3270 Heritage Preservation

Program Offered:

  • Master of Heritage Preservation
    • Concentration in Historic Preservation
    • Concentration in Public History
  • Certificate in Heritage Preservation
  • Dual B.A. in History and Master of Heritage Preservation

Heritage Preservation Program
Department of History
20th floor, 25 Park Place Bldg.
404/413-6365
E-mail: rlaub@gsu.edu
heritagepreservation.gsu.edu

Richard Laub, Director, Heritage Preservation Program
Robin Jackson, Administrative Specialist- (Graduate Program Coordinator)
404-413-6385, rmjackson@gsu.edu

The Master of Heritage Preservation (M.H.P.) degree program is designed to train professionals in the fields of cultural resource management and public history. The program seeks first to acquaint students with the broad range of disciplines that constitute the field of heritage preservation. Second, it seeks to develop skills in administration, research, analysis, field survey  interpretation, and historic site management that will be necessary in professional practice. Third, it provides practical experience in heritage conservation and public history through classroom practica, team and individual research projects, and internships in the field.

The Program in Heritage Preservation offers a degree in which the student can choose to concentrate in either historic preservation or public history.

The program seeks to provide trained personnel for careers in (1) cultural resource planning and management on the local, state, and federal levels; (2) administration of historical sites, historical societies and commissions, and museums; and (3) historical research positions in public and private agencies.

The program consists of a series of overview courses in the field including archeology, public history, folklore, architectural history, and preservation planning that are complemented by specialized courses in preservation history, administration and law. Students can choose a specialty area for more coursework, such as archeology, planning, architectural history, public history, or historical research. Finally, students engage in research projects through an interdisciplinary research seminar and an internship with an agency or organization that specializes in historic preservation or public history.

Students in the Master of Heritage Preservation program must maintain a 3.0 grade point average in order to receive a degree.

Applicants may obtain additional information about the Program in Heritage Preservation by contacting the Director at the addresses above.

Additional Admission Requirements

In addition to the general requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences, the Program in Heritage Preservation has the following requirements:

  1. Three letters of recommendation from individuals who can evaluate the applicant’s potential to do graduate work.
  2. A statement of educational and career goals.

Degree Requirements

Master of Heritage Preservation

Historic Preservation Track (42 hours)

Area 1: Cultural Resources (12 hours)

To gain an overview of the field of heritage preservation, students must take four of the following courses. Students with undergraduate or graduate backgrounds in one of these disciplines may be exempted by the program director from one or more courses in Area 1.

Area 2: Buildings and Environment (15 hours)

In order to understand the preservation of building interiors, legal, cultural, and landscaped environments, students will take courses in the history of preservation law, interior design, and landscape architecture as well as courses in preservation planning and public archaeology. Students should select five out of the seven courses below.

  • ANTH 8240 Public Archaeology (3)
  • HIST 8610 Preservation Law (3)
  • HIST 8630 The American Built Environment (3)
  • HIST 8640 Preservation Planning (3)
  • HIST 8645 Historic Resource Evaluation (3)
  • HIST 8650 Historic American Landscapes and Gardens (3)
  • ID 8650 History of Interior Design I: Antiquities to the Nineteenth Century (3)

Area 3: Area of Concentration (9 hours minimum)

In order to tailor their programs to such career interests as neighborhood revitalization, preservation planning, preservation administration, research and analysis, restoration finance, or architectural evaluation, students will select appropriate elective courses from preservation disciplines represented in the program. Courses may be taken from one or several disciplines and will be selected with the approval of the program director. Below is a list of possible options:

Area 4: Applied Studies (6-9 hours)

In order to gain experience in the practical work of heritage preservation, students will take courses that require preservation research projects and that offer the opportunity to see the operations of preservation organizations. For these purposes, there are internships, directed studies, and thesis options available to students where classroom and seminar knowledge may be applied to actual preservation needs. Students will take the following courses, or appropriate substitutes, approved by the program director:

Area 5: Oral Examination

Students must pass a general oral examination in order to graduate.

Master of Heritage Preservation

Public History Track (42 hours)

Area 1: Historical Foundations (15 hours)

To gain an overview of the field of public history, students must take five out of the nine courses listed.

  • HIST 6920 Oral History (4)
  • HIST 7000 Introduction to Historical Methods and Theory (4)
  • HIST 7010 Issues and Interpretations in American History (4)
  • HIST 7040 Issues and Interpretation in Public History (3)
  • HIST 8000 Introduction to Historical Methods and Theory (4)
  • HIST 8050 Southern Cities (3)
  • HIST 8060 Seminar in the History of the South (4)
  • HIST 8635 U.S. Cities (3)
  • HIST 8890 (Special Topics) Georgia History (4)

Area 2: Professional Concentrations (15 hours)

In order to understand the diverse options in the field of public history, students will take courses in folk studies, archives, preservation, and museum operations. Students should select five out of the courses listed below.

Area 3: Electives (6 hours).

In order to tailor their programs to such career interests, students will select appropriate courses from preservation and public history disciplines represented in the program. Other graduate courses in history may be substituted at the discretion of the program director. Other courses in documentary film, etc., can be substituted at the discretion of program director and with permission of other program directors. Below is a list of possible options:

Area 4: Capstone Courses (6 hours).

In order to gain experience in the practical work of public history, students will take courses that require research projects and that offer the opportunity to see the operations of public history organizations. For these purposes, there are internships, directed studies, and thesis options available to students where classroom and seminar knowledge may be applied to actual preservation needs. Students will take the following courses, or appropriate substitutes, approved by the program director:

Area 5 Oral Examination

Students must pass a general oral examination in order to graduate.

Certificate Program in Heritage Preservation

The College of Arts and Sciences offers a graduate certificate in Heritage Preservation with tracks in Historic Preservation and in Public History. The certificate program is open to students who are enrolled in graduate degree programs and in good academic standing at Georgia State University or other graduate institutions in such programs as history, architecture, planning, anthropology, geography, urban studies, public administration, and real estate. Others may apply for the certificate program using the same procedure as that used to apply for the MHP degree, and the same standards will apply. Students accepted into the certificate program will have student standing, with all the attendant responsibilities and privileges.

The Certificate in Heritage Preservation requires completion of 18 hours of course work and successful completion of a general examination. Students must maintain a 3.0 grade-point average in order to receive a certificate. While graduate credit from other institutions may, by petition, be applied toward the certificate, normally not more than six hours will be accepted.

Historic Preservation Track

Students must complete 18 hours of graduate study divided among the three following areas:

Area 1: Preservation Overview (6 hours)

  • HIST 8600 Introduction to Historic Preservation (3)
  • HIST 8700 Case Studies in Historic Preservation (3)

Area 2: Cultural Resources (6 hours)

Area 3: Preservation Specialties (6 hours)

Other courses may be approved by the director of the program.

Students must pass a general written examination.

Public History Track

Students must complete 18 hours of graduate study divided among the three following areas:

Area 1: Public History Overview (6 hours)

  • HIST 7040 Issues and Interpretation in Public History (3)
  • HIST 8800 Directed Study in Public History (3)

Area 2: Historical Foundations (6 hours)

  • HIST 6920 Oral History (4)
  • HIST 6940 Administration and Use of Historical Archives (3)
  • HIST 7000 Introduction to Historical Methods and Theory (4)
  • HIST 7010 Issues and Interpretations in American History (4)
  • HIST 8000 Introduction to Historical methods and Theory (4)
  • HIST 8060 Seminar in the History of the South (4)
  • HIST 8635 U.S. Cities (3)

Area 3: Public History Specialties (6 hours)

Other courses may be approved by the director of the program.

Students must pass a general written examination.

Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

The Department of History offers a dual B.A. in History and Master of Historic Preservation. The dual degree opportunity enables qualified students to enroll in graduate courses late in their undergraduate program and apply the coursework toward both the bachelor’s and master’s programs.

Students must be formally accepted into the dual degree program by the department and College of Arts and Sciences to be able to take graduate courses as an undergraduate. Additionally, acceptance into the dual program does not constitute admission to the master’s program. Students must fulfill regular graduate admissions requirements and apply for the master’s program following college processes.

Information about the dual program, including application instructions and program requirements, can be found at cas.gsu.edu/dual-degrees/.