5010 General Information

The Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions is committed to the preparation of professionals in the areas of Clinical Health Informatics, Nursing, Nutrition, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy and Respiratory Therapy. The graduate programs build on undergraduate education and prepare the students for advanced practice, research, and leadership. The programs are designed to meet the health and human service needs of the citizens of Georgia. Involvement in research and practice in the urban community is encouraged. The programs are responsive to the needs of both full-time and part-time students and to students entering both first and second careers. Courses are delivered through a variety of modes including classroom and laboratory instruction, web-based instruction, and distance technology.

5010.10 Office of the Dean

816 Urban Life
404-413-1100
snhp.gsu.edu

Nancy Kropf, Dean
Andrew Butler, Associate Dean for Research
Lynda Goodfellow, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

5010.20 Accreditation

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. The Coordinated Program in Dietetics is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education In Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND).  The Integrated Program (IP) in the Division of Respiratory Therapy leading to the Master’s of Health Sciences with a concentration in Respiratory Therapy is accredited for entry into the profession of respiratory care by the Committee on Respiratory Care Education (CoARC).

5010.30 Degrees Offered

The School of Nursing and Health Professions offers the following graduate programs:

  • Graduate Certificate in Clinical Health Informatics
  • Master of Science: major in health sciences (concentrations in nutrition and respiratory therapy)
  • Master of Science: major in nursing (concentrations in adult health-gerontology NP,  pediatric primary care NP, psychiatric/mental health NP, family nurse practitioner and nursing leadership in healthcare innovations.)
  • Post-Master’s Certificates in all clinical areas in nursing
  • Doctor of Nursing Practice
  • Doctor of Philosophy: major in Nursing (focus in health promotion, protection, and restoration in vulnerable populations)
  • Master of Occupational Therapy
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy

5010.40 Academic Units

School of Nursing

900 Urban Life Building
404-413-1200
nursing.gsu.edu/

Susan J Kelley, Associate Dean & Chief Academic Officer for Nursing

Faculty: Aycock, Bates, Breslin, Campbell, Casseus, Chen, Clark, Cranford, Cranwell-Bruce, DeMars, Eades, Eastman, Epps, Faulkner, Florman, Gay, Gordon, Grantham, Helvig, Hires, Horne, Lee, Kelley, Killian, Kirkendoll, Long, Marcus, Milner, Nelson, Plitnick, Polovich, Ramos, Ravenell, Roseberry, Schwarze, Sims, Spratling, Summers, Tice, Townsend, Washington, Wilmoth

Department of Health Informatics

1228 Urban Life Building
404-413-1226
healthinformatics.gsu.edu/

Tamara Melton, Program Director

Faculty: Melton

Department of Nutrition

862 Urban Life Building
404-413-1226
nutrition.gsu.edu/

Huanbiao Mo, Department Chair

Faculty: Henes, Hopkins, Johnson, Mo, Nucci, Thompson, Wanders, Wiley

Emeritus Faculty: Cody, Baxter, Benardot Kicklighter, Roman, Rosenbloom

Department of Occupational Therapy

935C Urban Life Building
404-413-1446
occupationaltherapy.gsu.edu/

Kinsuk Maitra,  Department Chair

Faculty: Maitra, Podolski,

Department of Physical Therapy

1228 Urban Life Building
404-413-1225
physicaltherapy.gsu.edu/

Andrew Butler, Associate Dean for Research and Interim Chair

Faculty: Butler, Chen,  Farrell, Garcia,  Gore, Huggins, Lorio, Morelli, Thompson, Tsai, Warren

Department of Respiratory Therapy

1228 Urban Life Building
404-413-1225
respiratorytherapy.gsu.edu/

Doug Gardenhire, Department Chair

Robert Pettignano MD, Medical Director

Faculty: Ari, Colquitt, Gardenhire, D, Gardenhire,R, Goodfellow, Murray, Shan, Zimmerman, Zavorsky

5020 Admissions

A person seeking to pursue any of the school’s programs of graduate study must be admitted to Georgia State University through the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions. The requirements for admission stated in the following sections are established by the School of Nursing and Health Professions and the department of the program. Acceptance into one of the programs in the School of Nursing and Health Professions does not imply acceptance into another College/School in the University.

Georgia State University welcomes applications from all qualified individuals regardless of race, color, sex, religion, creed, age, sexual orientation, gender, disability, veteran status or national origin. Admission is based on a number of factors including, but not limited to, an applicant’s academic record, test scores, experience, circumstances, good conduct and character. Admission is a competitive, selective process and meeting minimum requirements does not guarantee acceptance.

Absent extenuating circumstances, good disciplinary standing at previously attended colleges and universities is a condition of admission for all applicants. For purposes of admission, good disciplinary standing means that the applicant has no pending disciplinary charges, outstanding disciplinary sanctions or disciplinary issues that would prevent the applicant from re-enrolling at previously attended post-secondary institutions.

Applicants with a criminal and/or disciplinary history who are determined to be otherwise admissible for a respective term based on their academic record and other credentials are required to complete an admissions background review process before an admission decision is made by the university. Instructions for completing that review process are communicated to the applicant after the university has determined that the applicant is otherwise admissible for that term.

Omissions or misrepresentations on an application for admission are grounds for automatically invalidating consideration by, acceptance to and continuation at Georgia State. Applicants have a duty to update their application with Georgia State when information changes after application submission.

Graduate Admissions Appeals

The Chair of the academic department of the graduate program and the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success and Vice Provost  are the President’s designees for purposes of hearing Graduate Admissions Appeals.

Applicants for graduate program admissions who are denied admission due to academic ineligibility may appeal the denial to the department chair within twenty (20) calendar days of the date of the denial letter. The decision of the department chair is final.

Applicants for graduate admission who are denied for reasons related to disciplinary/criminal history or falsification of application may appeal the denial to the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success and Vice Provost within twenty (20) calendar days of the date of the denial letter. The decision of the Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success and Vice Provost is final.

Notice to applicant of background review requirements

The University requires applicants who have a criminal or disciplinary history to complete a background review. Please contact the Background Review Records Coordinator at 404-413-1515 for information regarding completion of the review process as soon as possible to ensure timely processing of your application.*  The Background Review Records Coordinator will let you know what supplemental documentation you will need to provide to complete the process.  You may be required to provide documentation such as:

  1. a personal statement explaining the circumstances surrounding criminal or school disciplinary violations, and the current status of any charges and sanctions;
  2. copies of criminal or school disciplinary records; and
  3. a background check (if you have a criminal history);

Please note that a final admission decision cannot be made until you complete all requirements of the admissions background review process.

*Applications may be withdrawn from review if the background review process is not initiated within two weeks.

  • Regarding non-resident Georgia (out-of-state) students that are taking courses via distance education, please review the State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (SARA) link on the Georgia State University’s website at oie.gsu.edu/assessment-and-review-academic-and-adminstrative/accreditation/state-authorization/ to determine if the courses you are planning to enroll in are accepted by your home state and/or home institution. If the courses are not authorized, you may not receive Georgia State credit taken in those states.” If you have any questions, please contact the Office of Academic Assistance.

Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics

The Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics is an 18-21 credit hour program of study. This is an online program and is designed for experienced healthcare professional or current students of the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions graduate clinical programs in physical therapy respiratory therapy, nutrition or occupational therapy. Graduate Nursing students are encouraged to apply for the Graduate Nursing Informatics program in the School of Nursing.

The program will consist of at least two courses per semester, and is one calendar year long (three semesters). Cohorts may be accepted each fall and spring semester. The deadline for fall semester is June 15 and spring is October 15.

The following materials are required for admission:

  1. Application for Graduate Study.
  2. A $50 application fee.
  3. Two copies of official transcripts from all colleges attended.
  4. Two letters of recommendation from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s professional and academic abilities.
  5. Current resume including education, work experience and professional development, professional and/or community activities, research and publications.
  6. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), for applicants whose native language is not English. See section on “International Admissions” for more information.
  7. For International Applicants, please provide all items listed above plus the items listed on this link: snhp.gsu.edu/academics-admissions/international-applicants/.
  8. Because this program is taught strictly online, it does not allow for F1 or 1 visa sponsorship for overseas students
  9. A personal statement identifying your educational/professional goals and the purpose for applying to the specific graduate option.
  10. A two page white-paper style writing sample on a health informatics topic (APA style).
  11. A Certificate of Immunization.
  12. At least two years of clinical experience as a clinician or health professional OR current enrollment in a clinical graduate program in the School of Nursing and Health Professions.

Master of Science in Nursing

The master’s program in nursing is open to registered nurses who wish to continue their education by obtaining an advanced degree. There are two admission options: RNs with a baccalaureate degree in nursing and RNs prepared at the associate or diploma level that have had outstanding practice experience and professional involvement. RNs who do not have a baccalaureate degree in nursing must complete additional undergraduate course work as prerequisites to master’s course work. The determination of required undergraduate course work is based on an evaluation of each applicant’s past academic work and on current undergraduate requirements for the baccalaureate nursing program.

Nursing accepts students into the master’s degree options each semester with the exception of the Pediatric Primary Care concentration which only accepts in the spring and the Nursing Leadership and Psychiatric Mental Health concentrations which only accepts in the fall. The application deadline for both summer and fall semesters is February 1 for the regular Master’s and March 1st for the Nursing Leadership. The application deadline for spring semester is September 1.

The following materials are required for admission:

  1. Application for Graduate Study, and supplemental application for specific program option.
  2. A $50 application fee.
  3. Two copies of official transcripts from all colleges attended.
  4. Two letters of recommendation from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s professional and academic abilities; if you have completed your undergraduate nursing degree within past five years, one letter must come from a former professor.
  5. Current vitae or resume including education, work experience and professional development, professional and/or community activities, research and publications.
  6. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), for applicants whose native language is not English. See section on “International Admissions” for more information.
  7. The MS Nursing program with a concentration in Nursing Leadership in Healthcare Innovations is strictly online, therefore it does not allow for F1 or J1 visa sponsorship for overseas students
  8. A written statement identifying your educational/professional goals and the purpose for applying to the specific graduate option.
  9. A two-page position paper on a current social or health issue (APA style).
  10. A Certificate of Immunization.
  11. Official scores from either the Miller Analogies Test (MAT), which is  preferred, or the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Additional requirements include the following:

  1. Graduation from an accredited nursing program.
  2. A cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.75 on a 4.00 scale. The GPA is based on all undergraduate college-level course work attempted at regionally accredited institutions.
  3. Registration as a professional nurse in Georgia or another U.S. state and evidence of application to the Georgia Board of Nursing.
  4. One to two years of clinical practice in the specialty area for master’s education is preferred for applicants in the clinical practice specialist.

Application information and materials are available on the School’s website nursing.gsu.edu/academics/admissions/.

Admission Status

Full Graduate Status: Admission to the master’s program is contingent upon the availability of faculty and clinical resources. Applicants who meet all admissions guidelines based upon faculty review may be admitted to full graduate status.

Provisional Graduate Status: Students who do not meet all admission criteria MAY be admitted on a provisional basis. These students are limited to nine semester hours of study. These nine hours of study are determined and authorized by the student’s faculty advisor. Courses that must be included in the program of study for provisional students include NURS 7310 Advanced Pathophysiological Concepts in Nursing, Part 1 and NURS 7320 Advanced Pathophysiological Concepts in Nursing, Part 2 and one of the following: NURS 7550 (Pharmacology), NURS 7900 (Theoretical Foundations for Advanced Practice Nursing), or NURS 7000 (Research Methods for Advanced Practice Nurses).  A grade of B must be achieved in each course during the provisional status period (9 credits); no course may be repeated. If a B is not achieved in each course, then the student will be withdrawn from the program. If a GPA of 3.0 is achieved (with at least a B in each course in the 9 credit course plan), and upon recommendation of the Master’s Program Committee, the student is admitted to full graduate status and will receive a letter notifying him or her of the change in status.

Post-Master’s Certificate

The Post-Master’s certificate program is open to all registered nurses who hold a master’s degree in Nursing. Post-Master’s certificate applicants have to meet the same admissions requirements as Masters’ degree applicants. Both Master’s degree and Post-Master’s Certificate admissions requirements can be found in the Graduate Admissions section under Nursing, Master of Science or Post-Master’s Certificate. The length time to complete the certificate varies depending on your academic history and the courses taken in the M.S. Nursing program, but generally takes one to two years.

Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing

The Nursing program accepts students into the doctoral program in the fall semester only. The application priority deadline is February 1 and the regular deadline is April 1.

The following materials are required for admission:

  1. Application for Graduate Study.
  2. A $50 application fee.
  3. Two copies of official transcripts from all colleges attended.
  4. Three letters of recommendation from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s professional, intellectual, and academic abilities.
  5. Current vitae or resume including education, work experience and professional development, professional and/or community activities, research, and publications.
  6. Statements of professional goals and research area of interest.
  7. A two-page position paper on a current social or health issue (in APA style).
  8. Official scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  9. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), for applicants whose native language is not English. See section on “International Admissions” for more information.
  10. A Certificate of Immunization.

Additional requirements include the following:

  1. Master’s degree in nursing. Applicants who hold a master’s degree in an area other than nursing must have (1) a bachelor’s degree in nursing, (2) a background in advanced clinical nursing practice, and (3) evidence of either previous course work in nursing theory or an individualized learning program in nursing theory.
  2. Licensure/Certification. All applicants (including international applicants) must hold a license in the United States as a registered nurse (R.N. license) prior to acceptance to the doctoral program.
  3. An interview with a Nursing faculty member.
  4. Applicants must have completed a graduate-level intermediate statistics course within the past five years prior to admission, OR must complete a graduate-level intermediate statistics course by the end of the first enrolled semester in the doctoral program.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

The Nursing program accepts students into the doctoral program in the fall semester only. The priority application deadline is February 1 and the regular deadline is April 1.

The following materials are required for admission:

  1. Application for Graduate Study.
  2. A $50 application fee.
  3. Two copies of official transcripts from all colleges attended.
  4. Three letters of recommendation from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s professional, intellectual, and academic abilities.
  5. Current vitae or resume including education, work experience and professional development, professional and/or community activities, research, and publications.
  6. Statements of professional goals and research area of interest.
  7. A two-page position paper on a current social or health issue (in APA style).
  8. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), for applicants whose native language is not English. See section on “International Admissions” for more information.
  9. A Certificate of Immunization.

Additional requirements include the following:

  1. Must have had a graduate level stats course before the first semester of the DNP program
  2. Master’s degree in nursing from an accredited nursing program
  3. Current RN licensure in state of residency and/or practice
  4. Current advance practice nurse certification for NP, CNRA and CNM applicants
  5. Actively practicing as an advanced practice nurse (CNS, NP, CNRA, CNM, administration and informatics)
  6. Minimum two years of clinical experience
  7. Recommended grade point average of 3.2 in master’s degree program (3.5 is preferred)

Nursing Non-Degree Admission

Non-degree status is granted on an individual basis in the graduate nursing programs. Applicants must possess a bachelor’s of science degree with a major in nursing to be eligible to take master’s courses. Applicants must have a GPA of 2.75 or greater to take master’s level nursing courses. Applicants wishing to take a doctoral course must have a master’s degree. Instructor permission is required for course enrollment. Admission to non-degree status does not warrant or secure admission to the degree program. Students with non-degree status may take up to a maximum of six credit hours of graduate coursework without admission to the nursing program.

Application information and materials are available on the School’s website at snhp.gsu.edu/academics-admissions/graduate-admissions/nondegree-status/

Nutrition, Master of Science in Health Sciences

IMPORTANT: The six courses listed below are required prerequisites to the M.S. degree program in Nutrition. These courses must be completed prior to admission. If you wish to complete or update the required prerequisites at Georgia State University, you can apply through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at admissions.gsu.edu for postbaccalaureate status.

Inorganic Chemistry (1 semester)

(GSU CHEM 1151K* or GSU CHEM 1211k and CHEM 1212K or equivalent)

Organic Chemistry (1 semester)

(GSU CHEM 1152K* or GSU CHEM 2400 or CHEM 3100 or equivalent)

Human Anatomy and Physiology (2 semesters)

(GSU BIOL 2110K and BIOL 2120K or GSU BIOL 2107K, BIOL 2108K, BIOL 3240 and BIOL 3250 or equivalent)

Principles of Nutrition (1 semester)
(GSU NUTR 2100 or equivalent)

*Will no longer be accepted as of Fall 2018

NOTE: Online laboratory courses will not be accepted.

Additionally, a biochemistry course (NUTR 6700 or equivalent) and a normal nutrition and metabolism course (NUTR 6500 or equivalent) are prerequisites to graduate coursework. They may be taken after acceptance into the graduate program. The biochemistry and nutrition/metabolism courses must have been completed within 10 years prior to beginning the graduate program if they are not taken as part of the graduate program.

The Master of Science program accepts students into the program each semester. The application deadline for summer semester is April 1, fall semesters is May 15 and for spring semester is October 1.

The selection of potential degree candidates for the Master of Science degree program in Health Sciences is competitive. Admission is based upon the quality of the undergraduate record, achievement on required admission tests, and suitable preparation for the specific degree program to be pursued All applicants must be graduates of accredited institutions with baccalaureate degrees and meet other requirements listed below.

The following materials are required for admission:

  1. Application for Graduate Study.
  2. A $50 application fee.
  3. Supplemental Application for the Master of Nutrition.
  4. Two letters of recommendation from individuals knowledgeable of the applicant’s professional, intellectual, and academic abilities.
  5. Statement of Professional Goals.

In addition to the materials required for program admission, the Department of Nutrition requires the following for applicants to the specialization in nutrition:

  1. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in all college-level coursework.
  2. A rank in the 50th percentile or greater on both the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures.
  3. A resume (curriculum vita) outlining professional, educational, and volunteer experience and special skills, such as proficiency in languages other than English.
  4. Two letters of recommendation.
  5. A statement of professional goals.
  6. College-level courses with laboratory experiences in anatomy, physiology, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. Biochemistry and normal nutrition (nutrition and metabolism) are prerequisites for many graduate courses. These courses must have been completed within 10 years prior to taking graduate courses for which they are prerequisites. They may be taken at the beginning of the graduate program but do not confer graduate credit.

Students may be admitted in Fall and Spring semesters to the specialization in nutrition. The application deadline for fall semester is May 15 and the application deadline for spring semester is October 1. Students planning full time course loads are strongly urged to enter in fall semester to maximize availability of courses due to sequencing.

Application information and materials are available on the School’s website at nutrition.gsu.edu/academics/graduate-admissions/.

Nutrition, Master of Science in Health Sciences, Coordinated Program

IMPORTANT: The six courses listed below are required prerequisites to the M.S. degree program in Nutrition. These courses must be completed prior to admission. If you wish to complete or update the required prerequisites at Georgia State University, you can apply through the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at admissions.gsu.edu for postbaccalaureate status.

Inorganic Chemistry (1 semester)

(GSU CHEM 1151K* or GSU CHEM 1211k and CHEM 1212K or equivalent)

Organic Chemistry (1 semester)

(GSU CHEM 1152K* or GSU CHEM 2400 or CHEM 3100 or equivalent)

Human Anatomy and Physiology (2 semesters)

(GSU BIOL 2110K and BIOL 2120K or GSU BIOL 2107K, BIOL 2108K, BIOL 3240 and BIOL 3250 or equivalent)

Principles of Nutrition (1 semester)
(GSU NUTR 2100 or equivalent)

*Will no longer be accepted as of Fall 2018

NOTE: Online laboratory courses will not be accepted.

Additionally, a biochemistry course (NUTR 6700 or equivalent) and a normal nutrition and metabolism course (NUTR 6500 or equivalent) are prerequisites to graduate coursework. They may be taken after acceptance into the graduate program. The biochemistry and nutrition/metabolism courses must have been completed within 10 years prior to beginning the graduate program if they are not taken as part of the graduate program.

Applicants to this program must meet the requirements for admission to the Master of Science in Health Science in Nutrition, including the Nutrition Specialization requirements listed above. They must also have completed an undergraduate course in anthropology, psychology, or sociology. Additionally, they must submit the supplemental application that is available online. Undergraduate majors from Didactic Programs in Dietetics who hold a ACEND Verification Statement listing completion date or ACEND Declaration of Intent to Complete Form with anticipated completion date must apply for this program January 15 for early admission or April 15 for a Summer Semester start date. All other applications are due May 15 for a Fall Semester start date.

The Coordinated Program accepts students once a year. The application deadline for fall semester is May 15.

Master of Occupational Therapy

The mission of Georgia State University’s program of occupational therapy is to improve on human lives through innovations in research, community engagement, an education in occupational therapy and rehabilitation in general. We will prepare highly competent and ethical entry-level occupational therapists in the delivery of evidence based, culturally-competent, and compassionate care to improve health and independence of individual and community with a highly technological and globally diverse environment.

The Occupational Therapy Master’s program accepts students once a year in the fall semester.

Students are required to complete the following prerequisite courses:

  • 2 courses in anatomy and/or physiology
  • 1 course in human growth and development or developmental psychology
  • 1 course in abnormal psychology
  • 1 course in statistics
  • 1 course in sociology or anthropology
  • 1 course in medical terminology

The following courses are not required to be completed before the start of the program:

  • Gross Human Anatomy with lab, 5000 level or higher, four credit hours or higher
  • Pathology, 5000 level or higher, three credit hours or higher

Applicants must meet the following minimum admissions criteria:

  • Take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Verbal and Quantitative Reasoning and Analytical Writing measures within five years of application to the program. The minimum required score of 150 on the Verbal section; 140 on the Quantitative Section; and 3.5 on the Analytic Writing section score.
  • A cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 is recommended. A GPA of 3.0 in prerequisite courses is required. All prerequisites must be completed within the last five years
  • Documentation of a minimum of 50 hours of work or volunteer experience in at least two different delivery systems demonstrating exposure to and understanding of the occupational therapist’s role.

The following materials are required for admission:

  1. A OTCAS Application and all associated OTCAS supplemental materials, including transcripts, and fees.
  2. Georgia State University Application for Graduate Study.
  3. A $50 Georgia State University application fee.
  4. A personal essay, no more than two pages, succinctly discussing how your academic background and life experiences will contribute to you success in the OT program while enhancing our program and the profession of occupational therapy.
  5. Three letters of recommendation. At least one from an OT, one from a professor, and one from a work supervisor, academic advisor or other healthcare professional (non-relatives).
  6. A current resume of professional and volunteer experiences.
  7. Official scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  8. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) taken in the last two years, for applicants whose native language is not English. Minimum scores: TOEFL a score of 90 with no less than 20 on each subset, IELTS a score of 6.5 with no less than 6 on each band score. See section on “International Admissions” in this chapter for more information.
  9. An interview on request from Georgia State.
  10. A Certificate of Immunization.

Doctor of Physical Therapy

Candidates for admission to the entry-level D.P.T. degree program must be able to demonstrate abilities to meet certain technical standards of performance necessary to carry out their activities as health professionals. They must demonstrate the functional use of their senses that will allow them to elicit appropriate information to perceive nonverbal communications from patients or clients. They must be able to communicate effectively and efficiently in oral and in written form. Additionally, each candidate should be physically able to provide reasonable care and emergency treatment when necessary.

All candidates must possess those intellectual, ethical, physical, and emotional attributes required to undertake the full curriculum and to achieve the levels of competence required by the faculty. They must possess the emotional health required for full utilization of these abilities in order to exercise good judgment in their activities as health professionals.

Prerequisites

The D.P.T. curriculum demands rigorous scholarly effort. Students with diverse strengths and backgrounds are encouraged to apply to the program. To gain admission, students must possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university. The baccalaureate degree must be completed prior to matriculation into the D.P.T. program. The baccalaureate degree should be in a student’s area of interest. The program is designed for the person with an undergraduate degree in a field other than physical therapy.

Students are required to complete the following prerequisite courses:

  • 2 courses in anatomy and/or physiology
  • 2 courses in physics
  • 2 courses in chemistry
  • 1 course in statistics
  • 1 course in biology
  • 1 course in psychology

Applicants must meet the following minimum admissions criteria:

  • A rank in the 50th percentile or greater on both the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures. The minimum required score on the Analytic Writing section score is 3.5.
  • A cumulative undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 is recommended. A GPA of 3.0 in prerequisite courses is required.
  • Documentation of volunteer and/or work experience in two physical therapy practice settings. A total of 80 hours of service is required with at least 20 hours of observation in each setting. The experience must be documented, and the documents must be signed by a supervisor who can attest to the applicant’s presence and the nature of the activities. The program is competitive, and the admissions application, cumulative GPA, prerequisite GPA, GRE scores, and Interview are utilized to rank applicants for admission.

The following materials are required for admission:

  1. A PTCAS Application and all associated PTCAS supplemental materials, including transcripts, and fees.
  2. Georgia State University Application for Graduate Study.
  3. A $50 application fee.
  4. Official scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  5. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), for applicants whose native language is not English. See section on “International Admissions” in this chapter for more information.
  6. A Certificate of Immunization.

Selected applicants are invited to campus for an interview with the faculty, clinical instructors and students of the Department of Physical Therapy.

Students are accepted into the program once a year and the program begins in the summer semester. The application deadline is generally nine to twelve months prior to the anticipated semester of entry. Application information is available on the School’s website at physicaltherapy.gsu.edu/graduate-admissions/.

Respiratory Therapy, Master of Science in Health Sciences

The selection of potential degree candidates for the Master of Science degree program in Health Sciences is competitive. Admission is based upon the quality of the undergraduate record, achievement on required admission tests, and suitable preparation for the specific degree program to be pursued. All applicants must be graduates of accredited institutions with baccalaureate degrees and meet other requirements listed below for the specialization areas.

Individuals are admitted into the program in one of two categories: full graduate status, which includes provisional status, or non-degree status.

Full Graduate Status

Full graduate status must be achieved in order to fulfill all degree requirements. Required materials include the following:

  1. Application for Graduate Study and supplemental applications, if applicable.
  2. A $50 application fee.
  3. Two copies of official transcripts from all colleges attended.
  4. Official scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE).
  5. Official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), for applicants whose native language is not English. See section on “International Admissions” in this chapter for more information.
  6. A Certificate of Immunization.

Provisional Status

Applicants who do not meet one or more of the admissions standards for full graduate status and who, in the opinion of the faculty, have the potential to be successful in graduate study, may be admitted to provisional status. Students admitted to this status must satisfy the requirements stated on their admission letter to continue in full graduate status. Students are admitted to this status at the option of the division and when adequate facilities are available.

Respiratory Therapy Specialization

In addition to the materials required for program admission, the Department of Respiratory Therapy requires the following for applicants to the specialization in respiratory care:

  1. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in all college-level coursework.
  2. A rank in the 50th percentile or greater on both the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning measures.
  3. Bachelor of Science/Arts degree in respiratory therapy or related field.
  4. Resumé (C.V.) outlining professional and educational experience, with two professional references listed.
  5. If you already have your bachelor’s degree in respiratory therapy, evidence of credentialing as a registered respiratory therapist (RRT), a copy of National Board of Respiratory Care (NBRC) credentials.

The MS RT Online track is strictly online, there for it does not allow for F1 or J1 visa sponsorship for overseas students. Student interested in F1 or J1 visa sponsorship should apply for the Traditional track.
Provisional StatusApplicants who do not meet one or more of the admissions standards for full graduate status and who, in the opinion of the faculty, have the potential to be successful in graduate study, may be admitted to provisional status. Students admitted to this status must satisfy the requirements stated on their admission letter to continue in full graduate status. Students are admitted to this status at the option of the department and when adequate facilities are available.

Respiratory Therapy Non-degree Status

Non-degree Status is provided to accommodate selected students who do not plan to seek the master’s degree. Additionally, this status may be used to accommodate selected students who have the potential for graduate study but, at the time of application, are not able to fulfill all the requirements for admission to full graduate status. A student is admitted to this status at the option of the department concerned. Admission to this status does not warrant or secure admission to the degree program. Students in non-degree status are limited to 12 semester hours of graduate course work.

Applications are accepted for the fall and spring semesters only. The application deadline for fall is May 15 and September 15 for spring and January 15 for summer. Application information and materials are available on the School’s website at snhp.gsu.edu/academics-admissions/graduate-admissions/nondegree-status/.

5020.10 Transient Student Admission

A student enrolled in a graduate degree program at another accredited institution may seek admission as a transient student in the school. Admission requirements include an application, application fee, certificate of immunization, and a letter of good standing from the institution the applicant is presently attending. The letter must include the courses approved by the home institution. The application must be printed/downloaded from the website at snhp.gsu.edu/academics-admissions/graduate-admissions/transient-status/.

Admission to transient status is normally for one semester only. A transient student who wishes to enroll for a subsequent semester at Georgia State must file an Application for Re-entry with the School of Nursing and Health Professions Office of Academic Assistance. Students must be in good Academic Standing at Georgia State University in order to continue as transient students at the University. Transient students who are not in good academic standing will not be allowed to continue taking courses as transient students in the School of Nursing and Health Professions per the University Re-entry Definition (see section 1110.10 in this catalog). If the student wishes to enroll in courses other than those listed in the original letter of good standing, the home institution must submit a new letter indicating approval of those courses.

Although the university cannot guarantee the availability of space in desired courses, every effort will be made to assist students in the registration process. The student is responsible for requesting that transcripts of grades earned at Georgia State be sent to the home institution. Transient students who do not remain in good academic standing at Georgia State University may not be allowed to continue taking courses in the School of Nursing and Health Professions.

5020.20 International Student Admission

It is the policy of Georgia State University to encourage the enrollment of students from other countries. The University subscribes to the principles of international education and to the basic concept that only through education and understanding can mutual respect, appreciation and tolerance of others be accomplished. The recognition of the values of cultural exchange is inherent in our philosophy of education and is predicated on an awareness of the need to foster better cooperation, friendship, and understanding among the peoples of the world. In this regard, we welcome international students to our campus because we believe in a cultural exchange program which will be beneficial to our own student body, to the international students involved, and to metropolitan Atlanta.

Academic Credentials: Applicants who have completed all or part of their education outside the United States are required to have their foreign credentials evaluated by an independent evaluation service. For graduate admissions, the School of Nursing and Health Professions recommends Josef Silny and Associates, Inc. (www.jsilny.com). The school will also accept evaluations of foreign credentials from Educational Credential Evaluators, Inc. (www.ece.org) and World Education Services (www.wes.org). If Josef Silny & Associates is used as the independent evaluation service, transcripts do not have to be provided by the applicant. Academic credentials must be original documents with authoritative signatures, seals, stamps, etc. Whenever possible, these should be sent by the institution responsible for issuing such documents. In cases where it is impossible for an applicant to have these credentials sent from such institutions, the applicant should forward a duly “notarized” or “attested to” copy. The notarization should be done by the proper institutional official or by the Ministry of Education in the home country. Documents in a language other than English must be accompanied by translations. Translations should be made by the home country embassy or an appropriate official, and the original copies of the translations, acceptably notarized as described above, must be provided. As a general rule, documents translated by the Office of the American Friends of the Middle East (AFME) or the Institute of International Education (IIE) will be acceptable.

English Proficiency: In addition to meeting the regular admission requirements, international applicants whose native language is not English must submit official scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) before admission can be considered. Scores cannot be more than two years old. The test is not required of international applicants who have received a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited U.S. institution.

Financial Resources: Applicants who plan to attend Georgia State University on an F-1 or J-1 visa must submit a Financial Statement showing the financial support necessary for the costs associated with the first year of study.

Course Load: The international student with a student visa is required to carry a full course of study in fall and spring semester. A full course of study at Georgia State University is nine semester hours for graduate students. International students cannot be admitted as non degree students.

5020.30 Changing Semester of Entry

Admission to a graduate program in the School of Nursing and Health Professions is valid only for the semester, the degree, the major and the concentration specified in the letter of acceptance. A student who does not enroll for the semester for which acceptance was granted should notify the school of their decision to change their semester of entry. In most programs, students who do not enroll for the semester they are accepted are not guaranteed admission in a subsequent semester. Students generally have to reapply to the program and must be reconsidered for admission.

5020.40 Re-entry Students

A re-entry student is a student who has been enrolled at Georgia State University and who:

  1. Has not registered for courses at Georgia State during the previous 12 months; or
  2. Attended any semester as a transient student and wishes to attend an additional semester as a transient student.

Graduate students in the School of Nursing and Health Professions may only re-enter the same graduate program or status in which they were last enrolled. Students must additionally be approved for re-entry through their division. Students who have attended Georgia State University in both undergraduate and graduate categories may apply to re-enter in either category. Reentry applications for Undergraduate Students are submitted online to the Office of Admissions at admissions.gsu.edu. Graduate students may obtain applications through the school’s website. Transient students should refer to the “Transient Student Admission” section in this chapter.

5020.50 Tuition Deposit

The Department of Physical Therapy requires students newly accepted into their program to submit a portion of their first semester’s tuition at the time of acceptance. The advanced tuition, which is nonrefundable, guarantees the student’s place in the class.

5030 Degree Regulations

Graduate students in the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions are responsible for knowledge of all regulations and procedures of the school, the university, and of the program or status in which they are enrolled. Enrollment in a program constitutes a students’ acknowledgment that they are obligated to comply with all academic and administrative regulations and degree requirements. Students are encouraged to read carefully the general regulations that follow and those specifically pertaining to their program.

5030.10 Transfer of Credit

Students who have completed graduate courses at other institutions prior to enrollment at Georgia State University may request that those courses be evaluated for transfer of credit to the School of Nursing and Health Professions. The request for transfer credit must be made by the student. Only those courses that are deemed to be appropriate to the student’s program of study in the school can be transferred. Transferred credits will be included in the year limitation placed on credits applicable to the degree.

Students who wish to enroll in courses at another institution after acceptance to a graduate program in the School of Nursing and Health Professions and wish to apply those courses to their graduate program at Georgia State University, must first obtain written approval from their adviser, the graduate director/coordinator, and any other appropriate persons. Students will not be allowed to enroll in courses to be transferred back to Georgia State University during the semester he or she expects to graduate from Georgia State University.

Students should inquire with the separate divisions in the School to determine the maximum amount of transfer credit allowed for each program.

5030.20 Academic Warning and Suspension

Each student admitted to a graduate program in the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00 at the end of a semester will be placed on Academic Warning. The student will be notified of this standing by the School of Nursing and Health Professions Office of Academic Assistance. If a 3.00 cumulative grade point average is not achieved by the end of the next twelve semester hours or two semesters, whichever is longer, of completed course work approved by the faculty adviser, the student will be suspended from the graduate program. Students in provisional status or non-degree status must achieve a 3.00 cumulative grade point average by the end of their period in that status, however individual programs may not allow students in these categories to continue if their cumulative grade point average falls below 3.00. Transient students must maintain a 3.00 cumulative grade point average in order to continue in that status. Transient students who do not maintain a 3.00 cumulative grade point average may be subject to academic suspension. A student may apply for reinstatement after one semester as a suspended student. Application for reinstatement must be made no later than six weeks prior to the first day of classes for the semester in which reinstatement is sought.

The academic standing policies for the Doctor in Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) and the Master’s and Doctoral Nursing programs differ from those above. Please refer to the section on the D.P.T. program for policies and the Nursing polices that pertain to students in those programs.

Each department may have additional policies related to academic progression. Students should refer to the applicable student handbooks.

5030.30 Changing Catalog Editions

Students will normally satisfy the degree requirements of the catalog in effect at the time they enter the graduate program in the School of Nursing and Health Professions. Revisions may be required to provide more effective programs. Degree requirements include the courses and grades required to earn the degree. A change in an academic regulation such as academic standing policy or appeals procedures will affect all students regardless of catalog edition.

Students will be required to change catalog editions when they reenter the university after a period of two or more consecutive years in which they have earned no academic credit at Georgia State University. Some graduate programs in the School of Nursing and Health Professions may have stricter requirements on changing catalog editions.

5030.40 Continuous Enrollment

Students in all graduate programs must maintain enrollment totaling 6 hours (or more) over all consecutive three semester periods (including summers). In other words, the total enrollment of the current term plus the two terms preceding it must add to 6 hours or more at all times. The status of all students will be checked by the midpoint of each term for compliance with the continuous enrollment requirement. Any student whose enrollment is out of compliance may receive a registration hold preventing all current and future registration. Those students will be notified by an email message sent to their official Georgia State University email account.

To resume their programs, students with continuous enrollment holds must file for re-entry by the published deadline and must enroll at a level sufficient to satisfy the continuous enrollment criterion. That is, their enrollment in the re-entry term plus the two terms preceding it must total to 6 hours or more. The maximum required enrollment level for the re-entry term is 6 hours. For more information on the re-entry process, see section 1110.

5040 Degree Requirements

Degree requirements in the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions are program specific and are listed under the individual programs.

5040.10 Thesis Hours

Students in Nutrition and Respiratory Therapy who are involved in writing a master’s thesis/research project shall register for at least three credit hours of thesis/research project credit each semester from the time they finish their course work until the time all requirements for the degree are completed. Master’s students in Nursing do not complete a thesis requirement.

All doctoral students in the Nursing who are involved in writing a dissertation shall register for at least three credit hours of dissertation credit each semester from the time they are admitted to candidacy until the time the dissertation is successfully defended.

Doctor of Physical Therapy students are not required to complete a thesis or dissertation.

5050 Academic Advisement and Graduation Procedures

Academic Advisement for graduate students in the Byrdine F Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions is done by the faculty within the School.

All candidates for the M.S.,O.T.M., Ph.D, D.N.P or D.P.T degrees or certificates in Nursing or Clinical Health Informatics must file a formal application for graduation with the University’s Graduation Office at least two semesters in advance of the expected semester of graduation. Deadlines are published on the Georgia State website: registrar.gsu.edu/graduation/. The Graduation Office will inform the School when the application is filed. The School of Nursing and Health Professions will conduct an audit and inform the student of any remaining requirements. A degree will be awarded only to a student who meets the university academic and residence requirements as well as the standards of performance and academic requirements for the M.S.,O.T.M, Ph.D, D.N.P or D.P.T degrees or post-master’s certificate in Nursing.

All credits, including transfer credits, presented for the Master of Science, Occupational Therapy Master, and Doctor of Physical Therapy degree must have been earned within six calendar years of the date of the degree. For the Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Nursing Practice degree credits, including transfer credits must be earned within seven years of the date of the degree. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in order to receive a master’s degree in the School of Nursing and Health Professions. A student must have a minimum grade point average of 3.0 in order to receive a Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Nursing Practice, and Doctor of Physical Therapy degree.

Please note that licensing boards or agencies for program-related occupations may deny, suspend or revoke a license if an applicant has a criminal history or licensee is convicted, pleads guilty or nolo contendre to a felony or other crime. Students should consult the licensing board corresponding to their intended occupations for more details. Successful completion of a program of study in the School of Nursing and Health Professions does not guarantee licensure, certification, or employment in the relevant occupation.

5070 Clinical, Field Experience or Internship

As part of the degree completion requirements for some of the programs in the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions, the student will be placed in a clinical setting which requires the student to care for and/or be exposed to individuals and patients of all ages and with a variety of diagnoses and symptoms, some of which are communicable and infectious. However, unless otherwise required by law, the Georgia State University School of Nursing and Health Professions does not grant special consideration or waiver of any degree completion requirements, including placement in a clinical setting.

Please note that majors in the School must complete a clinical program during their program. Some students will be placed with a clinical affiliate that gives care to vulnerable populations or deals with sensitive information. As a result, the affiliate may request a criminal background check or drug screen as a prerequisite for placement. If a student uses illegal drugs, has a criminal record before they declare their major or acquire a criminal record after declaring their major, they might be prohibited from participating in the clinical program. Since the program is a requirement, the student might be prevented from completing the degree program. The programs in the School of Nursing and Health Professions reserve the right to require the withdrawal of any student who, in the opinion of the faculty, does not maintain the standards of clinical performance or conduct.

5080 Graduate Assistants

A limited number of graduate assistant positions (GA) are available for qualified candidates in the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions. Further information regarding availability and qualifications for these positions can be obtained by contacting the graduate director/coordinator in each department.

Any student chosen for an GA  is required to have health insurance. There are two options for satisfying this requirement: students may provide proof of insurance if they already have coverage or they may apply for coverage through the University with either United Healthcare or Blue Cross and Blue Shield. For more information on student health insurance please go to this link: sfs.gsu.edu/tuition-fees/student-health-insurance/buy-student-health-insurance/.

5100 Clinical Health Informatics

Programs Offered:

  • Graduate Certificate in Clinical Health Informatics

935C Urban Life Building
404-413-1446

Tamara Melton, Program Director

Faculty: Melton

The Graduate Certificate in Clinical Health (GCHI) is an 18-21-credit hour program of study. All courses have been specially designed and developed for students currently working in a healthcare setting for at least two years, and who are seeking to gain skills in health informatics to maintain, upgrade, or advance their health informatics knowledge and skills. Students who are current students of one of the clinical graduate programs in the Lewis school may also apply for the GCHI. Since the Certificate is strictly online, F1/J1 visa sponsorship is not available.

Program Degree Requirements

Graduate Certificate in Health Informatics

Semester hours are shown in parentheses after each entry.

Graduate Certificate in Clinical Health Informatics Requirements (18-21 credit hours):

  • SNHP 7000 Introduction to Clinical Healthcare Informatics (3)
  • SNHP 7100 Concepts in Healthcare Informatics(3)
  • SNHP 7250 Healthcare Data Analytics (3)
  • SNHP 7270 Introduction to Healthcare Project Management (3)
  • SNHP 7300 Quality Improvement and Safety in Healthcare Environments(3)
  • SNHP 7550 Theoretical Foundations for Advanced Nursing Practice (3)
  • NURS 7600 Residency and Capstone Project (credit hours depend on student’s choice of certificate exam (3)

Program Academic Regulations

A minimum grade of C (2.0) is required in all courses in the GCHI program. All GCHI students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 to remain in the program.

The Byrdine F Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student at any time in order to preserve and maintain the school’s standards of scholarship and conduct. Furthermore, if the student has been sanctioned for any violation of university rules, procedures, or policies, an automatic review and determination of that student’s progress in the program will occur.

5110 Nursing

Programs Offered:

  • M.S. in Nursing
    • Concentrations in Adult Health – Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Family Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric/Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and Nursing Leadership in Healthcare Innovations
  • Ph.D. in Nursing
  • D.N.P. in Nursing Practice

900 Urban Life Building
404-413-1200

Susan J Kelley, Associate Dean and Chief Academic Officer for Nursing

Faculty: Aycock, Bates, Breslin, Campbell, Casseus, Chen, Clark, Cranford, Cranwell-Bruce, DeMars, Eades, Eastman, Epps, Faulkner, Florman, Gay, Gordon, Grantham, Helvig, Hires,  Horne, Kelley, Killian, Kirkendoll, Lee, Long, Marcus, Milner, Nelson, Plitnick, Polovich, Ramos, Ravenell, Roseberry, Schwarze, Sims, Spratling, Tice, Townsend, Washington, Wilmoth

The master’s program in nursing focuses on the preparation of leaders for innovative health delivery systems of the future. Graduates are prepared as clinical experts with advanced competencies in practice, critical thinking, inquiry, leadership, self-awareness and empowerment. The curriculum is designed to prepare graduates to assume nursing administration, nursing informatics, nurse practitioner and a various other advanced practice roles. Preparation is offered in a variety of nursing areas: adult health-gerontology,  psychiatric mental health, pediatric primary care, family health, nursing administration and nursing informatics.  The Master of Science program is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036, 202-887-6791. Graduates of all master’s options are eligible to take national certification examinations in their specialty area of concentration.

The purpose of the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is to prepare nurse leaders and scholars who will expand health-related knowledge and make socially relevant contributions to the discipline of nursing and the larger society. The focus of the curriculum is on the development of nurse scholars and scientists; emphasis is placed on  health promotion, protection, and restoration of health for high risk, vulnerable populations. The Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.) program is a practice focused doctoral degree which prepares nurses to advance nursing practice, participate in organizational and system leadership, and be leaders in evidence-based practice. The D.N.P. graduate will be able to use technology to improve patient outcomes, participate, implement and evaluate health care policy and practice nursing at the highest level. Both the master’s program and the doctoral programs are offered in a web-enhanced format. Classes are held onsite (approximately four times per semester) and online (synchronous and asynchronous formats).

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Nursing: Advanced Practice Nursing Concentrations

Semester hours are shown in parentheses after each entry.

Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist Core Courses (22 hours)

  • NURS 7310 Advanced Pathophysiological Concepts of Nursing- Part 1 (3)
  • NURS 7320 Advanced Pathophysiological Concepts of Nursing- Part 2 (3)
  • NURS 7500 Advanced Health Assessment (3)
  • NURS 7550 Pharmacology for the Advanced Practice Nurse (3)
  • NURS 7600 The Culture of Health Care (2)
  • NURS 7900 Theoretical Foundations for Advanced Nursing Practice (3)
  • NURS 7940 Advanced Professional Nurse Practice Issues (2)
  • SNHP 7800 Interprofessional Collaboration for Advanced Practice (3)

Adult Health-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

  • NURS 7010 Gerontological Nursing (3)
  • NURS 7340 Common Health Problems of Adults (10)
  • NURS 7080 Common Health Problems of Women (6)
  • NURS 7360 Advanced Nursing Practicum (4)
  • Elective

Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner

  • NURS 7420 Common Health Problems and Issues Pertinent to Children and Adolescents (9)
  • NURS 7430 Chronic Health Problems in Children and Adolescents (7)
  • NURS 7440 Advanced Practicum in Child Health (10)

Family Nurse Practitioner

  • NURS 7010 Gerontological Nursing (3)
  • NURS 7340 Common Health Problems of Adults (7)
  • NURS 7342 Common Health Problems of Children and Adolescents (6)
  • NURS 7080 Advanced Practice in Ambulatory Health Care of Women (6)
  • NURS 7360 Advanced Family Nursing Practicum (4)

Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner

  • NURS 7120 Theories of Advanced Psychiatric Nursing (3)
  • NURS 7140 Advanced Psychiatric Care for Individuals (6)
  • NURS 7160 Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing of Families and Groups (6)
  • NURS 7170 Advanced Psychopharmacology (2)
  • NURS 7190 Seminar on Complex Cases (2)
  • NURS 7340 Common Health Problems of Adults (5)
  • NURS 7420 Common Problems of Children and Adolescents (2)

Total = 48 semester hours Clinical Masters

Online-Nursing Leadership in Healthcare Innovations-Core Courses (27 hours)

  • NURS 7610 Leadership and Organizational Behavior in Multicultural Healthcare Environments (3)
  • NURS 7620 Leadership in Promoting Innovation in Nursing and Healthcare Systems (3)
  • NURS 7630 Leadership for Health Policy, Law and Ethics (3)
  • NURS 7660 Healthcare Technology and Clinical Informatics-An Overview (3)
  • NURS 7000 Research Methods and Designs for Measuring Quality and Effectiveness (3)
  • HA 8160 Health Care Systems (3)
  • HA 8550 Basics of Financial Management (3)
  • NURS 7730 Leadership Residency I (3)
  • NURS 7740 Leadership Residency II (3)

Courses for each Specialization Curriculum (9 hours)

Technology/Informatics Courses (9 hours)

  • NURS 7680 Health Information Systems (3)
  • NURS 7690 Human Computer Interfaces (3)
  • NURS 7720 Advanced Topics in Healthcare Informatics (3)

OR

Nursing Administration Courses (9 hours)

    • HA 8460 Human Resource Management (3)
    • HA 8620 Operations Management (3)
    • HA 8440 Executive Leadership in Healthcare (3)
    • NURS 7710 Advanced topics in Managing Healthcare and Nursing Systems (3)
      • Because the Nursing Leadership in Healthcare Innovations concentration is taught strictly online, it does not allow for F1 or J1 visa sponsorship for overseas students.

Total = 36 semester hours

Nursing Leadership in Healthcare Innovations

Required Preliminary Course Work for the RN with an Associate Degree or Diploma

All RNs with an associate degree or diploma are required to meet university and School of Nursing requirements for undergraduate non-nursing coursework  and to take two bridge courses NURS 6910 (Caring for Families and Communities  – 5 credit hours) and NURS 6930 (Leadership and Management in Nursing  – 3 credit hours).  Additionally, students who have not completed an undergraduate health assessment course will be required to complete an on-line health assessment course.

Students admitted to the R.N.-M.S. Program and requiring the bridge courses, NURS 6910 and NURS 6930, must work closely with the course administrators. NURS 6910 requires clinical site arrangement ONE semester before registering for the course. If clinical site arrangement is not done the semester before, students will not be eligible to take NURS 6910 in accordance with their program plans.

Clinical and Residency Course Requirements

Prior to entering clinical courses, students must complete the Nursing Student Health Form and provide evidence of current tuberculosis status and immunization for hepatitis B. The Health Form must be updated annually. Some clinical agencies require updates every six months. Additionally, students must provide evidence of current American Heart Association Basic Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Certification, student liability insurance, and current licensure as a Registered Professional Nurse (RN) within the U.S. Prior to any clinical activities, students will be required to have criminal background and substance usage checks. The student must utilize approved vendors to obtain these tests and must financially bear the costs.

Post-Master’s Certificates

Nursing offers post-master’s certificates in all clinical concentrations to enable nurses who hold master’s degrees in nursing to gain the knowledge and competencies needed for certification in a specific clinical options. The options offered are Adult-Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner, Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner, Pediatric Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Family Nurse Practitioner.

In addition to holding a master’s degree in nursing, applicants must meet the same admission requirements as all M.S. applicants. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) and Miller Analogies Test (MAT) are waived.

Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing

The program requires a minimum of 51 semester hours past the master’s degree in nursing, plus a minimum of nine semester hours of dissertation credit. In general, each three-semester credit hour course represents three lecture hours per week. Semester credit hours are shown in parentheses after each entry.

  • NURS 8012 Qualitative Research Methods (3)
  • NURS 8035 Theoretical and Philosophical Foundations of Nursing (3)
  • NURS 8040 Theory Construction (3)
  • NURS 8045 Introduction to Advanced Nursing Research (3)
  • NURS 8050 Quantitative Research Methods I (3)
  • NURS 8051 Quantitative Research Methods II (3)
  • NURS 8100 Health in Vulnerable Populations (3)
  • NURS 8205 Perspectives on Leadership, Research, Ethics, and Policy (3)
  • SNHP 8200 Instrument Evaluation and Construction (3)
  • NURS 8120 Univariate Statistics for Health Care Professionals (3)
  • NURS 8140 Multivariate Statistics for Health Care Professionals (3)
  • PH 8001 Epidemiology for Health Professionals (3)

Individualized Area of Concentration Courses (12)

Total Credit Hour Requirement: 60 hours

Doctoral Advisory Committee

Upon admission to the Ph.D. program in nursing, the student is assigned an advisor. Within the first year, a Doctoral Advisory Committee is formed to  assist the student in planning and approving an appropriate program of study, selecting residency activities, and constructing, administering and evaluating the comprehensive examination. There will be a minimum of three committee members: a major advisor from the Nursing faculty, one additional committee member from Nursing, and one non-nursing committee member with faculty rank outside the School. The outside member may be a faculty member from within Georgia State University, or a nursing or non-nursing faculty member from another institution.

Doctoral Dissertation Committee

The Doctoral Dissertation Committee is selected by the student after the successful completion of comprehensive examinations. This committee will recommend the student to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. Committee members will guide the student during the dissertation process and judge the acceptability of the dissertation. The committee will also judge the acceptability of the validation defense of the dissertation.

The Doctoral Dissertation Committee will consist of a minimum of three members: a major advisor and one other committee member from within Nursing and one member from outside of Nursing. The outside member may be a faculty member from within Georgia State University, or a nursing or non-nursing faculty member from another institution. All committee members must hold an earned doctorate and be graduate faculty or the equivalent. The Doctoral Dissertation Committee may consist of some or all of the same individuals from the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee, or the student may select a committee of new individuals to constitute the Doctoral Dissertation Committee.

Doctor of Nursing Practice

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.) program is a practice-focused doctoral degree which prepares nurses to advance nursing practice, participate in organizational and system leadership, and be leaders in evidence-based practice. The D.N.P. graduate will be able to use technology to improve patient outcomes, participate, implement and evaluate healthcare policy and practice nursing at the highest level.

Year One

  • Fall Semester
    • NURS 8670 Evidence Based Practice (3)
    • NURS 8700 Scholarly Writing( 2)
    • NURS 8992 Capstone Project – Roles Development Transition( 2)
    • Clinical Hours: 90
    • TOTAL Semester Hours: 7
  • Spring Semester
    • NURS 8160 Introduction to Health Systems (3)
    • NURS 8550 Basics of Financial Management in Health Care Organization (3)
    • NURS 8994 Capstone Project Planning (2)
    • Clinical Hours: 135
    • TOTAL Semester Hours 8
  • Summer Semester
    • NURS 8001 Epidemiology (3)
    • NURS 8620 Health Care Technologies (3)
    • TOTAL Semester Hours: 6

Year Two

  • Fall Semester
    • NURS 8610 Advanced Leadership & Organizational Behavior (3)
    • NURS 8996 Capstone Project Implementation (3)
    • Clinical Hours: 180
    • Elective (optional) 3
    • TOTAL Semester Hours: 6
  • Spring Semester
    • NURS 8205 Health & Law, Vulnerable Populations & Disparities (3)
    • NURS 8998Capstone Project Dissemination (3)
    • Clinical Hours: 180
    • Elective (optional)(3)
    • TOTAL Semester Hours: 6

Total Credit Hours for Doctor of Nursing Practice: 39 hours; electives optional

5120 Nutrition

Programs Offered:

  • Ph.D. in Chemistry, Specialization in Nutritional Sciences
  • M.S. in Health Science, Specialization in Nutrition (with optional emphasis in Sports Nutrition and/or optional Certificate in Public Health)
  • M.S. in Health Science—Coordinated Program in Dietetics without Didactic Program in Dietetics prior Completion
  • M.S. in Health ScienceCoordinated Program in Dietetics with Didactic Program in Dietetics prior Completion

Accreditation

The Coordinated Program (CP) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the  Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND), 120 South Riverside Plaza, Chicago, IL 60606; 312-899-5400.

This program provides students the opportunity to meet coursework requirements and pre-professional experiences (supervised practice) required for eligibility to take the Registration Examination for Dietitians to become Registered Dietitians (RD). Admission to this option does not require an undergraduate degree in nutrition; however, it does require completion of an undergraduate degree and the prerequisites for the M.S. The supervised practice component has a general focus with an urban health emphasis. The program requires a minimum four semester (students holding a Verification Statement at entrance) to six semester (students without Verification Statements) program of didactic coursework and supervised practice, if the student selects the project or coursework capstone option.

Students have the option of completing a thesis; this option could take longer than the minimum program completion time. The CP requires additional academic courses for students who enter the program prior to meeting the undergraduate coursework required for a Verification Statement from a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) accredited by ACEND. At the completion of the degree, graduates receive a Master of Science in Health Sciences with a specialization in nutrition and a Verification Statement that makes them eligible to take the Registration Examination for Dietitians.

Department of Nutrition

862 Urban Life Building
404-413-1226
nutrition.gsu.edu

Huanbiao Mo, Department Chair
Jessica Johnson, Coordinated Program Director
Anita Todd, Graduate Program Director

Faculty: Henes, Mo, Nucci, Poon, Shi, Thompson, Todd, Wanders, Wiley, Xue

Emeritus Faculty: Baxter, Benardot,Cody, Kicklighter, Roman, Rosenbloom

Students earning a Ph.D. in Chemistry with a concentration in Nutritional Sciences will gain an in-depth understanding of the biochemical and chemical processes governing metabolism of nutrients and dietary constituents in the body, and how these pathways function in healthy and disease states. The program will focus on providing students with a fundamental understanding of nutritional biochemistry and technical expertise that can be directly applied in the laboratory or industry settings. Students will hone skills of oral and written communication of scientific information, which will help to prepare them for academic and research positions in universities, private research institutions, government agencies, private industries, and the public policy sector. The student is required to take CHEM 6890 (Responsible Conduct of Research in Chemistry; 2.0 credit hours) or SNHP 8010 (Leadership and Ethics in Healthcare) in the first semester of enrollment.

The  Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions  offers a Master of Science major in Health Sciences with a specialization in the area of nutrition. The purposes of the program are to 1) foster critical thinking, inquiry, and professional leadership in the health professions; 2) prepare health professionals who can formulate research questions, organize and test research problems, and evaluate research study results; 3) provide health practitioners with advanced study in professional specialty areas; 4) enhance career development in the health professions; and 5) provide the framework for advanced degree study.

The overall program objectives are to develop an understanding of the theoretical basis for the health professions; to gain proficiency in the processes, techniques, and practices that are currently being developed within the health professions; to enable the student to discover and utilize specialized knowledge in other disciplines that are related to the effective practice of the health professions; and to develop within the student the ability to see healthcare as a whole, to visualize the interrelationships of its components, and to recognize the influence of political, social, and economic milieu on the healthcare system.

The graduate program of study in the Department of Nutrition is built on a common core of courses and allows for maximum flexibility to meet the needs of the students and their professions. In this way, each program may be individualized to meet the student’s professional goals in keeping with the overall objectives of the program. The curriculum includes core health sciences courses, nutrition specialization courses, elective courses, and either a thesis or non-thesis capstone option.

Program Academic Regulations

Students in the master’s program in Health Sciences are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 before registration for any capstone experience (thesis, project or coursework) will be permitted. Any grade below a C is not acceptable toward the master’s degree. No more than two C grades (maximum of six semester credits) in the health sciences core and/or major can be applied toward the degree. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required to receive the master’s degree.

Program Degree Requirements

Ph.D. in Chemistry, concentration in Nutritional Sciences

A minimum of 80 hours are required for a doctoral degree. Semester hours are shown in parenthesis after each entry.

Biostatistics Courses(6)

Chemistry Specific Courses (17)

Nutrition Specific Courses (12)

Elective Courses (6+)

Research Courses (39)
Chosen in Consultation with Doctoral Program Director

  • CHEM 8800 Seminar (1 x 3)
  • SNHP 8100 Grant Writing (3)*
  • NUTR 8070 Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (3)
  • NUTR 9998 Doctoral Research (1 x n)**
  • NUTR 9999 Doctoral Research (3 x n)**
  • NUTR 9990 Doctoral Dissertation (3)
    *Substitution of an equivalent course is permitted upon approval by the Department of Nutrition Curriculum Committee
    **Minimum 20 total hours
Master of Science, Health Sciences in Nutrition

A minimum of 36 hours are required for a Master’s degree. Semester hours are shown in parenthesis after each entry.

Health Sciences Core (9)

  • SNHP 6000 Research Methods for the Health and Human Science Professions (3)
  • SNHP 8000 Trends Affecting Health Policies, Practices and Laws (3)
  • SNHP 8010 Leadership and Ethics in Healthcare(3)

Specialization Curriculum (15)***

Electives (3-6)
Chosen in Consultation with Graduate Program Director

***Students without a Didactic Program in Dietetics verification statement must also take NUTR 6500 Macronutrients and NUTR 6700 Micronutrients

Capstone (6 minimum)

  • Thesis Option: Students will take NUTR 7999 Thesis. A minimum of two semesters at three credits each must be completed. Students must be enrolled in thesis credit each semester they continue to work on completion of the requirements for thesis research and must be registered for thesis in the semester of graduation.
  • Nonthesis Options: Project – Students will take NUTR 7990 Master’s Project. A minimum of two semesters at three credits each must be completed.
  • Coursework – Students must take three courses at three credits each. Courses are defined in specialty areas which may include but are not limited to: geriatrics, pediatrics, public health and sports. Students who select the coursework option will be required to take one three credit elective course vs. two.
  • Comprehensive exam – Students will take NUTR 7500 Comprehensive Examination for three credits in the semester of graduation. Students who select the comprehensive examination option will be required to take one additional three credit elective course.
Coordinated Program in Dietetics

The Coordinated Program (CP) includes a Master of Science in Health Sciences with a concentration in Nutrition degree and a supervised practice program.  The CP has two program tracks.  Track one: Students with a verification statement have completed the required didactic coursework and are eligible to begin the supervised practice component of the CP. Track two: Students without a verification statement must complete the required didactic coursework before beginning the supervised practice component of the CP.

Health Sciences Core (9)

  • SNHP 6000 Research Methods for the Health and Human Science Professions (3)
  • SNHP 8000 Trends Affecting Health Policies, Practices and Laws (3)
  • SNHP 8010 Leadership and Ethics in Healthcare (3)

Specialization Curriculum (44)

Capstone Option (6 minimum)

  • Thesis Option: Students will take NUTR 7999 Thesis. A minimum of two semesters at three credits each must be completed. Students must be enrolled in thesis credit each semester they continue to work on completion of the requirements for thesis research and must be registered for thesis in the semester of graduation.
  • Nonthesis Options: Project – Students will take NUTR 7990 Master’s Project A minimum of two semesters at three credits each must be completed.
  • Coursework – Students must take three courses at three credits each. Courses are defined in specialty areas which may include but are not limited to geriatrics, pediatrics, public health and sports.
  • Comprehensive examination – Students will take NUTR 7500 Comprehensive Examination for three credits in the semester of graduation. Students who select the comprehensive examination option will be required to take one additional three credit elective course.

Courses Required by the Program beyond Degree Requirements
This section includes courses that can be satisfied in an undergraduate curriculum and additional practice hours beyond the typical institutional requirements for the M.S. degree.

Electives – one to three courses at three-credits each depending upon track and capstone selection

Clinical Course Requirements

The Georgia State University Health Center requires an Immunization Record on file before students may register for courses. Additional health information, laboratory test and immunizations may be required by specific supervised practice rotations and/or facilities. It is the responsibility of the student to consult with the Coordinated Program Director or Coordinator in the Department of Nutrition prior to beginning a clinical assignment. Liability insurance must be purchased prior to beginning the program and again at the beginning of each academic year.

Criminal Background Check and Drug Screen

Your application for licensure may ask you to respond to questions regarding any violations of federal, state or local law. You may be required to provide documentation to the state licensing board explaining any such occurrence. The individual state licensing agencies have exclusive authority to issue a license and could decline to issue such a license based on an applicant’s prior criminal record.

Additionally, many of the clinical sites with which we have a clinical agreement require criminal background checks, finger printing and drug screen prior to allowing the student to be placed in the facility. The clinical facility has the right to deny the student an internship in the facility based on the findings of the criminal background check or drug screen.

Graduate/Thesis Committee

Students in the master’s program in health sciences who plan to complete a thesis will select, with assistance from the major adviser, a Graduate/Thesis Committee, consisting of a chairperson and at least two additional members. The Committee should be selected by the time 12 semester hours have been completed. The Committee should be selected in accordance with the following criteria:

  1. The Committee Chairperson must hold an appointment in the student’s department and hold full or provisional Graduate Faculty Status in the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions.
  2. A second member of the Committee must be from the faculty at Georgia State University.
  3. A third member must be selected from the faculty of Georgia State University or another institution of higher education or from a health-related agency.
  4. All Committee members must be selected in consultation with the chair of the Graduate/Thesis Committee and approved by the head of the department.
  5. No Committee may consist of fewer than three members; however, a student may elect to have more than three members.

Master’s Project Capstone Option

The Project Advisor must hold an primary appointment in the student’s department. A second committee member can be selected from the faculty at Georgia State University, from the faculty at another institution of higher education, or from a health-related agency.

5130 Occupational Therapy

Programs Offered:

  • Master of Occupational Therapy

Department of Occupational Therapy
935C Urban Life Building
404-413-1446
occupationaltherapy.gsu.edu/

Kinsuk Maitra, Chair and Program Director
Faculty: Maitra, Podolksi

Program Description

The scientific study of humans as occupational beings is a central concept of Occupational Therapy Master program at Georgia State University. The faculty believe that the concept of occupational therapy is based on the fundamental premise that occupation is an integral part of life and a pre-requisite to participation (Kielhofner 2008, Christiansen and Townsend, 2010). The program is designed by keeping in mind the demand of the increasingly dynamic healthcare system that requires graduates to be flexible, autonomous, broadly educated generalists. The program also focuses to produce leaders who are able to use creative and critical thinking, as well as clinical reasoning with great effectiveness and efficiency. This is accomplished through enhanced understanding of the rich complexities of occupation. The intent of this understanding of occupation is to improve the effectiveness of using occupation as an assessment as well as intervention within the health and wellness system. This simply means that the students investigate the art and science of occupation: doing the everyday activities of life within their socio-cultural contexts; examining how life-styles influence health and wellbeing, and how participation in occupation can be used therapeutically. Our curriculum philosophy therefore strongly embodies the profession’s Centennial Vision concepts of an evidence-based profession that is globally connected with a diverse workforce prepared to meet society’s occupational needs (AOTA, 2007).

Accreditation

The entry-level occupational therapy master’s degree program has applied for accreditation and has been granted Candidacy status by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), located at 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449. ACOTE’s telephone number c/o AOTA is (301) 652-AOTA and its Web address is www.acoteonline.org. The program must have a pre-accreditation review, complete an on-site evaluation, and be granted Accreditation Status before its graduates will be eligible to sit for the national certification examination for the occupational therapist administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be an Occupational Therapist, Registered (OTR). In addition, all states require licensure in order to practice; however, state licenses are usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. Note that a felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT certification examination or attain state licensure.

Mission

Our mission is to improve human lives through innovations in research, community engagement, and education in occupational therapy and rehabilitation in general. We will prepare highly competent and ethical entry level occupational therapist in the delivery of evidence based, culturally-competent, and compassionate care to improve health and independence of individual and community within a highly technological and globally diverse environment.

Vision

Our vision is to be locally and globally recognized and regarded as a preferred destination for exemplary occupational therapy research and scholarly activity, education, and community engagement.

Curriculum Design

The occupational therapy masters (OT/M) curriculum is sequenced for the study of occupational behavior across the life span, therapeutic interventions to support occupational participation, professional skills, values and behaviors, and models of research and evidence-based practice. Understanding the complexities of occupation and how occupation can be used in assessments and interventions are fundamental aspects of the curriculum. Scholastic inquiry of occupation is woven through the curriculum and is paramount to the understanding of the complexities of occupation. Another fundamental component of the curriculum is the structure of the learning experiences based on adult learning theories to enhance the students’ development of the necessary skills for thinking, self-reflection and reasoning as a therapist.

The curriculum sequence includes six identifiable threads:

  1. Foundational Knowledge – Reflects broad areas of study (i.e. social, behavioral, biological and physical sciences, education and contemporary society) which serve as foundations to the basic premises of occupational therapy.
  2. Understanding the rich complexities of occupation (Individual, Family, Community, Society) – Addresses the reciprocal influence of lifespan development on areas of occupation and the health & wellness/illness continua. Focus is given to understanding the interdependent relationship between one’s ability or inability to engage in occupation, and participation in life.
  3. Using Occupation as a basis of assessment and intervention: – Focuses on the influence of factors such as: performance skills, performance patterns, context, activity demands and client factors on occupational performance. At this stage previously constructed knowledge is organized and applied to occupational therapy assessment and interventions throughout the life span. Influence of technology on occupational assessment and intervention are also applied.
  4. Investigating occupation by integrating science and therapy – Focuses on developing research and scholarship skills as well as clinical reasoning skills to practice as an evidence based therapist.
  5. Applying knowledge to Practice – Applies problem solving skills to assorted clinical contexts for the application of knowledge and skills in diversified environments.
  6. Advocacy, Leadership and Cultural Competency – Instills acceptance of self as a professional with recognition of concomitant responsibilities, duties and rewards. Integrates the end process of the development of a professional and beginning of professional development a culturally competent occupational therapist who can advocate for and lead the profession.

Certification and Licensure

Most states require licensure to practice; however, it is usually based on the results of the NBCOT Certification Examination. A felony conviction may affect a graduate’s ability to sit for the NBCOT Certification Examination or attain state licensure. Students should be aware that it is difficult (or impossible) to obtain a license if they have ever been convicted, plead guilty or nolo contendre to a felony violation.

Background Check and Drug Screening

All incoming students, as part of the admission process, must comply with the Lewis School of Nursing and Health Profession’s and Georgia State’s policy for health and immunization screening and background check. The health and immunization screening includes the following requirements:

  • Immunization and /or titers of:
    • Varicella, Rubeola and Rubella, Mumps or MMR vaccine
    • Tetanus Toxoid booster; diphtheria; pertussis, or ADACEL vaccine
    • Hepatitis B Vaccine (3 doses)
    • PPD- 2 step-if 1st time taker
  • Medical history and Physical
  • CPR/BLS – for health care providers from AHA or American Red Cross
  • Proof of major medical health insurance coverage
  • 7 year employment verification
    Georgia State’s School of Nursing and Health Sciences utilizes American Data Bank as the background clearinghouse, and for tracking student immunization records. The background check includes social security number search (residency history, state and year SSN issued), criminal search (7 years), sex offender search, federal criminal search, and healthcare exclusion list

Program Degree Requirements

Year One
Fall Semester (1st Semester)

  • OT 6000 ANALYSIS AND ADAPTATION OF OCCUPATION(2)
  • OT 6001 ANALYSIS AND ADAPTATION OF OCCUPATION LAB (1)
  • OT 6010 SOCIAL AND CULTURAL DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH AND OCCUPATION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN(3)
  • OT 6020 FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN(3)
  • OT 6021 FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT ACROSS THE LIFESPAN LAB(1)
  • OT 6030 EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AND CLINICAL RESEARCH I(2)
  • OT 6040 FW 1A AND SKILLS FOR OCCUPATION BASED PRACTICE(3)
  • OT 6050 NEUROSCIENCE: ASSESSING HUMAN PERFORMANCE

TOTAL Semester Hours 17

Spring Semester (2nd Semester)

  • OT 6100 APPLIED CONCEPTS OF WELLNESS/ILLNESS-THEORETICAL FOUNDATION FOR THE SCOPE OF PRACTICE(3)
  • OT 6110 OCCUPATIONAL ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS LIFE SPAN(3)
  • OT 6111 OCCUPATIONAL ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS LIFE SPAN(1)
  • OT 6120 ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS LIFE SPAN(2)
  • OT 6121 ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS LIFE SPAN LAB(1)
  • OT 6130 EVIDENCE BASED PRACTICE AND CLINICAL RESEARCH II(2)
  • OT 7030 MASTERS PROJECT I(2)
  • OT 6140 FW 1 B -1 AND SKILLS FOR OCCUPATION BASED PRACTICE SEMINAR II(2)<li.

TOTAL Semester Hours 16

3rd Semester A: (Summer May-Mester) 3 CREDITS

  • OT 7000 ORTHOPEDIC ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN(2)
  • OT 7001 ORTHOPEDIC ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN LAB (1)

3rd Semester B: (Summer) 11 CREDITS

  • OT 7010 DISABILITY THEORY, MENTAL HEALTH AND GROUP PROCESS: ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN(3)
  • OT 7011 DISABILITY THEORY, MENTAL HEALTH AND GROUP PROCESS: ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN LAB(1)
  • OT 7020 COGNITIVE AND PERCEPTUAL ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTIONS ACROSSLIFESPAN(3)
  • OT 7021 COGNITIVE AND PERCEPTUAL ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTIONS ACROSS LIFESPAN LAB(1)
  • OT 7130 MASTERS PROJECT II(1)
  • OT 7040 FW 1C AND SKILLS FOR OCCUPATIONAL BASED PRACTICE SEMINAR III(2)

TOTAL Summer Semester Hours 14

Fall Semester (4th Semester) 12 Credits + 6 Interprofessional credits from Spring Semester (5th Semester)

  • OT 7110 NEUROLOGIC ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN(3)
  • OT 7111 NEUROLOGIC ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFE SPAN(1)
  • OT 7120 COMMUNITY BASED PRACTICE ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN(2)
  • OT 7121 COMMUNITY BASED PRACTICE ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION ACROSS THE LIFESPAN(1)
  • OT 7230 MASTERS PROJECT III(3)
  • OT 7140 FW 1D AND SKILLS FOR OCCUPATIONAL BASED PRACTICE SEMINAR IV(2)

TOTAL Fall Semester Hours 12 Credits +

Spring Semester (5th Semester)

  • OT 7150 COMPETENCY TESTING AND CLINICAL REVIEW SEMINAR -(1)
  • 1 CR (FIRST 2 Weeks)
  • OT 7200 FW II A (12 WEEKS) – 5 CR(5)

TOTAL Spring Semester 6 Interprofessional Credits

TOTAL Fall (4th Semester) and Spring Semester (5th Semester) Hours 18 Credits

***NOTE 12 Credits from Fall Semester + 6 Interprofessional credits from Spring Semester***

Occupational Therapy Curricular Credits: 70

Compulsory Inter-Professional Credits = 6

Fall Semester (4th Semester)

  • SNHP 7100 HEALTH CARE LEADERSHIP-ETHICS – 3 CR (INTER-PROFESSIONAL COMPULSORY ELECTIVE)(3)
  • SNHP 7110 SERVICE DELIVERY / INTER-PROFESSIONAL COLLABORATION IN OT- 3 CR (INTER-PROFESSIONAL) COMPULSORY ELECTIVE)(3)

Total Compulsory Interprofessional Credits: 6

Optional Elective Credits = 3: any 3 credits worth of coursework from the Lewis School or the University with permissions form a research or academic advisor Optional Elective Credits: 3

Total Credits: 76-79

5140 Physical Therapy

Programs Offered:

  • Doctor of Physical Therapy

Department of Physical Therapy
1228 Urban Life Building
404-413-1225
physicaltherapy.gsu.edu/

Andrew Butler, Associate Dean of Research and DPT Interim Chair
Faculty:  Butler, Chen, Farrell, Garcia, Gore, Huggins, Irwin, Lorio, Morelli, Thompson, Tsai, Warren

The Doctor of Physical Therapy curriculum is based on the same philosophical principles that guide the educational, clinical, and research activities of the Byrdine F. Lewis School of Nursing and Health Professions and Georgia State University. The curriculum integrates academic and clinical instruction with the scientific bases for clinical practice. In accordance with, and in support of the mission of Georgia State University, the purpose of the Department of Physical Therapy is to prepare doctors of physical therapy who are committed to clinical excellence, professional distinction, and the pursuit of scholarly activities that contribute to the body of scientific and clinical knowledge.

As a faculty, we believe in:

  • Educating students to serve the physical therapy needs of society by alleviating and eliminating impairments, functional limitations, and disabilities in people of all ages, with acute and chronic conditions; in addition to promoting prevention and wellness in all people
  • Creating a learning environment that is learner-centered, interactive, and facilitated by faculty members
  • Utilizing a variety of educational methods (e.g. didactic, case-based, reflective learning) to enhance critical thinking and clinical decision-making, while utilizing an evidence-based approach that promotes attitudes towards life-long learning.
  • Demonstrating professional behaviors of cultural competence, client-centered care, and interdisciplinary team collaboration
  • Engaging students in the scholarly pursuits (including clinical and basic science research)
  • Providing services to the broader community

Objectives of the Program

  1. Prepare a competent physical therapist who is ready to work autonomously in a variety of settings throughout the continuum of healthcare.
    • Provide culturally competent physical therapy services for prevention, health promotion, fitness, and wellness, to individuals, groups and communities.
    • Provide a variety of clinical educational opportunities to allow students to perform competently across the healthcare continuum.
  2. Prepare a competent physical therapist who has obtained a sufficient level of knowledge in the foundational (basic, applied and social) and clinical sciences to understand the facts, concepts, and principles essential to competent evidence based practice.
    • Deliver and manage a plan of care that is safe, effective and patient client centered and incorporates all elements of the physical therapy management model as described in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice.
    • Monitor and adjust the plan of care in response to patient/client status.
    • Provide physical therapy interventions to achieve patient/client goals and outcomes.
    • Consistently and critically evaluate sources of information related to physical therapy practice, research, and education and apply knowledge from these sources in a scientific manner and to appropriate populations.
    • Consistently integrate the best evidence for practice from sources of information with clinical judgment and patient/client values to determine the best care for a patient/client.
    • Use clinical judgment and reflection to identify, monitor, and enhance clinical reasoning in order to minimize errors and enhance patient/client outcomes.
    • Consistently apply current knowledge, theory, and professional judgment while considering the patient/client perspective in patient/client management.
  3. Prepare a competent physical therapist who recognizes the limits of current knowledge, clinical skill, and experience and demonstrate the commitment to acquire new knowledge and skill through lifelong learning.
    • Acquire new knowledge and skill: writing and presenting evidence based practice paper/research project, attend conferences and consult with colleagues
    • Facilitate reflective thinking using reflective journals, small group discussions
    • Utilize technology to access information
    • Formulate clinical patterns based on best available evidence for various patient populations.
    • Read literature, attend conferences, and consult with colleagues to examine and evaluate current and future trends to challenge the status quo of the practice of physical therapy.
  4. Prepare a competent physical therapist who embraces a multi-cultural learning environment that assists in the development of culturally competent physical therapy practitioners
    • Identify respect and act with consideration for patients’/clients’ differences, values preferences and expressed needs in all professional activities.
    • Effectively educate others using culturally appropriate teaching methods that are commensurate with the needs of the learner.
    • Provide culturally competent physical therapy services for prevention, health promotion, fitness and wellness to individuals, groups and communities
  5. Prepare a competent physical therapist who promotes interdisciplinary collaboration in the pursuit of clinical and scholarly activities.
    • Collaborate with patients/clients, family members, payers, other professionals, and other individuals to determine a plan of care that is acceptable, realistic, culturally competent, and patient/client-centered.
    • Develop and participate in inter-departmental research collaboration and education opportunities
  6. Prepare a competent physical therapist who supports professional, community, and clinical service opportunities and activities.
    • Incorporate pro bono services into practice.
    • Participate and show leadership in community organizations and volunteer service.
    • Advocate for the health and wellness needs of society.
    • Provide consultation within boundaries of expertise to businesses, schools, government agencies, other organizations, or individuals.
    • Participate in professional organizations
  7. Prepare a competent physical therapist who models professionalism consistent with the American Physical Therapy Association’s core values.
    • Adhere to legal practice standards, including all federal, state and institutional regulations related to patient/client care and fiscal management
    • Practice in a manner consistent with the professional code of ethics
    • Participate in organizations and efforts that support the role of the physical therapist in furthering the health and wellness of the public.
    • Place patient’s/client’s needs above the physical therapist’s needs.
    • Exhibit caring, compassion, and empathy in providing services to patients/clients.
    • Demonstrate integrity in all interactions with patients/clients, family members, caregivers, other health care providers, students, other consumers, and payers.
    • Demonstrate professional behavior in all interactions with patients/clients, family members, caregivers, other health care providers, students, other consumers, and payers.
    • Expressively and receptively communicate in a culturally competent manner with patients/clients, family members, caregivers, practitioners, interdisciplinary team members, consumers, payers, and policymakers.
    • Influence legislative and political processes

Clinical Course Requirements

Upon acceptance in to the program students must complete the School of Nursing and Health Professions Health Form and provide evidence of current tuberculosis status, immunization for hepatitis B, current ACLS certification (advanced cardiovascular life support), and review of current CDC guidelines on universal precautions. The health form and review of CDC guidelines on universal precautions must be updated annually. Clinical agencies may require additional evidence of health status. It is the responsibility of the student to consult with the ACCE/DCE prior to beginning a clinical assignment. Liability insurance must be purchased before the clinical course begins.

Criminal Background Check and Drug Screen

Please be aware that when you apply for licensure the jurisdiction in which you apply may ask you to respond to questions regarding any violations of federal, state or local law. You may be required to provide documentation to the state board of physical therapy explaining any such occurrence. The individual state licensing agencies have exclusive authority to issue a license for physical therapy and could decline to issue such a license based on an applicant’s prior criminal record. Additionally, many of the clinical sites with which we have a clinical agreement require criminal background checks, finger printing and drug screen prior to allowing the student to be placed in the facility. The clinical facility has the right to deny the student an internship in the facility based on the findings of the criminal background check or drug screen.

Program Academic Regulations

To graduate from the Department of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) program, the student must:

  • Have a 3.0 Cumulative GPA.
  • Must successfully complete (S) all courses graded by S/U.
  • Have no grades lower than C (2.0)
  • Successfully complete yearly comprehensive exams

Calculation of Cumulative GPA will be as follows:

  • Only courses numbered 6000 and above taken at Georgia State University in the D.P.T. curriculum are used to compute a student’s Cumulative GPA.
  • Courses graded with Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory (S/U) will not be used in computing GPA.
  • All original grades for courses attempted in the D.P.T. program will be used in computing the Cumulative GPA for purposes of determining academic standing.
  • To continue the following semester, all prior courses in the D.P.T. curriculum must be successfully completed (C or better or “S” for clinical courses).
  • A grade of “D” or “F” in any one course will result in the student being terminated from the program. A grade of “U” in any clinical internship course will result in the student being terminated from the program.
  • No course in which a grade of B (3.0) or greater has been earned may be repeated for credit.

Academic standing:

  1. “Good academic standing” is defined as having a Cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.
  2. If Semester GPA falls below 3.0, regardless of course load, the student is placed on “scholastic warning.” A letter stating this will be sent from the Department Head. Upon completion of subsequent semesters of relevant graduate course work, performance of the student on warning is evaluated in one of the following ways:
    1. If Semester GPA is at least 3.0 and Cumulative GPA is at least 3.0, the student returns to “good academic standing”.
    2. If Semester GPA is less than 3.0 and Cumulative GPA is less than 3.0, student is terminated from the program.
    3. If Semester GPA is less than 3.0 but Cumulative GPA is at least 3.0, student may continue to enroll, but will continue to be on “scholastic warning” until Semester GPA of at least 3.0 is achieved (at which time he/she will be returned to “good standing”) or until subsequent Semester GPAs bring Cumulative GPA to less than 3.0 (at which time he/she is terminated from the program).
    4. If Semester GPA is at least 3.0, but Cumulative GPA is less than 3.0, student is on “scholastic probation.” The student may continue to enroll on probation, provided the Semester GPAs are at least 3.0, until Cumulative GPA is brought back to at least 3.0. At this time the student will return to good standing. If any Semester GPA is less than 3.0 before Cumulative GPA is brought back to at least 3.0, the student is terminated from the program.
  3. A student may only be on warning twice. A third “Scholastic Warning” will result in termination from the program.
  4. A student will be placed on “scholastic warning” for failure of the first or 2nd year comprehensive exam, regardless of GPA.
  5. After termination from the program, the student may reapply for admission through the Department of Physical Therapy. The faculty may choose not to admit, or to admit with conditions.
  6. If a student is terminated from the program for a second time, he or she may not apply for readmission to the D.P.T. program.

Program Degree Requirements

Curriculum Design and Constructs

Several concepts interwoven throughout the curriculum provide a framework for application of clinical skills and professional development. These concepts include:

  • Using published literature as course readings in order to integrate concepts of research, theory, and critical inquiry into class discussion. These concepts address controversies in practice and the need for evidence gathered by practitioners to contribute to the establishment of new treatments, validate the efficacy of current practice, and enhance clinical outcomes.
  • Incorporating professional behaviors into each course which include safety, ethics, personal responsibility and accountability, cooperation with other healthcare providers, and recognition of one’s own professional limitations. Faculty will model these behaviors as well as discussing and encouraging them.
  • Instructing students with a comprehensive, patient-centered healthcare model that identifies, respects, and cares about patient differences with regard to values, preferences, and expressed needs.
  • The coordination of continuous care which clearly informs and educates patients to share in the decision making and management of their care. The faculty advocates disease prevention, wellness, and healthy lifestyles with a focus on population health.
  • Physical therapy education is the beginning step of professionalism and the lifelong commitment to the field and the pursuit of learning.

Curriculum Structure

The curriculum is divided into five categories of study and clinical internships spread across the three years of the program:

  • Biological/Clinical Science: (e.g. Anatomy, Pathophysiology, Neuroanatomy, Movement Sciences, Functional Anatomy). Basic sciences are presented in two areas: biological sciences and clinical sciences. The biological sciences provide the background for the study of normal and impaired movement; the clinical science component concerns the etiology, medical, surgical, therapeutic, and pharmacological management of deviations from homeostasis.
  • Patient Management and Intervention: (e.g. Acute, Medical, Surgical Pathology, Musculoskeletal, Geriatric, Pediatric, Neuromuscular, Cardiopulmonary, and Integumentary with corresponding Interventions courses). Patient management courses reinforce a model of examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, intervention, outcome, and discharge planning utilizing the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice of the APTA.
  • Professional Practice: (e.g. Doctoring Profession, Psychosocial Aspects of Disability and Disease, Management). Professional practice courses discuss health care delivery in various practice settings and the role of the PT as a member of the health care team. Each professional practice course is designed to address different issues that impact the delivery of physical therapy services within the health care system. This includes an examination of different practice settings, psychology of disability, teaching and learning activities, communication, health policy, structure of the health care delivery system, documentation, reimbursement issues, administration, management, and clinical decision making. In addition, time is incorporated into the curriculum to allow students to attend professional meetings, including the annual National PT Student Conclave, Combined Sections Meeting, Annual APTA meeting, and State PT (PTAG) Association meetings.
  • Evidence-Based Practice and Research: Emphasis is on the role of critical inquiry and current evidence in clinical decision-making and research. Components include research design, data collection, and statistics. Each student participates in small group research projects with a limited focus that complements on-going faculty research. The projects must be completed in the final year before the student sets forth on his or her final internship. Projects involve outcome studies, quality assurance studies, descriptive analysis, or other forms of secondary analysis. Students are prepared to disseminate their findings by platform and poster presentations, as well as through the literature.
  • Clinical Internships: Clinical internships provide an opportunity to integrate academic content into clinical practice. The internships incorporate full-time clinicals provided in the second, fourth, seventh, eighth and ninth semesters. The first internship is one week in length, and the second through fifth internships are 8-10 weeks in length. Students will complete internships in an acute or sub-acute care, out-patient, and adult rehabilitation settings. The fifth internship can be in a variety of settings such as pediatrics, geriatrics, sports, outpatient orthopedics, or acute care. Students are advised to budget for travel and living expenses associated with the clinical internships. A student should understand that he/she is likely to be assigned to clinical sites outside of Georgia for one or more of the clinical experiences.

Curriculum

First Year

  • Prof Practice I (2)
  • Lifespan I (2)
  • Pathophysiology (3)
  • Medical Terminology (3)
  • Gross Anatomy (2)
  • Gross Anatomy Lab (2)
  • Functional Anatomy I (4)
  • Clinical I (2)
  • Med Surg (3)
  • Movement Science I (3)
  • Research I (3)
  • Gross Anatomy II (2)
  • Gross Anatomy II Lab (1)
  • Functional Anatomy II (2)
  • Exercise Physiology (2)
  • Neuroanatomy I (3)
  • Neuroanatomy I Lab (1)
  • Interventions I (3)
  • Research Hours or Meta-Analyais (2)
  • EBP I (2)
  • Medical Screening (2)
  • Interventions II (2)
  • Diagnostic Imaging for PT (1)
  • Clinical II (8 wks) (6)

Second Year

  • Cardiopulm (4)
  • Movement Science II (2)
  • Musculoskeletal I (3)
  • Musculoskeletal II (3)
  • Neuro II (3)
  • Neuro III (2)
  • Research Hours (2)
  • Interventions III (3)
  • Int. IIIB Modalities (1)
  • Musculoskeletal III (3)
  • Neuro IV (3)
  • Neuro V (2)
  • Lifespan II: Peds (3)
  • Lifespan III: Peds Lab (1)
  • Research Hours (2)
  • Professional Practice II (2)
  • Musculoskeletal IV (2)
  • EBP II (1)
  • Prosthetics and Orthotic (2)
  • Clinical III (8 wks) (6)

Third Year

  • Clinical IV (10 wks) (7)
  • Lifespan IV: Geriatrics (2)
  • Musculoskeletal V (3)
  • Prof Practice III (2)
  • EBP III (1)
  • Research Hours (2)
  • Clinical V (10 wks) (7)
  • Elective (2)
  • Comprehensive Review (2)
  • Interventions IV (3)
  • Service Learning (2)
  • Health promotion (2)

Total = 143 semester hours

5150 Respiratory Therapy

Programs Offered:

  • Integrated M.S. Health Science, Respiratory Therapy
  • Online M.S. Health Science, Respiratory Therapy
  • Traditional M.S. Health Science, Respiratory Therapy

Department of Respiratory Therapy
1228 Urban Life Building
404-413-1225
respiratorytherapy.gsu.edu
Douglas S. Gardenhire,Chairman

Faculty: Ari, Gardenhire, D, Gardenhire, R, Goodfellow,Murray,Pettignano, Shan, Zimmerman, Zavorsky

The Department of Respiratory Therapy offers a Master of Science major in Health Sciences with a specialization in respiratory therapy. The purposes of the program are to 1) foster critical thinking, inquiry, and professional leadership in the health professions; 2) prepare health professionals who can formulate research questions, organize and test research problems, and evaluate research study results; 3) provide health practitioners with advanced study in professional specialty areas; 4) enhance career development in the health professions; and 5) provide the framework for advanced degree study.

The overall program objectives are to develop an understanding of the theoretical basis for the health professions; to gain proficiency in the processes, techniques, and practices that are currently being developed within the health professions; to enable the student to discover and utilize specialized knowledge in other disciplines that are related to the effective practice of the health professions; and to develop within the student the ability to see healthcare as a whole, to visualize the interrelationships of its components, and to recognize the influence of political, social, and economic milieu on the healthcare system.

There are a number of options in graduate study for Respiratory Therapy. One option is the Online or Traditional M.S. degree which is built on a common core of courses and allows for maximum flexibility to meet the needs of the students and their professions. Various specialty tracks or specialties in the Department of Respiratory Therapy are offered. In this way, each program may be individualized to meet the students’ professional goals in keeping with the overall objectives of the program. The curriculum includes core health sciences courses, specialty courses, elective courses, and either a thesis, non-thesis or advanced practice capstone option. The Advanced Practice option is available for students who want more of a clinical master’s degree and allows the student to obtain two advanced credentials prior to graduation. An initial program of study is planned by the student in consultation with the Department Chairman by the end of the first year or before 12 semester hours of coursework has been completed.

The Department of Respiratory Therapy also offers an Integrated Program (IP) for students who possess a bachelor’s degree and want to enter the profession without having to earn another bachelor’s degree. This program provides students with the opportunity to meet undergraduate and graduate pre-professional experiences required for eligibility to take the National Board for Respiratory Care credentialing exams. Admission to this option requires an undergraduate degree and completion of program prerequisites.

Application to this specialization option requires a completed application to the M.S. in Health Sciences and a supplemental application. This application must be received by the School of Nursing and Health Professions Office of Academic Assistance for review by January 15 for summer admission, May 15 for fall semester admission and September 15 for spring semester admission.

Program Academic Regulations

Students in the master’s program in health sciences are required to maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0. Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 before registration for any capstone experience (thesis or non-thesis) will be permitted. Any grade below a C is not acceptable toward the master’s degree. No more than two C grades (maximum of six semester credits) in the health sciences core and/or major can be applied toward the degree. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required to receive the master’s degree.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science Health Science, Respiratory Therapy (Traditional, Online)

A minimum of 36 hours are required for the traditional Master’s degree. Semester hours are shown in parenthesis after each entry.

Traditional Master’s Degree Program

The program of study for a Traditional Master’s of Science in Health Science with a concentration in Respiratory Therapy consists of a minimum of 36 semester hours. At this time the hours are:

  • Health Science Core (12 hours)
  • Specialization Curriculum (Respiratory Therapy) (18 hours)
  • Thesis/Project ( 6 hours)

Health Science Core Curriculum (12)

The following SNHP courses are required of all students in the Master’s Program

Required Courses (12)

  • SNHP 6000 Research Methods** (3)
  • SNHP 6010 Graduate Medical Terminology** (3)
  • SNHP 8010 Leadership and Ethics in Health Care**(3)
  • SNHP 8000 Trends Affecting Health Policies, Practices and Laws (3) OR SNHP 7800 Interprofessional Collaborative for Advanced Practice (3) OR SNHP 6900 EKG Interpretation (3)

Specialization (Respiratory Therapy) Curriculum (18)

The following courses are required of all students in the Master’s Program

Required Courses (18)

  • RT 7030 Advanced Topics in Ventilatory Support(3)
  • RT 7090 Research Seminar in Respiratory Care* (3)
  • RT 7050 Research Statistics II (3)
  • RT 7010 Teaching Practicum (3)
  • RT 7040 Ventilation Waveforms (3)
  • RT 7095 Special Problems in Respiratory Care (3)
  • RT 7950 Directed Readings (3)

Thesis/Non-thesis

Students will take a minimum of 2 semesters at 3 hours each in either the thesis option RT 7999 or a non-thesis RT 7995.

Thesis Option: Students will take RT 7999, depending on specialty area. A minimum of two semesters at three hours each must be completed. These courses must be taken consecutively. Students must be enrolled in thesis credit each semester they continue to work on completion of the requirements for thesis research.

Non-thesis Option (Project): Respiratory Therapy students will take six hours of RT 7995 Directed Study. A minimum of two semesters at three hours each must be completed. These courses must be taken consecutively. Students must be enrolled in non-thesis credit each semester they continue to work on completion of the requirements for non-thesis.

RT 7995 Directed Study (non-thesis or project) (3) or(6)
RT 7999 Thesis (3)-(6)

*RT 7090 Seminar in Respiratory Care should be taken prior to taking RT 7995 or RT 7999.
**Required Health Science Core

Course substitutions may be authorized by the Department Chair in sections I and II only. All authorizations must be in writing by the Department Chair before a student registers for the course.

Advanced Practice Option
Advanced Practice Master’s Degree Program

The program of study for a Traditional or Online Master’s of Science in Health Science with a concentration in Respiratory Therapy consists of a minimum of 36 semester hours. At this time the hours are:

  • Health Science Core (12 hours)
  • Specialization Curriculum (Respiratory Therapy) (18 hours)
  • Thesis/Project (6 hours)

Health Science Core Curriculum (12)

Choose 4 courses from the following

Required Courses (12)

  • SNHP 6000 Research Methods** (3)
  • SNHP 6010 Graduate Medical Terminology** (3)
  • SNHP 8010 Leadership and Ethics in Health Care** (3)
  • SNHP 8000 Trends Affecting Health Policies, Practices and Laws OR (3)
  • SNHP 7800 Interprofessional Collaborative for Advanced Practice OR (3)
  • SNHP 6900 EKG Interpretation (3)

Specialization (Respiratory Therapy) Curriculum (18)

Choose 6 courses from the following Required Courses (18)

  • RT 7030 Advanced Topics in Ventilatory Support (3)
  • RT 7090 Research Seminar in Respiratory Care* (3)
  • RT 7010 Teaching Practicum (3)
  • RT 7040 Ventilation Waveforms (3)
  • RT 7095 Special Problems in Respiratory Care (3)
  • RT 7950 Directed Readings (3)

Advanced Practice (6)

Respiratory Therapy students will register for six hours of RT 7995 Directed Study. Two-3 hour courses must be completed. These courses do not have to be taken consecutively.

Students must be enrolled in RT 7995 each semester as they continue to work on completion of the requirements for advanced practice.

  • RT 7995 Directed Study (non-thesis) (3)
  • RT 7995 Directed Study (non-thesis) (3)

*RT 7090 Seminar in Respiratory Care should be taken prior to taking RT 7995 or RT 7999.
**Required Health Science Core

Course substitutions may be authorized by the Department Chair in sections I and II only. All authorizations must be in writing by the Department Chair before a student registers for the course.

Requirements

For the two-3 hour RT 7995 courses the student will need to successfully pass 2 credentialing exams. The exam will be taken in the semester RT 7995 is registered or 2 exams can be taken in 1 semester and  credit will be given in the next semester that RT 7995 is registered upon submitting proof of passing success. A copy of the  exam certificate will be required by the end of the semester the exam is completed in order to receive a grade in RT 7995. The exam options include:

  • Neonatal-Perinatal Specialist
  • Advanced Critical Care Specialist
  • Certified Pulmonary Function Technologist
  • Registered Pulmonary Function Technologist
  • Certified Sleep Disorder Specialist
  • Registered Sleep Disorder Specialist
  • Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist
  • Certified Asthma Educator

The student must successfully pass the credentialing exam in the same semester that RT 7995 is registered. If the  student fails the exam, it can be repeated in the same semester. If the student does not pass the exam in the same semester that RT 7995 is registered then the student must re-register for RT 7995 in the next semester.  This will continue until the exam is passed.

To receive credit for the courses you will need to:

  1. Register for RT 7995.
  2. Register for one of the exams in the same semester you register for RT 7995.
  3. Sit for the exam in the same semester.
  4. Show your passing score from the grading sheet that you receive after completing the exam.
  5. Provide to the department a copy of the official certificate.
  6. You will receive your grade for RT 7995 at the end of the semester when grades are due.

If you sit for two exams in the same semester you will need to register for the second RT 7995 in the next semester. You will  receive credit for the second exam that you passed in that next semester for RT 7995.  You must continue to register for RT 7995 until 2 exams have been successfully completed.

If a student is already credentialed with one of the exams listed that student can receive credit for RT 7995 for each  credential. For example if a student has the RRT-NPS credential the following will need to be completed:

  1. Register for RT 7995 and pay for the course
  2. Provide to the department a copy of the official examination certificate.
  3. You will receive your grade for RT 7995 at the end of the semester when grades are submitted.

Integrated Program

Courses required by the Program beyond Degree Requirements. This section includes courses that can be satisfied in an undergraduate curriculum and additional practice hours beyond the typical institutional requirements for the M.S. degree.

Health Sciences Core (12)

  • SNHP 6000 Research Methods for the Health and Human Science Professions (3)
  • SNHP 6010 Graduate Medical Terminology (3)
  • SNHP 7800 Interprofessional Collaborative for Advanced Practice (3)OR
    SNHP 6900 EKG Interpretation (3)
  • SNHP 8000 Trends Affecting Health Policies, Practices and Laws (3)
  • SNHP 8010 Ethics and Leadership in Health Care (3)

Specialization Curriculum (58)

  • RT 6005 Clinical Cardiopulmonary Physiology (3)
  • RT 6111 Respiratory Therapy Equipment I (4)
  • RT 6025 Patient Evaluation (4)
  • RT 6030 Pulmonary Function Diagnostics (3)
  • RT 6040 Respiratory Care Pharmacology (3)
  • RT 6027 Pulmonary Diseases (3)
  • RT 6112 Respiratory Therapy Equipment II (3)
  • RT 7010 Teaching Practicum (3)
  • RT 7011 Mechanical Ventilation I (3)
  • RT 7012 Mechanical Ventilation II (3)
  • RT 7020 Advanced Clinical Preceptorship (3)
  • RT 7030 Advanced Topics in Ventilatory Support (3)
  • RT 7040 Advanced Cardiopulmonary Monitoring (3)
  • RT 7050 Statistical ResearchII (3)
  • RT 7070 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (2)
  • RT 7075 Patient Care Management Strategies (3)
  • RT 7080 Pediatric Respiratory Care (2)
  • RT 7081 Neonatal Respiratory Care (2)
  • RT 7085 Professional Trends to Long-Term Care (3)
  • RT 7090 Seminar in Respiratory Care (3)
  • RT 7095 Problems in Respiratory Care (3)
  • RT 7995 Directed Studies (3)
  • RT 7096 End of Life Issues (1)

Clinical Curriculum (15)

Thesis/Non-thesis Option (6)

  • Thesis Option RT 7999: Students will take RT 7999, depending on specialty area. A minimum of two semesters at three hours each must be completed. These courses must be taken consecutively. Students must be enrolled in thesis credit each semester they continue to work on completion of the requirements for thesis research.
  • Non-thesis Option RT 7995 : Respiratory Therapy students will take six hours of RT 7995, Directed Studies in Respiratory Therapy. These courses must be taken in consecutive semesters.
    * RT 7090 Seminar in Respiratory Care should be taken prior to taking RT 7995 or RT 7999.

**Required Health Science Core

Online Option
The Masters of Science in Health Sciences with a specialization in Respiratory Care Online Option consists of a minimum of 36 semester hours. All courses will be taught synchronously online. Because this option is taught completely online, F1/J1 visa sponsorship is not available. Please see the Traditional Option if you require F1/J1 visa sponsorship. At this time the hours are:

  • Health Science Core (12 hours)
  • Specialization Curriculum (Respiratory Therapy) (18 hours)
  • Thesis/Project/Advanced Practice (6 hours)

Health Science Core Curriculum (12)

The following SNHP courses are required of all students in the Master’s Program

Required Courses (12)

Specialization (Respiratory Therapy) Curriculum (18)

The following courses are required of all students in the Master’s Program

Required Courses (18)

  • RT 7010 Teaching Practicum (3)
  • RT 7030 Advanced Topics in Ventilatory Support (3)
  • RT 7040 Ventilation Waveforms (3)
  • RT 7090 Research Seminar in Respiratory Care* (3)
  • RT 7095 Special Problems in Respiratory Care (3)
  • RT 7950 Directed Readings (3)

Thesis/Non-Thesis/Advance Practice (6)
Students will take a minimum of 2 semesters at 3 hours each in one of the following options:

  • Thesis Option: Students will take RT 7999, depending on specialty area. A minimum of two semesters at three hours each must be completed. These courses must be taken consecutively. Students must be enrolled in thesis credit each semester they continue to work on completion of the requirements for thesis research.
  • Non-thesis Option (Project): Respiratory Therapy students will take six hours of RT 7995, Directed Study. A minimum of two semesters at three hours each must be completed. These courses must be taken consecutively. Students must be enrolled in non-thesis credit each semester they continue to work on completion of the requirements for non-thesis.
  • Advanced Practice: Respiratory Therapy students will register for six hours of RT 7995 Directed Study. Two-3 hour courses must be completed. These courses do not have to be taken consecutively. Students must be enrolled in RT 7995 each semester as they continue to work on completion of the requirements for advanced practice.
  • RT 7995 Directed Study (non-thesis project/ advanced practice option) (3) or (6) RT 7999 Thesis (3) or(6)
    *RT 7090 Research Seminar in Respiratory Care should be taken prior to taking RT 7995 or RT 7999.

Course substitutions may be authorized by the Department Chairman in sections I and II only.

All authorizations must be in writing by the Department Chairman before a student registers for the course.

Advanced Practice Credentials

  • Neonatal-Perinatal Specialist
  • Advanced Critical Care Specialist
  • Certified Pulmonary Function Technologist
  • Registered Pulmonary Function Technologist
  • Certified Sleep Disorder Specialist
  • Registered Sleep Disorder Specialist
  • Certified Tobacco Treatment Specialist
  • Certified Asthma Educator

Clinical Course Requirements

Students who must complete a clinical component as part of their program of study must complete the School of Nursing and Health Professions Health Form and provide evidence of current tuberculosis status, immunization for hepatitis B, and review of current CDC guidelines on universal precautions. The health form and review of CDC guidelines on universal precautions must be updated annually. Clinical agencies may require additional evidence of health status. It is the responsibility of the student to consult with the graduate program director in their academic unit prior to beginning a clinical assignment. Liability insurance must be purchased before the clinical course begins.

Criminal Background Check and Drug Screen

Your application for licensure may ask you to respond to questions regarding any violations of federal, state or local law. You may be required to provide documentation to the state licensing board explaining any such occurrence. The individual state licensing agencies have exclusive authority to issue a license and could decline to issue such a license based on an applicant’s prior criminal record.

Additionally, many of the clinical sites with which we have a clinical agreement require criminal background checks, finger printing and drug screen prior to allowing the student to be placed in the facility. The clinical facility has the right to deny the student an internship in the facility based on the findings of the criminal background check or drug screen.

Graduate/Thesis Committee

Students in the online, traditional and integrated program in health sciences will select, with assistance from the major adviser, a Graduate/Thesis Committee, consisting of a chairperson (usually the major adviser) and at least two additional members. The committee should be selected by the time 12 semester hours have been completed. The Committee should be selected in accordance with the following criteria:

  1. The Committee Chairperson must hold a primary appointment in the student’s department and hold full or provisional Graduate Faculty Status in the School of Nursing and Health Professions.
  2. A second member of the committee must be from the faculty at Georgia State University.
  3. A third member must be selected from the faculty of Georgia State University or another institution of higher education or from a health-related agency.
  4. All committee members must be selected in consultation with the chair of the Graduate/Thesis Committee and approved by the head of the department.
  5. No committee may consist of fewer than three members; however, a student may elect to have more than three members.