ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

This course is designed as an introduction to the discipline of anthropology through a survey of the five subfields: cultural, biological, archaeological, linguistics, and applied anthropology. The course will use a holistic and comparative approach to study the human condition with emphasis on human cultural, behavioral, and biological variation across place and time.

ANTH 2010 Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

This evidence-based course is designed to introduce students to the general concepts of biological anthropology. The course will use lecture and hands-on activities to explore major topics in evolution and natural selection, variation and adaptation, molecular and population genetics, the intersections of biology and cultural behavior, and the fossil record from early hominins through modern populations.

ANTH 2020 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

This course examines the theories, methods, and basic issues in contemporary cultural anthropology, stressing comparison and interpretation of contemporary social problems cross-culturally. An emphasis will be placed on applied methodologies used in cultural studies such as fieldwork, participant observation, ethnography, and ethnology. Topics include culture and cultural diversity, cultural categories of race, ethnicity, gender, as well as social institutions such as marriage, family, religion, and subsistence patterns.

ANTH 2030 Archaeology and Prehistory
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Brief overview of archaeological methods and concepts followed by an examination of major cultural developments including the geographical spread of humans and the emergence of agriculture and complex societies. Implications for understanding contemporary humanity are included.

ANTH 2040 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
Credit Hours 3.0
Description

Linguistic anthropology is broadly understood as the study of language as a part of culture. This course shows how language constitutes social action. Language is much more than a transparent medium for communicating ideas. Rather, the way we speak can have profound implications in terms of community membership, social exclusion, economic opportunity, identity, the way we view and understand the world. This course will cover the complexity of human languages and the significance of linguistic and cultural difference.