies in the first five subjects.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Physics and Astronomy by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the address above. Applications should be submitted online through the Graduate Admissions system of the College of Arts and Sciences (cas.gsu.edu/graduate-studies/admissions/).

Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Astronomy (71 hours beyond the baccalaureate degree)

  1. Students must either complete or exempt PHYS 6510, PHYS 6520, PHYS 6810, PHYS 7600, and PHYS 7700 (0-17 credit-hours). Exemption from these courses may be granted on the basis of testing or of having successfully completed similar courses elsewhere. Students not exempting at least two courses must take more than the 71 minimum hours required for the degree.
  2. Students must have competence in the following areas of mathematics: matrix algebra, vector and tensor analysis, partial differential equations, Fourier series and boundary value problems, and complex variables.
  3. Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in astronomy must complete the following six core courses (20):
    • ASTR 6100 Astronomical Techniques and Instrumentation (3)
    • ASTR 6200 Astronomical Data Analytics (3)
    • ASTR 8000 Stellar Atmospheres and Spectroscopy (4 credit-hours)
    • ASTR 8100 Stellar Structure and Evolution (4)
    • ASTR 8300 Interstellar Medium (3)
    • ASTR 8400 Extragalactic Astronomy (3)
    • Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in Astronomy must complete at least 15 additional hours of 8000-level astronomy courses, including at least two (but no more than three) hours of ASTR 8900 Seminar. No more than three hours of either ASTR 8710 Research Topics in Astronomy or ASTR 8910 Directed Study can count towards the degree. Alternatively, up to 12 hours of 8000-level physics (PHYS) or computer science (CSC) courses may be counted against the minimum of 15 additional hours
  4. Satisfactory completion of one hour of ASTR 6300 Teaching Astronomy and two hours of ASTR 6310 Teaching Astronomy Lab Practicum.
  5. A minimum of 30 hours of ASTR 9999 Doctoral Dissertation Research must be completed; only 34 hours of these count towards the 71 hours for the Ph.D.
  6. Proficiency in an approved language or research skill. Contact the graduate director for details.
  7. General Examinations:
    • Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in Astronomy must take the first astronomy general examination, administered as a written examination covering the fundamentals of astronomy, within a year of entering the program.
    • Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in Astronomy must also take the second general examination, administered as a written and oral examination, after passing at least twelve hours of 8000-level astronomy courses.
  8. Students pursuing the Ph.D. degree are strongly urged to satisfy the requirements for the Physics M.S. with a Concentration in Astronomy (non-thesis option) as soon as possible after entering the program. See the director of graduate studies for details.
  9. An oral presentation and discussion of the student’s proposed dissertation research, by the end of the third year after admission to the program.
  10. A dissertation.
  11. A final oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

Prior to registration each semester, students should be advised by either the chair of the department or the director of graduate studies.

3175 Big Data and Machine Learning

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science in Data Science and Analytics
    • Concentration in Big Data and Machine Learning

Department of Computer Science (see section 3210)
Department of Mathematics and Statistics  (see section 3300)

The Big Data and Machine Learning (BDML) program enables students to gain the technical skills that industry increasingly expects from data scientists. Big Data comes from the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, autonomous vehicles, and other IT‐related fields such as scientific labs working with medical or remote‐sensing data, companies specializing in big data processing and analysis, cloud storage and computing services. These companies aggressively seek graduate‐level professionals who can 1) collect, clean, manage, analyze and interpret big data, 2) derive new knowledge from big data, 3) make sure these discoveries are transferred to the form of actionable items for upper administrators, and 4) clearly communicate to stakeholders through sophisticated but human‐friendly computer visualization techniques.

Degree Requirements (34-36 hours):

  1. Required courses (to be taken in first term) (12)
  2. Additional required courses (15)
    • CSC 6760 Big Data Programming (4)
    • CSC 6740 Data Mining (4)
    • CSC 6850 Introduction to Machine Learning (4)
    • Select one of the following:
  3. Select two courses from the following (if not taken in areas 1 or 2 above) (6-8):
  4. BDML capstone project (1)

3180 Biology

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science in Biological Sciences
  • Dual B.S./M.S. in Biology
  • General degree
    • Concentration in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (AEM)
    • Concentration in Biotechnology
    • Concentration in Cellular and Molecular Biology and Physiology (CMBP)
    • Concentration in Medical Science (MBMS)
    • Concentration in Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry (MGB)
    • Concentration in Neurobiology and Behavior (NB&B)
    • Concentration in Bioinformatics
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Biology
    • Concentration in Applied and Environmental Microbiology (AEM)
    • Concentration in Cellular and Molecular Biology and Physiology (CMBP)
    • Concentration in Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry (MGB)
    • Concentration in Neurobiology and Behavior (NB&B)
    • Concentration in Molecular Genetics and Biochemistry with Interdisciplinary Specialization in Bioinformatics

Department of Biology
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4010
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-4010
Phone: 404-413-5300
Email: lallen47@gsu.edu
biology.gsu.edu

Geert de Vries, Chair
Ritu Aneja, Director of Doctoral Program
Casonya Johnson, Director of Master’s Program

Biology faculty members are actively engaged in a wide variety of research endeavors. Research efforts are concentrated in the following specific areas: applied and environmental microbiology (AEM), cellular and molecular biology and physiology (CMBP), molecular genetics and biochemistry (MGB), and neurobiology and behavior (NB&B).

Graduate research assistantships and teaching assistantships in the department are available to qualified students admitted to the graduate program. In addition, students may also qualify for support from grants and contracts in connection with their research programs.

The Department of Biology accepts applications for all semesters. In order to be considered for graduate assistantships, applicants must have all application materials to the department by the posted deadline. Foreign applicants should allow at least two months for processing of their application materials.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Biology or specific disciplines by contacting the Graduate Coordinator, Larialmy Allen, at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Biology has the following requirement. Applicants must complete and submit the Supplemental Application form for Biological Sciences to the Biology Department.

Degree Requirements

Master of Science

Students may choose between two degree options. The non-thesis option emphasizes coursework and the thesis option emphasizes research. However, all students enter under the non-thesis track. Transfer to the thesis option requires the approval of a thesis proposal by a three-member faculty committee that includes the thesis adviser.

In addition to the general degree plan, there are six discipline specific concentrations: applied and environmental microbiology (AEM), cellular and molecular biology and physiology (CMBP), medical science (MBMS), molecular genetics and biochemistry (MGB), neurobiology and behavior (NB&B), bioinformatics, and biotechnology. Students wishing to concentrate in AEM, MBMS, or Biotechnology must apply directly to those programs.

All entering M.S. students should obtain a copy of the departmental M.S. Policy Document. The document is available on the biology website or in the Graduate Coordinator’s office.

Non-Thesis Option (40 hours):

  1. Forty hours of classroom coursework, to be selected from 6000 and 8000-level courses, must include:
    • One course in biochemistry. This requirement may be waived if the student has taken and successfully completed an equivalent undergraduate course with a grade of B or higher.
    • Two hours of Seminar (BIOL 6960/BIOL 6970 or BIOL 8700). Students may take one BIOL 6960/BIOL 6970 and one 2 hour section of BIOL 8700 or two 2 hour sections of BIOL 8700. Each 2 hour section is equivalent to one credit hour.
  2. The successful completion of a laboratory or literature-based research paper. In order to satisfy this requirement, the student must select a major professor and enroll in BIOL 8888, Non-Thesis MS Research. A maximum of four credit hours of BIOL 8888 may be counted toward the 40-hour course requirement.

Thesis Option (40 hours):

  1. Twenty-six hours of classroom coursework, selected from 6000 and 8000-level courses, must include:
    • One course in biochemistry. This requirement may be waived if the student has taken and successfully completed an equivalent undergraduate course with a grade of B or higher.
    • Two hours of Seminar (BIOL 6960/BIOL 6970 or BIOL 8700). Students may take one BIOL 6960/BIOL 6970 and one 2 hour section of BIOL 8700 or two 2 hour sections of BIOL 8700. Each 2 hour section is equivalent to one credit hour.
  2. An orally defended thesis proposal
  3. Fourteen hours of BIOL 8999, Thesis Research.
  4. A thesis.
  5. A final presentation, directed primarily to the defense of the thesis.

M.S. in Biology with a concentration in Biotechnology

Application/Acceptance:

Interested students must apply for admission to the M.S. program and the biotechnology concentration. In addition to the personal statement, a second letter must be submitted that provides a rationale for entering this concentration and a description of three specific areas of training that the individual would like to pursue. In addition to the M.S. program admission requirements, applicants to the Biotechnology concentration must have completed CHEM 6600 (Biochemistry) or its equivalent with a grade of “B” or higher. Admission to the concentration will be made by the Biotechnology Area Committee on the basis of credentials and is dependent on space availability.

Non-Thesis Option (40 hours):

  1. Prerequisite (5):
  2. Core Courses (5):
    • BIOL 6696 Laboratory in Molecular Biological Techniques (4)
    • BIOL 8970 Topics in Molecular Biological Sciences (Instrumentation) (1)
  3. Laboratory Practica (15):
    • BIOL 6440 Practica in Biotechnology (15) (Mini-mester; 5 credit hours each time taken)
  4. Non-Thesis Research Paper Preparation (4):
    • BIOL 8888 Non-Thesis Master’s Research (4)
  5. Seminar (2 sections):
  6. Electives (9) (Approved by Biotechnology Committee)
  7. Laboratory Practica: Both technique-based and project-based rotations will be offered. Students will meet with an adviser upon entering the concentration to determine rotations that best suit the student’s goals and needs.
  8. Research Paper: Upon completing of each rotation, the student will submit a progress report covering activities engaged in during the rotation. An adviser will mentor the student in the writing process. The three progress reports will constitute the non-thesis research paper and will comprise the basis of a portfolio, which the student can use as evidence of training and accomplishments.

Thesis Option (40 hours):

For admission into the Thesis option, the student must have a Thesis proposal accepted.

  1. Prerequisite (5):
  2. Core Courses (5):
    • BIOL 6696 Laboratory in Molecular Biological Techniques (4)
    • BIOL 8970 Topics in Molecular Biological Sciences (1)
  3. Laboratory Practica (15):
    • BIOL 6440 Practica in Biotechnology (150) (Mini-mester; 5 credit hours each time taken)
  4. Thesis Research (4):
    • BIOL 8999 Thesis Research (4) (Up to 10 credit hours of BIOL 8800 (Practica) can be applied towards the Thesis Research requirement. 4 credits must come from 8999.)
  5. Seminar (2 sections):
  6. Electives (9) (Approved by Biotechnology Committee)
  7. Laboratory Practica: Both technique-based and project-based rotations will be offered. Students will meet with an adviser upon entrance into the concentration to determine rotations that best suit the student’s goals and needs.
  8. Research Paper: The student will submit a Thesis proposal to be accepted by a Thesis Committee. The student will complete a Thesis to be defended before the Thesis Committee. The thesis may be based upon research done during the rotations.
  9. Examination: The MS examination will consist of an oral defense of the Thesis.

Requirements for Biology M.S. Program with Interdisciplinary Emphasis in Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics has grown from the creation of large biological databases that required computational approaches for efficient manipulation and analysis to a multi-faceted discipline that also includes microarray technology, statistical analysis, and molecular modeling. We offer non-thesis and thesis options for this interdisciplinary degree. The non-thesis option requires a minimum of 40 semester credit hours of coursework and a non-thesis report. The thesis option requires a minimum of 26 semester hours of coursework and 14 credit hours of research.

Biology and Chemistry courses must be selected from courses numbered 6000 and 8000. (Biol and Chem 7000-7999 are not applicable toward the M.S. Degree in Biology.) Math and Computer Science courses at the 7000 level that serve as prerequisites for 6000 and 8000-level interdisciplinary courses may be applied towards the coursework requirement.

Coursework must include:

  1. One course in biochemistry. This requirement may be waived if the student has taken and successfully completed an equivalent undergraduate course with a grade of B or higher.
  2. BIOL 6564 Advanced Genetics (4)
  3. BIOL 6640 Fundamentals of Bioinformatics (4)
  4. Two seminar courses this must include at least one BIOL 8700 and can include a second BIOL 8700 or BIOL 6960 or BIOL 6970.
  5. Fifteen hours of interdisciplinary coursework to be selected from among the following:
    • CSC 6310 Parallel and Distributed Computing (4)
    • CSC 6350 Software Engineering (4)
    • CSC 6710 Database Systems (4)
    • CSC 6730 Data Visualization (4)
    • CSC 6740 Data Mining (4)
    • CSC 6810 Artificial Intelligence (4)
    • CSC 8630 Advanced Bioinformatics (4)
    • CSC 8850 Advanced Machine Learning (4)
    • MATH 6544 Biostatistics (3)
    • MATH 6548 Methods of Regression and Analysis of Variance (3)
    • STAT 8050 Statistics for Bioinformatics (3)
    • STAT 8540 Advanced Methodologies in Biostatistics (3)
      * Course counts towards degree requirements.

For the Non-Thesis Option:

  1. Thirteen hours of electives which may include:
    1. Biology courses including four hours of research (BIOL 8800)
    2. CHEM 6110, Physical Chemistry I (3) and CHEM 6450, Molecular Modeling Methods (3)
    3. Additional computer science or math and statistics courses in excess of the 12 hour requirement.
  2. The successful completion of a laboratory or literature-based research paper on a topic that includes a relevant bioinformatics component. The guidelines for the research paper are similar to those for the Biology, M.S. non-thesis research paper; however, one of the committee members must be from the math or computer science department.

For the Thesis Option:

  1. An approved and successfully defended thesis proposal. The guidelines for the written proposal and oral defense are similar to those for the Biology M.S. thesis proposal; however, the thesis topic must be on a topic that includes a relevant bioinformatics component and one of the thesis committee must be from the math or computer science department.
  2. Fourteen hours of BIOL 8999 Thesis Research
  3. A thesis.
  4. A final oral presentation directed primarily to defense of the thesis.

M.S. in Biology with a Concentration in Medical Science

The MBMS Program is designed to provide advanced medical instruction to students at GSU. The Master’s Program consists of three required courses, a choice of electives, and one capstone course for a total of 40 credit hours.

Degree Requirements (40 hours)

  1. Required Prerequisite Courses. The credit hours in this section will not count toward the Master’s Degree. The student MUST take the following prerequisite courses, or have taken equivalent courses at the undergraduate level and received a grade no lower than a B in the following:
  2. Required courses (2)
  3. Science Elective Courses (24-28 hours). The student must complete 24-28 CH of the following courses with a grade no lower than a B:
  4. Additional Elective Courses (6-9 hours) Choose two of the following:
    • GERO 8102 Life Course Sociology (3)
    • GERO 7200 Health and the Older Adult (3)
    • GERO 8320 Psychology of Aging (3)
    • PH 7011 Intro to Epidemiology (3)
    • BIOL 7021 Infectious Disease and Society (3)
    • HA 8160 Intro to Health Care System (3)
    • HA 8190 Health Policy & Ethics (3)
    • NUTR 6700 Med Biochem Principles (3)
    • BIOL 6744 Biostatistics or PH 7017 Fundamentals of Biostatistics (3)
    • [SNHP 6010] Medical Terminology (3) online course
  5. Capstone Courses (choose 4 hours)

Financial Aid

Title IV Financial Aid provides assistance in the form of Work Study. Students can get assistance via teaching which builds leadership skills. Teaching does not count toward tuition waiver or course credit, however. Contact the advisors if interested in this option.

Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Biology

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Biology. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Biology offers programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Biological Sciences. Specialized programs of study are provided in the following core disciplines: applied and environmental microbiology, cellular and molecular biology and physiology, molecular genetics and biochemistry, and neurobiology and behavior, molecular genetics & biochemistry with interdisciplinary specialization in bioinformatics.

General Requirements: At least 90 hours of graduate credit are required for the Ph.D. in Biological Sciences. To satisfy the minimum requirements for the degree, the student must complete successfully:

  1. 32 hours of graduate classroom coursework, which must include:
    • Discipline-specific core courses (8 hours)
    • Discipline-specific electives (8 hours)
    • Discipline-specific topics/concepts and seminar (14 hours, which must include at least 6 hours of topics or concepts and two hours of BIOL 8550 and three hours of BIOL 6801)
    • BIOL 9991 or BIOL 9992 (2 hours to be taken during qualifying exam)
  2. Proficiency in biochemistry. This requirement can be fulfilled by completion of CHEM 6600 or waived if the student has completed an equivalent undergraduate or graduate level course with a grade of B or higher. Substitution of an equivalent discipline-related subject (appropriate to the student’s program of study) will be considered on a case-by-case basis and requires prior written approval of the Area Program Director.
  3. 58 hours of biology research (BIOL 8800 or BIOL 9999). At least 30 hours must be BIOL 9999.
  4. A qualifying examination.
  5. A dissertation.
  6. A final oral presentation, directed primarily to the defense of the dissertation.

Specific Requirements: The following coursework constitutes the minimum core requirements for each discipline. Substitutions in the curriculum may be made based on the recommendation of the student’s research adviser and require the prior written approval of the Biology Graduate Committee. Students will be expected, however, to demonstrate knowledge of all material covered in discipline-specific core courses (below) during the qualifying examination.

Requirements for Biology (MGB) Ph.D. Program with Interdisciplinary Specialization in Bioinformatics

Departmental Requirements (4 hours; may be used to meet Elective requirement)

  • BIOL 6640 Fundamentals of Bioinformatics (4)

Interdisciplinary Requirements (12 hours)

Courses in Bioinformatics offered by the Mathematics and Statistics and/or Computer Science Departments (specified prerequisites may be used to satisfy the 12 hour requirement). In consultation with the Major adviser, the student will submit a course plan to meet these requirements for approval by the MGB Graduate Director. Interdisciplinary courses include:

  • MATH 6544 Biostatistics (3)
  • MATH 6548 Methods of Regression and Analysis of Variance (3)
  • STAT 8050 Statistics for Bioinformatics (3)
  • STAT 8540 Advanced Methodologies in Biostatistics (3)
  • CSC 6310 Parallel and Distributed Computing (4)
  • CSC 6350 Software Engineering (4)
  • CSC 6710 Database Systems (4)
  • CSC 6730 Data Visualization (4)
  • CSC 8630 Advanced Bioinformatics (4)
  • CSC 8710 Deductive Databases and Logic Programming (4)

3190 Chemistry

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science in Chemistry*
  • Dual B.S./M.S. in Chemistry
  • Doctor of Philosophy*
    • Concentration in Biochemistry
    • Concentration in Organic Chemistry
    • Concentration in Biophysical Chemistry
    • Concentration in Analytical Chemistry
    • Concentration in Geology
    • Concentration in Nutritional Sciences

*Interdisciplinary Emphasis in Bioinformatics is available.

Department of Chemistry
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4098
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-4098
Phone: 404-413-5500
Fax: 404-413-5505
Email: chemgradstudent@gsu.edu
chemistry.gsu.edu

Donald Hamelberg, Chair
Giovanni Gadda, Associate Chair
Suri Iyer, Director of Graduate Studies
Maged Henary, Associate Director of Graduate Studies

Chemistry faculty members are actively engaged in a wide variety of research projects. Active research programs are pursued in analytical, organic and biophysical/computational chemistry and biochemistry with an option in bioinformatics. The department currently brings in over five million dollars in external research funds annually.

Over 25 prestigious fellowships and assistantships are awarded by the department to outstanding Ph.D. students, including the Ambrose Pendergrast Fellowship, the David Withers Boykin Graduate Fellowship in Medicinal Chemistry, the Al Baumstark Award in Chemistry, the Robert “Pete” Pullen Family Scholarship in Analytical Chemistry, and the Harry P. Hopkins, Jr. Scholarship in Physical Chemistry. In addition graduate fellowships are offered in Molecular Basis of Disease (MBD) and Brains and Behavior (BB) research areas and include a stipend of at least $22,000 annually, waived tuition, and subsidized health insurance. Outstanding students may receive an initial offer of support as high as $25,000, with waived tuition and health insurance. Support is contingent on students remaining in good standing and maintaining satisfactory progress toward the degree. Inquiries concerning assistantships and other support should be made to the Graduate Coordinator in the Department of Chemistry. The Department of Chemistry accepts applications for all semesters. Early submission is encouraged for assistantship considerations.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Chemistry by contacting the Graduate Coordinator at chemgradstudent@gsu.edu.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Chemistry has the following requirements:

  1. Applicants should have an undergraduate degree in chemistry. However, consideration will be given to applicants with undergraduate degrees in biology, physics, or related fields who have substantial background in and knowledge of chemistry.
  2. M.S. program: Applicants to the M.S. program must submit a list of three individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in chemistry (submission of reference letters helpful but optional), and a statement of educational/career goals.
  3. Ph.D. program:
    1. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must arrange for submission of three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in chemistry.
    2. A detailed statement of educational/career goals and research interests must be provided.

Degree Requirements

Students should refer to the departmental program brochures for the specific details for each degree program. The following information is a brief overview of the various degree options.

Master of Science, thesis option (32 hours)

Satisfactory completion of:

  1. Twenty-six hours of approved graduate coursework selected from 6000 and 8000-level courses. Eight of the 26 hours may be taken in a related field or fields (upon approval). Two hours of CHEM 8800 are required. CHEM 8910 Directed Research in Chemistry may be used (1-15 hours).
  2. Minimum of six hours of CHEM 8999, Thesis Research.
  3. Proficiency in a foreign language (French, German, or Russian) or in an approved research skill.
  4. A general examination.
  5. A thesis.
  6. A thesis defense.

Master of Science, non-thesis option (36)

Satisfactory completion of:

  1. A minimum of 36 hours of approved coursework to be selected from 6000 and 8000-level courses:
    1. Eight hours of graduate-level biology or related field coursework may be applied toward the degree upon departmental approval.
    2. One hour of CHEM 8800, Seminar in Chemistry, must be included.
    3. Three hours of CHEM 8910 may be counted toward the 36-hour required course requirement. May be repeated for an additional 3 hours if the topics vary.
    4. The coursework must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Chemistry.
  2. Proficiency in a world language (French, German, or Russian) or in an approved research skill.
  3. The successful completion of an approved laboratory or literature research paper under the direction of a faculty adviser.

Chemistry M.S. Program with Interdisciplinary Emphasis in Bioinformatics

Bioinformatics has grown from the creation of large databases that required computational approaches for efficient manipulation and analysis to a multi-faceted discipline that also includes microarray technology, statistical analysis, and molecular modeling.

The department M.S. degree with emphasis in bioinformatics is available in both the non-thesis and thesis options described above with the following modifications.

Mathematics and computer science classes at the 7000 level that serve as prerequisites for 6000 and 8000-level interdisciplinary classes may be applied toward interdisciplinary coursework requirement. At least one course in biochemistry (CHEM 6600 or above) and CHEM 6640 or equivalent must be included in the above. In addition, 12 hours of interdisciplinary coursework may be applied toward the degree selected from the following partial listing:

For the non-thesis option, the approved laboratory or literature research paper must be on a topic within the area of bioinformatics. For the thesis option, one of the thesis committee members must be from outside the department.

Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Chemistry

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Chemistry. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Chemistry offers a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Chemistry. The Ph.D. degree is offered in biochemistry, organic chemistry, biophysical/computational chemistry, and analytical chemistry. A bioinformatics option is available in each of the four core disciplines. A Ph.D. is also offered in geochemistry in collaboration with the Department of Geosciences. Please contact the Department of Geosciences directly for details on the Ph.D. degree in geochemistry.

At least 80 hours of graduate credit are required for the Ph.D. degree. In order to satisfy the minimum requirements for the degree, students must complete successfully:

  1. Thirty hours of approved graduate core coursework.
  2. Forty hours of research, at least 20 hours of which must be Dissertation Research.
  3. Ten additional hours of graduate course electives or research.
  4. Satisfaction of the foreign language (research skill) requirement.*
  5. A written and an oral qualifying general examination.
  6. A dissertation.
  7. A final oral examination, directed primarily to the defense of the dissertation.

*World Language/Research Skill Requirement: A reading proficiency in French, German or Russian, or an equivalent research skill—e.g., computer language, technical writing, advanced statistics, electronics, etc.—(departmental approval necessary) is required. Students with M.S. degrees have already satisfied the language requirement. Credit hours used to fulfill this requirement do not count in the 80 hours.

Specific requirements: The following coursework illustrates the minimum curriculum requirements for each discipline. Substitutions in the curriculum may be made based on the recommendation of the student’s research adviser and require the prior written approval of the Director of Graduate Studies and the departmental chair. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of all material covered in the core or designated courses during the qualifying examination.

Biochemistry

  1. Core courses (9 hours) – To be selected from CHEM 6600, CHEM 6610, CHEM 6230, CHEM 6630, CHEM 8360, CHEM 8370, or approved substitutes;
  2. Area Electives (6 hours) – To be selected from CHEM 6400, CHEM 6410, CHEM 6015, CHEM 8510, or approved substitutes;
  3. Interdisciplinary Electives in Biology (6 hours) or approved substitutes;
  4. Topics, Electives and Seminar (6-19 hours) – To be selected from CHEM 6050, CHEM 6450, CHEM 8800, CHEM 8900, CHEM 8910, CHEM 8970, or approved substitutes;
  5. Research (40 hours) CHEM 8900, CHEM 8910, or CHEM 9999 (at least 20 hours must be CHEM 9999).

Biophysical Chemistry

  1. Core courses (9 hours) – CHEM 6110, CHEM 6120, and/or CHEM 8510 and choice of CHEM 6190, CHEM 6370, CHEM 6450, CHEM 6590, CHEM 6780, CHEM 8450, or approved substitutes;
  2. Area Electives: (6 hours) – To be selected from CHEM 6600, CHEM 6610, CHEM 6015, CHEM 8360, CHEM 8370 and/or CHEM 6410 and/or BIOL 6890, BIOL 8750 or approved substitutes;
  3. Interdisciplinary Electives in Biology (6 hours) or approved substitutes;
  4. Topics, Electives and Seminar (6-19 hours) – To be selected from BIOL 8970/CHEM 8970, BIOL 8700; CHEM 6050, CHEM 6450, CHEM 8800 and other approved electives;
  5. Research (40 hours) CHEM 8900, CHEM 8910, or CHEM 9999 (at least 20 hours must be CHEM 9999).

Organic Chemistry

  1. Core courses (9 hours) – CHEM 6400, CHEM 6410, CHEM 6430, CHEM 6650, CHEM 6330, CHEM 8400, or approved substitutes;
  2. Area Electives (6 hours) – To be selected from CHEM 6600, CHEM 6610, CHEM 6370, CHEM 8510, or approved substitutes;
  3. Interdisciplinary Electives in Biology (6 hours) or approved substitutes;
  4. Topics, Electives and Seminar (6-19 hours)- To be selected from BIOL 8970/CHEM 8970, BIOL 8700, CHEM 6050, CHEM 6450, CHEM 8800, CHEM 8900, CHEM 8910, CHEM 8970, or approved substitutes;
  5. Research (40 hours) CHEM 8900, CHEM 8910, or CHEM 9999 (at least 20 hours must be CHEM 9999).

Analytical Chemistry

  1. Core courses (9 hours) – CHEM 6850, CHEM 6015 and CHEM 6871, or approved substitutes;
  2. Area Electives (6 hours) to be selected from CHEM 6370, CHEM 6400, CHEM 6410, CHEM 6600, CHEM 6610, CHEM 8510, or approved substitutes;
  3. Interdisciplinary Electives in Biology (6 hours) or approved substitutes;
  4. Topics, Electives and Seminar (6-19 hours) to be selected from BIOL 8970/CHEM 8970, BIOL 8700, CHEM 6050, CHEM 6450, CHEM 8800, CHEM 8900, CHEM 8910, CHEM 8970, or approved substitutes;
  5. Research (40 hours) CHEM 8900, CHEM 8910, or CHEM 9999 (at least 20 hours must be CHEM 9999).

Bioinformatics

  1. Core courses (9 hours) – Biochemistry/Organic/Biophysical Analysis
  2. Area Electives: Appropriate electives for core discipline selected in A or approved substitutes.
  3. Interdisciplinary Electives in Biology (6) or approved substitutes.
  4. Computer Science Courses (Electives and Seminar) (19)
    1. 12 hours from CSc, Math and/or Chem/Biol Informatics courses or approved substitutes CSC 6260, CSC 6310, CSC 6730, CSC 6840, CSC 8710, CSC 8711, and STAT 8090, STAT 8440, STAT 8540, STAT 8561, STAT 8630, STAT 8660, and STAT 8670 are possible choices.
    2. Chem/Biol courses to fulfill requirement or approved substitutes.
  5. Research (40) Approved research courses (at least 20 hours must be CHEM 9999).

Geochemistry

Please refer to the Geosciences section for Ph.D. degree requirements in Chemistry with a concentration in geochemistry.

Concentration in Nutritional Sciences

Please contact the graduate director for additional information about the Ph.D. degree concentration in Nutritional Sciences.

3200 Communication

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Communication
    • Concentration in Digital Media Strategies
    • Concentration in Human Communication
    • Concentration in Mass Communication
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Communication Studies
    • Concentration in Media and Society
    • Concentration in Public Communication
    • Concentration in Rhetoric and Politics

Department of Communication
Georgia State University
8th Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
Atlanta, GA 30302-4000
404-413-5600
communication.gsu.edu
Email: commgraddirector@gsu.edu

Greg Lisby, Chair
Jaye Atkinson, Associate Chair

The Master of Arts degree in Communication is a multidisciplinary degree designed to prepare communication professionals and academicians for the demands of the twenty-first century. Each student may select an area of concentration from the following: 1) Digital Media Strategies, 2) Human Communication and Social Influence, or 3) Mass Communication. Required core classes are designed to provide coherence to the multidisciplinary offerings of the program by providing an overview of the communications field and by introducing concepts common and debated in all areas of communication.

The Ph.D. in Communication Studies is mainly designed to prepare students for positions in academia, but also equips those seeking professional advancement in research-based communication industry careers. Concentrations are offered in the areas of 1) Media and Society, 2) Public Communication, and 3) Rhetoric and Politics.

Based on theoretical perspectives from rhetoric, public argument, audience research, mass communication, international communication, health communication, strategic communication, and new media, the Communication Studies program is engaged in the exploration of public discourse and mass-mediated environments, with the purpose of preparing students to investigate how persuasive practices are transforming culture at home and abroad.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Communication by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the email address above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Communication has the following requirements:

  1. Applicants to the M.A. program must submit:
    • A statement of educational or career goals
    • Two letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in Communication
    • An above-average undergraduate grade-point average (a minimally qualified applicant typically will achieve at least a 3.0)
    • A sufficiently high score on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Records Examination (GRE) prior to consideration for acceptance into the graduate degree program (and for international students, the TOEFL examination)
  2. Applicants to the M.A. program, Digital Media Strategies track, must submit:
    • A statement of educational or career goals
    • Three (3) letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential for advance professional growth through graduate studies in Communication
    • Official transcripts from all colleges/universities the applicant has attended
    • A minimum of 3.0 overall undergraduate grade point average and a baccalaureate degree
    • Portfolio/sample work which demonstrates evidence of professional competence
  3. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must submit:
    • A statement of educational or career goals
    • Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in Communication
    • An above average undergraduate and master’s grade point average
    • A sufficiently high score on the verbal and quantitative portions of the Graduate Records Examination (GRE) prior to consideration for acceptance into the graduate degree program (and for international students, the TOEFL examination)
    • A writing sample that demonstrates their ability to conduct and effectively present academic research

NOTE: All applicants for the Ph.D. in Communication must have earned a master’s degree before entering the program.

Students who have substantial records of professional experience in a communication field may also provide a one-page summary of their experience.

The Department of Communication reviews applications for spring and fall semesters for applicants to the M.A. programs. Applicants for the Ph.D. program will be admitted in the fall only. The deadline to apply for admission and funding consideration for the PhD program is December 1 and the regular deadline for the PhD program is February 10. Deadline for applications for M.A. domestic students is March 15 for fall semester and October 15 for spring semester. Deadline for applications for international students is March 15 for fall semester and October 15 for spring semester. The department will not consider requests for Special Graduate Status admission.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts (Research Thesis option: minimum 36 hours)

  1. Six hours of core courses:
    • COMM 6010 Issues and Perspectives in Communication (3)
    • COMM 6030 Research Methods in Communication (3)
  2. Eighteen to twenty-four hours of courses designated by the area of concentration
  3. Up to six hours of coursework in related fields
  4. Proficiency in a foreign language or approved research skill
  5. Six hours of COMM 6990 Thesis Research
  6. A successful prospectus defense
  7. A research thesis
  8. A successful research thesis defense

Master of Arts (Creative Thesis option: minimum 36 hours)

  1. Six hours of core courses:
    • COMM 6010 Issues and Perspectives in Communication (3)
    • COMM 6030 Research Methods in Communication (3)
  2. Eighteen to twenty-seven hours of courses designated by the area of concentration
  3. Up to nine hours of coursework in related fields
  4. Proficiency in a foreign language or approved research skill
  5. Three hours of COMM 6990 Thesis Research
  6. A successful prospectus defense
  7. A creative thesis project
  8. A successful creative thesis defense

Master of Arts (Course-Intensive option: minimum 36 hours)

  1. Six hours of core courses:
    • COMM 6010 Issues and Perspectives in Communication (3)
    • COMM 6030 Research Methods in Communication (3)
  2. Eighteen to twenty-seven additional hours in communication courses designated by the area of emphasis (digital media strategies, mass communication, and human communication and social influence)
  3. Optional 0–6 hours of allied coursework in another area of emphasis or outside the department as approved by the advisor
  4. Two additional approved elective courses, where the credit hours total to a full six hours substitution
  5. An approved research paper

Master of Arts (Digital Media Strategies: minimum 36 hours)

  1. Nine hours of core courses:
    • COMM 6009 Digital Journalism (3)
    • Three hours of selected Conceptual courses
    • Three hours of selected Operational courses
  2. Twelve hours of selected Applied Media Skills Courses
  3. Nine hours of selected Media Studies Courses
  4. Six hours of selected Capstone Digital Media Experiences courses

Doctor of Philosophy in Communication Studies (Minimum of 68 hours beyond the master’s degree)

  1. Five hours of core courses:
    • COMM 8111 Introduction to Graduate Studies (2)
    • COMM 8035 Doctoral Colloquium in Communication Pedagogy (3)
  2. Twenty-four hours in area of concentration (Media and Society, Public Communication, or Rhetoric and Politics)
  3. Nine hours of coursework for Rhetoric and Politics and twelve hours of required coursework for Media and Society
  4. Nine hours of research tools for Rhetoric and Politics and six hours of research tools for Media and Society (approved courses that fall within the general categories of research design, observational methods, ethnography, computer programming, statistics, foreign language, and digital media methods)
  5. Twenty-one hours of COMM 9999 Dissertation Research
  6. A written comprehensive examination
  7. A successful oral defense
  8. A successful dissertation prospectus
  9. A successful dissertation defense

3210 Computer Science

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science (M.S.) in Computer Science
    • Concentration in Bioinformatics
    • Concentration in Security and Privacy
  • Master of Science in Analytics
    • Concentration in Big Data and Machine Learning (section 3175)
  • Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Computer Science
  • Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Computer Science
    • Concentration in Bioinformatics

Department of Computer Science
Georgia State University
7th Floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
P.O. Box 3994
Atlanta, GA 30302-3994
404-413-5700
cs.gsu.edu

Yi Pan, Chair
Yingshu Li, Director of Graduate Studies

The graduate programs offered by the Department of Computer Science include Master of Science (M.S.), Dual B.S./M.S., and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Computer Science. The programs focus on the technical aspects of both software and hardware. Computer Science faculty are actively engaged in a wide variety of research endeavors. Research efforts are concentrated in artificial intelligence and neural nets, computer architecture, database, data mining, big data, graphics and visualization, machine learning and deep learning, networks, security and privacy, parallel and distributed computing, cloud computing, cyber physical systems, Internet of Things (IoT), programming languages, simulation, and software engineering.

For the Ph.D. program, a Bioinformatics concentration is available. A baccalaureate or master’s degree in computer science, or its equivalent, is required for admission. The department encourages applications from high-tech and teaching professionals and those with non-computer science but closely related degrees. Pursuing the Ph.D. programs part-time is possible, so working professionals are encouraged to consider applying. Competitive financial aid is available for full-time Ph.D. students along with tuition waivers.

For the M.S. in Computer Science, Bioinformatics concentration and Security & Privacy concentration are available. The M.S. degree program in computer science provides students with advanced training in the fundamental principles and processes of computation. Graduate laboratory, research, and teaching assistantships are available to graduate students.

The computer science department accepts applications for the M.S. program each semester and for the Ph.D. program only fall semester with the general deadlines applying. However, in order to be considered for graduate assistantships, applicants must have all application materials in by February 15 for fall semester and by August 15 for spring semester.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Computer Science by contacting csgrad@gsu.edu.

Admission Requirements

Master of Science

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Computer Science has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in computer science, or equivalent. While we welcome capable students with non-computer-science degrees, they may need some foundation courses.
  2. A supplemental application for computer science.
  3. A statement of background and goals.
  4. Three letters of recommendations from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential for graduate work in computer science.
  5. GRE (General) score.

Doctor of Philosophy

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Computer Science has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate or master’s degree in computer science or its equivalent. While we welcome capable students with non-computer science degrees, they may need some foundation courses.
  2. A supplemental application for computer science.
  3. A statement of background and goals.
  4. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential for Ph.D. work in computer science.
  5. GRE (General) score.
  6. Minimum GPA 3.0/4.0.

Degree Requirements

A grade of B must be earned for all courses counting toward Computer Science graduate degrees.

M.S. in Computer Science

  1. Foundation coursework: If any of the following foundation courses in Computer Science or Mathematics have not been taken in another program, these must be completed at the earliest. 4000-level foundation courses must be taken as their 6000-level counterparts by graduate students.
  2. CSC 8900 Seminar in Computer Science (1 hour). A research training course which must be taken in the first semester.
  3. Graduate-level coursework (24 hours): To be taken in consultation with an academic adviser, and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies, with a grade of B or higher in each course.
    • Sixteen hours of computer science courses at the 8000-level, exclusive of Research, Thesis Research, and Independent Study courses.
    • An additional eight hours of graduate-level coursework, exclusive of Research, Thesis Research and Independent Study courses.
  4. Thesis/Project/Course Only (6-8 hours)
    • Thesis Option: Six hours of Thesis Research (CSC 8999). A thesis committee must be set up no later than two semesters after completing any foundation courses. This work should culminate in the writing of a thesis. The thesis must be defended successfully in an oral examination. This examination will pertain to, but is not limited to, the subject matter of the thesis.
    • Project Option: Four hours of CSC 8930 in which the student completes a project and an additional four hours of graduate-level coursework in computer science at the 6000 level or above exclusive of Foundation Research, Thesis Research, and Independent Study courses. The project must be supervised by a computer science graduate faculty adviser. The student must write a report on the project and pass an oral final examination given by an ad hoc faculty committee headed by the project adviser. This examination will pertain to, but is not limited to, the subject matter of the project.
    • Course Only Option: One credit hour of CSC 8901 in which the student covers the topics in core areas of computer science, recent developments, and future directions. In addition, two additional courses, one at the 6000-level or above in computer science exclusive of Foundation courses, Research, Thesis Research, and Independent Study courses and the other at the 8000-level exclusive of Research, Thesis Research, and Independent Study courses.

M.S. in Computer Science (Bioinformatics Concentration)

  1. Foundation Coursework (any that are not done): MATH 2211; MATH 2212; CSC 2510; CSC 2720; CSC 3210 or CSC 4210; CSC 4320; CSC 4330, CSC 4340, or CSC 4510; CSC 4350, and CSC 4520 with B or better in each. 4000-level foundation courses must be taken as their 6000-level counterparts by graduate students.
  2. Graduate Coursework (30 hours):
  3. Thesis/Project/Course Only (6-8 hours):
    • Thesis Option: Six hours of CSC 8999 Thesis Research. A thesis committee must be set up no later than two semesters after completing any foundation courses. This work should culminate in the writing of a thesis. The thesis must be defended successfully in an oral examination. This examination will pertain to, but is not limited to, the subject matter of the thesis.
    • Project option requires 4 hours of CSC 8930 M.S. Project and an additional classroom taught 6000-level or higher computer science course.
    • Course Only Option: One credit hour of CSC 8901 in which the student covers the topics in core areas of computer science, recent developments, and future directions. In addition, two additional courses, one at the 6000-level or above in computer science exclusive of Foundation courses, Research, Thesis Research, and Independent Study courses and the other at the 8000-level exclusive of Research, Thesis Research, and Independent Study courses.

M.S. in Computer Science (Security and Privacy Concentration)

  1. Foundation Coursework (any that are not done): MATH 2211, MATH 2212, CSC 2510, CSC 2720,
  2. CSC 3210 or CSC 4210, CSC 4320, CSC 4520 with B or better in each. 4000-level foundation courses must be taken as their 6000-level counterparts by graduate students.
  3. CSC 8900 Seminar in Computer Science (1). A research training course which must be taken in the first semester.
  4. Graduate Required Courses (12 hours):
  5. Graduate-level coursework (16 hours): Complete 16 hours of the following courses (at least two at the 8000 level must be included):.
    • [CSC 6224], [CSC 6250], [CSC 6251], [CSC 6360], [CSC 6740], [CSC 6760], CSC 8220, [CSC 8222], [CSC 8223], [CSC 8228], [CSC 8250], [CSC 8251], [CSC 8320], [CSC 8370], [CSC 8350], [CSC 8550], [CSC 8712]
  6. Project: Four hours of CSC 8930 M.S. Project. (4 hours)

Dual B.S./M.S. in Computer Science

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Computer Science. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Master of Science in Analytics Concentration in Big Data and Machine Learning

The Big Data and Machine Learning (BDML) program enables students to gain the technical skills that industry increasingly expects from data scientists. Big Data comes from the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, autonomous vehicles, and other IT‐related fields such as scientific labs working with medical or remote‐sensing data, companies specializing in big data processing and analysis, cloud storage and computing services. See section 3175 for additional information.

Ph.D. in Computer Science

Note: Students enrolled in this program must maintain 3.5 GPA in coursework at Georgia State University.

  1. Foundation Coursework. If any of the following foundation courses in computer science or mathematics has not been taken in another program, these must be completed at the earliest. 4000-level foundation courses must be taken as their 6000-level counterparts by graduate students.
  2. Ph.D. Coursework (48 hours)
    Of these 48 hours, no more than 12 hours can be taken at the 6000 level. These 12 hours exclude any of the foundation courses previously listed.

  3. Qualifying Process. The qualification process consists of two parts:
    • Curriculum Requirement: The student is required to complete three courses in two core areas (Theories and Systems) and receive at least two A grades and one B grade in these courses to meet the curriculum requirement of the qualifying process.
    • Research Examination: The objective of the research examination is to assess the student’s potential to begin doctoral‐level research. The examination will assess the student’s abilities to:
      • Read and understand research papers in their field.
      • Formulate a problem clearly and provide the motivation and requirements for a solution.
      • Determine if a solution is correct.
      • Assess to what extent a presumably correct solution solves the problem.
      • Clearly identify potential next research problems and provide solutions.
      • Communicate effectively, both in writing and orally.
      • Answer questions related to the problem and its solutions.
      • The student will request the research examination in an area/sub‐area of computer science. A committee of 3 faculty members will choose two advanced research papers and assign to the student. After a period of time, the student will present a written report and schedule an oral defense in which there will be general questioning by the committee. The result of the exam is PASS/FAIL. A student who receives a FAIL in the first attempt will be given a second and final attempt.
    • Timeline: A typical student (one who is admitted to the Ph.D. program with very few foundation courses to take) is expected to qualify by the end of the third semester (excluding summers) after admission.
  4. Dissertation Committee. Must be formed immediately after completing the qualification process.
    • Major adviser plus at least three other members.
    • One member must be from outside the department. Major adviser and at least two other members must be computer science graduate faculty.
    • This committee should be consulted to plan electives and possibly required courses to ensure depth in the research area.
    • This committee may suggest additional technical writing, mathematics, or computer skill courses depending on the student’s background.
  5. Candidacy Examination. To be taken within two years of qualifying. A written proposal on the research to be carried out will be submitted and defended in front of the dissertation committee. Upon successful completion of the candidacy examination, a student is declared a candidate for the doctoral degree. An unsuccessful result in the candidacy examination would require the student to take the candidacy examination a second and last time within three semesters (excluding summer).
  6. Dissertation (24 hours of CSC 9999).
  7. Written dissertation and oral defense.

Ph.D. Computer Science (Bioinformatics Concentration)

Note: Must maintain 3.5 GPA in coursework at Georgia State University.

  1. Foundation Coursework. If any of the following foundation courses in computer science or mathematics has not been taken in another program, these must be completed at the earliest. 4000-level foundation courses must be taken as their 6000-level counterparts by graduate students.
  2. Ph.D. Coursework (48 hours)
  3. Qualifying Process: same as in regular Ph.D. requirements.
  4. Dissertation Committee: same as in regular Ph.D. requirements except one member must be a biologist or chemist.
  5. Candidacy Examination: same as in regular Ph.D. requirements.
  6. Dissertation (24 hours of CSC 9999): Research should involve a current topic in bioinformatics.
  7. Written Dissertation and Oral Defense.

3220 English

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in English
    • Concentration in Literary Studies
    • Concentration in Creative Writing
    • Concentration in Rhetoric and Composition
  • Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing
    • Concentration in Fiction
    • Concentration in Poetry
  • Doctor of Philosophy in English
    • Concentration in Literary Studies
    • Concentration in Creative Writing
    • Concentration in Rhetoric and Composition

Department of English
23 Floor, 25 Park Place Building
404-413-5800
Email: ckocela@gsu.edu
english.gsu.edu

Lynée Gaillet, Chair
Audrey Goodman, Associate Chair
Chris Kocela, Director of Graduate Studies
Tanya Caldwell, Associate Director of Graduate Studies
Lori Howard, Assistant Director of Graduate Studies

The Department of English offers the Master of Arts (M.A.), the Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.), and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees. The M.A. and Ph.D. degree programs provide concentrations in literary studies, creative writing, and rhetoric and composition; the M.F.A. degree program allows students to concentrate in either poetry or fiction. The M.A. degree program prepares students for further graduate study or for careers in writing, editing, technical communications, research, or business. Time to degree for the M.A. program depends on whether students choose the M.A. thesis track (available in all concentrations), or the M.A. independent study track, (available only in the literary studies and rhetoric and composition concentrations). The M.A. thesis track usually requires two to three years of study, while the M.A. independent study track is designed to enable students to complete the degree within four semesters. The M.F.A. and Ph.D. degree programs prepare students to write, to teach at the college level, and to conduct scholarly research. The M.F.A. degree usually requires three to four years of study, including coursework, and a substantial creative thesis. The Ph.D. degree usually requires four to six years of study, including coursework, examinations, and a dissertation. In addition to its course offerings in British, American, and Transnational Literatures, as well as literary theory, folklore, rhetoric, composition, technical/professional writing, and creative writing, the department provides opportunities for training in scholarly and textual editing through several long-term publishing and editing projects.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of English by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Transfer Credit

No more than six semester hours or two courses of graduate work completed at another accredited college or university and approved by Georgia State University may be applied to a graduate degree in English. All transferred coursework must correspond to courses offered in the Georgia State Department of English. Such transferred coursework must have a grade of B (3.0 grade-point average) or higher and must not have been used toward the satisfaction of any previous degree requirements. Transfer credit must be approved no later than the end of the second semester in Full Status. Transferred credits will be included in the time limitations placed on credits applicable to graduate degrees.

Please note that the acceptance of transfer credit is not automatic; it must be approved and documented by the departmental director of graduate studies and the department chair or appropriate associate dean.

Financial Aid

Students interested in scholarships and student loans should consult the Office of Student Financial Aid. The Department of English currently provides financial support primarily in the form of Graduate Teaching Assistantships, which carry full tuition waivers. Graduate Teaching Assistantships are available on a competitive basis to a limited number of M.F.A., Ph.D., and second-year M.A. students with superior qualifications (the Department cannot fund M.A. students in their first years). The Paul Bowles Graduate Fellowship, the Virginia Spencer Carr Graduate Fellowship, and the Scholarship Endowment in Creative Writing are awarded to entering fiction writing students who have been admitted to the M.F.A. or Ph.D. program. Again, Graduate Teaching Assistantships are awarded on a competitive basis, and admission alone to any graduate program in English does not automatically guarantee funding. Further information and application forms are available from the Department of English.

Grades

Throughout their coursework students must maintain a B average or higher. Only those courses in which students earn an A or a B will be credited toward a degree.

Academic Warning and Dismissal

A graduate student whose cumulative grade-point average (GPA) falls below 3.0 at the end of any semester will receive a warning from the associate dean for Graduate Studies of the College of Arts and Sciences. At the end of the next 18 hours of enrollment, the student must achieve a 3.0 cumulative GPA, or the College of Arts and Sciences will dismiss the student. As per the Graduate Assistant Policy of the College, students may not receive assistantship funding while on academic probation.

Non-Degree and Transient Student Admission

Students may be admitted on a non-degree status only if classroom space is available. Preference will be given to degree students. Students must complete an application, submit two transcripts of all previous college or university work, and provide a list of courses they wish to take. Only six credit hours earned while on non-degree status may later be applied to degree programs. Transient students must reapply each semester.

Further Information

Application forms and information about the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and other materials are available at cas.gsu.edu/graduate-studies/admissions/. If you have any questions about graduate studies in English, please call 404-413-5800 to make an appointment to see the Director of Graduate Studies.

Master of Arts

The Department of English offers four master’s degree programs:
  1. Master of Arts, Concentration in Literary Studies;
  2. Master of Arts, Concentration in Rhetoric and Composition;
  3. Master of Arts, Concentration in Creative Writing; and
  4. Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing (M.F.A.).

Admission

Applicants should be aware that admission is competitive and that meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the M.A. program. Before entering the program a student must have completed a bachelor’s degree with a major in English or its equivalent from an accredited college or university with at least a B average (3.0) in the undergraduate major. The Department of English admits students to its M.A. programs in the spring and fall semesters of the academic year; admission to the M.F.A. program occurs only in the fall semester. The Director of Graduate Studies in English will consider only complete admission files. Applicants are responsible for seeing that their admission files are complete by the deadlines for admission published in the current edition of this catalog.

The applicant should supply the following materials:

  1. A statement of purpose that includes a brief explanation of what the student hopes to accomplish, a clear indication of which degree program the applicant is seeking admission to, and (if the applicant has not yet completed a bachelor’s degree) an indication of the term in which the applicant expects to receive the degree;
  2. Competitive scores (no more than five years old) on the general GRE test;
  3. Transcripts of all previous college or university work. Students should upload unofficial transcripts from every post-secondary institution directly to the application. Any student offered admission will need to have official transcripts sent to the Office of Graduate Services.
  4. Two letters of recommendation sent directly from persons who testify to the applicant’s ability to do graduate work;
  5. A critical writing sample of approximately eight to twelve pages. The critical sample is not required for the Creative Writing M.A. or M.F.A.
  6. Applications for the M.A., Concentration in Creative Writing, and the M.F.A. program must also contain the following:  a portfolio consisting of a minimum of 10 poems; or two or three works of fiction totaling no fewer than 30 and no more than 50 pages.  One of the two or three fiction samples may be an excerpt of a longer work (novel, novella, etc.), and you may include short-short/flash fiction, but we ask that you send at least one complete, stand-alone example of your short fiction of 15 pages or more. On the first page of the creative sample, the applicant should list her or his name, email address, phone number, and program she or he is applying to (M.F.A. Fiction, M.F.A. Poetry, M.A. Fiction, M.A. Poetry.)

Registration and Advisement

Approximately one week before registration begins, the Office of the Registrar will post registration time-ticket assignments on the web and students can find out the date and time of their registration by entering the GoSOLAR website. The Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of English will act as advisor to all entering M.A. students. Students are responsible for making appointments with the Director of Graduate Studies for advisement and for being familiar with the requirements for their degree as set forth here. Students are encouraged to select a faculty advisor early in the program.

The Graduate Research Skill Requirement

The Graduate Research Skill Requirement will connect to, and further, a graduate student’s selected field of study and program emphases. Graduate Research Skill may be defined as the acquiring and practice of specialized skills, methods, and linguistic or language studies that include world languages (spoken fluency, written competency, reading knowledge, or translating from English into a world language, or translating from a world language into English), translation studies, or a specialized language system, such as digital humanities and/or emerging communication technologies. Note: The Graduate Research Skill is not a requirement of the M.F.A. program.

The Graduate Research Skill Requirement may be fulfilled with or by:

  1. A sequence of undergraduate courses in a world language (French, German, Italian, Spanish, etc.) culminating in a grade of B or better in an intermediate course (numbered 2002 or higher) completed within five years of admission to the graduate program;
  2. A grade of B or better in a world language course numbered 2002 or higher taken while in the graduate program;
  3. Passing a CLEP examination in a world language;
  4. Passing a translation examination administered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures;
  5. Passing any other course (with a grade of B or better) or examination representing the acquisition and practice of a research skill that may be proposed by the student and approved by the Graduate Admissions and Review Committee.

The Graduate Research Skill Requirement may be fulfilled at the level of the M.A. or Ph.D. Students who fulfill the requirement during their M.A. program will have no further research skill requirement to fulfill at the doctoral level. Doctoral students who did not satisfy the requirement during their M.A. program must do so before taking any doctoral exams.

Time Limit

All requirements for a master’s degree must be completed within seven years.

Master of Arts, Concentration in Literary Studies

Candidates for the M.A. with concentration in literary studies may choose either the thesis or independent study track.

Thesis Track

This track requires completion of 30 credit hours (10 courses), plus 6 hours of thesis credit, and a critical thesis (40-60 pages excluding notes and reference material) approved by a thesis committee consisting of a director and two other faculty members.

Coursework

In the interests of facilitating broad historical and disciplinary coverage across the areas of language, literature, and culture, the following courses are required:

  1. ENGL 8000 Bibliography and Research Methods (3) (should be taken in the first semester);
  2. ENGL 8001 M.A. Proseminar (3) (should be taken in the second semester);
  3. Three hours in English language study from the following:
  4. Three hours in literary theory/critical methodology/cultural studies from the following:
  5. Nine hours in literature before circa 1800;
  6. Nine hours literature after circa 1800;
  7. Of the eighteen hours in areas 5 and 6, six hours must be in British literature; six hours must be in American literature; and three hours must be in transnational, diasporic, multi-ethnic, racially diverse, and/or postcolonial Anglophone literature (African, African-American, Irish, Native-American, Caribbean, Asian-American, Southeast Asian, Hispanic, etc.)
  8. In the interests of fostering interdisciplinary study, and with written approval by the Director of Graduate Studies, up to six hours of electives may be substituted for any two courses described in areas 3-7 above. Electives may include transfer courses; GSU English Department courses outside the Literary Studies concentration (e.g., Rhet/Comp); courses taken from other GSU departments (History, Communications, Philosophy, etc.); or courses taken through the GSU cross-registration system. However, in ordinary circumstances, no substitutions within the Lit Studies concentration will be approved (no swapping a second course in theory for a pre-1800 lit); moreover, to be approved, any course proposed as a substitute must clearly and strongly relate to the area of the targeted course (Renaissance Art History or Colonial American History for a pre-1800 lit course, or a seminar on Hegel, Nietzsche, or Marx from Philosophy as a substitute for Foundations of Modern Critical Theory, for examples).
  9. Six hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Thesis

It is the student’s responsibility to select a topic and to find a faculty member who will direct the thesis and two others who will serve on the thesis committee. Only members of the graduate faculty may direct theses.

The semester before beginning to write the thesis, M.A. students must submit a written proposal for approval by their thesis committee. The proposal should include the following:

  1. A description of the subject, including a statement of the way the proposed approach to the subject differs from, contributes to, or modifies the existing scholarship on the subject;
  2. A description of the proposed method of treatment and an account of the research necessary to complete it; and
  3. A preliminary bibliography, including a discussion of the availability of materials.

The thesis must conform in all matters of documentation to the most recent edition of The MLA Style Manual. The Office of Graduate Services of the College of Arts and Sciences has specific standard requirements for format. The student is responsible for conforming to those standards. The thesis must be between 40 and 60 pages in length, excluding notes and reference material. By the time the thesis is completed, a student must have registered for at least six hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Independent Study Track

This track requires completion of 27 hours of graduate coursework (9 courses), plus three hours of thesis credit, and an Independent Study Project (20-25 pages excluding notes and reference material) approved by a committee as described below.

Coursework

  1. ENGL 8000 Bibliography and Research Methods (3)
  2. Three hours in English language study from among the following:
  3. Three hours in literary theory/critical methodology/cultural studies from among the following:
  4. Nine hours in literature before circa 1800
  5. Nine hours in literature after circa 1800
  6. Of the eighteen hours in areas 4 and 5, three hours must be in British literature; three hours must be in American literature, and three hours must be in transnational, diasporic, multi-ethnic, racially diverse, and/or postcolonial Anglophone literature
  7. Up to three hours of internships can be used to satisfy requirements in areas 4 and 5.
  8. Three hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Independent Study Project:

This project will consist of a substantial, article-length treatment of a research topic 20-25 pages in length, excluding critical apparatus. The Independent Study Project could originate as an essay written in one of the courses taken by the student toward completion of the degree, in which case the Project Advisor may be the professor who taught that course. As per College of Arts and Sciences requirements, the Independent Study Project must also be read by two other faculty members in the department, one of whom, in addition to the Project Advisor, must approve the project by the appropriate College deadline for graduation. Readers of the Project are to be selected by the student in consultation with his/her Advisor.

Master of Arts, Concentration in Rhetoric and Composition

Information about the rhetoric and composition program is available at sites.gsu.edu/rhetcomp/.

Candidates for the M.A. with concentration in rhetoric and composition may choose either the thesis or independent study track.

Thesis Track

This track requires completion of 30 hours of graduate coursework (10 courses), plus 6 hours of thesis research credit, and a substantial (40–60 pages excluding notes and reference material) academic paper or a digital media project approved by a thesis committee consisting of a director and two other faculty members.

Coursework

In the interests of facilitating broad historical and disciplinary coverage across the areas of rhetoric, composition, professional writing, and technical communication, the following courses are required:

  1. Nine hours in history and theory courses:
    • ENGL 8170 History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition I (3)
    • ENGL 8171 History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition II (3)
    • ENGL 8180 Contemporary Issues in Writing Studies (3)
  2. Three hours in research methods from the following:
    • ENGL 8122 User Experience Research (3)
    • ENGL 6521 Archival Research Methods (3)
    • ENGL 8175 Topics in Rhetoric and Composition (3) (only when the course is tagged as having a research methods focus)
  3. Twelve additional hours of rhetoric and composition courses and strongly related courses;
  4. Six hours of electives (may be taken in any related fields of study in English or in other departments, with approval of advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies);
  5. Six hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Thesis

Thesis research may involve digital and workplace projects as well as textual studies, and the thesis can be a substantial (40–60 pages) academic paper or a digital project with approval of the director. The proposal for thesis research must be submitted and approved by the student’s committee the semester prior to writing the thesis.

Graduate Research Skill Requirement

Candidates for the M.A. with an emphasis in rhetoric, composition, and technical and professional writing are expected to fulfill the graduate research requirement or to have received a grade of B or higher in either of the following course sets:

Independent Study Track

This track requires completion of 27 hours of graduate coursework (9 courses), plus three hours of thesis credit, and an Independent Study Project (20-25 pages excluding notes and reference material) approved by a committee as described below. Completion of an internship as substitute for 3 to 6 hours of required coursework is strongly recommended.

Coursework

  1. Nine hours in history and theory courses:
    • ENGL 8170 History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition I (3)
    • ENGL 8171 History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition II (3)
    • ENGL 8180 Contemporary Issues in Writing Studies (3)
  2. Nine hours of rhetoric and composition or strongly related courses from among the following:
  3. Three hours Directed Reading in the area of specialization in which Independent Study Project is to be written.
  4. Six hours electives (may be taken in related fields of study in English or in other departments, with approval of advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies) and/or Internship(s) (register for ENGL 8920 for graduate internships).
  5. Three hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research

Independent Study Project:

This project may involve digital and workplace projects as well as textual studies, and can be either a substantial (20-25 pages) academic paper or equivalent digital project. In any event, the Independent Study Project must originate as a text/assignment within one of the courses taken by the student toward completion of the degree, and the Project Advisor will be the professor who taught the course in which the text/assignment originated. As per College of Arts and Sciences requirements, the Independent Study Project must also be read by two other faculty members in the department, at least one of whom, in addition to the Project Advisor, must approve the project by the appropriate College deadline for graduation. Readers of the Project are to be selected by the student in consultation with his/her Advisor.

Graduate Research Skill Requirement

Satisfaction of this requirement remains the same as for the thesis track M.A in English, Concentration in Rhetoric and Composition.

Master of Arts, Concentration in Creative Writing

The Master of Arts in English, Concentration in Creative Writing is appropriate for those students who wish to complete a non-terminal degree, and can also serve as an initial graduate degree for those who plan to continue their work at the M.F.A. or doctoral level. Upon attaining the M.A. degree, students will have acquired a productive specific knowledge of their chosen genre/area of specialization (either Poetry or Fiction).

The M.A., Concentration in Creative Writing student must satisfactorily complete 27 credit hours of graduate coursework (9 courses), plus 6 hours of thesis research credit.

All Poetry and Fiction workshops (ENGL 8020 Poetry Writing, ENGL 8030 Fiction Writing), creative writing craft courses (ENGL 8201 Contemporary Poetry, ENGL 8202 Contemporary Fiction Craft, ENGL 8203 20th-Century American and British Poetry Craft I), and form and theory coursework (ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft ) must be completed at Georgia State University during the degree program.

Coursework for the M.A., Concentration in Creative Writing

  1. Twelve hours of either ENGL 8020 Poetry Writing or ENGL 8030 Fiction Writing depending on the program to which the student was admitted;
  2. Six hours of either ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft, ENGL 8201 Contemporary Poetry, ENGL 8202 Contemporary Fiction Craft, or ENGL 8203 20th-Century American and British Poetry Craft I depending on the program to which the student was admitted;
  3. Six hours of literature courses. (Rather than narrowly specializing in a particular area, a student should select courses that help her or him to achieve a lively understanding of a broad range of English, American, and World literature.);
  4. Three hours of literature, rhetoric and composition, or folklore courses;
  5. Six hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Thesis

Shortly before, or directly after completing all required Creative Writing coursework, and no later than the semester before a student plans to graduate, she or he must submit to her or his director, and to the Director of Creative Writing, a written proposal that describes her or his thesis project.  The M.A., Concentration in Creative Writing thesis must contain at least 35 pages of poetry or 60 pages of fiction. It must include an introduction or an afterword in which the student discusses his or her approaches, styles, methods, and influences.

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing

The Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing is a terminal degree that prepares students to write and to teach at the college level. It also provides students an excellent foundation if they choose to continue their graduate work at the doctoral level. Upon attaining the M.F.A. degree, students will have acquired a productive specific knowledge of their chosen genre/area of specialization (either Poetry or Fiction). Any student who receives more than one C during his or her program will be dropped from the M.F.A. program.

The M.F.A. student must complete satisfactorily at least 42 hours of graduate coursework (14 courses), plus 6 hours of thesis research credit.

All Poetry and Fiction workshops (ENGL 8020 Poetry Writing, ENGL 8030 Fiction Writing), creative writing craft courses (ENGL 8201 Contemporary Poetry, ENGL 8202 Contemporary Fiction Craft, ENGL 8203 20th-Century American and British Poetry Craft I), and form and theory coursework (ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft ) must be completed at Georgia State University during the degree program.

Coursework

Fiction Writers:

  1. Fifteen to 21 hours of ENGL 8030 Fiction Writing (must be completed while enrolled in degree program) *
  2. Fifteen to 21 hours of English and American and World literature, and/or Rhetoric and Composition,and/or folklore *
  3. ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in Fiction (3)
  4. ENGL 8202 Contemporary Fiction Craft (3)
  5. Six hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research

* 36 hours are required for Areas 1 and 2 combined.

Students who enter the M.F.A. program with an M.A. in English or creative writing must satisfy a different set of course requirements totaling 36 hours:

  1. Fifteen to 18 hours of ENGL 8030 Fiction Writing (must be completed while enrolled in degree program) *
  2. Six to nine hours of English and American and World literature, and/or Rhetoric and Composition, and/or folklore *
  3. ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in fiction (3)
  4. ENGL 8202 Contemporary Fiction Craft (3)
  5. Six hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research

* 24 hours are required for Areas 1 and 2 combined.

Poets:

  1. Fifteen to 21 hours of ENGL 8020 Poetry Writing (must be completed while enrolled in degree program) *
  2. Twelve to 18 hours of English and American and World literature, and/or Rhetoric and Composition, and/or folklore *
  3. ENGL 8203 20th-Century American and British Poetry Craft I (3)
  4.  ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in poetry (3)
  5.  ENGL 8201 Contemporary Poetry (3)
  6. Six hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research

* 33 hours are required for Areas 1 and 2 combined.

Students who enter the M.F.A. program with an M.A. in English or creative writing must satisfy a different set of course requirements totaling 36 hours:

  1. Fifteen hours of ENGL 8020 Poetry Writing (must be completed while enrolled in degree program);
  2. Six hours of English and American and World literature, and/or Rhetoric and Composition, and/or folklore
  3. ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in Poetry (3)
  4. ENGL 8201 Contemporary Poetry (3)
  5. ENGL 8203 20th-Century American and British Poetry Craft I (3)
  6. Six hours of [Engl 8999] Thesis Research

Thesis

Shortly before, or directly after completing all required Creative Writing coursework, and no later than the semester before a student plans to graduate, she or he must submit to her or his director, and to the Director of Creative Writing, a written proposal that describes her or his thesis project. The M.F.A. thesis must be a minimum of 50 pages long for a manuscript of poems or a minimum of 150 pages for a manuscript of prose fiction. M.F.A. theses must include an introduction or an afterword in which the student discusses his or her approaches, styles, methods, and influences. The semester before beginning to write the thesis, students must submit for approval by their thesis director and the Director of Creative Writing a written proposal detailing the thesis project.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D. degree programs prepare students to write, to teach on the college and university levels, and to conduct scholarly research. At the end of their Ph.D. coursework, students will have acquired a productive general knowledge of the various fields of literary study in English and will have developed a concentrated preparation in their areas of specialization.

Admission

Applicants should be aware that admission is competitive and that meeting the minimum admission requirements does not guarantee admission to the Ph.D. program. Before entering the Ph.D. program, students are generally expected to have completed a master’s degree in English or a closely related discipline from an accredited college or university. The Department of English admits students to its doctoral programs only in the fall semester of the academic year. The Director of Graduate Studies in English will consider only complete admission files. Applicants are responsible for seeing that their admission files are complete by the deadlines for admission published in this catalog.

All applicants must submit the following materials:

  1. Transcripts of all previous college or university work. Students should upload unofficial transcripts from every post-secondary institution directly to the application. Any student offered admission will need to have official transcripts sent to the Office of Graduate Services.
  2. Three letters of recommendation sent directly from persons who testify to the applicant’s ability to do graduate work. Applicants from the M.A. program in English at Georgia State must submit new letters of recommendation, preferably from English department faculty;
  3. Competitive scores (no more than five years old) on the General portion of the GRE;
  4. An essay composed by the applicant stating goals and career objectives; and
  5. A 10-20 page critical writing sample.
  6.  For Creative Writing applicants only: a portfolio consisting of a minimum of 10 poems; or three works of fiction totaling no fewer than 30 and no more than 50 pages.  One of the three fiction samples may be an excerpt of a longer work (novel, novella, etc.), and you may include short-short/flash fiction, but we ask that you send at least one complete, stand-alone example of your short fiction of 15 pages or more. On the first page of the creative sample, the applicant should list her or his name, email address, phone number, and program she or he is applying to (PhD Fiction, PhD Poetry).

Advisement

The Director of Graduate Studies will serve as the student’s initial faculty advisor, whom the student should consult regularly. However, very early in the program, the student should begin to design a course of study leading toward an area of specialization. The student will be tested on this specialization (the doctoral examination and the coursework required for taking it are described below). Optimally in the first semester of the doctoral program, but certainly before the end of the second semester, the student should form a three-member faculty advisory committee composed of at least two faculty members in the area of specialization. Working with this committee, the student will define and develop the area of specialization and determine the courses that can be used to satisfy the specialization requirements.

Doctoral Degree Plans

Students may choose to follow one of three plans. Plan 1 focuses on literary studies. Plan 2 emphasizes rhetoric and advanced writing courses. Plan 3 emphasizes creative writing.

Basic Coursework and Residency Requirements

Depending on the plan chosen by a student, the total credit hours required vary from 50 to 59 beyond the M.A. (30-39 hours of coursework plus 20 hours of dissertation research). To fulfill the residency requirement for the Ph.D. degree, students must enroll for a minimum of 6 hours per term for 4 semesters. Two of these semesters must be consecutive. Each plan has further particular coursework requirements which are specified below.

Doctoral Examinations

After completing coursework and the graduate research skill requirement (see above), students in all concentrations must pass the examination specific to their concentrations.

In the Creative Writing concentration, the doctoral examination in poetry is a two-day, on-site exam. Each examination period is four hours. The examination on Day 1 includes a section of identifications and either two or three essays dealing with the works and authors pre-1900 drawn from the Ph.D. reading list. The examination administered on Day 2 is comprised of three or four essays about the works and authors post-1900 drawn from the Ph.D. reading list. The examination director will decide on the final format for the examination.

In the Creative Writing concentration, the doctoral comprehensive examination in fiction is a two-day, on-site exam. Each day a four-hour examination is administered. The examination on Day 1 includes a section of identifications and either two or three essays dealing with works and authors pre-1900 drawn from the Ph.D. reading list. The examination director will decide on the final format for the examination.

In the Rhetoric and Composition concentration, the doctoral examination is a seven-day, off-site examination. The examination draws on both a primary field of specialization and a research focus within that field. Further information on the format of the doctoral examination in Rhetoric and Composition is available at sites.gsu.edu/rhetcomp/.

In the Literary Studies concentration, the doctoral examination will be in the area in which the student plans to write the dissertation. The examination consists of three parts: a two and a half hour on-site written, a seventy-two hour off-site written, and a ninety-minute oral. As described in the list of required courses below, in order to take the examination, the student must have completed 12 credit hours (4 courses) in or strongly related to that area. The exam itself will be based on a reading list composed of no fewer than forty texts, devised by the student in consultation with the faculty advisor who will be the primary reader of the exam. The examination reading list must be composed, and approved by the faculty advisor, at least one semester prior to the semester in which the student will take the exam. The examination questions must be approved by the Director and Associate Director of Graduate Studies.

Examinations are not offered in the summer. Students must give the Director of Graduate Studies in English written notification of their intention to take the primary examination by the departmental deadline. Each doctoral examination will be graded by at least three faculty members. A student must pass the examination on either the first or second try in order to remain in the Ph.D. program. Examples of past examination questions and of successful answers are available to students preparing for the examination.

Dissertation

Doctoral students must submit a dissertation acceptable to the Department of English and to the Office of Graduate Services of the College of Arts and Sciences. Stages in the preparation of the dissertation include the following: choosing a dissertation director and dissertation committee, submitting a dissertation proposal, defending the dissertation proposal, writing the dissertation, defending the dissertation.

Soon after completing the doctoral examination, a doctoral student must submit to his or her dissertation committee a written dissertation proposal that should include the following:

  1. A description of the subject, including a statement of the way the proposed approach to the subject differs from, contributes to, or modifies the existing scholarship on the subject;
  2. A description of the proposed method of treatment and an account of the research necessary to complete it; and
  3. A preliminary bibliography, including a discussion of the availability of materials.

After consulting informally with the dissertation director and the other members of the student’s dissertation committee, the student must defend the proposal orally in a meeting with the committee and the Director of Graduate Studies. If the committee judges the student’s proposal to be acceptable, the student will be given permission to proceed with the project. While writing the dissertation, the student must register for at least 20 hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Each student must pass a public oral defense of the dissertation open to all interested faculty and students. The structure of this defense will be determined by the student’s dissertation committee. After booking a room for the defense at a time agreeable to all members of the committee, the student must notify the graduate director and submit the completed dissertation to committee members at least two (2) weeks before the defense date (or earlier if required by the committee). The date, time, and location of the defense will be publicized by the graduate director. The student will bring to the defense a properly formatted Dissertation Title Page/ Signature Sheet. In the event of a successful defense, all committee members as well as the Department Chair must sign the Dissertation Title Page. It is the student’s responsibility ensure that the proper signatures are obtained and that the title page and dissertation are uploaded to the Office of Graduate Services before the graduation deadline.

Time Limit

Work on the doctorate must be completed within ten years of admission to the program.

Particular Requirements of Individual Ph.D. Plans:

Plan 1: Literary Studies:

In the interests of facilitating professional specialization within the broad fields of linguistic, literary, and cultural study, the following are required:

  1. Thirty hours of course work beyond the M.A. degree (including, if desired, a maximum of nine hours of coursework in related fields offered by other departments);
  2. Fulfillment of areas 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 of the M.A. course requirements;
  3. An additional three hours in English language study OR literary theory/critical methodology/cultural studies;
  4. In preparation for the doctoral examination and dissertation, twelve hours of coursework in or strongly related to an area of primary specialization (may include courses taken at the M.A. level and a maximum of one course in a strongly related field offered by another department);
  5. Nine hours of coursework in or strongly related to an area of secondary specialization (may include courses taken at the M.A. level and a maximum of one course in a strongly related field offered by another department);
  6. For the purposes of fulfilling requirements 4 and 5, an area of specialization may be defined in terms of geographical region and historical period; literary genre; theory or methodology; or some combination of the preceding. Students should begin to craft their courses of study by meeting with appropriate faculty advisors early in their doctoral program and by meeting with their advisors thereafter on a regular basis to make revisions as the student’s goals evolve. For a list of possible areas of specialization, please refer to the Department of English website.
  7. Electives as needed to complete the 30-hour requirement;
  8. Twenty hours ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Plan 2: Rhetoric and Composition

Information about the rhetoric and composition program is available at sites.gsu.edu/rhetcomp/. Dissertation research may involve digital and workplace projects as well as textual studies, and the dissertation can be a substantial academic project or a digital project with approval of the director. In the interests of facilitating professional specialization within the broad fields of rhetoric, composition, professional writing, and technical communication, the following courses are required:

  1. A total of thirty hours of course work beyond the M.A. level (including, if desired, a maximum of six hours of coursework in related fields offered by other departments);
  2. Nine hours in history and theory courses:
    • ENGL 8170 History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition I (3) (if not taken at the M.A. level)
    • ENGL 8171 History and Theory of Rhetoric and Composition II (3) (if not taken at the M.A. level)
    • ENGL 8180 Contemporary Issues in Writing Studies (3) (if not taken at the M.A. level)
  3. Six hours in academic research and publishing courses:
    • ENGL 8120 Writing for Academic Publication (Pro Seminar) (3)
    • ENGL 8125 Writing and Research Methodology (3)
  4. Nine hours of rhetoric, composition courses, technical communication and strongly related courses
  5. To complete the 30-hour requirement, electives as needed in rhetoric and composition, language, theory, literature, or any strongly related fields of study outside of English (with approval from the student’s advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies and with a maximum of six hours of coursework outside of rhetoric and composition)
  6. Twenty hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research.

Graduate Research Skill Requirement

Satisfaction of this requirement remains the same as for the thesis track M.A in English, Concentration in Rhetoric and Composition.

Plan 3: Creative Writing:

Students in creative writing select either Poetry or Fiction as their primary specialization and the other genre as their secondary specialization.

No more than one month after passing comprehensive written examinations, a student must submit to her or his director, and to the Director of Creative Writing, a written proposal that describes her or his dissertation project. The creative writing dissertation must be a minimum of 50 pages long for a manuscript of poems or a minimum of 150 pages for a manuscript of prose fiction. It must include a critical introduction in which the student discusses his or her approaches, styles, methods, and influences that is acceptable to the Department of English and to the Office of Graduate Services of the College of Arts and Sciences.

All Poetry and Fiction workshops (ENGL 8020 Poetry Writing, ENGL 8030 Fiction Writing), creative writing craft courses (ENGL 8201 Contemporary Poetry, ENGL 8202 Contemporary Fiction Craft, ENGL 8203 20th-Century American and British Poetry Craft I) and form and theory coursework (ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft)  must be completed at Georgia State University during the degree program.

In the interests of facilitating professional specialization within the field of creative writing, the following are required:

Fiction Writers:

The Ph.D. student in Fiction must complete satisfactorily at least 36 hours of graduate coursework beyond the M.A. or M.F.A. (12 courses), plus 20 hours of thesis research credit. Any student who receives more than one C during his or her program will be dropped from the Ph.D. program.

For fiction writers, the following courses and research hours are required:

  1. Twelve hours of ENGL 8030 Fiction Writing
  2. ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in Fiction (3)
  3. ENGL 8202 Contemporary Fiction Craft (3)
  4. Three hours of courses in or strongly related to area of primary  specialty;
  5. ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in Poetry (3)
  6. Six hours of courses in or strongly related to area of secondary specialty;
  7. Three hours of language study, unless satisfied at M.A. level:
  8. Three hours of literary theory/ critical methodology/ cultural studies, unless satisfied at the M.A. level:
  9. Twenty hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research

Poets:

The Ph.D. student in Poetry must complete satisfactorily at least 39 hours of graduate coursework beyond the M.A. or M.F.A. (13 courses), plus 20 hours of thesis research credit. Any student who receives more than one C during his or her program will be dropped from the Ph.D. program.

For poets, the following courses and research hours are required:

  1. Twelve hours of ENGL 8020 Poetry Writing
  2. ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in Poetry (3)
  3. ENGL 8201 Contemporary Poetry (3)
  4. ENGL 8203 20th-Century American and British Poetry Craft I (3)
  5. ENGL 8160 Form and Theory of Literary Craft in Fiction (3)
  6. Three hours of courses in or strongly related to area of primary specialty;
  7. Six hours of courses in or strongly related to area of secondary specialty;
  8. Three hours of language study, unless satisfied at M.A. level:
  9. Three hours of literary theory/ critical methodology/cultural studies, unless satisfied at the M.A. level:
  10. Twenty hours of ENGL 8999 Thesis Research

3230 French

Program Offered:

  • Master of Arts in French
    • Concentration in French Studies
    • Concentration in Language, Pedagogy, and Applied Linguistics
  • Dual B.A./M.A. in French

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
Email: wlcgraduate@gsu.edu
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Gladys Francis, Director of Graduate Studies (gfrancis5@gsu.edu)

The Department of World Languages and Cultures offers an interdisciplinary Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in French and a dual B.A./M.A. in French. In the B.A./M.A. program, B.A. students can take four graduate courses during their 3rd or 4th year (these courses count toward their B.A. and M.A.); they then complete their M.A. degree in 1 year after receiving their BA.

The Master of Arts in French degree emphasizes advanced study in the language and cultures of the French-speaking world, including courses of particular interest to foreign language teachers. We offer an innovative final portfolio model that encourages students to integrate the work they do inside and outside the classroom.

The Department of World Languages and Cultures sees itself as the gateway for students to internationalize their degree in a way that will not only help them better understand a globalized society but will also make them more competitive for career opportunities as they enter a global economy. World Languages and Cultures seeks to capitalize on the strategic location of the university at the heart of Atlanta, a global center of international commerce and culture, to offer students real world opportunities to combine and apply language abilities, cultural knowledge, and career skills. We are interested in graduate students who have a variety of lived experiences, knowledge, and linguistic/intercultural competences.

The Department of World Languages and Cultures recognizes that an active command of the world language and a thorough exploration of the related cultures form an essential basis for further study in the various areas of its curriculum. To this end, the department sponsors graduate exchange programs in France (Bordeaux and Paris), in the French Caribbean (Guadeloupe and Martinique), and in Africa (Senegal). Graduate students enrolled in the French M.A. program are uniquely provided with tailored career readiness opportunities in the francophone world through internships and externships during these exchange programs.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of World Languages and Cultures by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies, Dr. Gladys M. Francis, at the above email address.

The department is home to the Center for International Resources and Collaborative Language Engagement (CIRCLE), a multi-purpose academic support center that offers walk-in tutoring in each of the languages taught at Georgia State and provides a variety of digital resources (i.e., software, apps, media and materials) to support the language studies of the university community. In addition, the CIRCLE hosts special events focused on cultural awareness and communication opportunities, such as conversation meetups, discussion groups, and other social events, as well as language and technology workshops. The center addresses the university and College of Arts and Sciences strategic goals of increasing internationalization in the curriculum and of enhancing the global competency (including the study of world languages) of students, faculty and staff.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of World Languages and Cultures has the following requirements:

  1. An undergraduate major or very strong knowledge in the language to be studied.
  2. A minimum of three literature courses, including an introductory course, or equivalent.
  3. A complete dossier which must include:
    • Two-page Letter of Intent (in English) expressing the objectives of the student in entering the program;
    • Two letters of recommendation (in English or in the target language) from people familiar with the candidate’s academic work; and
    • A writing sample, in the target language, showing strong analytical skills

At the discretion of the Graduate Committee, an entrance exam or interview may be required. Our program does not require the GRE as part of the application materials.

Master of Arts in French

Within the M.A. in French, students may choose a concentration in French Studies or in Second Language Pedagogy and Applied Linguistics. Students are required to take 30 hours among courses pertinent to the degree, as listed below. If writing a Thesis, students need only take 24 hours from courses pertinent to the degree, plus six credit hours of Thesis research FREN 8999. Courses pertinent to the degree may only be repeated if failed or special topics vary.

Students must have a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher in all courses counting towards the Master of Arts degree. Only courses passed with a grade of B or higher will count toward the degree.

Concentration in French Studies (30)

Degree Requirements with either a Thesis or Non-Thesis Option:

Thesis Option:

  1. Twenty-four credit hours of courses in Literature, Language, and Culture from the list below.
  2. A written thesis proposal
  3. Six hours of thesis research
  4. A thesis
  5. A final master’s portfolio
  6. An oral exit interview
  7. Proficiency in a world language other than the student’s major

Non-Thesis Option:

  1. Thirty credit hours of courses in Literature, Language, and Culture from the list below.
  2. A research paper
  3. A final master’s portfolio
  4. An oral exit interview
  5. Proficiency in a world language other than the student’s major

French Literature, Language, and Culture Sample Courses:

  • FREN 6103 Advanced French Syntax (3)
  • FREN 6108 French for International Business I (3)
  • FREN 6109 French for International Business II (3)
  • FREN 6135 Intro: Theory and Practice of Translation (3)
  • FREN 6140 General Translation (3)
  • FREN 6063 Contemporary France (3)
  • FREN 8000 Text Analysis (3)
  • FREN 8220 Topics in the French Novel (3) *
  • FREN 8230 Topics in French Drama (3) *
  • FREN 8240 Topics in French Poetry (3) *
  • FREN 8250 Topics in the History of Ideas (3) *
  • FREN 8265 Seminar in French Literature (3) *
  • FREN 8630 French Pronunciation through Music and Theater (3)
  • FREN 8631 Translation through Literature, Culture and Media (3)
  • FREN 8632 Francophone Cinema (3)
  • FREN 8633 Francophone Literature (3)
  • FREN 8634 Francophone Perspectives on the Media, the Arts and Popular Culture (3)
  • FREN 8635 Francophone Perspectives on Power, Human Rights and Resistance (3)
  • FREN 8636 Francophone Perspectives on Gender, Sexuality, Race and Class (3)
  • FREN 8639 Francophone Immersion through Workshops (3)
  • Six hours of other courses pertinent to the student’s major field can be taken outside the Department of World Languages and Cultures with approval from the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS).

* May be repeated if topic varies

Additional Degree Requirements

Thesis Option:
A Master’s Thesis project may be submitted for final approval only during fall and spring semesters—not in the summer term. Students who choose the thesis option are required to submit an M.A. Research Paper at the end of their coursework. The total length of your non-thesis must be 50 pages, which includes a bibliography. Student are advised to contact their prospective Thesis Director at the end of their first year so they can work on their reading and thesis plan during their third semester and write/finalize their thesis during their fourth/last semester.

Non-Thesis Option:
A Master’s non-Thesis project may be submitted for final approval only during fall and spring semesters—not in the summer term. Students who choose the non-thesis option are required to submit an M.A. Research Paper at the end of their coursework. The total length of your non-thesis must be 25 pages, which includes a bibliography. It is normally an expanded, revised version of a paper previously submitted for a graduate course and presented in the format of an article prepared for scholarly publication. The final version must be approved by the faculty director of the project and a second reader, and submitted at the time of the written examination. Students must complete the Form for M.A. non-Thesis research project, have all readers and the Director of Graduate Studies sign the form, attach it to their completed paper, and turn in the signature form to the main office of the Department of World Languages and Cultures, 19th floor of 25 Park Place. Students are expected to use the format (MLA, APA, Chicago) agreed upon with the advisor in writing their Master’s Non-Thesis.

Concentration in Language, Pedagogy, and Applied Linguistics (30)

Degree Requirements with either a Thesis or Non-Thesis Option:

Thesis Option:

  1. Eighteen credit hours of courses in Literature, Language, and Culture from the list above
  2. Six credit hours in the student’s Language Pedagogy and Applied Linguistics from the list below
  3. A written thesis proposal
  4. Six hours of thesis research
  5. A thesis
  6. A final master’s portfolio
  7. An oral exit interview
  8. Proficiency in a world language other than the student’s major

Non-Thesis Option:

  1. Eighteen credit hours of courses in Literature, Language, and Culture from the list above
  2. Twelve credit hours in the student’s Language Pedagogy and Applied Linguistics from the list below
  3. A research paper
  4. A final master’s portfolio
  5. An oral exit interview
  6. Proficiency in a world language other than the student’s major

Language Pedagogy and Applied Linguistics Sample Courses:

  • AL 8240 General Linguistics (3)
  • AL 8250 Second Language Acquisition (3)
  • FORL 8250 Topics in Foreign Language Pedagogy (3)
  • FORL 8125 Early Language Learning, P-8 (3)
  • FORL 6126 Approaches to Language Teaching, 9-12 (3)
  • FORL 8800 Research in Second/Foreign Language Education (3)
  • Other ForL or AL courses may be included with permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

Additional Degree Requirements

Thesis Option:
A Master’s Thesis project may be submitted for final approval only during fall and spring semesters—not in the summer term. Students who choose the thesis option are required to submit an M.A. Research Paper at the end of their coursework. The total length of your non-thesis must be 50 pages, which includes a bibliography. Student are advised to contact their prospective Thesis Director at the end of their first year so they can work on their reading and thesis plan during their third semester and write/finalize their thesis during their fourth/last semester.

Non-Thesis Option:
A Master’s non-Thesis project may be submitted for final approval only during fall and spring semesters—not in the summer term. Students who choose the non-thesis option are required to submit an M.A. Research Paper at the end of their coursework. The total length of your non-thesis must be 25 pages, which includes a bibliography. It is normally an expanded, revised version of a paper previously submitted for a graduate course and presented in the format of an article prepared for scholarly publication. The final version must be approved by the faculty director of the project and a second reader, and submitted at the time of the written examination. Students must complete the Form for M.A. non-Thesis research project, have all readers and the Director of Graduate Studies sign the form, attach it to their completed paper, and turn in the signature form to the main office of the Department of World Languages and Cultures, 19th floor of 25 Park Place. Students are expected to use the format (MLA, APA, Chicago) agreed upon with the advisor in writing their Master’s Non-Thesis.

Dual B.A./M.A. Program in French

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in French. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs. More specifically, B.A. students can take four approved graduate courses during their third or fourth year (these courses count toward their B.A. and M.A.); they are then able to complete the M.A. degree in as little as one year after receiving the B.A.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/. Contact Rene Mondy (reneprestimondy@gsu.edu, 404-413-5000, 25 Park Place 3rd Floor) for more information about the BA/MA dual degree program and your eligibility. Contact the Director of Graduate Studies to discuss course options once accepted into the dual B.A./M.A. program

3240 Geosciences

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science in Geosciences
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry with Concentration in Geology (see section 3190)
  • Professional Certificate in Geographic Information Science
  • Dual B.A. or B.S. / M.S. in Geosciences

Department of Geosciences
38 Peachtree Center Ave.
730 Langdale Hall
P.O. Box 3965
Atlanta, Georgia 30303
Phone: 404-413-5750
Fax: 404-413-5768
geosciences.gsu.edu

Katherine Hankins, Chair, khankins@gsu.edu
Nadine Kabengi, Director of Graduate Studies for Geosciences, geosgraddirector@gsu.edu
Richard Milligan, Dual Degree Coordinator, rmilligan@gsu.edu

The Department of Geosciences offers the Master of Science (M.S.) in Geosciences in two tracks: Thesis or Capstone option. The thesis track offers a research-intensive experience for students seeking additional advanced degrees or research-based employment. The track culminates in a thesis project. The thesis track affords the experience of writing for publication and is suited for students with a project requiring more time to pursue. The capstone track is experiential in nature and is the appropriate choice for working professionals or students seeking a more structured, time-confined project. The track culminates in a capstone project that covers a variety of options such as case studies, internships, surveys, or extensive literature reviews. The M.S. track is normally selected on the application. A switch between tracks is possible pending approval from the Director of Graduate Studies and as long as it is completed by the end of the first year of study at the latest. Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Geosciences by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Program Overviews:

Master of Science in Geosciences – Geography Concentration

Students seeking this degree and concentration are offered a broad range of courses that prepare students for research and professional careers. Areas of specialization include: urban geography, geospatial science, physical geography/, environmental studies, and human geography.

Students with professional goals are encouraged to enroll on the track. Geoscience faculty members will assist students in selecting an appropriate project, including potential internships. Our students have interned with a diverse group of sponsors, including local and regional planning agencies; federal, state, and municipal governments; nongovernmental organizations and community-based advocacy groups; and numerous private corporations. Applications and internship qualifications can be obtained from the department. Thirty-six hours are required for completion of this degree. Further information is provided at geosciences.gsu.edu.

Master of Science in Geosciences – Geology Concentration

The M.S. degree program with a Geology concentration offers a broad range of courses that prepare students for research and professionals careers. Research efforts in either thesis or capstone projects are in the following broad areas: geochemistry (analytical, aqueous, environmental, igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary), mineralogy, hydrogeology, petrology, sedimentology, structural geology, and geoinformatics. Thirty-six hours are required for completion of this degree. Further information is provided at geosciences.gsu.edu.

Master of Science in Geosciences – Water Sciences Concentration

A strong demand exists in the public sector and private industry for understanding of aquatic systems. The M.S.degree program with a Water Sciences concentration is designed to provide students with a working knowledge of both the quality and quantity of water in the environment, and modern techniques to assess, model, and remediate aquatic environmental problems, and understand the social context and implications of water resources. Thesis research and capstone projects with faculty are carried out in the following broad areas: aqueous geochemistry, hydrogeology, watershed hydrology, water resources, ecohydrology, urban hydrology, meteorology, and applied climatology. Thirty-six hours are required for completion of this degree. Further information is provided at geosciences.gsu.edu.

Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry – Geology Concentration

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Chemistry with a concentration in Geology is offered in collaboration with the Department of Chemistry. This program culminates in a dissertation containing the results of distinctive and original research scholarship carried out by the candidate. The dissertation must be defended publicly and judged to be a significant contribution in the advancement of science.

Professional Certificate in Geographic Information Science (GIS)

Geographic Information Science (GIS) is a rapidly growing discipline, with applications in many fields. A strong demand exists for proficient users of geospatial technology. The graduate-level Professional Certificate Program in GIS is designed to facilitate those students working toward graduate degrees in a variety of disciplines, as well as those who use GIS in the workplace and would like to obtain systematic training in the field without having to complete a graduate degree. The Certificate Program consists of five courses with a total of 18-19 credit hours, including elective courses from a variety of departments/programs. Please contact the Department of Geosciences for more information.

Dual B.A./M.S. and Dual B.S./M.S. Programs in Geosciences

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Sciences and Master of Science in Geosciences. The dual degree program is designed for high-achieving GSU undergraduate students majoring in Geosciences and allows students to complete both their bachelors and masters degrees in just five years. Students are able to take up to four graduate-level courses as they complete their undergraduate degree.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/. Interested students may contact the dual degree coordinator at the addresses above.

Additional Program Information

Further information concerning specific courses applicable to each program, concentration and its disciplinary specializations is available in the departmental publication, Guide to Graduate Studies in Geosciences, which may be obtained from the department.

Graduate assistantships are available for qualified M.S. and Ph.D. students. Masters students in the capstone track must participate in an internship or equivalent limited research project as a directed study and submit a report to the graduate faculty on the findings of this project. The capstone M.S. degree students must also pass the departmental comprehensive exam.

Applications for admission are accepted for all three semesters. International students and students requesting graduate assistantships must have submitted their complete application by April 15 to be considered for admission for the fall semester and by November 15 for the spring semester.

Admission Information

Applications for admission are accepted for all three semesters. The regular deadlines are April 1 admission to the fall semester and November 1 for the spring and summer semesters. International students and students requesting graduate assistantships are encouraged to apply by the priority deadlines of February 15 for fall admissions and October 1 for spring and summer admissions. The late deadline for application for fall admissions is June 1. There is no late deadline for spring and summer applications. Online applications must be submitted and all materials received to be reviewed for admission.

Graduate assistantships are available for qualified M.S. and Ph.D. students.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Geosciences has the following admission requirements:

  1. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential for graduate work.
  2. A statement of educational, research, and/or career goals, where the applicants indicate their desired area of specialization and their intention to pursue a thesis or capstone  project.

In addition to the above departmental requirements that apply to all applicants, concentration-specific requirements are outlined below.

Additional Admission Requirements – Geology Concentration

  1. A bachelor’s degree in Geology or other physical science or engineering. Students with a B.S. degree in fields other than Geology are also welcome but are expected to take additional Foundational courses listed below. These courses are normally expected to have been completed as part of the applicant’s undergraduate education and completed with a grade of C or higher. However, students who are otherwise qualified may be accepted under Special Status, with the condition that this coursework is completed as part of their graduate study.
  2. Foundation coursework (0-46 hours)
    These courses are assigned as part of the admission process. They can be exempted if equivalent work has been completed with grades of C or higher. Note: Field Geology requirement may be satisfied by presenting evidence of supervised field work in Geology performed at the upper-division undergraduate level. Graduate students who are required to take the Geology Foundation courses should take them at the graduate level (i.e., 6000 and higher) if available.

    1. Geology (0-32 hours):
      • [GEOL 1121K] Introductory Geology I (4)
      • [GEOL 1222K] Introductory Geology II (4)
      • [GEOL 2001] Natural Resources and the Future of Energy (3)
      • [GEOL 4006] Sedimentary Environments and Stratigraphy (4)
      • [GEOL 4013] Structural Geology (4)
      • [GEOL 4015] Crystallography and Mineralogy (4)
      • [GEOL 4016] Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4)
      • [GEOL 4120] Basic Field Geology (4)
      • [GEOL 4121] Advanced Field Geology (4)
    2. Allied Disciplines (0-20 hours)

Additional Admission Requirements for the Water Sciences Concentration

    1. A bachelor’s degree in geography, geology, or related field.
    2. Foundational coursework for students who wish to specialize in physical-chemical aspects of water science. These courses are normally expected to have been completed as part of the applicant’s undergraduate education and completed with a grade of C or higher. However, students who are otherwise qualified may be accepted under Special Status, with the condition that this coursework is completed as part of their graduate study:
      1. Minimum one semester of calculus
      2. Minimum one semester of physics
      3. Minimum one semester of chemistry
      4. Two semesters of introductory physical geography or geology

Degree Requirements

Early in their coursework, all students must select thesis and projects advisers to direct their programs of study. Students on the thesis track must also appoint a thesis committee. A timeline is provided in the Guide to Graduate Studies.

Students should consult with faculty members to align their course of study with desired professional licensure and certification appropriate to their desired career trajectory – for example, either the American Institute of Hydrology’s Professional Hydrologist Certification, or the Association of State Boards of Geology’s Professional Geologist Licensure Examination.

Below is an overview of the degree requirements for specific program, concentration and track.

Master of Science in Geosciences – Geography Concentration

Thesis Track (36 hours)

Satisfactory completion of:

  1. GEOS 8002 Geoscience Research Methods (3) (to be taken the first time offered after the student’s admission to the program)
  2. Techniques training equivalent by completion of one of the following courses (course may count toward the departmental minimum credit hour requirements):
    • GEOS 6518 Digital Cartography (3)
    • GEOS 6530 Introduction to Remote Sensing (4)
    • GEOS 6532 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4)
    • GEOS 6534 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4)
  3. Select one of the following (this requirement may be waived if student has equivalent training):
    • GEOS 6515 Qualitative Methods in Geography (3)
    • GEOS 6520 Quantitative Spatial Analysis (3)
  4. Six semester hours of coursework at the 8000 level in addition to GEOS 8002
  5. Seminar (1-2 hours) GEOS 6095 Seminar in Geosciences (1)
  6. Remaining hours in student’s area of specialization chosen from graduate level courses
  7. Six semester hours of GEOS 8999 Thesis Research for capstone option (6)
  8. Proficiency in a world language or in an approved research skill. Courses taken to fulfill this requirement may not count towards the departmental minimum credit hour requirements.
  9. Completion of thesis and passing oral examination of thesis

Capstone Track (36 hours)

Satisfactory completion of:

  1. Requirements 1-6 above for the thesis option
  2. Additional (3 or more) credits of graduate level coursework in lieu of GEOS 8999
  3. Pass a written comprehensive examination
  4. GEOS 8990 Research Practicum (3) (in consultation with a faculty member)
  5. Pass an oral examination of the capstone project carried out in GEOS 8990

Master of Science in Geosciences, Geology Concentration

Thesis Track (36 hours)

Satisfactory completion of:

  1. GEOS 8002 Geoscience Research Methods (3) (to be taken the first time offered after the student’s admission to the program)
  2. Techniques training equivalent by completion of one of the following courses (course may count toward the departmental minimum credit hour requirements):
    • GEOS 6518 Digital Cartography (3)
    • GEOS 6530 Introduction to Remote Sensing (4)
    • GEOS 6532 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4)
    • GEOS 6534 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4)
  3. Geology courses (14-20 hours)
  4. Seminar (1-2 hours) GEOS 6095 Seminar in Geosciences (1)
  5. Extra departmental courses (3-6 hours): An approved list of courses is available from the Department of Geosciences.
  6. Proficiency in a world language or in an approved research skill. This requirement can be fulfilled by taking an approved course or by taking an examination.
  7. Nine hours of GEOS 8999 Thesis Research
  8. Completion of thesis and passing oral examination of thesis

Capstone Track (36 hours)

Satisfactory completion of:

  1. Requirements 1 – 6 above for the thesis option
  2. An additional 6 (or more) credits of GEOS graduate courses. An approved list of courses is available from the department
  3. Pass a written comprehensive examination
  4. GEOS 8990 Research Practicum (3) (in consultation with a faculty member)
  5. Pass an oral examination of the capstone project carried out in GEOS 8990

Master of Science in Geosciences, Water Sciences Concentration

Thesis Track (36 credit hours)

  1. Take all courses from Group I: Department Requirements (13 hours):
    • GEOS 6095 Seminar (1)
    • GEOS 8002 Geoscience Research Methods (3)
    • GEOS 8999 Thesis Research (9)
    • Successfully defend thesis in public presentation
  2. Select two courses from Group II: Core Required Water Sciences Courses (6 hours):
  3. Elective Water Sciences Courses (minimum 6 hours):
    • Any course from Group II above not already taken
    • GEOS 6003 Aqueous Geochemistry (3)
    • GEOS 6009 Application of Chemical Tracers in Hydrology (3)
    • GEOS 6235 Water, Wastewater, and the Environment (3)
    • GEOS 6640 Geomorphology (3)
    • GEOS 6642 Advanced Weather and Climate (3)
    • GEOS 6644 Environmental Conservation (3)
    • GEOS 6784 Global Climate Change (3)
    • GEOS 8007 Urban Environmental Geography (3)
    • GEOS 8040 Seminar in Hydrology and Geomorphology (3)
    • BIOL 6451 Aquatic Pollution and Toxicology (4)
    • PH 7297 Global Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (4)
  4. Related Geoscience Skills Courses (minimum 6 hours):
    • GEOS 6042 Environmental Instrumentation (4)
    • GEOS 6123 Geoinformatics (3)
    • [GEOG 6515] Qualitative Methods in Geography (3)
    • GEOS 6520 Quantitative Spatial Analysis (or approved statistics substitute) (3-4)
    • GEOS 6532 GIS (4)
    • GEOS 6534 Advanced GIS (4)
    • GEOS 6536 GIS Programming (or approved Comp Sci substitute) (4)
    • GEOS 6538 Urban GIS (4)
    • PH 7299 Sampling of the Environment (3)
    • Remaining courses taken in consultation with the student’s advisor.

Capstone Track

  1. All above requirements, except GEOS 8999 and thesis defense under section 1.
  2. An additional 6 (or more) credits of GEOS graduate courses
  3. Pass a written comprehensive examination
  4. GEOS 8990 Research Practicum (3) (in consultation with a faculty member)
  5. Pass an oral examination of the research project carried out in GEOS 8990

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in Chemistry with a concentration in Geology is offered in collaboration with the Department of Chemistry. At least 80 hours of graduate credit are required for the Ph.D. degree. In order to satisfy the minimum requirements for the degree, students must complete successfully:

  1. Thirty hours of approved graduate core coursework.
  2. Forty hours of research, at least 20 hours of which must be Dissertation Research.
  3. Ten additional hours of graduate course electives.
  4. Satisfaction of the world language (or research skill) requirement.
  5. A written and oral qualifying general examination.
  6. A dissertation.
  7. A final oral examination directed primarily to the defense of the dissertation.

Specific requirements: In the list of requirements that follows, the minimum number of credit hours required in each category is indicated and the courses that can be taken to fulfill these requirements are listed in parentheses. Credit will be given only for those Geology courses in which the student receives a grade of B or higher. Category C may be used as the minor area of specialization if approved by the examination committee. Substitutions may be made by the graduate director in Category C with written approval of the Department of Geosciences.

  1. Core courses: Geology (11 hours). To be selected from GEOS 6003, GEOS 8001, GEOS 8010, or other approved substitutes;
  2. Minor Area electives: (13 hours). To be selected from: GEOS 6004, GEOS 6006, GEOS 6009; Analytical Chemistry: CHEM 6850, CHEM 6860, CHEM 6800, CHEM 8900; Biophysical Chemistry: CHEM 6000, CHEM 6010, CHEM 6190, CHEM 6110, CHEM 6580; Organic Chemistry: CHEM 6400, CHEM 6410, CHEM 6450, CHEM 8900; or other approved substitutes;
  3. Interdisciplinary elective: (6 hours). To be selected from Chemistry or Biology or approved substitutes;
  4. Special Topics, Electives and Seminar: (10 hours). To be selected from GEOS 6008, GEOS 6095, GEOS 6097, GEOS 6640, GEOS 6650; BIOL 6439, BIOL 6458; CHEM 6600, CHEM 6610, CHEM 6490; or other approved substitutes; and
  5. Research: (40 hours). To be selected from GEOS 8097 or GEOS 9999 (a minimum of 20 hours are selected from GEOS 9999).

World language/research skill requirement: A reading proficiency in one world language is required. An equivalent research skill such as computer language, technical writing, advanced statistics, electronics, etc. may be substituted for the world language (departmental approval required). The world language requirement satisfied for a student’s M.S. degree can satisfy the PhD world language requirement. Note: credit hours used to fulfill the language requirement do not count in the 80 hours.

GIS Certificate Requirements 

Satisfactory completion of:

  1. Admission to the program: B.A. or B.S. in a related field. A statement of intent, GRE scores, and transcripts must be provided to the Graduate School as part of the application. Students lacking appropriate background may be required to take prerequisite courses:
  2. Required Courses (15) The student must take the following courses:
    • GEOS 6518 Digital Cartography (3)
    • GEOS 6530 Introduction to Remote Sensing (4)
    • GEOS 6532 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (4)
    • GEOS 6534 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (4)
  3. Elective Courses (3-4) The student must take one of the following courses:
  4. Examination: The student must pass an examination of GIS knowledge and applications. The certificate will be issued to students who complete the above requirements, including graduate students enrolled in the non-degree program.

3260 Gerontology

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Gerontology
    • Concentration in Program Administration
    • Concentration in Research
  • Dual B.A. in Sociology / M.A. in Gerontology
  • Graduate Certificate in Gerontology

Gerontology Institute
605 One Park Place
404-413-5210
Email: gerontology@gsu.edu
gerontology.gsu.edu

Elisabeth Burgess, Director
Wendy Simonds, Director of Graduate Studies

Gerontology is more than an academic subject; it provides a way of understanding ourselves and our families as we move across the life course, and it seeks to explain how our society and the world are being revolutionized by an aging population. We know that the aging process is universal. Gerontology shows us how this process is bounded by our genes, our mind, our culture, and our social networks. It acknowledges the realities that often beset old age, but recognizes that the aging process also is malleable and meaningful. Gerontology provides us with powerful tools for understanding the forces that are fundamentally altering our society as well as how they will shape our own future selves.

The Gerontology Institute offers a Master of Arts (M.A.) and a Certificate in Gerontology for students who wish to prepare for careers in the field of aging and focus their graduate studies in the area of gerontology. Students pursuing the M.A. degree may choose either the program administration concentration or the research concentration. The program administration concentration prepares students to work in aging services and administration and emphasizes program design and management. The research concentration prepares students to enter doctoral programs in gerontology, sociology, psychology, policy studies, family studies, or related fields and for beginning careers with organizations engaged in aging research.

The Graduate Certificate in Gerontology is designed to integrate knowledge of gerontology into students’ own disciplinary fields. It is offered for students preparing for a variety of careers in the aging field and for professionals already working in such areas as health care, social services, recreation, government, and business.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Gerontology Institute by contacting the addresses above.

Master of Arts-Requirements for Admission

  1. The general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
  2. Three letters of recommendation.
  3. A statement of educational and career goals.
  4. A current resume.

Graduate Certificate-Requirements for Admission

  1. Internal Applicants (Students currently enrolled in graduate degree programs at Georgia State University).
    1. The general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences. (An application fee is not required).
    2. Two letters of recommendation.
    3. A statement of educational and career goals.
    4. A current resume.
  2. External Applicants (Those not currently enrolled who plan to pursue the certificate program independently of a degree).
    1. The general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences.
    2. Two letters of recommendation.
    3. A statement of educational and career goals.
    4. A current resume.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts (36)

Prerequisite required of students without previous coursework in statistics.

SOCI 3010 Social Statistics (3) or another approved statistics course

  1. Core courses (15)
    1. Required:
  2. Concentration requirements (9). Select one of the following tracks.
    1. Administration Concentration (9)
    2. Research Concentration (9)
  3. Select four elective courses (12)
    Choose four electives from this list of approved electives:

    • GERO 6475 Communication and Aging (3)
    • GERO 7110 Aging Policy Services (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • GERO 7200 Health and the Older Adult (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • GERO 7260 Aging Practice, Policy, and Research (3)
    • GERO 8102 Life Course Sociology (3)
    • GERO 8110 Evaluation Research in Gerontology (3) (if not taken as a concentration requirement)
    • GERO 8115 Qualitative Gerontology (3) (if not taken as a concentration requirement)
    • GERO 8120 Intervention Research Methodology: Design, Implementation, and Dissemination (3)
    • GERO 8116 Sociology of Aging (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • GERO 8119 Global Aging and Social Policies (3)
    • GERO 8122 Death, Dying, and Loss (3)
    • GERO 8124 Diversity and Aging (3) (if not taken in core)
    • GERO 8130 Intimate Ties in Later Life (3)
    • GERO 8200 Aging Program Administration (3) (if not required in concentration)
    • GERO 8320 Psychology of Aging (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • GERO 8330 Mental Health and Aging (3)
    • GERO 8340 Dementia (3)
    • GERO 8700 Special Topics in Gerontology (3)
    • GERO 8800 Directed Reading in Gerontology (3)
    • GERO 8910 Gerontology Internship (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • NUTR 7105 Geriatric Nutrition (3)

Dual B.A. in Sociology/M.A. in Gerontology Program

In partnership with the Department of Sociology, the Institute offers a dual Bachelor of Arts in Sociology and Master of Arts in Gerontology. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Graduate Certificate in Gerontology

The certificate program is open to students enrolled in graduate degree programs and in good standing at Georgia State University. In addition, non-enrolled students may apply for the certificate program.

Certificate Requirements (18)

  1. Core courses (9)
    Select three of the following core courses:

  2. Select two elective courses (6)
    • GERO 6475 Communication and Aging (3)
    • GERO 7110 Aging Policy and Services (3) (if not taken in core)
    • GERO 7200 Health and the Older Adult (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • GERO 7260 Aging Practice, Policy, and Research (3) (if not taken in core)
    • GERO 8000 Seminar in Gerontology (3)
    • GERO 8102 Life Course Sociology (3)
    • GERO 8116 Sociology of Aging (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • GERO 8119 Global Aging and Social Policies (3)
    • GERO 8122 Death, Dying, and Loss (3)
    • GERO 8124 Diversity and Aging (3)
    • GERO 8130 Intimate Ties in Later Life (3)
    • GERO 8200 Aging Program Administration (3)
    • GERO 8320 Psychology of Aging (3) (if not taken in the core)
    • GERO 8330 Mental Health and Aging (3)
    • GERO 8340 Dementia (3)
    • GERO 8700 Special Topics in Gerontology (3)
    • GERO 8800 Directed Reading in Gerontology (3)
  3. Internship (3)
    • GERO 8910 Gerontology Internship (3) or an approved alternate internship course

3270 Heritage Preservation

Program Offered:

  • Master of Heritage Preservation
    • Concentration in Historic Preservation
    • Concentration in Public History
  • Certificate in Heritage Preservation
  • Dual B.A. in History and Master of Heritage Preservation

Heritage Preservation Program
Department of History
20th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-6365
Chad Keller, Director, Heritage Preservation Program, ckeller@gsu.edu
Alexander Cummings, Director of Graduate Studies
Robin Jackson, Graduate Program Coordinator, 404-413-6385, rmjackson@gsu.edu

The Master of Heritage Preservation (M.H.P.) degree program is designed to train professionals in the fields of cultural resource management and public history. The program seeks first to acquaint students with the broad range of disciplines that constitute the field of heritage preservation. Second, it seeks to develop skills in administration, research, analysis, field survey interpretation, and historic site management that will be necessary in professional practice. Third, it provides practical experience in heritage conservation and public history through classroom practica, team and individual research projects, and internships in the field.

The Program in Heritage Preservation offers a degree in which the student can choose to concentrate in either historic preservation or public history.

The program seeks to provide trained personnel for careers in (1) cultural resource planning and management on the local, state, and federal levels; (2) administration of historical sites, historical societies and commissions, and museums; and (3) historical research positions in public and private agencies.

The program consists of a series of overview courses in the field including archeology, public history, folklore, architectural history, and preservation planning that are complemented by specialized courses in preservation history, administration and law. Students can choose a specialty area for more coursework, such as archeology, planning, architectural history, public history, or historical research. Finally, students engage in research projects through an interdisciplinary research seminar and an internship with an agency or organization that specializes in historic preservation or public history.

Students in the Master of Heritage Preservation program must maintain a 3.0 grade point average in order to receive a degree.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Program in Heritage Preservation by contacting the Director at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Program in Heritage Preservation has the following requirements:

  1. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work.
  2. A statement of educational and career goals.

Degree Requirements

Master of Heritage Preservation

Historic Preservation Track (42 hours)

Area 1: Cultural Resources (12 hours)

To gain an overview of the field of heritage preservation, students must take four of the following courses. Students with undergraduate or graduate backgrounds in one of these disciplines may be exempted by the program director from one or more courses in Area 1.

Area 2: Buildings and Environment (15 hours)

In order to understand the preservation of building interiors, legal, cultural, and landscaped environments, students will take courses in the history of preservation law, interior design, and landscape architecture as well as courses in preservation planning and public archaeology. Students should select five out of the seven courses below.

  • ANTH 8240 Public Archaeology (3)
  • HIST 8610 Preservation Law (3)
  • HIST 8630 The American Built Environment (3)
  • HIST 8640 Preservation Planning (3)
  • HIST 8645 Historic Resource Evaluation (3)
  • HIST 8650 Historic American Landscapes and Gardens (3)
  • ID 8650 History of Interior Design I: Antiquities to the Nineteenth Century (3)

Area 3: Area of Concentration (9 hours minimum)

In order to tailor their programs to such career interests as neighborhood revitalization, preservation planning, preservation administration, research and analysis, restoration finance, or architectural evaluation, students will select appropriate elective courses from preservation disciplines represented in the program. Courses may be taken from one or several disciplines and will be selected with the approval of the program director. Below is a list of possible options:

Area 4: Applied Studies (6-9 hours)

In order to gain experience in the practical work of heritage preservation, students will take courses that require preservation research projects and that offer the opportunity to see the operations of preservation organizations. For these purposes, there are internships, directed studies, and thesis options available to students where classroom and seminar knowledge may be applied to actual preservation needs. Students will take the following courses, or appropriate substitutes, approved by the program director:

Area 5: Oral Examination

Students must pass a general oral examination in order to graduate.

Master of Heritage Preservation

Public History Track (42)

Area 1: Historical Foundations (15)

To gain an overview of the field of public history, students must take five out of the courses listed.

  • HIST 6920 Oral History (4)
  • HIST 7000 Introduction to Historical Methods and Theory (4)
  • HIST 7010 Issues and Interpretations in American History (4)
  • HIST 7040 Issues and Interpretation in Public History (3)
  • HIST 8060 Seminar in the History of the South (4)
  • HIST 8065 History of Georgia (4)
  • HIST 8635 U.S. Cities (3)
  • HIST 8020 Seminar in 19th Century U.S. History (4)
  • HIST 8030 Seminar in 20th Century U.S. History (4)
  • HIST 8070 Seminar in African American History (4)

Area 2: Professional Concentrations (15 hours)

In order to understand the diverse options in the field of public history, students will take courses in folk studies, archives, preservation, and museum operations. Students should select five out of the courses listed below.

Area 3: Electives (6 hours).

In order to tailor their programs to such career interests, students will select appropriate courses from preservation and public history disciplines represented in the program. Other graduate courses in history may be substituted at the discretion of the program director. Other courses in documentary film, etc., can be substituted at the discretion of program director and with permission of other program directors. Below is a list of possible options:

Area 4: Capstone Courses (6 hours).

In order to gain experience in the practical work of public history, students will take courses that require research projects and that offer the opportunity to see the operations of public history organizations. For these purposes, there are internships, directed studies, and thesis options available to students where classroom and seminar knowledge may be applied to actual preservation needs. Students will take the following courses, or appropriate substitutes, approved by the program director:

Area 5 Oral Examination

Students must pass a general oral examination in order to graduate.

Certificate Program in Heritage Preservation

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a graduate certificate in Heritage Preservation with tracks in Historic Preservation and in Public History. The certificate program is open to students who are enrolled in graduate degree programs and in good academic standing at Georgia State University or other graduate institutions in such programs as history, architecture, planning, anthropology, geography, urban studies, public administration, and real estate. Others may apply for the certificate program using the same procedure as that used to apply for the MHP degree, and the same standards will apply. Students accepted into the certificate program will have student standing, with all the attendant responsibilities and privileges.

The Certificate in Heritage Preservation requires completion of 18 hours of course work and successful completion of a general examination. Students must maintain a 3.0 grade-point average in order to receive a certificate. While graduate credit from other institutions may, by petition, be applied toward the certificate, normally not more than six hours will be accepted.

Historic Preservation Track

Students must complete 18 hours of graduate study divided among the three following areas:

Area 1: Preservation Overview (6 hours)

  • HIST 8600 Introduction to Historic Preservation (3)
  • HIST 8700 Case Studies in Historic Preservation (3)

Area 2: Cultural Resources (6 hours)

Area 3: Preservation Specialties (6 hours)

  • HIST 6320 Metropolitan Atlanta (3)
  • HIST 8610 Preservation Law (3)
  • HIST 8620 Conservation of Historic Building Materials (3)
  • HIST 8640 Preservation Planning (3)
  • HIST 8650 Historic American Landscapes and Gardens (3)
  • HIST 8660 Case Studies in International Preservation (3)

Other courses may be approved by the director of the program.

Students must pass a general written examination.

Public History Track

Students must complete 18 hours of graduate study divided among the three following areas:

Area 1: Public History Overview (6 hours)

  • HIST 7040 Issues and Interpretation in Public History (3)
  • HIST 8800 Directed Study in Public History (3)

Area 2: Historical Foundations (6 hours)

  • HIST 6920 Oral History (4)
  • HIST 7000 Introduction to Historical Methods and Theory (4)
  • HIST 7010 Issues and Interpretations in American History (4)
  • HIST 8020 Seminar in 19th Century U.S. History (4)
  • HIST 8030 Seminar in 20th Century U.S. History (4)
  • HIST 8060 Seminar in the History of the South (4)
  • HIST 8065 History of Georgia (4)
  • HIST 8070 Seminar in African American History (4)

Area 3: Public History Specialties (6 hours)

Other courses may be approved by the director of the program.

Students must pass a general written examination.

Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

The Department of History offers a dual B.A. in History and Master of Historic Preservation. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

3280 History

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in History
    • Concentration in World History
  • Dual B.A./M.A. in History
  • Combined Master of Arts/Doctor of Philosophy in History
  • Doctor of Philosophy in History

Department of History
20th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-6385
Email: Director of Graduate Studies (DGShistory@gsu.edu)
history.gsu.edu

Michelle Brattain, Chair
Alexander Cummings, Director of Graduate Studies
Robin Jackson, Graduate Studies Program Coordinator

The Master of Arts (M.A.) degree program prepares students to teach in junior, community, or small liberal arts colleges; for careers in the management and use of historical records in archives or museums and in historic preservation; and for admission into a doctoral program in history.

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree program prepares students for positions in junior, community, small liberal arts, and senior colleges and universities; for productive postdoctoral research in history; and for careers in public service.

Major fields of study for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees include: Colonial/Early National United States; 19th and 20th Century United States; Early Modern Europe; Modern Europe; World History; Regional and Global History; and Public History. The department also offers a number of regional fields as well as topical fields in a variety of subjects, including legal and constitutional history, labor history, urban studies, women’s and gender history, transnational and postcolonial studies, history of science, and historic preservation.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of History by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of History has the following requirements:

Master of Arts–Requirements for Full Graduate Status Admission

  1. An undergraduate major in history or its equivalent, which includes survey courses in American, World, and/or European history.
  2. Acceptable scores on the General (Aptitude) Test of the Graduate Record Examination.
  3. A high standard of undergraduate achievement, especially in the major.
  4. A statement of the applicant’s educational and professional goals.
  5. A writing sample.
  6. Three letters of recommendation from faculty members (preferably in history) with whom the applicant has studied.
  7. Official transcripts of all previous college and graduate level work.

Doctor of Philosophy–Requirements for Full Graduate Status Admission

  1. A high standard of undergraduate achievement, in undergraduate and graduate work, especially in the major field.
  2. Ordinarily, the M.A. degree in history. Additional course work may be required if the department deems previous graduate work inadequate for Ph.D. study in history.
  3. Acceptable scores on the General (Aptitude) Test of the Graduate Record Examination.
  4. Language skills deemed adequate by the department. This will normally include evidence of proficiency in at least one alternate language.
  5. Positive evidence of research aptitude and skill, such as the M.A. thesis, and a sample of the applicant’s research and written work.
  6. A statement of the applicant’s educational and professional goals.
  7. Recommendations from three faculty members (preferably in history), who have had the student in graduate courses.
  8. Official transcripts of all previous college and graduate level work.

Combined Master of Arts/Doctor of Philosophy–Requirements for Full Graduate Status Admission

Admission requirements for the Combined M.A. / Ph.D. program are the same as for the Ph.D. track (omitting the M.A. in history), with the following additions:

  1. Recommended, an overall Grade Point Average of at least 3.5
  2. Recommended, a Grade Point Average in the major of at least 3.8.
  3. Recommended, a score in the 90th percentile or higher on the Graduate Record Exam.

Procedural Rules:

  1. The Department of History may require a personal interview with the Ph.D. applicant.
  2. Admission to the Ph.D. program is not automatic on the completion of the M.A. in history at Georgia State University.
  3. Normally, a student may not take three degrees—the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctorate—in the Department of History at Georgia State University.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts

  1. Coursework:
    Students are required to take a total of nine courses. The distribution of courses is described below.

    1. HIST 7000 Introduction to Methods and Theory
    2. One course selected from  HIST 7010, [HIST 7020], [HIST 7030], or [HIST 7040], to support the student’s major field.
    3. HIST 7050 Introduction to Graduate Studies and Pedagogy. Students not intending to teach may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take 7045, a one-hour version of HIST 7050.
    4. HIST 7060 Research Seminar: Thesis students must take HIST 7060; Non-thesis students can fulfill this requirement with HIST 7060 or any graduate course designated as a research seminar.
    5. Students may take up to two directed readings courses to fulfill their course requirements.
    6. All new students should take HIST 7050 in their first semester of study and HIST 7000 in their second semester of study.
    7. Major Field: Students must complete 3 courses in the major field and may apply HIST 7010, [HIST 7020], [HIST 7030], or [HIST 7040] to their major field. HIST 7060 may not apply to major field course requirements. Major fields include the following:
      • Colonial/Early National U.S.
      • 19thand 20th Century U.S.
      • Early Modern Europe
      • Modern Europe
      • World History
      • Regional and Global History
      • Public History
    8. Geographic Distribution: In addition to the regular M.A. requirements, students whose major field is in US history must also complete one course each in (a) European; and (b) African, Asian, Latin American, or Middle Eastern history. Students whose major field is in European history must also complete one course each in (a) U.S.; and (b) African, Asian, Latin American, or Middle Eastern history.
    9. Electives: Remaining courses are electives.
  2. Language Requirement: Proficiency in one alternate language.
  3. Comprehensive Examination: A comprehensive examination to be taken within one semester after completion of coursework. The comprehensive examination may written or oral; the format will be determined by the major advisor in consultation with the student. The exam will test knowledge of the student’s major field and coursework, including the core curriculum. A committee that consists of the student’s main advisor and two other faculty members with whom the student has taken coursework with will conduct the exam. The examination may be repeated once following a minimum interval of three months. A student who fails the examination for the second time will be subject to scholastic termination. Committees for both the thesis and the non-thesis option are nominated by the student and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies on behalf of the Chair of the department.
  4. Continuous Enrollment: In order to remain in compliance with the university’s policy on continuous enrollment, students must maintain enrollment totaling 6 hours or more over all consecutive three-semester periods.
  5. Thesis/Non-Thesis Options
    1. Thesis option requirements:
      • Six hours of HIST 8999 Thesis Research
      • A thesis prospectus, approved by a director and a second reader, and a thesis.
    2. Non-Thesis Option requirements:
      • One additional graduate history class. A second comprehensive examination, either written or oral, to be administered by an examination committee, which will consist of the advisor and one additional faculty member.
      • In lieu of the thesis, research competence must be demonstrated on the basis of a research paper or other substantive piece of written work.
  6. Graduation: Students must be registered for a minimum of one hour during the term of their graduation.

World History Concentration

The History Department offers a concentration in World History at the M.A. level. The concentration combines the theoretical and empirical frameworks of world history with opportunities to conduct more detailed research within chosen areas of interest. Students will apply theoretical approaches and empirical methodologies that support the comparative and global study of societies and cultures as well as the interconnections among different world regions. The requirements fit into the framework of a regular M.A. in history, with several more specific stipulations as noted below:

  1. Coursework:
    As in the regular History M.A., students must take nine courses. The distribution of courses is described below.

    1. HIST 7000: Introduction to Methods and Theory
    2. HIST 7030: Issues and Interpretations in World History
    3. Either [HIST 7010], [HIST 7020], or [HIST 7040]
    4. HIST 7050 Introduction to Graduate Studies and Pedagogy. Students not intending to teach may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take 7045, a one-hour version of HIST 7050.
    5. HIST 7060 Research Seminar. Thesis students must take HIST 7060; Non-thesis students can fulfill this requirement with HIST 7060 or any graduate course designated as a research seminar.
    6. Major Field: Students must declare World History as their major field and complete three courses in the major field. Students may also apply HIST 7030 to the major field. Courses in the major field should demonstrate a conspicuous world history dimension.
    7. Geographic Distribution: In addition to the regular M.A. requirements, students completing the world history concentration must also complete one course each in (a) U.S.; (b) European; and (c) African, Asian, Latin American, or Middle Eastern history. Either the U.S. or the European course should have a world dimension, which is also desirable for the course chosen above under (c).
    8. Electives: Any of the remaining required nine courses are electives. Students are encouraged to select electives that include a world history dimension.
  2. Any courses taken as part of the major field or the geographic distribution or to meet the basic M.A. requirements may be applied elsewhere to meet the requirements of the concentration.
  3. Foreign language, oral examination, and requirements for the thesis or non-thesis option are the same as for a regular M.A.

The Program Director will advise students on courses qualifying as world history. Students may petition the World History Committee for the inclusion of other courses with conspicuous world dimensions.

Master of Heritage Preservation / Certificate Program

The Department offers a master’s degree in Heritage Preservation. This program is divided into two tracks of study: one in Historic Preservation and one in Public History. The program is designed to train professionals in the fields of cultural resource management and the interpretation of history to a broad audience. The department also offers a certificate program, with a concentration in historic preservation or public history. For more information about the Heritage Preservation program and requirements, visit the program website at heritagepreservation.gsu.edu.

Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

The department offers the following dual degree program:

  • Dual B.A./M.A. in History
  • Dual B.A. in History and Master of Historic Preservation

These dual degree opportunities enable qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Doctor of Philosophy

  1. Coursework:
    Students will complete 10 graduate level history courses. The distribution of courses is described below.

    1. HIST 7000 Introduction to Methods and Theory
    2. One course selected from HIST 7010, [HIST 7020], [HIST 7030], or [HIST 7040], to support the student’s major field.
    3. HIST 7050 Introduction to Graduate Studies and Pedagogy. Students not intending to teach may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take 7045, a one-hour version of HIST 7050.
    4. HIST 7060 Research Seminar.
    5. Students who enter the Ph.D. program with an MA in history earned at GSU may replace two HIST 7000-level core courses with two sections of HIST 8890 (Special Topics in History).
    6. All new students should take HIST 7050 in their first semester of study and HIST 7000 in their second semester of study.
    7. Students may take up to three directed readings courses to fulfill their coursework requirements.
    8. Major Field: Students must complete 3 courses in the major field and may apply HIST 7010, [HIST 7020], [HIST 7030], or [HIST 7040] to their major field. HIST 7060 may not apply to major field course requirements. Major fields include the following:
      • Colonial/Early National U.S.
      • 19thand 20thCentury U.S.
      • Early Modern Europe
      • Modern Europe
      • World History
      • Regional and Global
      • Public History
    9. Minor Fields: Students must declare two minor fields and complete at least 2 courses in each of their minor fields, which may include the appropriate 7000-level course. Minor fields must demonstrate temporal, methodological, or geographical diversity from the major field. Minor fields include the following:
      • Any of the Major Fields
      • African Diaspora
      • East Asia
      • African-American
      • South Asia
      • Atlantic, Indian or Pacific Oceans
      • Mediterranean
      • Economic, Labor or Working Class History
      • Legal and Constitutional History
      • Medieval
      • History of Science
      • Early Modern Britain
      • Immigration and Ethnicity
      • Modern Britain, Ireland, British Empire
      • Islamic World
      • American South
      • France
      • Germany
      • Religion
      • Women’s History
      • Sexuality
      • Gender
      • Historic Preservation
      • World
      • Empires
        Students may define an alternative minor field in consultation with their advisor and the Director of the Graduate Studies.
  2. Language Requirement: The student must demonstrate reading proficiency in a world language, through successful completion of a graduate language course (with a grade of B or better) or successfully completing a reading knowledge examination.
  3. Residency: Students in the doctoral program are required to be in residence for four semesters, two of which must be consecutive. In all four semesters the students must register for at least eight hours of coursework.
  4. Continuous Enrollment: In order to remain in compliance with the university’s policy on continuous enrollment, students must maintain enrollment totaling 6 hours or more over all consecutive three-semester periods.
  5. Examinations: Upon completion of the language requirements and the course work in the doctoral program, the doctoral student will be required to complete successfully a comprehensive examination (consisting of written and oral parts) in his/her major and minor fields. These examinations, administered by an examination committee consisting of two examiners for each field, will be offered twice a year in the Fall and Spring semesters on days and at times to be announced at least one month in advance. The student will normally complete the oral examination in the major and minor fields with two weeks of the written examination. At the conclusion of the comprehensive examination, the members of the examination committee will determine whether the student has passed or failed. A unanimous vote of the committee is required to pass. Should a student fail the comprehensive examination, the committee shall determine the conditions under which the student will be permitted to re-take the examination or portions thereof in accordance with the regulations of the Graduate Division of the College of Arts and Sciences. The examination may be repeated once following a minimum interval of six months. A student who fails the examination a second time will be subject to termination. The examination must be passed at least one academic year prior to the conferral of the degree.
  6. Dissertation Prospectus: On the successful completion of the written and oral parts of the general examination, the student will be required to submit a prospectus of the dissertation to a scheduled meeting of members of the dissertation committee (which will normally be comprised of three professors of the Department of History faculty), who are nominated by the student and approved by the director of graduate studies on behalf of the department chair. The prospectus will include a carefully prepared and closely reasoned statement or exposition of the topic or subject that the student has chosen to research in consultation with the dissertation advisor. An oral defense of the dissertation prospectus will normally follow within six months of exams and will be administered by the dissertation committee.
  7. Candidacy: After completing the language, course work, general examination and dissertation prospectus requirements, the student will be admitted to candidacy for the degree.
  8. Dissertation: The student must complete satisfactorily a dissertation and earn not less than twenty hours of credit in HIST 9999 (Dissertation Research), supervised by the dissertation director.
  9. Dissertation Defense. Upon completion of the dissertation, the candidate will be required to pass an oral defense of the dissertation that will be conducted by members of the dissertation committee.
  10. Graduation: Students must be registered for a minimum of one hour during the term of their graduation.

Combined Master of Arts / Doctor of Philosophy

The requirements for the M.A. / Ph.D. degree are the same as for the Ph.D., except in the area of coursework. Students are required to complete at least twelve graduate level courses, which are distributed as follows.

  1. Coursework:
    Students will complete 12 graduate level history courses. The distribution of courses is described below.

    1. HIST 7000 Introduction to Methods and Theory
    2. One course selected from HIST 7010, 7020, 7030, and 7040, to support the student’s major field.
    3. HIST 7050 Introduction to Graduate Studies and Pedagogy. Students not intending to teach may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take 7045, a one-hour version of HIST 7050.
    4. HIST 7060 Research Seminar.
    5. All new students should take HIST 7050 in their first semester of study and HIST 7000 in their second semester of study.
    6. Students may take up to three directed readings courses to fulfill their coursework requirements.
    7. Major Field: Students must complete 3 courses in the major field and may apply HIST 7010, 7020, 7030, or 7040 to their major field. HIST 7060 may not apply to major field course requirements. For list of fields see above.
    8. Minor Fields: Students must declare two minor fields and complete at least 2 courses in each of their minor fields, which may include the appropriate 7000-level course. Minor fields must demonstrate temporal, methodological, or geographical diversity from the major field. For list of fields see above.
    9. Electives to complete the required total of 12 courses.
  2. Award of M.A. degree: Students may apply to earn a non-thesis M.A. degree on route to completing the doctoral program after completing 10 courses and passing their Ph.D. comprehensive exams, normally in the third year of coursework. Students who wish to leave the program may opt in to the M.A. degree program and may earn a non-thesis or thesis M.A. degree after completing all requirements for that degree.

3290 Latin American Studies

Program Offered:

  • Graduate Certificate in Latin American Studies

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
Email: wlcgraduate@gsu.edu
wlc.gsu.edu

Certificate program coordinator: Leslie L. Marsh (llmarsh@gsu.edu), Director, Center for Latin American and Latino/a Studies

The Graduate Certificate in Latin American Studies, which is coordinated by the Center for Latin American and Latino/a Studies (clals.gsu.edu) of Georgia State University, attests to the recipient’s knowledge and understanding of Latin American culture, economy, history, and politics, as well as to his or her competence in one or more of the principal languages of the region. Its purpose is to give students a broad knowledge and understanding of Latin America and U.S. Latino/as that will help prepare them to work or study in Latin America or to work with individuals and groups of U.S. Latino/as or of Latin American origin in the United States.

The certificate is particularly well suited to students pursuing graduate degrees in anthropology, art history, business, history, world languages, political science, or sociology (to name just a few) who have a concentration or a definite interest in Latin American and U.S. Latino/as or who want to expand their understanding by taking related course work. It is also well suited to individuals who desire to enhance their marketability and skills in relation to a region whose economy and culture have become increasingly important to the United States in recent years. The Certificate may be earned alone or in conjunction with a graduate program in one of the academic departments of Georgia State University; courses included in an academic program may be used for credit toward a Certificate. The GRE (Graduate Record Examination) is not required for acceptance into the Certificate program.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the certificate by contacting the coordinator of the program at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

Admission to the certificate program is on the basis of:

  1. A BA/BS or graduate degree;
  2. Prior course work indicated in valid transcripts;
  3. A statement of purpose;
  4. Two letters of recommendation;
  5. Competence in Spanish or Portuguese.

Competence is demonstrated by completion of a four-semester sequence of the language at the undergraduate level, by completion of at least one graduate course in Spanish, or by an entrance language exam administered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures. Candidates who have completed the four semester sequence more than three years before applying for admission to the certificate program will be required to take the entrance language exam. Students should consult with their advisor on how best to fulfill this requirement.

Applicants should apply online at the following: cas.gsu.edu/graduate-services/admissions/.

A committee chaired by the certificate coordinator/director of the CLALS will review the material, decide on admission, and assign an appropriate advisor.

Degree Requirements

The minimum requirements for the certificate are 15 graduate-level hours in courses with significant content addressing Latin America or U.S. Latino/as and a grade of B or better in each course. These courses must be selected from at least two different academic departments. For those students enrolled in a master’s degree program at Georgia State University, two courses from the student’s master’s degree may be used towards the certificate.

Courses addressing significant content on Latin America or U.S. Latino/as may include those offered in African-American Studies, Anthropology, Communication, Economics, History, International Business, Political Science, World Languages and Cultures (Spanish program) and other academic units at Georgia State.

The following is a list of a few — but not all — graduate courses from affiliated departments that may be taken for credit toward the Graduate Certificate in Latin American Studies. Students who are accepted into the program should contact the certificate coordinator/director of the CLALS to discuss an individual plan of study

  • AH 6630 Pre-Colombian Art (3)
  • AH 6660 Nineteenth and Twentieth-Century Art in Latin America (3)
  • AH 6900 Special Studies Seminar (3) (when the course deals with Latin America)
  • ANTH 6040 Race, Class, and Gender in Global Perspective (3) (when course deals with Latin America and/or U.S. Latino/as)
  • ANTH 6060 Environmental Anthropology (3) (when course deals with Latin America, Latino/as)
  • ANTH 6160 Archaeology of South America (3)
  • ECON 8600 Economics of Development (3)
  • FREN 8220 Topics in French and Francophone Culture and Society (3) (when the course treats Francophone cultures of the Caribbean)
  • HIST 8420 Seminar in Latin American History (4) (may be repeated if topics vary)
  • HIST 8660 Case Studies in International Preservation (3) (when the course deals with Latin America)
  • IB 8190 Doing Business in World Regions (3) (when the course deals with Latin America)
  • POLS 6158 Campaigns and Elections (3) (when the course treats Latin America and/or U.S. Latino/as)
  • POLS 8228 Comparative Party System Development (3)
  • POLS 8250 Latin American Politics (3)
  • PSYC 8200 Community Psychology (3)
  • PSYC 8060 Issues of Human Diversity (3)
  • RELS 6700 Between Animals and Gods (3)
  • SPAN 8603 Cultural Studies (3) (when the course treats Latin America and/or U.S. Latino/as) (may be repeated)
  • SPAN 8885 Special Topics in Latin American Literature and/or Culture (3) (may be repeated)
  • SPAN 8710 Special Topics in Spanish Applied Linguistics (3)
  • WGSS 6910 Special Topics (3) (topic: Gender, Sexuality, and Postcoloniality in Contemporary Ecuador)
  • WGSS 8002 Globalization and Gender (3) (when the course treats Latin America and/or U.S. Latino/as)

Please note: some study abroad programs include graduate-level coursework that may count towards the Graduate Certificate in Latin American Studies. Students should contact the Office of Study Abroad to learn about study abroad programs and then discuss their options with the certificate coordinator/director of the CLALS.

3300 Mathematics and Statistics

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science in Mathematics
    • Concentration in Bioinformatics
    • Concentration in Biostatistics
    • Concentration in Discrete Mathematics
    • Concentration in Scientific Computing
    • Concentration in Statistics
    • Concentration in Statistics and Allied Field
  • Dual Degree Programs:
    • B.S. in Mathematics / M.S. in Mathematics
    • B.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration) / M.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration)
  • Master of Science in Analytics
    Concentration in Big Data and Machine Learning (section 3175)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics and Statistics
    • Concentration in Bioinformatics
    • Concentration in Biostatistics
    • Concentration in Mathematics

Department of Mathematics and Statistics
25 Park Place, 14th Floor
Atlanta, Georgia 30303-3083, USA
Phone: (404) 413-6400
Web address: www.mathstat.gsu.edu

Guantao Chen, Chair
Alexandra Smirnova, Associate Chair
Florian Enescu, Director of Graduate Studies in Mathematics
Gengsheng (Jeff) Qin, Director of Graduate Studies in Statistic

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree programs in mathematics provide education at the graduate level in algebra, analysis, applied mathematics, and statistics. Students completing these degrees are prepared for positions in industry, government, business, college teaching, and for advanced study in mathematics.

The M.S. degree in mathematics is offered with no concentration, or with one of six possible concentrations. Four of the concentrations are in statistics, one is in discrete mathematics, and one is in scientific computing. The concentrations in statistics are programs designed for persons who wish to prepare for careers as professional statisticians in industry, business, or government. These programs provide advanced training in applied statistics for those who are presently working in areas that use statistics, as well as for those who plan to enter these areas. The programs present an optimal balance among the broad range of statistical techniques, mathematical methods, and computation. The concentrations in discrete mathematics and scientific computing are designed for persons who wish to combine their study of mathematics with selected areas in discrete mathematics and computer science. Opportunities exist to apply this study to related areas outside the department.

The Ph.D. degree program in Mathematics and Statistics includes concentrations in bioinformatics, biostatistics, and mathematics. These concentrations address the critical need for mathematics faculty and the need for highly trained specialists in the areas of bioinformatics and biostatistics. The concentrations in bioinformatics and biostatistics will graduate strong bioinformaticians and biostatisticians with a broad background in applied areas for direct placement in business, industry, governmental institutions and research universities. The mathematics concentration will graduate mathematicians with broad knowledge of core areas of pure and applied mathematics.

Majors are encouraged to consider carefully the career objectives they wish to pursue after graduation. Early selection of these objectives may suggest the degree programs or concentrations that will prepare students for their chosen careers. Faculty who serve as advisers for graduate majors will discuss with majors the degree programs and concentrations available to them.

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics accepts applications for all three semesters. However, in order to be considered for graduate assistantships for the fall semester, applicants must complete the application process in the Office of Graduate Services in sufficient time for the department to receive it by March 1. This process often takes several weeks. International applicants should allow at least two additional months for processing of applications for admission.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Mathematics and Statistics by contacting the Directors of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Master of Science in Mathematics (with thesis)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to the following:

Degree Requirements

  1. Twenty-four hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8820 and 8999 courses).
    1. The following courses are required:
    2. One additional three-hour 8000-level course in Mathematics.
    3. Nine additional hours of graduate-level coursework from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics or in a related field selected in consultation with an adviser and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. These may include no more than six hours (e.g. two courses) in a related field. Any courses which are used in area 2 of the “Additional Admission Requirements” section of this catalog cannot be applied toward the degree.
  2. Six hours of Thesis Research (MATH 8999)
  3. Additional Requirements
    1. A thesis
    2. A thesis defense

Master of Science in Mathematics (non-thesis option)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to the following:

Degree Requirements

  1. Thirty hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of  MATH 8820).
    1. The following courses are required:
    2. One additional three-hour 8000-level course in Mathematics.
    3. Eighteen additional hours of graduate-level coursework from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics or in a related field selected in consultation with an advisor and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. These may include no more than nine hours (or three courses) in a related field. Any courses which are used in area 2 of the “Additional Admission Requirements” above cannot be applied toward the degree.
  2. Three hours of Research (MATH 8820)
  3. A literature-based research paper completed under the direction of a graduate faculty advisor within the department.

Concentration in Bioinformatics (with thesis)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, statistics, or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to:

Degree Requirements

  1. A minimum of 27 hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8820 and 8999 courses)selected from the list below are required.
  2. Six hours of Thesis Research (MATH 8999/STAT 8999)
  3. Additional requirements:
    • thesis
    • thesis defense

Concentration in Bioinformatics (non-thesis option)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, statistics, or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to:

Degree Requirements

  1. A minimum of 30 hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of MATH 8820) selected from the list below are required.
  2. Three hours of Research (MATH 8820 or STAT 8820)
  3. A lab or literature-based research paper completed under the direction of a graduate faculty advisor within the department.

Concentration in Biostatistics (with thesis)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, statistics, or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to:

Degree Requirements

  1. Twenty-four hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8820 and 8999 courses).
    1. The following courses are required:
    2. Nine additional hours of Statistics courses at the 8000-level, from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.
    3. Six additional hours of graduate-level coursework from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics or in a related field selected in consultation with an adviser and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. The courses listed as Additional Admission Requirements in section 2 above and other 6000-level Statistics courses are excluded.
  2. Six hours of  STAT 8999 Thesis Research.
  3. Additional Requirements
    1. A thesis
    2. A thesis defense

Concentration in Discrete Mathematics (with thesis)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general examinations of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to at least two of the following:

Degree Requirements

  1. Twenty-four hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8820 and 8999 courses).
    1. The following courses are required:
    2. One additional 8000-level course in mathematics
    3. Nine additional hours of graduate-level coursework from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics or in a “related field” selected in consultation with an adviser, and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. These may include no more than six hours (e.g., two courses) in a related field. At most one of the courses listed in section 2 of “Additional Admission Requirements” above can be applied toward the degree.
  2. Six hours of Thesis Research (MATH 8999)
  3. Additional requirements
    1. thesis
    2. thesis defense

Concentration in Discrete Mathematics (non-thesis option)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to at least two of the following:
  3. Thirty hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8820).
    1. The following courses are required:
    2. One additional 8000-level course in mathematics
    3. Fifteen additional hours of graduate-level coursework from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics or in a “related field” selected in consultation with an advisor, and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. These may include no more than six hours (e.g., two courses) in a related field. At most one of the courses listed in section 2 of “Additional Admission Requirements” above can be applied toward the degree.
  4. Three hours of Research (MATH 8820)
  5. A literature-based research paper completed under the direction of a graduate faculty advisor within the department.

Concentration in Scientific Computing (with thesis)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, computer science, or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics and computer science equivalent to the following:

Degree Requirements

  1. Twenty-four hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8820 and 8999 courses).
    1. The following courses are required:
      • MATH 8200 Advanced Matrix Analysis (3)
      • MATH 8610 Advanced Numerical Analysis (3)
      • MATH 8620 Numerical Linear Algebra (3)
      • If an equivalent course has not already been taken as part of another program:
    2. Six additional hours of 8000-level coursework selected in consultation with an adviser and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.
    3. Additional graduate-level courses in mathematics, computer science, or a related field to total 24 hours selected in consultation with an adviser and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. There are many options for coursework in this area, including:
  2. Six hours of Thesis Research (MATH 8999)
  3. Additional Requirements
    1. A thesis
    2. A thesis defense

Concentration in Scientific Computing (non-thesis option)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, computer science, or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics and computer science equivalent to the following:

Degree Requirements

  1. Thirty hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8820).
    1. The following courses are required:
      • MATH 8200 Advanced Matrix Analysis (3)
      • MATH 8610 Advanced Numerical Analysis (3)
      • MATH 8620 Numerical Linear Algebra (3)
      • If an equivalent course has not already been taken as part of another program:
      • MATH 6265 Partial Differential Equations (3)
      • MATH 6620 Numerical Analysis II (3)
    2. Six additional hours of 8000-level coursework selected in consultation with an advisor and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.
    3. Additional graduate-level courses in mathematics, computer science, or a related field to total 30 hours selected in consultation with an advisor and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. There are many options for coursework in this area, including:
  2. Three hours of Research (MATH 8820)
  3. A literature-based research paper completed under the direction of a graduate faculty advisor within the department.

Concentration in Statistics (with thesis)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, statistics, or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to:

Degree Requirements

  1. Twenty-four hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8999 courses).
    1. The following courses are required:
    2. Twelve additional hours of Statistics courses at the 8000-level, from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.
    3. Six additional hours of graduate-level coursework from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics or in a related field selected in consultation with an adviser, and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. The courses listed as Additional Admission Requirements in section 2 above and other 6000-level Statistics courses are excluded.
  2. Six hours of STAT 8999 Thesis Research.
  3. Additional Requirements
    1. A thesis
    2. A thesis defense

Concentration in Statistics (non-thesis option)

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics have the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, statistics or its equivalent
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to:

Degree Requirements

  1. Thirty-six hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8999 courses).
    1. The following courses are required
    2. Eighteen additional hours of Statistics courses at the 8000-level from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.
    3. Twelve additional hours of graduate-level coursework. At least six of these from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and at most six hours in a related field selected in consultation with an adviser and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. The courses listed as Additional Admission Requirements in section 2 above and other 6000-level statistics courses are excluded.
    4. At most three hours of the 36 can be in STAT 8820.
  2. Additional Requirements: A research paper or written report of a laboratory experience. This requirement can be satisfied by taking STAT 8820 Research.

Concentration in Statistics and Allied Field

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics have the following requirements:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, statistics, or its equivalent.
  2. Courses in mathematics equivalent to:

Degree Requirements

  1. Thirty-six hours of graduate-level courses (exclusive of 8999 courses).
    1. The following courses are required:
    2. Twelve additional hours of graduate Statistics courses, at least six hours of which must be taken at the 8000-level from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. The courses listed as Additional Admission Requirements in section 2 above and other 6000-level Statistics courses are excluded.
    3. Twelve hours of graduate courses in an allied field a single area of application selected in consultation with an adviser and approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.
    4. At most three hours of the 36 can be in STAT 8820.
  2. Additional Requirements: A research paper or a written report of a laboratory experience. This requirement can be satisfied by taking STAT 8820 Research.

Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

The department offers the following dual degree programs:

  • B.S. in Mathematics / M.S. in Mathematics
  • B.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration) / M.S. in Mathematics (Statistics concentration)

These dual degree opportunities enable qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by participating departments and colleges to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Master of Science in Analytics Concentration in Big Data and Machine Learning

The Big Data and Machine Learning (BDML) program enables students to gain the technical skills that industry increasingly expects from data scientists. Big Data comes from the Internet of Things (IoT), robotics, autonomous vehicles, and other IT‐related fields such as scientific labs working with medical or remote‐sensing data, companies specializing in big data processing and analysis, cloud storage and computing services. See section 3175 for additional information.


Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics and Statistics

Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics have the following requirements for students who wish to enter into the Ph.D. program, regardless of concentration:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in mathematics, statistics, or a related field with a grade point average of 3.0 out of 4.0. Students with a grade point average of 2.75 will be considered for conditional admission.
  2. Three letters of reference,
  3. Recent GRE scores,
  4. A statement describing study plans.
  5. Applicants from non-English speaking countries must achieve a satisfactory score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Students must have completed courses in mathematics equivalent to the following with a grade of B or higher:

Degree Requirements

Each of the concentrations requires 54 hours of coursework and 30 hours of dissertation research.

Students must take four of the six following common core courses (12 credit hours):

Concentration in Bioinformatics

  1. The bioinformatics concentration requires that a student takes three qualifying exams. At least two of the qualifying exams must be chosen from the required courses for the bioinformatics concentration. One of the qualifying exams can be the required (core) course either from concentration in mathematics or from concentration in statistics.
  2. Students must take five of the following six required courses   (15 credit hours):
    • MATH 8500 Systems Biology (3)
    • MATH 8505 Advanced Mathematical Biology (3) (if not taken as a required course)
    • MATH 8515 Mathematical Neuroscience (3)
    • MATH 8520 Applied Combinatorics and Graph Theory (3)
    • MATH 8525 Applied Stochastic Processes (3)
    • MATH 8560 Informatics of Biological Systems (3)
  3. Students must take at least 9 credit hours selected from the list below (9 credit hours).
  4. Students must take at least 18 credit hours that should be selected from other graduate level courses in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and courses from other departments listed below. The total number of required hours of coursework is 54; if STAT 8561 is taken as part of the core and used to also satisfy the 9 required hours above, a student must take additional coursework in Mathematics and Statistics or from the list below.
  5. Dissertation Research (30 hours of MATH 9999 or STAT 9999)

Concentration in Biostatistics

  1. The following two courses should be included if they are not selected in the core courses:
  2. The following courses (27 credit hours) are required:
  3. At least 15 credit hours should be selected from other graduate-level courses in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and courses from other departments listed as follows:
  4. Dissertation Research (30 hours of MATH 9999 or STAT 9999)

Concentration in Mathematics

  1. The mathematics concentration requires that a student chooses three of the following six areas as subjects for the qualifying exam and take the two required courses for the topic if they were not taken as part of the common core. The qualifying exam is comprised of three separate written exams on each of the three chosen areas. The exam is administered by the department.
    • Analysis:Take both of the following:
    • Matrix Theory: MATH 8200 Advanced Matrix Analysis (3) and one of following:
    • Algebra: Take both of the following:
    • Discrete Mathematics: Take both of the following:
    • Applied Mathematics: Select two courses from the following:
    • Collegiate Mathematics Education: Take both of the following:
      • MATH 9126 Epistemology of Advanced Mathematical Concepts (3)
      • MATH 9136 Learning Theories Relevant to Collegiate Mathematics Education (3)
  2. For breadth and specialization a student following the concentration in mathematics will take at least 8 additional courses (24 hours) chosen from the following. At least three but no more than six should be 8000 and/or 9000-level courses within the student’s chosen area of specialization. Students are not permitted to take 6000 or 7000-level courses in an area in which they have taken a qualifying exam. Topics courses can be taken more than once if the topic is different. The total number of hours of coursework should not be less than 54 hours. If there is overlap between courses taken for the qualifying exam and the common core, then additional courses from the following list should be taken to meet the requirement for 54 hours. Two of the 8000-level courses within the student’s specialty will be chosen by the student as the basis for the candidacy exam. No student will be permitted to take a candidacy exam based on a course that was used for a qualifying exam.
  3. Dissertation Research (30 hours of MATH 9999 or STAT 9999)

Transfer credit hours: Students can transfer at most 24 semester credit hours to the program with the approval of the appropriate Graduate Director of the Department. Petition documents include the transcript, the course syllabi, exams and course notes or the textbook.

Qualifying exam: Students must pass a qualifying exam set by the appropriate graduate committee in accordance with any further requirements specified in the previously described concentrations. Students who fail the exam on the first attempt may take it only one more time. Students must pass the qualifying exam within two calendar years of admission.

Candidacy exam: Students must pass an oral candidacy exam before a committee that includes at least two final members of the student’s dissertation committee. The candidacy exam is set by the committee and covers course material within the student’s area of specialization or a proposed topic of thesis research. The details are determined by the committee in a manner consistent with any guidelines stated above for the student’s concentration. A student must advance to candidacy by the fourth year. The candidacy exam can be taken only twice.

Dissertation Committee: The student and his/her dissertation adviser shall form a dissertation committee. The committee should consist of at least four faculty members. For students in the bioinformatics and biostatistics concentrations, one committee member should be from another department such as the School of Public Health, the Department of Biology or another institution.

Final dissertation defense: Upon completion of the research, the student must defend his/her dissertation publicly.

3320 Neuroscience

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science in Neuroscience
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Neuroscience
    • Concentration in Neuroethics
  • Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Neuroscience

Neuroscience Institute
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 5030
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-5030
404-413-5445
neuroscience.gsu.edu

Nancy Forger, Director
Charles Derby, Graduate Director
Emily Hardy, Graduate Coordinator

The Neuroscience Institute emphasizes an interdisciplinary approach to graduate training. Using state of the art facilities and equipment, Neuroscience Institute faculty are actively engaged in basic research that includes molecular, cellular, behavioral, computational, and cognitive approaches. For more specific details about the Neuroscience Institute and for all application materials, please visit: neuroscience.gsu.edu.

The Neuroscience Institute offers a Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) and Master of Science degrees in Neuroscience. There are three options for the Master of Science degree. One is for Ph.D. students, who earn a M.S. en route to the Ph.D. degree. Second, there is also a stand-alone M.S. in Neuroscience, for applicants that prefer the M.S. option as the terminal degree. Third, there is the B.S./M.S. program for GSU undergraduate Neuroscience majors who want to earn the M.S.

Admission Deadlines

Applications are considered for admission in the fall semester. The Application for Graduate Study, application fee, and all supporting materials (transcripts, GRE scores, letters, and Supplementary Form for Graduate Study in Neuroscience) must be received by December 1 for applicants to the Ph.D. program and by February 15 for applicants to the stand-alone M.S program..

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Neuroscience Institute has the following additional requirements, especially for applicants to the Ph.D. program:

  1. A strong record of coursework and/or experience in a discipline related to the Neurosciences.
  2. Strong performance on the Graduate Record Examination.
  3. Students with prior laboratory experience relevant to the Neurosciences will be viewed favorably.

Master of Science in Neuroscience

Master of Science en Route to Ph.D. Degree Requirements (36)

A Master of Science is earned en route to the Neuroscience Ph.D. degree. A minimum of 36 hours of graduate coursework is required for the Master of Science Degree in Neuroscience. To satisfy the minimum requirements for the degree, the student must complete successfully:

  1. A minimum of 28 hours of graduate classroom coursework, which must include:
    • Neuroscience core course (4 hours).
    • Neuroscience core elective courses (6 hours).
    • Quantitative core course (3-4 hours).
    • Introduction to Graduate Studies core courses (4 hours).
    • Neuroscience electives (10-11 hours, 6 of which must be topics, concepts and seminar courses).
  2. A minimum of 8 semester hours of research credit. This requirement can be satisfied by enrolling in NEUR 8800 Master’s Research or the equivalent.
  3. A qualifying exam.

Students admitted for graduate study who have already taken relevant graduate classes or who are in possession of a graduate degree may be accorded advanced standing after an evaluation of previous graduate work.  This evaluation would normally be conducted by the Director of Graduate Studies before entry into the program or at the very latest during the first semester of enrollment.

Stand-alone Master of Science in Neuroscience Degree Requirements (36)

A minimum of 36 hours of graduate coursework is required for the stand-alone Master of Science degree in Neuroscience. To satisfy the minimum requirements for the degree, the student must complete successfully:

  1. A minimum of 27 hours of graduate classroom coursework, which must include:
    • Neuroscience core course. Select one course from the following (4):
    • Core elective courses. Select two courses from the following (6) :
      • NEUR 8010 Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Neuroscience (3)
      • NEUR 8020 Systems Neuroscience (3)
      • NEUR 8031 Behavioral Neuroscience (3)
      • NEUR 8420 Principles of Cognitive Neuroscience (3)
    • Quantitative course requirement. Select one course from the following (3-4):
      • NEUR 6050 Statistics for Neuroscience (4)
      • NEUR 8040 Research Design and Analysis in Neuroscience (4)
      • NEUR 8380 Computational Neuroscience (3)
    • Responsible Conduct in Research: NEUR 8600 (1)
    • Neuroscience electives: Select a minimum of 12-13 hours, six of which must be 8000-level topics, concepts, and/or seminar courses; the remaining may be taken at the 6000-level.
  2. A minimum of nine semester hours of research credit. This requirement may be satisfied by enrolling in NEUR 8800 Master’s Research or similar independent studies.
  3. A written product approved by the student’s Master’s Committee. Students have the option of defending a formal Master’s thesis, or of selecting the non-thesis option. In the latter case, students submit an empirical paper, literature review, methodological / technical paper, research proposal or other product with the approval of the Graduate Program Committee.

Doctor of Philosophy

Degree Requirements (90)

A minimum of 90 hours of graduate credit is required for the Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience. To satisfy the minimum requirements for the degree, the student must complete successfully:

  1. The Master of Science in Neuroscience en Route to Ph.D. (36 hours) (see above for details)
  2. A minimum of 54 semester hours of research credit. This requirement can be satisfied by a combination of NEUR 9910 Advanced Research, NEUR 9999 Dissertation Research (minimum 20 hours) and NEUR 9920 Advanced Directed Readings or the equivalent.
  3. A dissertation proposal.
  4. A dissertation.
  5. A final oral presentation, directed primarily to the defense of the dissertation.

Concentration in Neuroethics

Students in the Neuroscience Ph.D. program can earn a concentration in Neurothics. This interdisciplinary field considers how ethical theories inform neuroscientific practice and how neuroscientific discoveries inform ethical theorizing.  Neuroethics Ph.D. students must satisfy all requirements described above for the Ph.D. degree in Neuroscience plus take 12 hours of coursework in Neuroethics to satisfy the concentration, and receive a grade of B or better in each of these courses.

  • Neuroethics (PHIL 6780/NEUR 6530, 3 credits) is required for the concentration.
  • One course on the elective list for the concentration (any with NEUR 6000-level numbers) may be used to satisfy the Neuroscience Elective requirement as described in 1b. above.
  • One course on the elective list for the concentration (any with NEUR 8000-level numbers) may be used to satisfy 3 of the required 7-8 hours of the topics/concepts/seminar requirement as described in 1e. above.
  • The additional 6 hours in Neuroethics courses can be taken in lieu of additional credit hours in research (NEUR 9910) or directed readings (NEUR 9920) that current Neuroscience doctoral students currently take in excess of the minimum 54 credit hours required for the Ph.D.

Dual B.S./M.S. Program in Neuroscience

The Neuroscience Institute offers a dual Bachelor of Science and Master of Science in Neuroscience. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified Georgia State University undergraduate students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the Neuroscience Institute and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

3330 Philosophy

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Philosophy
    • Concentration in Neurophilosophy
    • Concentration in History of Philosophy
  • Dual Master of Arts in Philosophy and Juris Doctor in Law (in cooperation with the College of Law)

Department of Philosophy
16th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-6100
Email: philgrad@gsu.edu
philosophy.gsu.edu

Eddy Nahmias, Chair
Timothy O’Keefe, Director of Graduate Studies

The department’s M.A. program serves two different communities of students. First, it serves those who seek the M.A. as preparation before seeking admission to a philosophy Ph.D. program. Second, it serves those who seek the M.A. as a terminal degree to advance their chosen careers or as preparation for other degrees. In addition to a traditional M.A. in Philosophy, the Department offers three special programs: an M.A. in Philosophy with a specialization in empirically based philosophy of mind (the Neurophilosophy concentration); an M.A. with a concentration in History of Philosophy, which is designed to prepare students to complete an M.A. in Teaching degree and become certified to teach history; and, in conjunction with the College of Law, a J.D./M.A. program. The J.D./M.A. track allows students to receive the M.A. in philosophy and the J.D. in four years instead of five that would normally be required.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Philosophy by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the address above.

Degree Requirements, Thesis Option

  1. Twenty-seven hours of graduate coursework in philosophy.
  2. Distribution requirements
    1. Logic requirement: PHIL 6500 Symbolic Logic
    2. History Requirement: at least one history course. See below for the list of courses in this area.
    3. Value Theory Requirement: at least one course in value theory. See below for the list of courses in this area.
    4. Metaphysics and Epistemology Requirement: at least one course in metaphysics or epistemology. See below for the list of courses in this area.
    5. Seminar requirement: at least four letter-graded courses with the word “Seminar” in the title. This requirement is exempt from the usual “no double-counting” rule for distribution requirements; e.g. PHIL 8030 can count both toward this requirement and the history requirement.
  3. Six hours of thesis research.
  4. A thesis.
  5. An oral thesis defense.

Degree requirements, non- thesis option

The non-thesis option requires thirty-three hours of graduate coursework in philosophy (six more than the thesis option), and it has the same distribution requirements as the thesis option. It does not require six hours of thesis research, a thesis, or an oral thesis defense. Students taking the non-thesis option should not expect to receive letters of recommendation to philosophy Ph.D. programs.

History Courses

Value Theory Courses

Metaphysics and Epistemology Courses

Neurophilosophy Concentration

In addition to meeting the requirements noted above, students seeking the M.A. with a Neurophilosophy concentration have the following additional requirements

  1. PHIL 6330, Philosophy of Mind, PHIL 6340, Philosophy and Cognitive Science, PHIL 8330, Seminar in Philosophy of Mind, or PHIL 8340, Seminar in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. This requirement is exempt from the usual “no double-counting” rule for distribution requirements; e.g. PHIL 8330 can count both toward this requirement and the seminar requirement.
  2. Six hours at the graduate level of courses relevant to neurophilosophy from other departments, such as Neuroscience or Psychology. (These courses count towards the 27-hour requirement and must be approved, in advance, by the Philosophy Neurophilosophy Faculty and the Philosophy Director of Graduate Studies.) For the purposes of the rule below that only six hours of credit earned outside the Department of Philosophy at Georgia State University may be applied towards the Georgia State M.A. in philosophy, these courses count as courses taken in the Department of Philosophy at Georgia State.
  3. Must take least three letter-graded courses with the word “Seminar” in the title. (This is one less than the number required of other students.)
  4. Must write a thesis on a topic related to Neurophilosophy, broadly construed (topic will be approved by the Philosophy Neurophilosophy Faculty and the Philosophy Director of Graduate Studies).

Concentration in History of Philosophy

The M.A. in Philosophy with Concentration in History of Philosophy is designed to prepare students to continue their education in history and pedagogy by transitioning into and obtaining the Masters in Teaching (M.A.T.) degree in Social Studies Education in GSU’s College of Education and Human Development (CEHD) and to become certified to teach Social Studies for grades 6-12.

In addition to meeting the requirements noted above, students seeking the M.A. with a Concentration in History of Philosophy have the following additional requirements:

  1. All Department of Philosophy Teaching Preparation requirements.
  2. History Content requirements: 12 content hours at the 6000- or 8000-level in history courses listed below. Courses taken to fulfill this requirement can also count toward the distribution requirements above. E.g., PHIL 8085 can count both toward this requirement and the Seminar requirement.

These history content courses also satisfy the 12 hours of Advanced Studies in Social Studies required for the MAT degree. As their schedule allows, students are encouraged to take additional graduate-level history courses.

The J.D./M.A. Track

The J.D./M.A. track, offered in conjunction with the College of Law at Georgia State University, allows students to receive the M.A. in philosophy and the J.D. in four years instead of the usual five.

The J.D./M.A. track is a demanding course of study. Each student in the track is assigned an adviser from the College of Law faculty and an adviser from the faculty of the Department of Philosophy. Students must work closely with their advisers to make sure that they correctly progress towards the degrees.

  1. Nine hours of qualifying courses in law. (The student will, in consultation with her or his advisers, select the most appropriate three courses.)
  2. Eighteen hours of graduate coursework in philosophy with the following distribution requirements:
    1. At least two seminar courses.
    2. Either PHIL 6700 Ethics or PHIL 6800 Social and Political Philosophy.
    3. In addition to the courses taken to fulfill requirements 2.b., at least one of the following courses:
    4. Epistemology Requirement—at least one of the following courses:
    5. Metaphysics Requirement–at least one of the following courses:
  3. Either PHIL 6820 Philosophy of Law or LAW 7295 Jurisprudence. PHIL 6820 Philosophy of Law counts towards requirement 2.C. and LAW 7295 Jurisprudence, counts towards requirement 1. (If one of these two courses has been taken, credit for the second will be given only if the J.D. adviser and the M.A. adviser determine that the second would not substantially duplicate the first.)
  4. Six hours of thesis research.
  5. A thesis.
  6. An oral thesis defense.

Other Notes Concerning the J.D./M.A. Track

Students must independently meet the admission requirements of the Department of Philosophy and the College of Law. Admission to the College of Law creates no presumption favoring admission to the Department of Philosophy. Admission to the Department of Philosophy creates no presumption favoring admission to the College of Law.

Students on the J.D./M.A. track may, if they wish, count one seminar course towards both the seminar requirement and one other requirement. For example, PHIL 8300 might fulfill both the seminar requirement and the Metaphysics Requirement.

The Department of Philosophy will only grant credit for those law courses in which the student earns a grade of 80 or higher.

Law students may not take any philosophy courses while completing the first year law curriculum.

The J.D. degree must be completed within six years of the initial semester of enrollment in the J.D. program.

Students enrolled in the J.D./M.A. program may subsequently elect not to pursue both degrees and may remain in either the J.D. or M.A. program, but any hours earned in a degree program from which a student withdraws will not be credited toward a degree granted by the program in which the student remains.

Additional Restrictions Which Apply to All Tracks

  1. Only three credit hours of PHIL 8950 Directed Readings may be counted towards the degree. Additional hours of PHIL 8950 may be taken, but they will not count towards the degree.
  2. Other than the exceptions specifically indicated above, only six hours of credit earned outside the Department of Philosophy at Georgia State University may be applied towards the Georgia State M.A. in philosophy.

The M.A. with Distinction

Students who meet all of the following three requirements shall be awarded the M.A. with distinction:

    1. A graduate Georgia State philosophy GPA of 3.85 or higher.
    2. A thesis and oral thesis defense that, upon vote of the committee grading the thesis, are judged to merit distinction.
    3. The Director of Graduate Studies judges that the student’s record at Georgia State University is one of distinction.

Applicants are strongly encouraged to review the additional information about the Department of Philosophy which has been placed on its website, philosophy.gsu.edu/.

3340 Physics

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Science in Physics 
    • Standard Program 
    • Concentration in Astronomy
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Physics
    • Concentration in Atomic Physics
    • Concentration in Biophysics
    • Concentration in Molecular Physics
    • Concentration in Nuclear Physics
    • Concentration in Condensed Matter Physics
    • Concentration in Astrophysics
    • Concentration in Applied Physics

Department of Physics and Astronomy
Georgia State University
Room 605, 25 Park Place
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-4106
404-413-6033
phy-astr.gsu.edu
Email (Administrative Coordinator): kwright14@gsu.edu
Email (Director of Graduate Studies): msar@gsu.edu

Sebastien Lepine, Chair
Murad Sarsour, Director of Graduate Studies, Physics

The Department of Physics and Astronomy works closely with graduate students on theoretical and experimental research in the following areas: atomic physics, biophysics, molecular physics, nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, astronomy, and astrophysics.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Physics and Astronomy by visiting the departmental website or by contacting the Administrative Coordinator and/or Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above. Applications should be submitted online through the Graduate Admissions system of the College of Arts and Sciences (cas.gsu.edu/graduate-studies/admissions/).

Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Physics (30)

  1. Students must either complete or exempt PHYS 6510, PHYS 6520, PHYS 6810, PHYS 7600 and PHYS 7700 (0-17 credit-hours). Exemption from these courses may be granted on the basis of testing or of having successfully completed similar courses elsewhere. Students not exempting at least two courses must take more than 30 hours to complete the degree requirements.
  2. Students must have competence in the following areas of mathematics: matrix algebra, vector and tensor analysis, partial differential equations, Fourier series and boundary value problems, and complex variables.
  3. Students must complete the following core courses:
  4. Students must complete additional graduate level courses appropriate to the focused research area (0-11 credit-hours). Course choices should be selected after discussion with the research adviser, and approval of the graduate director. No more than two hours of ASTR 6300/PHYS 6300 Teaching Physics/Astronomy, one hour of ASTR 6310/PHYS 6310 Teaching Physics/Astronomy Lab Practicum, and three hours of ASTR 8710/PHYS 8710 Research Topics or ASTR 8910/PHYS 8910 Directed Study can be applied to the M.S. degree requirements.
  5. Proficiency in an approved language or research skill. Contact the department for details.
  6. A general examination.
  7. Six hours of PHYS 8999 Thesis Research.
  8. A thesis.
  9. A final oral presentation directed primarily to the defense of the thesis

Master of Science in Physics, Concentration in Astronomy (30)

  1. Students must either complete or exempt PHYS 6510, 6520, 6810, 7600 and 7700 (0-17 credit-hours). Exemption from these courses may be granted on the basis of testing or of having successfully completed similar courses elsewhere. Students not exempting at least two courses must take more than 30 hours to complete the degree requirements.
  2. Students must have competence in the following areas of mathematics: matrix algebra, vector and tensor analysis, partial differential equations, Fourier series and boundary value problems, and complex variables.
  3. Students must complete the following six core courses (20):
    • ASTR 6100 Astronomical Techniques and Instrumentation (3)
    • ASTR 6200 Astronomical Data Analytics (3)
    • ASTR 8000 Stellar Atmospheres and Spectroscopy (4)
    • ASTR 8100 Stellar Structure and Evolution (4)
    • ASTR 8300 The Interstellar Medium (3)
    • ASTR 8400 Extragalactic Astronomy (3)
  4. Six credit hours of PHYS 8999 Thesis Research.
  5. Additional graduate level courses should be taken to complete the 30 hours degree requirements (0-4 credit-hours). No more than three hours total of ASTR 6300/PHYS 6300 Teaching Physics/Astronomy and ASTR 6310/PHYS 6310 Teaching Physics/Astronomy Lab Practicum, and no more than three hours of ASTR 8710/PHYS 8710 Research Topics or ASTR 8910/PHYS 8910 Directed Study can be applied to the M.S. degree requirements.
  6. Proficiency in an approved language or research skill. Contact the department for details.
  7. A general examination:
    • Students seeking an MS degree in Physics, concentration in Astronomy, must pass the first astronomy general examination, administered as a written examination covering the fundamentals of astronomy, within a year of entering the program.
  8. A thesis.
  9. A final oral presentation directed primarily to the defense of the thesis.

Master of Science in Physics, Non-Thesis Option (36)

  1. Students must either complete or exempt PHYS 6510, PHYS 6520, PHYS 6810, and PHYS 7600 (0-13 credit-hours). Exemption from these courses may be granted on the basis of testing or of having successfully completed similar courses elsewhere.
  2. Students must have competence in the following areas of mathematics: matrix algebra, vector and tensor analysis, partial differential equations, Fourier series and boundary value problems, and complex variables.
  3. Students must complete the following core courses (13):
  4. Students must complete at least 2 additional 8000-level physics (PHYS) courses (6-8 credit-hours), excluding PHYS 8710, PHYS 8910, or PHYS 8999. Courses should be selected in consultation with the graduate director.
  5. Additional graduate level courses should be taken to complete the 36 hours degree requirements (2-17 credit-hours). No more than three hours of PHYS 6300 Teaching Physics and PHYS 6310 Teaching Physics Lab Practicum, and no more than three hours of PHYS 8710 or PHYS 8910 can be applied to the M.S. degree requirements.
  6. Proficiency in an approved language or research skill. Contact the department for details.
  7. A general oral examination.
  8. A research paper or written report.

Master of Science in Physics, Concentration in Astronomy, Non-Thesis Option (36)

  1. Students must either complete or exempt PHYS 6510, PHYS 6520, PHYS 6810, and PHYS 7600 (0-13 credit-hours). Exemption from these courses may be granted on the basis of testing or of having successfully completed similar courses elsewhere.
  2. Students must have competence in the following areas of mathematics: matrix algebra, vector and tensor analysis, partial differential equations, Fourier series and boundary value problems, and complex variables.
  3. Students must complete the following six core courses (20):
    • ASTR 6100 Astronomical Techniques and Instrumentation (3)
    • ASTR 6200 Astronomical Data Analytics (3)
    • ASTR 8000 Stellar Atmospheres and Spectroscopy (4)
    • ASTR 8100 Stellar Structure and Evolution (4)
    • ASTR 8300 The Interstellar Medium (3)
    • ASTR 8400 Extragalactic Astronomy (3)
  4. Students must complete at least 2 additional 8000-level astronomy (ASTR) or physics (PHYS) courses (6-8 credit-hours) excluding ASTR 8710/PHYS 8710, ASTR 8910/PHYS 8910, or PHYS 8999. Courses should be selected in consultation with the graduate director.
  5. Additional graduate level courses should be taken to complete the 36 hours degree requirements (0-10 credit-hours). No more than three hours total of ASTR 6300/PHYS 6300 Teaching Physics/Astronomy and ASTR 6310/PHYS 6310 Teaching Physics/Astronomy Lab Practicum, and no more than three hours of [ASTR 8710/PHYS 8710 or ASTR 8910/PHYS 8910 can be applied to the M.S. degree requirements.
  6. Proficiency in an approved language or research skill. Contact the department for details.
  7. A general examination:
    • Students seeking an MS degree in Physics, concentration in Astronomy, must pass the first astronomy general examination, administered as a written examination covering the fundamentals of astronomy, within a year of entering the program.
  8. A research paper or written report.

Doctor of Philosophy in Physics (71 hours beyond the baccalaureate degree)

  1. Students must either complete or exempt PHYS 6510, PHYS 6520, PHYS 6810, and PHYS 7600 (0-13 hours). Exemption from these courses may be granted on the basis of testing or of having successfully completed similar courses elsewhere. Students not exempting at least two courses must take more than the 71 minimum hours required for the degree.
  2. Students must have competence in the following areas of mathematics: matrix algebra, vector and tensor analysis, partial differential equations, Fourier series and boundary value problems, and complex variables.
  3. Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in Physics must complete the following core courses (19):
  4. Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in physics must complete at least two graduate level courses appropriate to the focused research area (6-8 credit-hours). Course choices should be selected after discussion with the research adviser, and approval of the graduate director.
  5. Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in physics in any concentration must complete at least 12 additional credit-hours of 8000-level physics (PHYS) courses, excluding PHYS 8710, PHYS 8910, or PHYS 8999. Courses should be selected in consultation with the student’s research adviser and the graduate director. Alternatively, up to 9 credit-hours of 8000-level non-physics graduate courses in the area of concentration may be counted toward this requirement with approval of the graduate director.
  6. Students must complete PHYS 6300 Teaching Physics and PHYS 6310 Teaching Physics Lab Practicum for a total of 3 credit-hours.
  7. A minimum of 20 credit-hours of either PHYS 9999 or ASTR 9999 Doctoral Dissertation Research must be completed. No more than 20 credit-hours may count towards the degree.
  8. Additional graduate levels courses should be taken to complete the 71 hour degree requirements.
  9. Proficiency in an approved language or research skill. Contact the graduate director for details.
  10. Students seeking a Ph.D. degree in Physics must take the physics general examination, administered as a written examination, after taking the required core courses.
  11. Students pursuing the Ph.D. degree are strongly urged to satisfy the requirements for the M.S. (non-thesis option) as soon as possible after entering the program. See the appropriate director of graduate studies for details.
  12. An oral presentation and discussion of the student’s proposed dissertation research.
  13. A dissertation.
  14. A final oral presentation and defense of the dissertation.

Prior to registration each semester, students must be advised by either the chair of the department or the appropriate director of graduate studies.

3350 Political Science

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Political Science
    • General Political Science
    • Concentration in American Politics
    • Concentration in International and Comparative Politics
    • Concentration in Political Science for Educators
    • Concentration in Professional Politics
  • Dual B.A./M.A. in Political Science
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science

Department of Political Science
1005 Langdale Hall
Tel: 404-413-6159
Fax: 404-413-6156
Email:  polsci@gsu.edu
politicalscience.gsu.edu

Michael Herb, Chair
Ryan E. Carlin, Director of Graduate Studies
Charles R Hankla, M.A. Program Director

The purpose of the Master of Arts (M.A.) degree program is to guide students in the development of analytical and critical capabilities through inquiry into political and governmental processes. The objective of the program is to provide education for persons interested in pursuing careers in research, teaching, or the professional practice of public service and politics. Students can choose a degree program that will provide them with a general knowledge of the discipline, or one that will provide them with a specialization in American politics, international and comparative politics, or the professional practices of government and politics.

A Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) prepares students for careers in research and teaching. Students enhance their skills by furthering their knowledge of the literature of the discipline, increasing their methodological ability, and writing a publishable dissertation. The Ph.D. program produces scholars who are experts in their substantive field of study and who are able to combine theoretical sophistication with methodological rigor.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Political Science by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Political Science has the following requirements:

  1. Applicants to the M.A. degree program must:
    • Submit acceptable scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the GRE, except when specially waived by the Director of Graduate Studies.
    • Have an acceptable cumulative undergraduate grade-point average and the equivalent of at least a minor in political science.
    • Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in political science or a related field.
    • Submit official transcripts from all colleges and/or universities applicant has attended.
    • Submit a statement of research interest and goals for political science degree.
    • Submit a writing sample demonstrating graduate level research capabilities
  2. Applicants to the Ph.D. degree program must:
    • Submit acceptable scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the GRE.
    • Have an acceptable cumulative master’s grade-point average and substantial prior coursework in political science or a related field, preferably with a thesis.
    • Submit three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work in political science.
    • Submit official transcripts from all colleges and/or universities attended.
    • Submit a statement of research interests and goals for political science degree.
    • Submit a writing sample demonstrating graduate level research capabilities
    • Applicants who intend to pursue comparative politics as their major field should have at least one year of college level training in a world language.

Degree Requirements

Both masters and doctoral students must be registered for a minimum of three (3) semester hours the semester of completion of all degree requirements.

Master of Arts

  • General Political Science
  • Concentration in American Politics
  • Concentration in International and Comparative Politics
  • Concentration in Political Science for Educators
  • Concentration in Professional Politics

The department also includes an informal track that provides a specialization in Public Law (see below).

General Political Science (30)

  1. Methods Sequence: Students may choose between a regular and an advanced methods track.
    1. Regular methods track:
      • POLS 6800 Research Design and Applied Data Analysis (3)
    2. Advanced methods track:
      • POLS 6800/POLS 8800 Elements of Research Design (3)
      • POLS 8805 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (3)
      • Either POLS 8810 Uses of Intermediate Statistical Methods in Political Science Research or POLS 8840 Qualitative Research Methods (3).
  2. Seven additional graduate Political Science courses (21 hours) for students on the regular methods track. Five additional graduate Political Science courses (15 hours) for students on the advanced methods track. Students should take one course in three of the five major areas of study. These areas include American government and politics, comparative politics, international politics, political theory and public law. Two of the courses may be taken outside the department or may be taken as experiential learning hours with the advance approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies.
  3. Thesis Option:
    • A minimum of six hours of POLS 8999 Thesis Research.
    • A thesis, written following successful defense of proposal before three-member faculty committee. The chair and at least one member of this committee must come from the department’s graduate faculty, but the third member may come from the graduate faculty of another department at Georgia State University or from among the department’s permanent non-graduate faculty.  Subject to the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, additional members beyond the required three may also come from outside the university, normally among members of the political science graduate faculty at an MA or PhD granting institution.
    • A thesis defense.
  4. Non-Thesis Option (Students wishing to pursue a doctoral degree should not choose this option.):
    • Six additional hours of graduate courses in political science.
    • A research paper completed according to departmental guidelines. First readers on this paper should be chosen from among the department’s graduate faculty, but second readers may also be chosen from among the department’s permanent non-graduate faculty or from among the graduate faculty of other departments at Georgia State University, subject to the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies.

Concentration in American Politics (30)

  1. Methods Sequence: Students may choose between a regular and an advanced methods track.
    1. Regular methods track:
      • POLS 6800 Research Design and Applied Data Analysis (3)
    2. Advanced methods track:
      • POLS 6800/POLS 8800 Elements of Research Design (3)
      • POLS 8805 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (3)
      • Either POLS 8810 Uses of Intermediate Statistical Methods in Political Science Research or POLS 8840 Qualitative Research Methods (3).
  2. POLS 6100/POLS 8100 Seminar in American Politics (3)
  3. Six additional graduate Political Science (18 hours) courses for those on the regular methods track. Four additional graduate Political Science courses (12 hours) for those on the advanced methods track. These must be chosen from general American, Public Law, American Institutions, or American Political Behavior offerings (POLS 6100 to POLS 6180, POLS 8100 to POLS 8180). One course may be taken in a different political science concentration with the advance approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies. Two of these courses may be taken in another department or may be taken as experiential learning hours with the advance approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies.
  4. Thesis Option:
    • A minimum of six hours of POLS 8999 Thesis Research.
    • A thesis, written following successful defense of proposal before three-member faculty committee.
    • A thesis defense.
  5. Non-Thesis Option (Students wishing to pursue a doctoral degree should not choose this option):

Concentration in International and Comparative Politics (30)

  1. Methods Sequence: Students may choose between a regular and an advanced methods track.
    1. Regular methods track:
      • POLS 6800 Research Design and Applied Data Analysis (3)
    2. Advanced methods track:
      • POLS 6800/POLS 8800 Elements of Research Design (3)
      • POLS 8805 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (3)
      • Either POLS 8810 Uses of Intermediate Statistical Methods in Political Science Research or POLS 8840 Qualitative Research Methods (3).
  2. POLS 6200/POLS 8200 Comparative Political Analysis (3) and POLS 6400/POLS 8400 International Politics (3).
  3. Five additional graduate Political Science courses for those on the regular methods track. Three additional graduate Political Science courses (9 hours) for those on the advanced methods track. These should be chosen from the areas of comparative (POLS 6200 to POLS 6280, POLS 8200 to POLS 8280) and international politics (POLS 6400 to POLS 6480, POLS 8400 to POLS 8480).Two of these courses may be taken in other departments or may be taken as experiential learning hours with the advanced approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies. One may be taken in a different political science concentration with the advanced approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies.
  4. Thesis Option:
    • A minimum of six hours of POLS 8999 Thesis Research
    • A thesis, written following successful defense of proposal before three-member faculty committee
    • A thesis defense.
  5. Non-Thesis Option (Students wishing to pursue a doctoral degree should not choose this option):

Concentration in Political Science for Educators (30)

This concentration provides the professional skills needed by those pursuing career paths in the teaching of the social sciences. It is offered as a terminal degree with a non-thesis option and can be undertaken in a traditional classroom setting, fully online, or hybridized.

  1. Methods Sequence: Students may choose between a regular and an advanced methods track.
    1. Regular methods track:
      • POLS 6800 Research Design and Applied Data Analysis (3)
    2. Advanced methods track:
      • POLS 6800/POLS 8800 Elements of Research Design (3)
      • POLS 8805 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (3)
      • Either POLS 8810 Uses of Intermediate Statistical Methods in Political Science Research or POLS 8840 Qualitative Research Methods (3).
  2. Core seminars in the sub-fields of political science
  3. Courses in the teaching of political science
    • POLS 6987 Teaching Politics with Simulations (3)
    • POLS 6988 Teaching American Citizenship (3)
  4. Specialized courses in political science
    • Coursework in political science at the 6000 or 8000 level. Three courses (9 hours) for those on the regular methods track. One course (3 hours) for those on the advanced methods track.
  5. A capstone course, practicum, or directed reading in which the student will complete a project under the supervision of one or more faculty members (3 hours)

Concentration in Professional Politics (30)

This concentration provides the professional skills needed by those pursuing career paths in public service, politics, lobbying and advocacy. It is offered as a terminal degree with a non-thesis option and can be undertaken in a traditional classroom setting, fully online, or hybridized.

  1. Methods Sequence: Students may choose between a regular and an advanced methods track.
    1. Regular methods track:
      • POLS 6800 Research Design and Applied Data Analysis (3)
    2. Advanced methods track:
      • POLS 6800/POLS 8800 Elements of Research Design (3)
      • POLS 8805 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (3)
      • Either POLS 8810 Uses of Intermediate Statistical Methods in Political Science Research or POLS 8840 Qualitative Research Methods (3).
  2. POLS 6100 Seminar in American Politics (3)
  3. Select one course:
  4. Select one course:
    • POLS 6200 Seminar in Comparative Politics (3)
    • POLS 6400 Seminar in International Politics (3)
      Necessary substitutions can be made with the advance permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.
  5. Three additional graduate Political Science courses (9 hours) for students on the regular methods track. One additional graduate Political Science course (3 hours) for students on the advanced methods track. These should be selected to strengthen knowledge of practice areas related to a student’s professional goals.
  6. Experiential Learning Project (6 hours): Students must complete one experiential learning project for 6 credit hours; students may choose to find an internship with an organization or political campaign or create another experiential learning project related to their main practice area. All experiential learning projects must receive the advance permission of the Director of Graduate Studies before students will be allowed to register for POLS 8995 Administrative and Policy Internship hours. Student progress will be monitored by a faculty member through regular reports and a final paper. Students may choose to take an additional 3 hours of experiential learning as a substitute for one graduate course with the advance permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.
  7. Up to two courses (6 hours) in departments outside of Political Science may be used if relevant and with advance permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.
  8. A capstone course, practicum, or directed reading in which the student will complete a project under the supervision of one or more faculty members (3 hours).
  9. A non-thesis research paper completed according to departmental guidelines is required. Students interested in completing a thesis may substitute it for six hours of course or experiential learning credit with the advance permission of the Director of Graduate Studies.

Specialization in Public Law (30)

  1. Methods Sequence: Students may choose between a regular and a more advanced methods track.
    1. Regular methods track:
      • POLS 6800 Research Design and Applied Data Analysis (3)
    2. Advanced methods track:
      • POLS 6800/POLS 8800 Elements of Research Design (3)
      • POLS 8805 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (3)
      • Either POLS 8810 Uses of Intermediate Statistical Methods in Political Science Research or POLS 8840 Qualitative Research Methods (3).
  2. Either POLS 6100/POLS 8100 Seminar in American Politics, POLS 6200/POLS 8200 Comparative Political Analysis, or POLS 6400/POLS 8400 International Politics (3)
  3. POLS 8140 Judicial Process and Policy Making (3)
  4. POLS 8145 Law, Courts and Policy (3)
  5. Either POLS 8427 International Human Rights or POLS 8139 Constitutional Theory (3)
  6. For students on the regular methods track, choose two additional Public Law or Public Law-related courses (6). For students on the advanced methods track, choose one additional Public Law or Public Law-related course (3). One course may be taken in a different political science concentration with the advance approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies. Potential courses include, but are not limited to:
    • POLS 6131 Civil Rights & Liberties (3)
    • POLS 6190 Studies in American Politics (3)
    • POLS 8421 International Institutions and Organizations (3)
  7. For students on the regular methods track, choose one elective course in consultation with the departmental Director of Graduate Studies (3). Two of the above courses may be taken in another department or may be taken as experiential learning hours with the advance approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies.
  8. Thesis Option:
    • A minimum of six hours of POLS 8999 Thesis Research.
    • A thesis, written following successful defense of proposal before three-member faculty committee.
    • A thesis defense.
  9. Non-Thesis Option (Students wishing to pursue a doctoral degree should not choose this option):
    • Six additional hours of graduate courses in Public Law or Public Law-related courses.
    • A research paper completed according to departmental guidelines.

Dual B.A./M.A. Program in Political Science

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Political Science. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs. Typically, students apply four graduate Political Science courses (12 hours) to their undergraduate degree requirements in Area H.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes. Once admitted, they will need to fulfill the regular M.A. requirements listed above for each concentration, though they may take up to 9 experiential learning hours (POLS 8995 Administrative and Policy Internship) as a substitute for general required courses.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

Doctor of Philosophy

  1. POLS 8800 Elements of Research Design (3)
  2. POLS 8805 Introduction to Quantitative Analysis (3)
  3. POLS 8810 Uses of Intermediate Statistical Methods in Political Science Research (3)
  4. Either POLS 8830 Advanced Quantitative Methods or POLS 8840 Qualitative Research Methods (3). Students intending to write their dissertations in Political Theory may make a request to the departmental Director of Graduate Studies that up to two of the four courses in the required methods sequence be waived.
  5. An additional twenty-four hours of coursework beyond the M.A. (excluding the required methods sequence). For students without an M.A. in hand, thirty-six hours of coursework must be completed (excluding the required methods sequence). Only 8000-level coursework in political science will be counted towards this requirement, unless other courses are specifically allowed by the Director of Graduate Studies.
  6. Distribution Requirement: To ensure a broad knowledge of the discipline of Political Science, all students must take at least one course each in two fields that will not serve as qualifying exam fields. For the purposes of this requirement, the fields are: American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Politics, Political Theory, and Public Law. The remaining courses should be chosen by the student in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies in accordance with the student’s planned qualifying exam fields (POLS 8100 to POLS 8980).
  7. Students admitted to the program without a previously earned MA will earn an ‘MA in passing’ consisting of a rigorous research paper. This requirement must be met by the completion of 33 hours of coursework.
  8. Qualifying Exams
    • All doctoral students must pass a written examination in two of the following fields: American Politics, Comparative Politics, International Politics, Political Theory, Public Law, and Research Methods. All students are expected to take their qualifying exams after completing no more than 42 credit hours of coursework in political science at Georgia State beyond the M.A. In order to take these exams, a student must have a 3.4 grade-point average in political science courses taken in the Ph.D. program at Georgia State University. Students who do not have the required 3.4 GPA for graduate Political Science courses taken at Georgia State after 36 hours will be issued a scholastic warning. Students who have failed to achieve the required 3.4 GPA to take the qualifying exams after 42 hours will be subject to scholastic termination. Students must also have taken at least three courses in each of their examining fields in preparation for the qualifying exams. (Students taking Qualifying Exams in Research Methods may not count POLS 8800, 8805, or 8810 towards the three-course requirement). Students must register for POLS 8900 during the semester of the exams. Individual exam committees, at their discretion, may require students to complete an oral examination as part of their qualifying exams.  Students may take the exams twice if necessary.
  9. World Language and Research Skill Requirement: In addition to the required methods sequence, students must demonstrate further research competency by either taking one additional methodology course (to be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies) or passing a world language proficiency examination administrated by the Department of World Languages and Cultures. Ph.D. students with a major in Comparative Politics must present a world language. The Department strongly urges students to complete this requirement before taking the qualifying examination.
  10. Professionalization/Research Presentation Requirement: All doctoral students will be required by the time they have completed 36 hours of coursework to present a major research paper at the annual GSA Graduate Student Conference or another conference approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. Doctoral students will also be expected to attend Departmental colloquia, workshops, and other events and presentations on a regular basis as part of their ongoing professionalization activities.
  11. Twenty hours of POLS 8999 Thesis Research.
  12. Students must defend their dissertation proposal no later than 90 days after having completed the qualifying exams.
  13. Dissertation written and approved by a three-member faculty committee. The chair and at least one member of this committee must come from the department’s graduate faculty, but the third member may come from the graduate faculty of another department at Georgia State University.  Subject to the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, additional members beyond the required three may also come from outside the university, normally among members of the political science graduate faculty at a Ph.D. granting institution.
  14. First and Second Year Process
    • First Year Review: Based on each first year doctoral student’s research interests, he or she will be assigned a faculty mentor in that area. All doctoral students will be evaluated at the end of their first year by the Department’s graduate faculty as to their performance in the program to date. An unsatisfactory review may result in dismissal from the program.
    • Second Year Review: All doctoral students will again be evaluated at the end of their second year by the Department’s graduate faculty as to their performance in the program to date. An unsatisfactory review may result in dismissal from the program.
  15. Ph.D. students must have approval from the Director of Graduate Studies to count online courses towards their degree.

No grade below a “C” may be used towards the M.A. or Ph.D. degrees. In addition, because the field of political science changes so quickly, the department will not normally support the use of coursework and other qualifications older than seven years towards the M.A. and ten years towards the Ph.D.

3360 Psychology

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Psychology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology
    • Concentration in Clinical Psychology
    • Concentration in Community Psychology
    • Concentration in Clinical/Community Psychology
    • Concentration in Clinical/Neuropsychology
    • Concentration in Developmental Psychology
    • Concentration in Neuroethics
    • Concentration in Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
    • Concentration in Cognitive Sciences Psychology
  • Dual Master of Public Health / Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology with a Concentration in  Community Psychology

Georgia State University
Department of Psychology
P.O. Box 5010
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-5010
404-413-6200
Email: psycadmissions@gsu.edu
psychology.gsu.edu

Chris Henrich, Chair
Lindsey Cohen, Director of Graduate Studies

The Department of Psychology offers courses of study leading primarily to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree. A Master of Arts (M.A) degree is completed by students as part of their courses of study. The master’s level education of graduate students focuses upon basic psychological knowledge and methodologies common to the science and profession of psychology across program areas. Although students typically begin specialized coursework at this level, the master’s degree is intended as preparation for continued learning in pursuit of the doctoral degree. Doctoral-level study then provides students the opportunity to acquire the additional knowledge and skills necessary for professional careers in teaching, research, clinical service, and consultation.

The doctoral-level education of advanced graduate students focuses upon specialized coursework and supervised experiences in the department’s five program areas. The program areas are Clinical Psychology, Community Psychology, Clinical/Community Psychology, Clinical/Neuropsychology, Developmental Psychology, Neuroethics, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neuroscience, and Cognitive Sciences Psychology. The areas of specialization within the programs are defined by the interests and expertise of the faculty and, thus, will change within a scholarly context that encourages diversity, growth, and change.

The facilities of the department permit work in cognition, development, behavioral neuroscience, neuropsychology, learning, infant behavior, sensation and perception, motivation, aging, social psychology, assessment, individual psychotherapy, group and family therapy, behavior therapy, and community psychology. Students may work with both human and nonhuman populations. Human populations include all age ranges and a variety of ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds. Nonhuman populations include several rodent and primate species.

The graduate program in clinical psychology is accredited by the American Psychological Association.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Psychology by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Policy on Non-Degree Admission

Students may take no more than six hours of coursework in non-degree status without petitioning the department for an exception to this policy. Students enrolled in non-degree status in a psychology graduate course may not at the same time be applicants to a degree program and may not apply for admission to a graduate degree program in the department for one year following the semester in which the non-degree course was taken. Applications for non-degree admission may be obtained from the College of Arts and Sciences. Application deadlines for non-degree status are the same as the general deadlines for the College of Arts and Sciences and can be found in the section of the catalog entitled “Admission Policies.”

Admission Deadlines

Applications for all programs are considered for the fall semester only. The Application for Graduate Study, $50 application fee, and all supporting materials (transcripts, GRE scores, letters, and supplemental form) must be postmarked by the posted deadline for admission the following fall.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Psychology has the following requirements:

  1. Applicants are expected to have a background in psychology, although an undergraduate major is not required. A minimum of four courses is required: psychological statistics, a course in research methods in psychology, plus two or more content courses in psychology at the junior or senior level. It is recommended that applicants to the clinical program take abnormal psychology as one of the content courses.
  2. The applicant must submit scores that are well above average on the general test of the Graduate Record Examination.
  3. A student in possession of a graduate degree or coursework who is admitted to graduate study may be accorded advanced standing after an evaluation of previous graduate work. The evaluation ordinarily will be conducted during the first semester of enrollment. If the student’s previous graduate work did not include courses equivalent to the required core courses and a thesis, these will be required. Students given full credit for master’s work elsewhere will have one year in which to complete all work stipulated as conditions of admission or transfer of credit.
  4. Each student must fill out the Supplementary Form for Graduate Study in Psychology.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts (33)

A complete statement of the departmental requirements for the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees may be obtained from the Department of Psychology. General requirements are indicated below. Satisfactory progress through the program is expected in a timely manner, and when students fail to meet progress guidelines set by the department they may be dismissed. Furthermore, there are departmental regulations concerning maintenance of active status, leaves of absence, and reentry into the program. Graduate students must be aware of these regulations. The M.A. degree requires a thesis and 33 hours of coursework as outlined below:

  1. Fifteen hours of core courses.
  2. Twelve additional hours of graduate psychology courses.
  3. Six hours of PSYC 8999 Master’s Thesis Research.
  4. A thesis.
  5. A thesis defense.

Doctor of Philosophy

A minimum of 95 post baccalaureate hours, the majority of which must be taken at Georgia State University, are required for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Credit for up to 30 hours is possible for students with master’s degrees from other institutions with the approval of the departmental Graduate Program Committee and the Office of Graduate Services of the College of Arts and Sciences. Upon petition, 6 hours of work may be taken at other institutions. Students meeting particular program area requirements frequently find it necessary to take more than the minimum of 95 hours of credit.

Additional requirements include:

  1. A master’s degree based on a written thesis.
  2. A minimum of one year’s full-time residence.
  3. Sixty-two credit hours of coursework beyond the master’s degree.
  4. Nine hours of PSYC 9980 Readings for General Examination.
  5. Twenty hours of PSYC 9999 Doctoral Dissertation Research.
  6. A general examination, which consists of both written and oral parts, to be taken after the student has completed the coursework required by the program.
  7. A dissertation.
  8. A dissertation defense.
  9. Clinical Psychology students: one year of internship at a site approved by the American Psychological Association.

Dual Master of Public Health / Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology with a Concentration in Community Psychology

The PhD/MPH enables participating students to complete both programs in an average of four and half years rather than six. The SPH requires that all MPH candidates earn at least 42 credits hours: 24 hours of core requirements (16 hours of core courses, 3 hours of research methods, 2 hours of practica, and 3 hours to complete a thesis/capstone) and 18 hours filled by taking required concentration core and elective courses in the HPMB or EPID concentrations. For students enrolled in the PhD/MPH program, the SPH will accept as course credit 12 semester hours of qualifying Comm PSYC courses for the HPMB concentration and 9 credit semester hours for the EPID concentration. Students must earn a grade of B or better to receive MPH credit for Comm PSYC course work.

The CPP requires that all PhD candidates earn at least 95 credit hours (33 hours for the MA degree and then 62 hours for the PhD): 18 credit hours are core courses, 3 credit hours for a required research methods course, 6 hours of statistics, 5 hours to complete a thesis project, 12 hours of other PSYC courses, 12 hours of electives, 9 hours of practicum, 9 hours of reading for general exams and 20 hours of doctoral dissertation research. For students enrolled in the PhD/MPH program, the CPP will accept as course credit 30-33 hours (for HPMB) or 33-36 hours (for EPID) of qualifying public health courses from the MPH curriculum to be credited towards the requirement for the PhD in Comm PSYC. Students must earn a grade of B or better to receive CP credit for their MPH course work.

3370 Religious Studies

Program Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Religious Studies
    • Concentration in Nonprofit Management
    • Concentration in Religion and Aging
  • Dual B.A./M.A. in Religious Studies

Department of Religious Studies
17th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
Georgia State University
P.O. Box 4089
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-4089
404-413-6110
religiousstudies.gsu.edu

Molly Bassett, Chair and Director of Graduate Studies

Founded in the past century, the modern field of Religious Studies endeavors to better understand religion by means of modern academic approaches. The Department of Religious Studies offers a Masters of Arts in Religious Studies that trains students in a range of world religious traditions and theoretical perspectives. All students gain a general understanding of comparative approaches to the study of religion while having the opportunity to specialize in one or more specific religion(s). The department offers four programs of study: a thesis track, a course work intensive track, the M.A. with a Concentration in Nonprofit Management, and the M.A. with a Concentration in Religion and Aging. These programs serve different student populations, including students preparing to enter doctoral programs and those wishing to enter careers.

Students who plan to seek a Ph.D. in the field are strongly encouraged to discuss their intentions with the Religious Studies faculty as soon as possible so that a course of study can be determined to prepare them for doctoral work. Students wishing to enter particular professions are encouraged to discuss their goals with the Graduate Director early in their program of study.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Religious Studies by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies.

Additional Admissions Requirements and Process–M.A. Programs

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Religious Studies has the following requirements:

  1. Three letters of recommendation addressing the ability of the student to undertake graduate study.
  2. A sample of their written work that demonstrates their academic abilities, including research.

Admissions Requirements–M.A. with Concentration Programs

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of Master’s degree-seeking students in terms of test scores, transcripts, the application fee, forms, and goals statement.  Admission may occur in one of two ways: (1) A candidate may apply to both the Graduate Certificate and the M.A. Program in Religious Studies simultaneously. Admission to the concentration is dependent on admission to both programs; or (2) a candidate may initially apply and be admitted to the M.A. in Religious Studies program. During the first year in that program, that student may apply to the Graduate Certificate program. Once admitted, students will complete the Certificate requirements as outlined below. The requirements for the Graduate Certificate are accepted as electives toward the M.A. in Religious Studies. At the end of two years, a student will graduate with:

  • an M.A. in Religious Studies with a Concentration in Nonprofit Management from the College of Arts and Sciences and a Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management from the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies; or
  • an M.A. in Religious Studies with a Concentration in Religion and Aging and a Graduate Certificate in Gerontology from the College of Arts and Sciences.

Degree Requirements–Thesis Option

  1. Twenty-four hours of non-thesis course work.
  2. Distribution requirements:
    • Theory and methods requirement: RELS 8200 Pro-Seminar in Advanced Theory and Method
    • History of Religions requirement (6 hours). At least one course in Abrahamic traditions and at least one course in non-Abrahamic traditions. See the list below for courses in these areas.
    • Comparative/thematic approaches to religions requirement (3 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • Religion and ethics/politics requirement (3 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • Three additional graduate-level electives from either Religious Studies or affiliated courses to bring the total to twenty-four hours. See the list below for affiliated courses.
  3. Six hours of RELS 8999
  4. A thesis
  5. An oral thesis defense

Degree Requirements–Course work Intensive Option

  1. Thirty-six hours of non-thesis course work.
  2. Distribution requirements:
    • Theory and methods requirement: RELS 8200 Pro-Seminar in Advanced Theory and Method
    • History of Religions requirement (6 hours). At least one course in Abrahamic traditions and at least one course in non-Abrahamic traditions. See the list below for courses in these areas.
    • Comparative/thematic approaches to religions requirement (3 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • Religion and ethics/politics requirement (3 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • Seven additional graduate-level electives from either Religious Studies or affiliated courses to bring the total to 36 hours. See the list below for affiliated courses.
    • A paper that reflects graduate level research and writing in fulfillment of the College of Arts and Sciences degree requirement. A committee of at least three members of the faculty will pass on the acceptability of the paper or project. Two-thirds of the committee must indicate approval. This approval must be submitted in writing to the Office of Graduate Services by the appropriate deadline (cas.gsu.edu/graduate-studies/admissions/application-deadlines/).

Degree Requirements–M.A. with Concentration in Nonprofit Management

The M.A. of Religious Studies with a Concentration in Nonprofit Management is designed to prepare students for work in the nonprofit sector. Conceived in collaboration with colleagues in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, this program provides training in religious literacy and cultural competency while students acquire the professional skills necessary for managing nonprofit organizations. Students may earn the M.A. and Concentration without applying to the AYSPS certificate program, but students wishing to earn both the M.A. and certificate should apply to each separately either at the time of application to the M.A. program or after enrolling. The Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) in Religious Studies advises students in the concentrations and deviations to the course plans outlined below should be directed to the DGS.

Students who successfully complete the M.A. of Religious Studies with a Concentration in Nonprofit Management will be able to employ the theories and methods acquired in their study of religions and nonprofit management to design a final research project in which they:

  • Identify relationships between the study of religions and nonprofit management significant to their own research interests and career objectives; and
  • Articulate those relationships in a graduate-level research project that fulfills the M.A. with a Concentration in Nonprofit Management degree requirement.

In order to receive the M.A. of Religious Studies with a Concentration in Nonprofit Management, a student must complete:

  1. Thirty-six hours of non-thesis course work.
  2. Distribution requirements:
    • Theory and methods requirement: RELS 8200 Pro-Seminar in Advanced Theory and Method
    • History of Religions requirement (6 hours). At least one course in Abrahamic traditions and at least one course in non-Abrahamic traditions. See the list below for courses in these areas.
    • Comparative/thematic approaches to religions requirement (3 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • Religion and ethics/politics requirement (6 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • One additional 8000- or 6000-level course in Religious Studies (3 hours).
    • Nonprofit Management Certificate requirement: PMAP 8210 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
    • Nonprofit Management approved electives, two of the following courses:
    • Required elective, choose one of the following approved courses:
      • RELS 6650 Religion and Ethics (3)
      • RELS 6140 Religion and Law (3)
      • RELS 6485 Ethics & Morality in Islam (3)
      • RELS 6645 Religion and Sexuality in Popular Culture (3)
      • RELS 6465 Religion in the American South (3)
      • RELS 6270 Women and Religion (3)
      • RELS 6281 Racial Thought in Religion and Philosophy (3)
      • RELS 6650 Religion and Ethics (3)
      • RELS 6890 Religion On-Site in Atlanta (3)
      • Or an alternate 6000- or 8000- level course approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.
  3. One semester internship: RELS 6400. In the internship placement agreement, the student and advisors must articulate the placement’s relevance to the Concentration in Nonprofit Management.
  4. Submit one paper/project representative of high-quality graduate level research and writing. The paper/project will be received and reviewed by the student’s Faculty Advisor for the Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management and Social Enterprise as well as a faculty member in the Department of Religious Studies. Faculty will assess the learning outcomes outlined above when they review the final projects. The final project review is a formal process involving faculty advisors from both units and final approval by the Religious Studies Curriculum Committee and the Director of Graduate Studies. The faculty advisors review the paper and record substantive feedback regarding the quality of its representation of the student’s graduate level work in the M.A. and Concentration for the Curriculum Committee. The Committee’s members review the comments and paper, and they make a final recommendation to the Director of Graduate Studies. If the Committee approves the project, the Director of Graduate Studies signs the cover sheet that the student submits to Graduate Services.

Degree Requirements–M.A. with Concentration in Religion and Aging

The M.A. of Religious Studies with a Concentration in Religion and Aging is designed to prepare students for work in professions related to health and human resources. A collaboration with the College of Arts and Sciences Gerontology Institute, this program provides training in religious literacy and cultural competency while students acquire the professional skills necessary for work related to human development. Students may earn the M.A. and Concentration without applying to the Gerontology Institute’s certificate program, but students wishing to earn both the M.A. and certificate should apply to each separately either at the time of application to the M.A. program or after enrolling. The Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) in Religious Studies advises students in the concentrations and deviations to the course plans outlined below should be directed to the DGS.

Students who successfully complete the M.A. of Religious Studies with a Concentration in Religion and Aging will be able to employ the theories and methods acquired in their study of religions and aging to craft a final research project in which they:

  • Identify relationships between the study of religions and aging significant to their own research interests and career objectives; and
  • Articulate those relationships in a graduate-level research project that fulfills the M.A. with a Concentration in Religion and Aging degree requirement.

In order to receive the M.A. of Religious Studies with a Concentration in Religion and Aging, a student must complete:

  1. Thirty-six hours of non-thesis course work.
  2. Distribution requirements:
    • Theory and methods requirement: RELS 8200 Pro-Seminar in Advanced Theory and Method
    • History of Religions requirement (6 hours). At least one course in Abrahamic traditions and at least one course in non-Abrahamic traditions. See the list below for courses in these areas.
    • Comparative/thematic approaches to religions requirement (6 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • Religion and ethics/politics requirement (3 hours). See the list below for courses in this area.
    • One additional 8000- or 6000-level course in Religious Studies (3 hours).
    • Gerontology Certificate requirements, two of the following courses:
    • Gerontology approved electives, one of the following courses:
      • GERO 6475 Communication and Aging (3)
      • GERO 8000 Seminar in Gerontology (3)
      • GERO 8124 Diversity and Aging (3)
      • GERO 8200 Aging Program Administration (3)
      • GERO 8330 Mental Health and Aging (3)
      • Or an alternate 7000 or 8000-level course approved by the Director of Graduate Studies in Religious Studies
    • Required elective, choose one of the following approved courses:
      • RELS 6240 Death and the Afterlife (3)
      • RELS 6225 Psychology and Religion (3)
      • RELS 6080 Religious Dimensions of Human Experience (3)
      • Or an alternate 6000- or 8000- level course approved by the Director of Graduate Studies
  3. One semester internship: RELS 6400. In the internship placement agreement, the student and advisors must articulate the placement’s relevance to the Concentration in Religion and Aging.
  4. Submit one paper/project representative of high-quality graduate level research and writing. This paper will be received and reviewed by a faculty member in Gerontology, as well as a faculty member in the Department of Religious Studies. Faculty will assess the learning outcomes outlined above when they review the final projects. The final project review is a formal process involving faculty advisors from both units and final approval by the Religious Studies Curriculum Committee and the Director of Graduate Studies. The faculty advisors review the paper and record substantive feedback regarding the quality of its representation of the student’s graduate level work in the M.A. and Concentration for the Curriculum Committee. The Committee’s members review the comments and paper, and they make a final recommendation to the Director of Graduate Studies. If the Committee approves the project, the Director of Graduate Studies signs the cover sheet that the student submits to Graduate Services.

Sample of Courses by Distribution Area

An up-to-date list of courses by distribution area is available on the Department’s website under “Resources.”

History of Religions, Abrahamic

History of Religions non-Abrahamic

  • RELS 6301 Animals and Religion (3)
  • RELS 6615 Introduction to Buddhism in Asia and the West (3)
  • RELS 6620 Introduction to Daoism, Confucianism, and the Religions of China (3)
  • RELS 6625 Introduction to Zen Buddhism, Shinto, and the Religions of Japan (3)

Comparative/Thematic Approaches

Religion and Ethics/Politics

Affiliated Courses

Most students will concentrate their coursework within the Religious Studies Department. (See course listings under Religious Studies later in this catalog.) Other departments and programs within Georgia State University also offer courses directly bearing on the academic study of religion. When Religious Studies Masters students satisfy the prerequisites for the courses, they may take and have applied toward their degree requirements no more than two of the following:

  • AH 6000 African Art (3)
  • AH 6010 Art of Ancient Egypt and Nubia (3)
  • AH 6011 Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt I: 4000-1600 B.C. (3)
  • AH 6012 Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt II: 1600-31 B.C. (3)
  • AH 6020 Art and Architecture of the Ancient Near East (3)
  • AH 6200 Art and Architecture of the Middle Ages (3)
  • AH 6310 Art of Northern Europe in the Renaissance Era (3)
  • ENGL 8290 Topics in Medieval Literature (3)
  • ENGL 8390 Milton (3)
  • FOLK 6110 Irish Folk Culture (3)
  • FOLK 8200 Folklore (3)
  • HIST 6920 Oral History (4)
  • HIST 8430 Seminar in South Asian History (4)
  • HIST 8450 Seminar in Middle Eastern History (4)
  • PHIL 6300 Metaphysics (3)
  • PHIL 8090 Seminar in Continental Philosophy (3)
  • POLS 8215 Politics of Peace (3)
  • POLS 8260 Politics of the Middle East and North Africa (3)
  • SOCI 8122 Death, Dying and Loss (3)
  • SOCI 8156 Sexuality and Society (3)
  • SOCI 8212 Race and Ethnic Relations (3)
  • SOCI 8360 Sociology of Religion (3)
  • WGSS 6210 Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective (3)
  • WGSS 8002 Globalization and Gender (3)

Note: While the above courses have particular pertinence to the Masters in Religious Studies, not all listed courses will be appropriate for the program of study of every student. Students should select courses in consultation with their advisers. Additionally, courses not included on the above list may be appropriate to the program of study of certain students within the Religious Studies M.A program. Upon approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, such courses may be counted toward the degree on a case-by-case basis.

Restrictions

  1. Only six hours of credit transferred from another institution may be applied towards the Georgia State M.A.
  2. Of the hours taken at Georgia State and applied toward the M.A, no more than six hours may be from outside the Department of Religious Studies.

World Language Competencies

Depending upon their area(s) of concentration, students who wish to go on to pursue a Ph.D. in Religious Studies may need to initiate or complete studies in a particular language or languages before beginning doctoral studies. Students are urged to consult with their advisers for advice and direction concerning language competencies.

Dual B.A./M.A. Program in Religious Studies

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Religious Studies. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

3380 Sociology

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Sociology
  • Joint Master of Arts in Sociology and Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology
    • Concentration in Urban Spaces and Geography

Department of Sociology
1041 Langdale Hall
Tel: 404-413-6500
Fax: 404-413-6505
sociology.gsu.edu

Eric Wright, Chair
Jim Ainsworth, Director of Graduate Studies
Reginald Butler, Graduate Coordinator

The Department of Sociology offers three programs, the MA only professional program, the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree program for those who already have an M.A. degree, and the Joint Master of Arts (M.A.) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) degree program for those entering with a B.A. degree. These programs provide students with both a broad exposure to the discipline of sociology as well as in-depth study in special areas of expertise. Qualified students are accepted into the Joint M.A./Ph.D. Program after their completion of a baccalaureate degree or are accepted into the Ph.D.-Only Program after their completion of a master’s degree in sociology or a closely related field. The broad knowledge of sociology comes through coursework in a variety of substantive areas, as well as through training in research methodology, statistics, and theory. Most of the faculty’s interest and expertise lie in six specialty areas: (1) Family; (2) Gender; (3) Health; (4) Life Course, (4) Race and Ethnic Relations; (5) Sexualities; and (6) Urban Studies. We have one interdisciplinary concentration in urban spaces and geography with the geosciences department for students who wish to specialize in urban sociology and geography. The department’s approach is to enable students to apply sociological principles in a real-world environment and to foster a close working relationship between faculty and graduate students.

The goals of the Department are to provide: (1) a general intellectual foundation that supports the student’s analytic understanding of social life; (2) a sound methodological background that prepares the student for social research; and (3) a rich and specialized body of knowledge that equips the student for the practice of sociology in both the public and private sectors. Students are offered many opportunities to become actively involved in the discipline at the state, regional, or national levels. Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of Sociology by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the address above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Sociology has the following requirements:

  1. Students applying for the M.A. only program from a baccalaureate program:
    • Applicants must submit scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the GRE.
    • Applicants must submit three (3) letters of recommendation from faculty personally acquainted with the applicant’s academic achievements.
    • Applicants must submit a sample of their written scholarly work (e.g., their term/research paper).
  2. Students applying for the Doctor of Philosophy program from a baccalaureate program (Joint M.A./Ph.D. Track):
    • Applicants must submit scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the GRE.
    • Applicants must submit three (3) letters of recommendation from faculty personally acquainted with the applicant’s academic achievements.
    • Applicants must submit a sample of their written scholarly work (e.g., their term/research paper).
  3. Students applying for the Doctor of Philosophy program from a master’s program (Ph.D.-Only Track):
    • Applicants must submit scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical sections of the Graduate Record Examination.
    • Although a master’s degree in sociology is not required, only students who have an accredited master’s degree, in a closely related field, or who have nearly completed the master’s degree, will be considered for the Ph.D. program. Applicants should have completed master’s level coursework in research methods, statistics, and sociological theory. If they have not had these courses, they must complete them as additional courses prior to enrolling in Ph.D. courses in these areas.
    • Applicants must submit three (3) letters of recommendation from faculty personally acquainted with the applicant’s academic achievements.
    • Applicants must submit a sample of their written scholarly work (e.g., their Master’s thesis or term/research paper).

M.A. in Sociology (without continuing to the Ph.D.)

Professional Specialization in Data Analysis

The M.A. Only Program is a 31 credit hour degree program beyond the Bachelor’s degree (25 credit hours of course work and 6 credit hours of internship and capstone paper). If a student needs to take SOCI 3010: Social Statistics, SOCI 3020: Research Methods, and/or SOCI 3030: Sociological Theory (or their equivalents, as determined by the Director of Graduate Studies), these courses must be taken as non-credit prerequisites for SOCI 8010, SOCI 8020, and SOCI 8030. The M.A.-Only Program consists of a Master’s Core (1), Master’s Electives (2), and Other Master’s Requirements (3).

  1. Master’s Core Course Work (16 hours):
  2. Master’s Elective Course Work (9 hours or 3 courses):
    Students will take an additional three substantive sociology courses or advanced data analysis courses as electives.

    1. One elective should be in a substantive area such as:
    2. One elective should be in an advanced data analysis or data collection method either in Sociology or another department with permission from the instructor such as:
      • SOCI 9050 Advanced Topics in Research Methods (3)
      • SOCI 8900 Domestic Field School (3)
      • GEOS 6520 Quantitative spatial analysis (2)
      • SOCI 8900 Applied Sociology and Evaluation Methods (3)
      • PH 7711 Epidemiological Methods (3)*
      • PH 8890 Special topics in Biostatistics (3)*
      • EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling (3)*
      • SOCI 8900/GERO 8700 Intervention Research Design (3)
        *Any other methods course that the student would like to take with permission from the graduate director and the course instructor.
    3. One additional substantive or methodological elective of your choice from either offerings (a) or (b).
  3. Other Master’s Requirements (6 hours):

Students with post-Bachelor’s degree course work from other accredited institutions may petition to transfer up to 6 hours (2 courses) of course work towards the M.A. degree following petition to, and approval by, the departmental Director of Graduate Studies. With the approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies, up to 6 hours (2 courses) of advanced data analysis may be taken in a related field or fields with approval of graduate director.

NOTES:

  1. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (“B”) or better and must receive a grade of “B” or better in each of the required courses.  If a student receives a lower grade in a required course, the student must repeat the course the very next time the course is offered to rectify the grade.
  2. The total number of hours must include a minimum of 25 hours in sociology in the Department of Sociology at Georgia State University.

Joint M.A./Ph.D. in Sociology

Ninety semester credit hours (52 semester hours of course work and 38 semester hours of non-course work) beyond the Baccalaureate degree, consisting of a Master’s Core (1), Master’s Electives (2), Other Master’s Requirements (3), Doctoral Core (4), Doctoral Specialty Core (5), Doctoral Electives (6), and Other Doctoral Requirements (7).

  1. Master’s Core Required Course Work (16 hours):
  2. Master’s Elective Course Work (9 hours or 3 courses):
    • Students with post-Bachelor’s degree course work from other accredited institutions may petition to transfer up to 6 hours (2 courses) of course work towards the M.A. degree following petition to, and approval by, the departmental Director of Graduate Studies. With the approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies, up to 3 hours (1 course) may be taken in a related field or fields and/or up to 3 hours of SOCI 8970 Directed Readings may be taken.
  3. Other Master’s Requirements (6 hours of non-course work):
    • SOCI 8999 Thesis Research (6)
    • A thesis proposal, thesis, and oral defense.
  4. Doctoral Core Required Course Work (9 hours):
  5. Select at least two from the core areas (6 hours)
  6. Doctoral Elective Course Work (12 hours or 4 courses):
    • With the approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies, up to 3 hours (1 course) may be taken in a related field and/or up to 3 hours of SOCI 8970: Directed Readings may be taken.
  7. Other Doctoral Requirements (32 hours of non-course work):
    • SOCI 9999 Dissertation Research (32)
    • Written doctorial exams, a dissertation proposal, dissertation, and oral defense.

NOTES:

  1. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (“B”) or better. Students may not earn two or more grades of “C” or lower in graduate Sociology courses. Students who fail to meet either of these requirements will be scholastically terminated from the Sociology graduate program.
  2. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (“B”) or higher and must receive a grade of B or higher in each of the required courses. If a student receives a grade below a B in a required course, the student must repeat the course the very next time the course is offered to rectify the grade.
  3. Students must register for SOCI 8999 or SOCI 9999 while they are appointed as a GRA, GTA, and/or GLA.
  4. Students who are appointed as a GTA B must successfully complete SOCI 9000 Teaching Sociology and SOCI 9001 Teaching Internship prior to their appointment.
  5. SOCI 9001 Teaching Internship hours cannot be applied to the Ph.D. degree.
  6. tudents must take 3 hours of SOCI 8000 in the Fall semester of their first year in the Joint M.A./Ph.D. Program.

Ph.D. in Sociology

Sixty-three semester credit hours (31 semester hours of course work and 32 semester hours of non-course work) beyond the Master’s degree, consisting of a Doctoral Core (1), Doctoral Specialty Core (2), Doctoral Electives (3), and Other Doctoral Requirements (4).

  1. Doctoral Core Required Course Work (16 hours):
    • SOCI 8000 Proseminar in Sociology (3)
    • SOCI 8342 Qualitative Methods in Sociology (3)
    • SOCI 9010 Multivariate Sociological Data Analysis (4)
    • SOCI 9020 Advanced Research Methodology (3)
    • SOCI 9030 Sociological Theory II (3)
      NOTE: If a student needs to take SOCI 8010 Intermediate Social Statistics, SOCI 8020 Research Methods, and/or SOCI 8030 Sociological Theory I (or their equivalents, as determined by the Director of Graduate Studies), these courses must be taken as non-credit prerequisites for SOCI 9010, SOCI 9020, and SOCI 9030.
  2. Select at least two from the core areas (6hours):
  3. Doctoral Elective Course Work (9 hours or 3 courses):
    • With the approval of the departmental Director of Graduate Studies, up to 3 hours (1 course) may be taken in a related field and/or up to 3 hours of SOCI 8970: Directed Readings may be taken.
  4. Other Doctoral Requirements (32)
    • SOCI 9999 Dissertation Research (32)
    • Written doctoral exams, a dissertation proposal, a dissertation, and oral defense

NOTES:

  1. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (“B”) or better. Students may not earn two or more grades of “C” or lower in graduate Sociology courses. Students who fail to meet either of these requirements will be scholastically terminated from the Sociology graduate program.
  2. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 (“B”) or better and must receive a grade of B or better in each of the required courses. If a student receives a grade below a B in a required course, the student must repeat the course the very next time the course is offered to rectify the grade.
  3. Students must register for SOCI 8999 or SOCI 9999 while they are appointed as a GRA, GTA, and/or GLA.
  4. Students who are appointed as a GTA B must successfully complete SOCI 9000 Teaching Sociology and SOCI 9001 Teaching Internship prior to their appointment.
  5. SOCI 9001Teaching Internship hours cannot be applied to the Ph.D. degree.
  6. Students must take 3 hours of SOCI 8000 in the Fall semester of their first year in the Ph.D.-Only Program.

Concentration in Urban Spaces and Geography

The Ph.D. in Sociology with a concentration in Urban Spaces an Geography consists of a minimum of sixty-three semester credit hours (31-33 semester hours of course work and 32 semester hours of non-course work) beyond the Master’s degree, consisting of a Doctoral Core (1), Doctoral Specialty Core (2), Doctoral Electives (3), and Other Doctoral Requirements (4).

  1. Doctoral Core Course Work for Urban Spaces and Geography concentration, taken in consultation with PhD advisor (17):
  2. Select at least two from the doctoral specialty core areas (7-8):
  3. Select two sociology electives (6-7)
  4. Other Doctoral Requirements (32 hours of non-course work):
    • SOCI 9999 Dissertation Research (32)
    • Written doctoral exams, a dissertation proposal, a dissertation, and oral defense.

3390 Spanish

Program Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Spanish
  • Dual B.A./M.A. Program in Spanish

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Gladys Francis, Director of Graduate Studies

The Department of World Languages and Cultures offers the Master of Arts (M.A.) degree in Spanish. The Master of Arts degree emphasizes advanced study in the language and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, including courses of particular interest to foreign language teachers.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Department of World Languages and Cultures by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the address above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts & Sciences, the Department of World Languages and Cultures has the following requirements:

  1. An undergraduate major or its equivalent in the language to be studied.
  2. A complete dossier which must include: (a) a letter of intent expressing the objectives of the student in entering the program; (b) two letters of recommendation from people familiar with the candidate’s academic work; and (c) a writing sample of an analytical nature in the target language. (At the discretion of the Graduate Committee, an entrance exam may be required.)

Program Financial Information

Lab fees are assessed automatically for students who register for certain courses. As a result, students will no longer be required to purchase lab fee cards. For more information, please feel free to contact the department or review the GoSolar or catalog course listings to determine if a course includes a lab fee.

Degree Requirements

Master of Arts

  1. Basic Requirements:
    1. Students may choose to emphasize a particular field of study — literature, culture, or linguistics/pedagogy — by (A) selecting a faculty advisor in that field, (B) taking a minimum of 2 courses in that field, and (C) writing a thesis or a non-thesis paper in that field.(See 2a. & 2b. below)
    2. A final Master’s portfolio (See the WLC graduate student portfolio guidelines here: wlc.gsu.edu/m-portfolio-information/)
    3. An oral exit interview
    4. Proficiency in a language other than Spanish
  2. Thesis/Non-Thesis Option
    1. Thesis Option:
      • Twenty-four hours (24) of graduate coursework
      • A written thesis proposal
      • Six hours of thesis research
      • A thesis
    2. Non-Thesis Option:
      • Thirty hours (30) of graduate coursework
      • A revised research paper. (See WLC graduate handbook

A student must have a grade-point average of 3.0 or higher in all courses counting towards the Master of Arts degree. Only courses passed with a grade of B or higher will count toward the degree.

Dual B.A./M.A. Program in Spanish

The department offers a dual Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in Spanish. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.

3400 Translation and Interpretation

Programs Offered:

  • Graduate Certificate in Translation (French, German, Spanish)
  • Graduate Certificate in Interpretation (Spanish)

Department of World Languages and Cultures
19th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404-413-5980
wlc.gsu.edu

P.O. Box 3970
Atlanta, Georgia 30302-3970
404-413-5980
Email: wclgraduate@gsu.edu

William Nichols, Chair
Faye Stewart, Associate Chair
Annette G. Cash, Director (acash@gsu.edu)

Qualification for entrance into either program is based on achievements on an appropriate proficiency examination. Candidates for the program in translation must pass a written examination in English and in the language of specialization. Candidates for the program in interpretation must pass written and oral examinations in both the source and target languages. Candidates who are not considered admissible because of insufficient knowledge of the proposed working language or deficiencies in their general backgrounds will be advised to consider preparatory courses in the Department of World Languages and Cultures or in another department. The entrance examination is offered at regular intervals each year for entrance in the fall semester. However, the course sequence in Translation or Interpretation cannot be initiated unless there is a sufficient enrollment. Thus, there is no guarantee that the Translation and Interpretation programs in French, German, and Spanish can be offered routinely every year. In some cases there will be a delay in initiating a sequence until a critical mass of qualified students is available.

In addition to demonstrating proficiency by means of the admission examination(s), candidates must demonstrate an appropriate educational background. Normally, applicants will be expected to have an American undergraduate degree or the equivalent. Candidates without a baccalaureate degree must provide evidence of educational and professional activities and accomplishments indicating that they have the prior experience needed to be successful in translation or interpretation. Students accepted into the program will not be permitted to enroll in graduate courses taught outside the Program in Translation and Interpretation unless they have applied and been admitted to the M. A. program in the Department of World Languages and Cultures. Students with a baccalaureate degree (or the equivalent) from an accredited institution are eligible to take undergraduate courses.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Program in Translation and Interpretation by contacting the Director at the addresses above.

Translation

This program provides professional training in written translation for students who wish to acquire proficiency in a specific language combination. The student’s progress will be monitored closely, and the student’s potential for completing the program will be evaluated at the end of each individual course.

The program includes one class in comparative stylistics, one class in general translation, two classes in specialized translation, and a final translation workshop. Students must complete each one of these courses with a grade of B or higher and must receive a score of at least a grade of B on the exit examination in order to receive a certificate.

Interpretation

This program provides professional training in both medical and legal interpretation for those who wish to become interpreters. At the present time, the program is only offered in Spanish. Admission to the program in interpretation presupposes completion of the course of study in translation, or demonstration of proficiency in written translation at a comparable level, in addition to oral proficiency in the student’s source and target languages.

The program is comprised of classes in medical and legal (state court) interpretation. The interpretation program involves a class in the introduction to the field of interpretation, a class in consecutive, simultaneous and sight interpretation, a class in medical interpretation, and a class in legal interpretation (state court system). Each student’s progress and potential for successful completion of the program will be evaluated each semester. Students must complete these courses with a grade of B or higher, and must receive a score of at least a B on the exit examination in order to receive a certificate.

Although individual courses in both areas are assigned graduate credit, none of the 7000-level courses listed below may be used to fulfill requirements in regular degree programs of the World Languages and Cultures.

All courses in each program are required and should be taken in the prescribed sequence.

The following courses comprise the translation sequence in French, German, and Spanish: FREN 7135, FREN 7140, FREN 7142, FREN 7145, and FREN 7146; GRMN 7135, GRMN 7140, GRMN 7142, GRMN 7145, and GRMN 7146; SPAN 7135, SPAN 7140, SPAN 7142, SPAN 7145, and SPAN 7146.

The following courses comprise the interpretation sequence in Spanish: SPAN 7150, SPAN 7152, SPAN 7154, and SPAN 7157.

3410 Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Arts in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
  • Graduate Certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Institute for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Georgia State University
22nd floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
P.O. Box 3969
Atlanta, GA 30302-3969
Phone: 404-413-6587
Fax: 404-413-6585
Email: wgss@gsu.edu
wgss.gsu.edu

Megan Sinnott, Director of Graduate Studies

Our M.A. program offers innovative, interdisciplinary approaches to the study of gender, sexuality, race, class, and nation. The Institute for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies’ cutting edge academic program focuses on three crucial areas: globalization, sexuality, and social change. The interests of our core faculty members span the globe, including the African diaspora, Latin America, Southeast Asia, and North America, with an emphasis on issues related to globalization, sexualities, and culture, as well as local and transnational articulations of feminism. The M.A. prepares students for doctoral work in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and other disciplines, as well as careers in non-profit organizations, the social service sector, the political arena, and private enterprise. Some of our students pursue work in creative fields as artists, musicians, poets, journalists, or filmmakers.

To prepare for these career possibilities, WGSS provides three research options:

  • Action Research Project: Examples include internships or community organizing accompanied by a theoretical essay.
  • Creative Project: Examples include film-making, fiction writing, photography, or performing arts, accompanied by a theoretical essay.
  • Thesis Research: Examples include empirical research and theoretical inquiry.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Institute for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies by contacting the Director of Graduate Studies at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Institute for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies has the following requirements:

  1. Three letters of recommendation addressing the ability of the student to undertake graduate study.
  2. A statement of educational and/or career goals.
  3. A writing sample of up to 30 pages in length.
  4. Students seeking an M.A. degree are admitted to the program once a year (to begin in fall semester). Applicants seeking graduate assistantships must submit all application materials to the Office of Admissions-Graduate Programs by February 1 to be considered for the first decision-making process. Later applications may be considered. All applicants are considered for graduate assistantships.

Master of Arts Degree Requirements (36 hours):

Students must receive a B minus or above in all core and elective WGSS courses, and maintain a minimum overall GPA of 3.0.

  1. Required courses (15):
    • WGSS 8001 Feminist Theories (3)
    • WGSS 8002 Globalization and Gender (3)
    • WGSS 8003 New Directions in Feminism (3)
    • WGSS 8004 Feminist Methodologies (3)
    • WGSS 8005 Proseminar in WGSS (1 or 2) (taken twice for a total of 3 hours)
  2. Elective courses (15):
    • Select 15 hours of coursework with the WGSS prefix, including WGSS courses cross-listed with other departments or approved courses in other departments.
  3. A minimum of six hours of WGSS 8999 Thesis Research.
  4. A thesis or project approved by the student’s committee.

Graduate Certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

A Graduate Certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is available to eligible graduate students who successfully complete five graduate courses (15 hours) in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Students must receive a grade of B or higher in each certificate course.

Graduate Certificate Requirements (15 hours):

  1. Select at least 9 hours of WGSS core courses from the following:
  2. Select additional graduate coursework with the WGSS prefix to complete 15 hours (may include core courses not taken above). Only one course can originate from the student’s home department (i.e., courses taught by other departments but cross-listed with WGSS).

Eligibility:

All students seeking the WGSS Graduate Certificate must submit a formal application through the Office of Admissions-Graduate Programs. Applications are accepted three times per year: July 1 (for Fall semester), November 15 (for Spring semester), and April 1 (for Summer semester). The following individuals are eligible:

  • Students who are enrolled in an M.A. or Ph.D. program in another department or institute at Georgia State University — such students must apply, but existing materials on file can be used for the application and the application fee will be waived;
  • Students in the Institute for Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies M.A. degree program who are unable to complete the program and who have completed the requisite coursework—these students must apply, but existing materials on file can be used for the application and the application fee will be waived;
  • Students who apply solely for the Graduate Certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies — these students must submit a complete application and pay the requisite fee.