2000 Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Undergraduate programs in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies are described in detail in this chapter. See subsections for specific program information as well as policies and procedures.

2010 Office of the Dean

14 Marietta St. N.W., Suite 635
404/413-0000
aysps.gsu.edu
Mary Beth Walker, Dean
Nancy Kropf, Associate Dean
Cynthia Searcy, Assistant Dean

2010.10 Purpose

The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies was established in 1996 with the objective of achieving excellence in the design, implementation, and evaluation of policies that help guide society and the economy. To this end, the school has assembled a distinguished faculty and professional staff, combining practical experience and scholarly credentials on a broad range of policy matters.

The school is committed to quality education, offering a variety of academic undergraduate and graduate degree programs as well as nondegree training programs. It engages in basic and applied research and outreach addressed to the ongoing management of policies and programs, as well as effective delivery of human welfare services. The school houses several prestigious research centers focusing on the practical needs of governmental, nonprofit, and private-sector organizations in Atlanta, the state of Georgia, and the broader national and global communities. Degree programs in criminal justice and criminology, economics, policy studies, public administration, and social work integrate individual academic career preparation with addressing those needs.

2010.20 Accreditation

The Master of Public Administration degree is accredited by The National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. The School of Social Work is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

2010.25 Academic Advisement

14 Marietta St. N. W., Suite G-52
404/413-0021
aysps.gsu.edu/oaa
Shelly-Ann Williams, Director
Mathieu Arp, Assistant Director
Danielle Churchill, Academic Advisor
Jacqueline Pearce, Academic Advisor
Michelle Lacoss, Administrative Specialist-Curriculum

The Office of Academic Assistance (OAA) supports the school’s commitment to quality education in the field of policy studies by promoting the school to prospective undergraduate and graduate applicants, by facilitating the application process, and by admitting well-qualified students to the graduate programs.

Academic advisement is required of all students in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. The school has developed a system of advisement that integrates the Office of Academic Assistance and faculty Advisors within the school. Through the advisement process, students will be able to know the requirements and policies of the university, college, and department as they relate to their educational experiences and goals. Students will be able to identify and utilize university resources effectively to: satisfy degree requirements; plan programs of study, including selection of appropriate courses and registration; discover how interests, skills and goals connect to fields of study and careers; and be able to formulate appropriate questions, seek information, and evaluate and apply academic advice. The office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Monday through Friday. Walk-in advisement without an appointment is scheduled on Mondays and Thursdays from 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m..

2010.30 Degrees Offered

Undergraduate and graduate degree programs are offered through the Department of Economics, Department of Criminal Justice & Criminology, Department of Public Management and Policy, and the School of Social Work. Graduate degree programs are listed at the end of this section. The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies offers the following undergraduate programs of study:

Bachelor of Arts

  • Major in Economics
  • Major in International Economics and Modern Languages
    • Concentrations in: Chinese Studies, French, German, Italian, and Spanish

Note: The  J. Mack Robinson College of Business offers the B.B.A. degree with a major in Business Economics. (See the “J. Mack Robinson College of Business” chapter of this catalog for program curriculum.)

Bachelor of Science

  • Major in Criminal Justice
    • Legal Track
  • Major in Economics
  • Major in Public Policy
    • Concentrations in: Nonprofit Leadership, Planning and Economic Development, and Public Management and Governance

Bachelor of Social Work

2010.35 Study Abroad Opportunities

The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies is committed to providing students the opportunity to study abroad through Maymester/Summer or exchange programs. Currently the school participates in four Maymester/Summer and four exchange programs:

Maymester/Summer programs:

  1. Europe (France, Germany, The Netherlands & Czech Republic): a three-week Maymester program open to all students interested in critical appraisals of different policies, administrative structures and political processes in Europe and the United States. Co-Program directors – Dr. Greg Streib (gstreib@gsu.edu) or Dr. Cynthia Searcy (csearcy@gsu.edu).
  2. South Africa: a three-week Maymester program that provides a broad understanding of the workings of the South African economy, its infrastructure, its environment and its governance. Program director – Dr. Glenwood Ross (gross@gsu.edu).
  3. South Africa: a Summer program that examines social change, conflict transformation and nonviolence, using as a backdrop South Africa and its efforts to effect transformative social change; focus on Kingian nonviolence and restorative justice. Program director – Dr. Elizabeth Beck (ebeck@gsu.edu).
  4. Trinidad and Tobago: a Maymester program that explores crime and justice from an international, comparative perspective and examines public policy issues related to crime and violence in developing nations. Program director – Cyntoria Johnson (cjohnson5@gsu.edu).
  5. Ghana: A three-week Maymester program that allows students to delve into the topic of international development and its effects on the challenges of eradicating poverty and helping communities become sustainable. Program Director –Dr. Maggie Tolan (mtolan@gsu.edu).
  6. Costa Rica: A Maymester program designed to increase students’ awareness of policies and practices impacting health and well-being, social justice, sustainable environmental, health and community development issues in Costa Rica and the United States. Program Director –Dr. Mary L. Ohmer (mohmer@gsu.edu).

Exchange programs:

  1. England, Northumbria University with all AYSPS degree programs: an exchange program for one semester that gives undergraduate or graduate students an opportunity to take courses in their majors while learning the tools necessary for work with foreign cultures. Program director – Dr. Cynthia Searcy (csearcy@gsu.edu).
  2. Italy and France, University of Venice – Ca’Foscari and France, University of Versailles Saint-Quentin with the economics department: an exchange program that grants students a degree from Georgia State University (most likely a BA or BS in economics, or a BA in International Economics and Modern Languages) and a degree in Economics and Management from the University of Venice Ca’Foscari, after one year of study in Italy and a semester in France. Program director – Dr. Shelby Frost (sfrost@gsu.edu).
  3. Lausanne, Switzerland, University of Lausanne Faculté des Hautes Etudes Commerciales with the economics department: an exchange program where students gain expertise in the areas of international economies and economic policy through coursework, while living in a new cultural setting. Program director – Dr. Felix Rioja (frioja@gsu.edu).
  4.  Istanbul, Turkey, Marmara University: A semester or year-long exchange program between GSU and Marmara University. Economics students can take classes in their major while earning GSU credit. Program Director –Dr. Cynthia Searcy (csearcy@gsu.edu).

2010.40 Academic Resources and Services

AYS Career Services & Student Life Office

14 Marietta St. N.W., Suites G47-51
aysps.gsu.edu/career/

The Andrew Young School provides career support & leadership development services to all current AYS students and alumni.  Students are invited to attend our career events and workshops as well as meet with our career counselors to discuss individual career questions.  Career Services can help students with resume writing, interviewing, job searching, internship development, and networking.  To see what career panels, career fairs, and events are available this semester, please visit:  aysps.gsu.edu/career/events. The office also supports all AYS student clubs and organizations – so read about the various groups within the college, and join one today:  aysps.gsu.edu/career/student-organizations.  Make the most of your education by utilizing these great resources.  The AYS Career Services & Student Life office is located on the ground floor of the Andrew Young Building, in rooms G47-51.

AYSPS Research Vault

14 Marietta St. N.W., Suite V-51
404/413-0019
aysps.gsu.edu/oaa/research-support

The Research Vault offers research tools in policy studies and economics for faculty, staff and students at the AYSPS.  It provides students with an introduction to relevant databases, data set manuals, and websites. The Vault also houses selected literature and data sets on fiscal policy, public administration, and economic issues to support ongoing research projects of AYSPS faculty and its research centers. The website above is available to assist patrons in searching the literature of regional, national, and international policy issues located in the Vault.

Research Vault staff, along with university liaison librarians, develops links to electronic journals and databases licensed to Georgia State University for the use of its student and faculty community, as well as those licensed by the powerful statewide Galileo system. Available are such sources as the Web of Science, a leading citation index, access to social science data from the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), and Lexis-Nexis statistical tables for geographic, demographic, income and time series. The Vault holds data sets and publications from agencies in state government as well as the international community, especially in taxation.

The reading room has student workstations and provides copies of Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Financial Times, and The Economist. Such periodicals as Tax Analysts Tax Weeklies, Journal of Economic Literature, Journal of Econometrics, and the Nonprofit Quarterly are available upon request.

International subscriptions include Government Finance Statistics Yearbook, International Financial Statistics Yearbook, World Economic Outlook, World Development Indicators, as well as other publications and data sets by the OECD, IMF, the World Bank and the United Nations.

Economics Tutoring Lab

14 Marietta St. N.W., Room 526
404/413-0141
aysps.gsu.edu/econ/5967

The Economics Tutoring Lab provides tutoring for students in undergraduate economics classes, particularly in principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics (ECON 2105 and ECON 2106). Day and evening sessions are available; contact the Department of Economics for a schedule.

2010.50 Research Centers and Programs

Domestic Programs

14 Marietta St. N.W., 4th Floor
aysps.gsu.edu/dpo

Domestic Programs is the administrative home to several separate programs, projects, and activities. Some of these programs link the School with the community. Other activities and projects aim to inform the debate on public policy in the metropolitan Atlanta area, the state of Georgia, and the nation, through research and education. The issues that are addressed include those associated with the environment, education policy, urban-regional issues, and social policy.  Recent topics include a multi-year study of public housing transformation, financial analysis of proposed new local governments, food stamps, transportation funding, and foster care. Funding for Domestic Programs comes from a variety of governmental, foundation, and business sources.

Center for Collaborative Social Work

140 Decatur Street, 12th Floor
404/413-1050
aysps.gsu.edu/socialwork/ccsw

The Center for Collaborative Social Work is a key component of the School of Social Work at Georgia State University. The School of Social Work was developed in 1965 and is the first school in the country to offer a master’s with a sole concentration in community partnerships. The school’s commitment to community partnerships grew out of collaborative efforts with community stake holders from a variety of social service agencies in the greater Atlanta area. Together, they developed a program based on the following principles:

  • “Partnership is critical for human service delivery and building communities;
  • Challenges facing individuals and communities are interrelated and that solutions must be as well;
  • Students should commit themselves to addressing social and economic justice issues that test the spirit of individuals and communities;
  • Students should be educated for leadership roles to facilitate partnerships; and
  • The program must continue to be relevant to the professional lives of students and practitioners and to the needs of diverse communities.” (Wertheimer et al. 2004)

The Center developed out of the School of Social Works’ need for an organizational structure that extended the school’s founding principles beyond the classroom and into the community.

The Experimental Economics Center

14 Marietta Street, N.W., 4th Floor
404/413-0194
excen.gsu.edu/

The Experimental Economics Center (ExCEN) supports research, teaching, and policy applications involving controlled experiments with human decision makers. Its central objective is to promote the development and application of economics and related academic disciplines as empirical social science. Ongoing research in the Center involves development of economic theory supported by data. Research and teaching support facilities developed and maintained by ExCEN include the AYSPS experimental economics laboratory, a mobile laboratory, and EconPort (econport.org), an economics digital library and virtual laboratory containing Internet software for experiments. External funding is provided by the National Science Foundation and core support comes from the Georgia Research Alliance and the state government. Projects currently receiving grant support include the following:  Collaborative Research: IT-Enhanced Market Design and Experiments; Disseminating Experiments in Economics with the EconPort Digital Library; Choosing Among Risky Alternatives: An Experimental Investigation of the Impact of Insurance on Biases in Decision-Making; Game Theory and Social Interactions: A Virtual Collaboratory for Teaching and Research; Prejudice and the Perpetuation of Differences: Experiments Exploring the Impact of Performance and Appearance on Sorting; Contracting Out of Poverty: Some Experimental Approaches; “The Girl Scout Cookie Phenomenon-An Experimental Study of Social Effects in Fundraising.”

Fiscal Research Center

14 Marietta Street, N.W., 4th Floor
404/413-0249
aysps.gsu.edu/frc/

The Fiscal Research Center (FRC) was established in 1995 to provide nonpartisan research, technical assistance, and education in the evaluation and design of state and local fiscal and economic policy.
Among its many activities, the FRC provides tax advisement to local and state governments, develops fiscal and economic impact studies, and supports research reports, conferences, workshops, and training on topics related to fiscal and economic policy. The FRC’s technical assistance responsibilities include supporting the Georgia State Economist, developing estimates for tax-related fiscal notes, writing the Georgia State Tax Expenditure Budget, and conducting research on a variety of topics associated with state fiscal policy issues at the request of the Governor’s office and the Georgia General Assembly.

The Georgia Health Policy Center

14 Marietta Street, N.W., 1st and 2nd Floors
404/413-0314
www.gsu.edu/ghpc

The Georgia Health Policy Center (GHPC), established in 1995, provides evidence-based research, program development, and policy guidance on local, state, and national levels to improve health status at the community level. The center distills qualitative and quantitative research findings to connect decision makers with the evidence-based research and guidance needed to make informed decisions about health policy and programming. The GHPC focuses on the most complex health care issues including: public and private health insurance coverage, health care reform, long-term services and supports, public health, children’s health and well-being, health in all policies, and community health systems development. The center offers a wide range of services to public and private clients, including research and evaluation, technical assistance, meeting design and facilitation, policy analysis, grants management, strategic planning, and health impact assessment. Home to the Georgia Center of Excellence in Child and Adolescent Behavioral Health, the Philanthropic Collaborative for a Healthy Georgia, Community Health Systems Development team, Legislative Health Policy Certificate Program, Child Policy Initiative, and Georgia Health Decisions, the GHPC is at work across Georgia and in all 50 states across the nation.

International Studies Program

14 Marietta Street, N.W., 5th Floor
404/413-0233
aysps.gsu.edu/isp/

The International Studies Program (ISP) provides academic and technical training, research, and technical assistance to support sound public policy and sustainable economic growth in transitional and developing economies. ISP technical assistance efforts and training programs complement the academic research and the educational mission of the Andrew Young School and give graduate students the opportunity to gain hands-on public policy experience. This program is recognized worldwide for its contributions to fiscal policy reform.

ISP faculty and staff, other Andrew Young School faculty, affiliates, and a network of experts serve as project directors, senior Advisors, chiefs-of-party, or lead economists for major projects in areas including fiscal policy, tax administration, economic analysis and revenue forecasting, fiscal decentralization and intergovernmental fiscal relations, and public administration, budgeting, and financial management. ISP has managed technical assistance projects and training programs for clients in more than 60 countries.

ISP projects are sponsored by agencies such as the United States Agency International Development (USAID), The World Bank, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), the Inter-American Development Bank (IADB), and other regional and national funding agencies and governments.

ISP annual summer training programs provide training on fiscal decentralization and local governance, tax policy and revenue forecasting, and public budgeting and fiscal management for senior government officials from developing and transitional countries and for donor agency representatives. ISP also develops specially tailored training focused on specific policy topics as requested by its clients.

Nonprofit Studies Program

14 Marietta Street, N.W., 3rd Floor
404/413-0133
aysps.gsu.edu/nsp/

The Nonprofit Studies Program (NSP) was organized in 2001 to foster collaborative research on the nonprofit sector within the academic community, to promote policy research that is relevant in today’s political and economic environment, to educate nonprofit managers and leaders, and to serve as a link between scholars and nonprofit practitioners in creating and disseminating knowledge about the sector. The Program involves educational, research and service activities focused on helping nonprofit organizations address their social missions effectively through problem-solving, policy advocacy and effective deployment of their resources. The Program is interdisciplinary, and has special strengths in economic analysis, resource development and management, and policy analysis applied to the concerns of nonprofit organizations. It includes over 30 core and associated faculty from the Andrew Young School, other schools and colleges of Georgia State University, and other universities.

Public Performance and Management Group

10 Park Place, Suite 415B
404/413-0180
www.ppmgsu.org

The Public Performance and Management Group (PPM) offers an array of resources and solutions to assist public administrators to strengthen strategic and operational performance. Core activities include executive level training and development; applied research projects; short or long-term assistance with planning and performance improvement; and dissemination of effective practices. PPM supports improved public performance by providing real-world solutions to today’s public management problems. In addition, PPM provides the ongoing opportunity for faculty and student involvement in field-based projects. All activities are practitioner-oriented and customized for a wide range of state and local government settings. Funding for PPM projects comes from federal grants as well as state and local contracts.

2020 Academic Regulations

2020.05 Grades of C in Major/Minor/Concentration

Grades in the major, concentration, minor and policy/business area requirements, where applicable, require a grade of C or higher.

2020.10 Transient Status at Other Institutions

Students enrolled in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies who wish to take course work in transient status at another institution, whether as a full-time or part-time student, must have prior written approval from the Office of Academic Assistance if they wish to apply the credit to a degree program. A transient petition form should be submitted prior to registration.

2020.20 Directed Readings

Directed Readings courses in the various undergraduate programs are intended to allow students of proven performance to do independent study in a specific subject area. Enrollment in a directed readings course requires prior consent of the instructor. A maximum of one directed readings course may count toward fulfillment of degree requirements, and the course may not be substituted for a core course requirement. The subject of the independent study will be determined in consultation with the faculty member responsible for supervising the independent work. A faculty member may seek the assessment of a second faculty reader on any directed readings paper. Letter grades, rather than grades of S or U (satisfactory or unsatisfactory), will be assigned for all directed readings courses.

2020.30 Modification of Degree Requirements

Students may petition for modifications of the degree requirements of the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. Degree modification petitions are granted only in the case of extenuating circumstances and only when an educationally acceptable substitution is proposed. Petition forms and information are available online at the following link: aysps.gsu.edu/oaa/student-forms.

Under certain conditions, an undergraduate or postbaccalaureate student may be admitted into a graduate course. To be eligible, an undergraduate student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher and be within 18 semester hours of graduation; a postbaccalaureate student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher in his or her undergraduate work as well as any graduate work taken at this or any other institution. Information is available at the following link: aysps.gsu.edu/oaa/student-forms.

Eligibility does not guarantee admission into a course. The interested student must apply through the Office of Academic Assistance for special graduate student status. Approval of that status requires the concurrence of the student’s academic advisor and the director of the Office of Academic Assistance. Once the status has been approved, the student is permitted to enroll in a graduate course only with the permission of the instructor and the chair of the department in which the course is taught.

2020.50 Awards and Honors

The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies recognizes the academic achievements and service of its students each spring semester at an Honors Day ceremony.  A number of awards and honors are presented annually to outstanding undergraduate students, including the Judge Andrew A. Mickle Outstanding Instructor Award, the Outstanding Criminal Justice Agency Award, the Undergraduate Academic Achievement Award, the Graduate Academic Achievement Award, the Criminal Justice And Criminology Graduate Research Award, the AYS Excellence In Teaching Criminal Justice Award, the Economics Award, the Economics Student Achievement Award, the Excellence in Microeconomics Award, the IEML Award, the Mark E. Schaefer MA in Economics Award, the Best Third-Year Paper Award, the Quantitative Economics Award, the Theodore C. Boyden Excellence in Teaching Economics Award, the AYS Excellence in Teaching Economics Award, the Research Excellence in Economics Award, the Williams R. Gable Award, the Diane Caves Award, the Governor Joe Frank Harris Award, the Dan Sweat Award, the Best Research Paper Award, the Master of Public Administration/Juris Doctor Achievement Award, the Public Administration Academic Achievement Award, the Public Policy Academic Achievement Award, the Outstanding Intern Award, the Public Management and Policy Student Leadership Award, the AYS Excellence in Teaching Policy Award, the Outstanding Doctoral Student In Public Policy Award, the Graduate Excellence in Scholarship Award, the Undergraduate Excellence in Scholarship Award, the Social Work Recognition Award, the Community Leadership in Social Work Award, the Diane B. Davis Award, the Wanda K. Cardwell Award, the Outstanding M.S.W. Student Award, the Outstanding Part-time M.S.W. Student Award, Field Placement Awards, and the Social Justice Award.

2030 College-level Degree Requirements

All undergraduate programs offered by the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies are designed to comply with the University System of Georgia core curriculum requirements. The program requirements for Undergraduate Core Curriculum Areas A through E are listed in the “Core Curriculum” chapter of this catalog.

2060 Student Organizations

Alpha Phi Sigma

The purposes of Alpha Phi Sigma shall be to recognize and promote high scholarship among students actively engaged in college study in the Criminal Justice area, to keep abreast of the advances in scientific research, to elevate the ethical standards of the Criminal Justice professions, and to establish in the public mind the benefit and necessity of education and professional training.   To learn more about Alpha Phi Sigma contact Dr. Leah Daigle at ldaigle@gsu.edu or visit alphaphisigma.org/index.html.

BSW Social Work CLUB (Can Lead US Beyond)

The purpose of the Social Work Club at Georgia State University is to serve as a link between current social work students, prospective social work majors, faculty, and administration.  The Social Work Club upholds the core values of the profession: service, social justice, dignity, and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence while supporting the development of social, academic, and cultural awareness among undergraduate social work students.  The Social Work club is also a community organization extending services beyond the limits of Georgia State, by providing needed services to groups within the University and the larger community.   Visit their website for more information: aysps.gsu.edu/socialwork/student-organizations/bsw-club.

Criminal Justice Student Association

The Criminal Justice Student Association is an organization open to all GSU students who are interested in pursuing a career in criminal justice. It is our mission to facilitate networking and career building activities in order to create a more cohesive and professional student criminal justice community. We seek to provide forums that focuses on the interaction between students, faculty, program alumni, professionals employed in the field, and members of the broader community. We are committed to developing networks with future criminal justice employers, the GSU Student Government Association, and faculty members in the Criminal Justice and Criminology  Department. Membership brings students and the community together to promote awareness of criminal justice issues in society. Being a member of the CJSA is a great way to get involved on campus and in the Atlanta community, to help develop team building and leadership skills, and to meet other individuals interested in criminal justice issues. For more information visit their website at: aysps.gsu.edu/cj/cjsa.

Criminal Justice Graduate Association

The Criminal Justice Graduate Student Association will assist members with adjustment into the Criminal Justice Graduate Program, act as student-faculty liaisons for the purpose of addressing student body concerns, organize events designed to promote graduate research, encourage student involvement in academic and social events within the Department of Criminal Justice, and assist graduating students in transitioning into graduate careers. For more information contact the Criminal Justice department at 404/413-1020.

The Economics Club

The aim of this chartered organization is to promote knowledge of economics on campus and in the community through its activities, and provide a forum where students with similar interests can meet, share ideas, socialize, and enhance their knowledge. Membership is open to all students interested in economics, regardless of their major. The club’s many activities include a guest speaker series that brings noted economists and business leaders to the campus, seminars focusing on career information, and social events. For more information, contact the Department of Economics, 404/413-0141 or visit the Economics Club website:  aysps.gsu.edu/econ/economics-club.

The Graduate Student Association

The Economics Department’s Graduate Student Organization (GSA) is a non-profit, student-run organization established for the benefit of all economics graduate students at the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies at Georgia State University. All officially-enrolled economics graduate students are automatically members of the GSA, and the GSA levies no dues.  The GSA promotes scholarship, develops a spirit of cooperation and fellowship among economics graduate students, and fosters interaction between graduate students and faculty. For more information, visit their website at:  aysps.gsu.edu/econ/graduate-student-association.

The Nonprofit Leadership Alliance Club

The Department of Public Management and Policy in the Andrew Young School is affiliated with Nonprofit Leadership Alliance , a national alliance of colleges, universities and nonprofit organizations dedicated to preparing students for careers in nonprofit leadership. The NLA Club will focus on professional leadership development, fundraising, and career networking within the nonprofit community. The club is open to all GSU majors (undergraduate and graduate) who are interested in working and/or volunteering in a nonprofit environment. For more information about meeting times and a calendar of events, please visit their website at aysps.gsu.edu/pmap/nla.

Planning and Economic Development Club

The Planning & Economic Development Club seeks to enrich students in the area of planning and economic development. Enrichment of students will occur through: creating a network for students with interest in planning and economic development to interact with one another outside the classroom; informing planning and economic development students of academic and professional opportunities in this area; connecting planning and economic development students to professionals working in this field, hosting a monthly speaker series with topics in planning and economic development; and further enhancing the career development of planning and economic development students at Georgia State University.  For  more information about the club, visit:  aysps.gsu.edu/pmap/ped-club.

Public Budgeting & Finance Club

This club’s purpose is to enrich students in the area of public budgeting and finance.  Enrichment of students will occur through:  creating a network for students with interest in public budgeting and finance to interact with one another outside the classroom; informing public budgeting and finance students of academic and professional opportunities in this area; connecting public budgeting and finance students of academic and professional opportunities in this field; hosting a monthly speaker series with topics in public budgeting and finance; and further enhancing the career development of public budgeting and finance students at Georgia State University.  For more information, visit: aysps.gsu.edu/pmap/public-budgeting-and-finance-club.

Omicron Delta Epsilon

Omicron Delta Epsilon is a national honor society open to students majoring in Economics. To be eligible for membership, a student must have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. For information about Georgia State’s chapter of this honor society, or to apply for membership, contact the Department of Economics, 404/413-0141 or visit the website:  omicrondeltaepsilon.org/.

Phi Alpha Social Work Honor Society

Students within the School of Social Work are eligible for induction into the Phi Alpha Honor Society for Social Work.  The GSU School of Social Work Chapter is Omicron Gamma, and was chartered in November 2007.  Undergraduate membership requirements include being a social work major, achieving sophomore status, completing 8 semester hours of required social work course, and achieving an overall 3.0 GPA and a 3.25 social work GPA.  Membership meetings are held twice yearly;  once in the Fall and again in the Spring semesters.

Master of Social Work Club: Bridge Builders

Bridge Builders is the graduate level social work club within the School of Social Work. Bridge Builders offers monthly events that bring together all MSW students through social and educational activities. The club partners with one social service agency each semester to participate in a group community service event. Activities primarily focus on career and professional opportunities within the field of Community Social Work. Bridge Builders also supports the undergraduate social work club and serves as a resource to the undergraduates as they explore graduate school possibilities.  Visit their website for more information:  aysps.gsu.edu/socialwork/student-organizations/msw-bridge-builders.

2070 Academic Departments and Faculty

The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies is composed of four academic departments: Criminal Justice and Criminology, Economics, Public Management and Policy, and the School of Social Work.

Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology

1201 Urban Life Building
404/413-1020
aysps.gsu.edu/cj

Dean A. Dabney, Interim Chair
Brent Teasdale, Director of Graduate Studies

Faculty: Blackwell, Brezina, Collins, Dabney, Daigle, Finn, Hinkle, Jacques, Johnson, Overton, Pridemore, Reed, Shapiro, Teasdale, Topalli, Warner

Prefix: CRJU

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree in criminal justice represents a broad range of study designed to meet the academic needs of students seeking further graduate education, pre-professional students, and those already employed in the wide range of agencies that make up the criminal justice and juvenile justice systems. The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree program in criminal justice and criminology provides additional in-depth training in criminological theory, as well as advanced statistics and research methodology. The Ph.D. program prepares students for careers in research, teaching, management, and community service.

In each degree program, the focus of study includes the justice system as well as the nature, causes, and control of criminal behavior. The requirements of degree programs in this department stress an integrated view of the criminal justice system. In this view, all components of the system interrelate with all other components to provide coordinated justice administration. The curriculum is designed to give students an understanding of the developing theoretical knowledge base in this area of study, while simultaneously providing an understanding of how each of the component parts relates in forming the justice system, and how offenders and victims fit within it.

In addition, students learn how the justice system influences, and is influenced by other institutions in society. An adequately functioning criminal justice system participates in appropriate structuring of legislation, providing information and education within the system and to the public, crime prevention, psychological counseling, and prisoner rehabilitation. Also included among its many roles is work with juveniles, quantitative and qualitative scholarly research, guidance to probationers and parolees, assistance to citizen groups and crime victims, and many other tasks.

Students’ learning in the classroom is enhanced as members of the faculty bring forth a myriad of expertise in criminal justice and criminology. Currently, faculty research topics include but are not limited to sex differences in criminality and criminal justice processing; specialty courts; community policing; public defense systems; domestic violence; elder abuse; sexual harassment; comparative criminal justice; drugs and crime; homicide co-victimization; legal issues in policing; evaluation research; community differences in the nature of crime; place-based criminology; private security; electronic monitoring; informal social control; domestic terrorism; homeland security; healthcare fraud; mental health; organizational misconduct; juvenile delinquency and youth violence; criminological theory; active offender decision-making; drug markets and urban violence; crime victimization; and community corrections. Faculty members conduct research drawing on their expertise in a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods, thus allowing them to bring not only their topical expertise, but also their methodological experience into the learning environment.

Department of Economics

5th floor, AYSPS Building
404/413-0141
aysps.gsu.edu/econ

Sally Wallace, Chair

Caroline Griffin, Administrative Specialist – Managerial
Bess Blyler, Administrative Specialist – Academic
Courtney L. Hill-Ward, Administrative Specialist – Administrative
Jamaal Madison, Administrative Coordinator – Senior

Faculty: Banzhaf, Courtemanche, Cox, Cyan, Feltenstein, Ferraro, Frost, Gibson, Gurmu, Heaghney, Hirsch, Kaufman, Laury, Luger, Mangum, Mansfield, Martinez-Vazquez, Marton, Moore, Nguimkeu, O, Patrick, Price, Rider, Rioja, Ross, Rutstrom, Sadiraj, Sass, Seaman, Sjoquist, Stephan, Swarthout, Tchernis, Tekin, Timofeev, Walker, Wallace, Xu

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Shelby Frost

Prefix: ECON

Georgia State’s Department of Economics, recently ranked number one in Georgia by the Southern Economic Journal, has won national acclaim for its insightful research into practical economic topics. Its concentrations in environmental and labor economics, urban and regional economics and public finance are setting new academic standards in programs of study that combine solid research with practical policy education.

Students in our program have access to innovative research resources on campus, including the Experimental Economics Lab, the Fiscal Research Center, the International Studies Program, the Economic Forecasting Center, and the Georgia Health Policy Center. Faculty in these centers work closely with local, state, national and international organizations to provide the information needed to address today’s complex policy issues.

A Bachelor’s degree in Economics provides students with the resources to be leaders and innovators, as well as a broad understanding of economic issues. Undergraduate majors may choose from four degree options: the Bachelor of Arts with a major in Economics, which includes a language option and a minor field; the Bachelor of Science with a major in Economics, which includes math to the calculus level and a minor field; the Bachelor of Arts with a major in International Economics and Modern Languages, which includes intensive study in a language to prepare international professionals; and the Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Business Economics, including course work in business-related topics such as accounting, marketing and finance (the “business core”). A minor in Economics consists of five courses with at least 9 hours at the upper level. Graduate degrees are available in economics, economics with a policy track, and business economics.

Department of Public Management and Policy

3rd Floor, AYSPS Building
404/413-0107
aysps.gsu.edu/pmap

Gregory B. Lewis, Chair

Elsa Gebremedhin, Administrative Specialist – Managerial
Lisa Shepard, Administrative Specialist – Academic
Abena Otudor, Administrative Coordinator

Faculty: Bourdeaux, Capers, Esnard, Hacker, Hildreth, Kahnweiler, Kerlin, Lecy, Lewis, Liu, Martin, Minyard, Newman, Poister, Roch, Searcy, Snyder, Streib, Thomas, Tolan, Waugh, Willoughby, Wright, Young

Director of the B.S. in Public Policy program: Joseph Hacker

Prefix: PMAP

The Department of Public Management and Policy offers a variety of interdisciplinary degree programs designed to prepare students for life and work in a range of professions in metropolitan areas. At the undergraduate level, the department offers a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in public policy which includes a choice of concentrations in nonprofit leadership, planning and economic development, and public management and governance. Minors are available in nonprofit leadership, planning and economic development, and public policy.  All minors require 15 semester hours of credit.  Graduate degrees are available in public administration and public policy.

School of Social Work

1242 Urban Life Building
404/413-1050
aysps.gsu.edu/socialwork

Mindy Wertheimer, Interim Director

Faculty: Beck, Brooks, Dear, Forge, Hartinger-Saunders, Ivery, Kropf, Lewinson, Liddie-Hamilton, Ligon, Littrell, Ohmer, Scott, Seelman, Smith, Watkins, Wertheimer, Whitley

Prefix: SW

The Master of Social Work (MSW) program’s mission is to prepare students for social work leadership roles in the effort to solve, in partnerships with others, the existing and developing challenges that confront communities  and the people within these communities. Graduates will be educated to advance the needs and capacities of the total community by promoting social and economic justice while maximizing human potential.  The goals of the MSW program are to graduate students who are able to: (1) think critically and communicate effectively in the application of social work knowledge, skills, and values to community partnerships practice and (2) engage as social work leaders to build and strengthen communities. The competencies and practice behaviors of the MSW program are designed to be consistent with the mission and goals of the MSW program, the Council on Social Work Education Curriculum Policy Statement, Georgia State University, and the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies.

2105 Criminal Justice

Program Offered:

  1. B.S. in Criminal Justice

Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology
1201 Urban Life Building, 404/413-1020
aysps.gsu.edu/cj

Dr. Dean Dabney, Interim Chair
Dr. Mark D. Reed, Undergraduate Program Coordinator

The Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice focuses on the study of the criminal justice system and its component parts, as well as the causes and consequences of crime. The degree program stresses an integrated view of the criminal justice system, highlighting relationships between system components in service provision and how the justice system influences/is influenced by other societal institutions. The curriculum is designed to provide students with a developing theoretical knowledge base in studies of crime and criminal justice, focusing on examining the system and its parts, as well as the roles of victims and offenders.  The curriculum also is designed to provide students with a liberal arts education that focuses on basic skills, such as the abilities to read critically, write clearly, speak effectively, and think analytically. The curriculum is broadly structured to meet the academic needs of pre-professional students, those already employed in the wide range of agencies that compose the criminal and juvenile justice systems, and those pursuing graduate education.

Students’ classroom experiences are enhanced through the research expertise of the criminal justice faculty. Currently, faculty research topics highlight sex differences in criminality and criminal justice processing; specialty courts; public defense systems; community policing; problem-oriented policing; domestic violence; violence by and against people with mental illness; elder abuse; sexual harassment; comparative criminal justice; drugs and crime; the role of alcohol in violence and mortality; homicide investigation; homicide co-victimization; sexual victimization; legal issues in policing; evaluation research; community differences in the nature of crime;  electronic monitoring; supermax prisons; informal social control; juvenile delinquency and youth violence;  active offender decision-making; and and suburban crime and urban violence. Faculty members use a variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods, bringing not only topical knowledge but also methodological expertise into the learning environment.

Degree programs offered through the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology include a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice, a Master of Science in criminal justice, and a doctorate in criminology and criminal justice. The bachelor’s degree program complies with the core curriculum requirements of the University System of Georgia.

Mission

The Department of Criminal Justice emphasizes issues of crime and justice occurring in urban environments from a multicultural, interdisciplinary perspective to inform science, policy, and practice.  The mission of the Department is to produce students who are critical and ethical thinkers, knowledgeable about the issues of crime and justice, and prepared for leadership positions in public and private criminal justice.

Program Admission

There are no admission requirements specific to the Bachelor of Science degree program in Criminal Justice and Criminology beyond the admission requirements to the University.

Program Financial Information

No special fees are associated with the Bachelor of Science degree program in Criminal Justice. Students must pay all tuition and fees required by the University.

Program Academic Regulations

  1. The Department has two academic track options: Crime and Justice Track or Legal Track. The Crime and Justice Track provides a traditional curriculum for criminal justice majors, while the Legal Track is designed for criminal justice majors desiring more intensive exposure to law in preparation for law school. Students are automatically placed in the Crime and Justice Track unless they opt into the Legal Track.
  2. Students must earn a grade of C or higher in CRJU 1100 (or equivalent transfer course) and C- or higher in all Area G – L, 2000 – 4000-level criminal justice courses to be eligible for a degree in Criminal Justice. Students must have an institutional grade point average of 2.0 at Georgia State (GSU) in order to graduate from the University.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 39 semester hours in 2000-4000-level criminal justice courses at Georgia State University. CRJU 1100CRJU 3100 is not included in this GSU CRJU residency requirement.
  4. Students may transfer in a maximum of three (3) courses (e.g., 9 credits) in Areas G-J.  Students must still meet the GSU CRJU residency requirement.
  5. A student who has received a grade of D, F, or WF in an Area (H) (Foundations of Analyses) course may repeat the course up to two times. This allows the student a maximum of three attempts to successfully complete the course. Hardship withdrawals will not count against course attempts; documentation that a hardship withdrawal was granted must be provided in the situation where a fourth attempt is requested.
  6. Students should complete a majority of lower-division courses (Areas A – F) prior to taking 4000 level criminal justice courses.
  7. Students should take or complete all Area G (Criminal Justice Core) courses before taking 4000 level criminal justice courses.
  8. Students should be enrolled in or have taken all Area H (Foundations of Analyses) courses before enrolling in 4000 level criminal justice courses
  9. All criminal justice majors must complete an internship/capstone experience (CRJU 4930 and CRJU 4935) during their final semester in the program. These combined courses count for a total of nine (9) hours (CRJU 4930 at 3 hours, CRJU 4935 at 6 hours). Students will complete 180 hours at an internship agency as part of the requirements in CRJU 4935. Placement with an agency that deals with sensitive information may require a background investigation, which can include checks for prior arrests and convictions, abuse of illegal drugs, and DUI convictions. If students have a criminal record either before they declare their major or acquire a criminal record after declaring their major, they might be prohibited from participating in the internship. Since the internship is a requirement, students might be excluded from the degree program by the internship coordinator or department chair.  A thorough description of the internship program is found at  aysps.gsu.edu/cj/internship-program.
  10. The Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology believes that all students in the internship program (criminal justice seminar and field placement) must be personally and psychologically equipped as well as academically prepared. A student may be denied entry into internship field experience based on departmental prerequisites or the professional judgment of faculty based on observed performance, behavior, or documentation that indicates erratic, unpredictable, or unsuitable conduct. This policy is based on the premise that criminal justice faculty should be part of the evaluation of a student’s ability to function adequately and safely in a criminal justice setting and that the faculty has a right and responsibility to make such judgments prior to placing a student in an internship. The internship coordinator and department chair have authority to withdraw a student from a classroom and/or field experience (i.e., CRJU 4930, CRJU 4935) if the student’s performance constitutes a detriment to students in the class and/or to personnel at the field internship site. If withdrawal is necessary, the student will be given an F for the course(s).
  11. The internship coordinator or department chair may remove a student from an internship site if circumstances at the site arise that pose an unforeseen danger to the student’s welfare or an unforeseen risk of liability to the student, faculty, or Department.
  12. All applications for the internship program, without exception, must be completed and turned in to the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology by the following dates in order for students to be considered for placement in the specified semester: February 15 for Fall semester; May 15 for Spring semester; September 15 for Summer semester.

Program Degree Requirements:

Crime and Justice Track

Requirements for Areas A through E of the undergraduate core curriculum are listed in the “Core Curriculum” in the GSU undergraduate catalog. Semester hours are shown in parentheses following an entry. Area I courses can fulfill Area J requirements. Courses from Areas I and J can fulfill Area L requirements. Before enrolling in any 4000 level courses, a student should be enrolled in or have taken all Area H courses.

Area A: Essential Skills (9)

Area B: Institutional Options (4)

Area C: Humanities and Fine Arts (6)

Area D: Math, Technology and Science (11)

Area E: Social Science (12)

Area F: Courses Related to the Program of Study (18)

  • CRJU 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 2200 Social Science and the American Crime Problem (3)
  • Four (3.0 hour) courses chosen from the 1000-2000 level offerings of the College of Arts & Sciences, Robinson College of Business, the School of Public Health, or the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies (12)

Area G: Criminal Justice Core (9)

Area H: Foundations of Analysis (12)

  • CRJU 3020 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 3060 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 3410 Criminological Theory (3)
  • CRJU 3610 Statistical Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)

Area I: Legal Issues (3)*

Select one course from the following:

  • CRJU 3710 Policing and Individual Rights (3)
  • CRJU 4040 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems (3)
  • CRJU 4720 Law, Justice, and Social Change (3)
  • CRJU 4760 Criminal Procedure (3)
  • CRJU 4780 Criminal Law (3)
  • CRJU 4910 Selected Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 4915 Controversial Legal Issues in Criminal Justice (3)

* Note:  Area I courses may count towards Area J

Area J: Criminal Justice Issues (12)

Select four courses from the following:

*Note CRJU 3005 does not count in Area J for criminal justice majors but it will count in Area L

Area K: Capstone and Internship (9)

  • CRJU 4930 Internship Seminar in Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 4935 Criminal Justice Field Instruction (6)

Area L: Electives (15)

Students may choose 15 credit hours (five 3-credit courses) from 2000-4000 level Criminal Justice courses, or 3000-4000 level courses from other GSU departments. Note: The University’s 39 credit hour residency requirement and the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology 39-hour residency requirement must be satisfied (see Program Policies #4 and #5).

Total Semester Hours for Degree: 120

Legal Track

Requirements for Areas A through E of the undergraduate core curriculum are listed in the “Core Curriculum” in the GSU undergraduate catalog. Semester hours are shown in parentheses following an entry. Area I courses can fulfill Area J requirements. Courses from Areas I and J can fulfill Area L requirements. Before enrolling in any 4000 level courses a student must be enrolled in or have taken all Area H courses.

Area F: Courses Related to the Program of Study (18)

  • CRJU 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 2200 Social Science and the American Crime Problem (3)
  • Four (3.0 hour) courses chosen from the 1000-2000 level offerings of the College of Arts & Sciences, Robinson College of Business, the School of Public Health, or the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies (12)

Area G: Criminal Justice Core (9)

Area H: Foundations of Analysis (12)

  • CRJU 3020 Research Methods in Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 3060 Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 3410 Criminological Theory (3)
  • CRJU 3610 Statistical Analysis in Criminal Justice (3)

Area I: Legal Issues (12)

Select four courses from the following:

Area J: Criminal Justice Issues (3)

Select one course from the following:

* Note CRJU 3005 does not count in Area J for criminal justice majors but it will count in Area L

Area K: Capstone and Internship (6)

  • CRJU 4930 Internship Seminar in Criminal Justice (3)
  • CRJU 4935 Criminal Justice Field Instruction (6)

Area L: Electives (15)

Students may choose 15 credit hours (5 3-credit courses) from 2000-4000 level Criminal Justice courses, or 3000-4000 level courses from other GSU departments. Note: The University’s 39 credit hour residency requirement and the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology 39-hour residency requirement must be satisfied (see Program Policies #4 and #5).

Total Semester Hours for Degree: 120

2110 Economics

Programs Offered:

  1. Bachelor of Arts Major in Economics
  2. Bachelor of Science Major in Economics
  3. Bachelor of Arts Major in International Economics and Modern Languages

For information about the B.B.A. degree with a major in business economics offered by the J. Mack Robinson College of Business, please refer to that college’s chapter in this catalog.

Economics provides a way of thinking about everyday decision-making in a world of limited options. It explains the economy as a whole; how it is best organized to provide goods, services, jobs, stable prices, and other economic goals. Economists study the ways a society distributes scarce resources such as land, labor, raw materials, and machinery to produce goods and services choices that must be made because time, income, wealth, workers, and natural resources are limited. Principles of economics are useful at all levels of decision-making, and provide an essential framework for analyzing and understanding such major issues as inflation, unemployment, deregulation of banking, tax reform, fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, labor productivity, and foreign debt crises.

Most economists are concerned with practical applications of economic policy in a particular area. They use their understanding of economic relationships to advise businesses and other organizations, including insurance companies, banks, securities firms, computer and data processing companies, management consulting firms, industry and trade associations, labor unions, and government agencies. Some economists work abroad for companies with international operations and for organizations like the World Bank and United Nations.

Economists use mathematical models to develop programs that predict, for example, the nature and length of business cycles, the effects of inflation on the economy, or the effects of tax legislation on unemployment levels. Preparing reports on the results of their research is an important part of the economist’s job. Being able to present economic concepts in a meaningful way is particularly important for economists who are involved in making policy for their organizations.

The student with a major or minor in economics may choose from a broad array of topics including foreign trade, environmental and natural resources economics, money and credit, public sector economics, labor economics, economic development, international finance, urban and regional economics, economic history, industrial organization and antitrust policies, and mathematical economics. Majors may pursue careers in many areas, some of which are listed below along with courses applicable to the career choice.

Career Opportunities and Related Courses: A recent study by the U.S. Census Bureau showed that college graduates who majored in economics were among the highest paid employees (economics ranked as the third most lucrative major). An undergraduate degree in economics furnishes a valuable background for a domestic or international career in law, government, business or education. Government service provides many opportunities at the federal, state, and local level that require only an undergraduate degree in economics. What economists do in business is as broad and varied as the full scale of managing a firm’s operations; economists are found in staff departments handling marketing, business planning and policy, finance, international operations, government relations, and even purchasing and operating logistics. An economics degree also combines well with training in other disciplines such as finance, real estate, political science, journalism, history, law, and foreign languages.

Students who plan to have a career or pursue graduate work that uses economics should consider the courses listed below. The listings are suggestions for broad categories and do not exclude other offerings. These suggestions do not replace advisement or override any degree requirements regarding choices of major or elective courses.

  • Business: ECON 4300, 4500, 4470, 4800, 4810, 4950, 4960.
  • Local, State, or Federal Government: ECON 4210, 4220, 4300, 4350, 4400, 4450, 4470, 4500, 4600, 4950, 4960.
  • Foreign Service or International Business: ECON 4500, 4600, 4610, 4620, 4800, 4810.
  • Pre-Law: ECON 4080, 4220, 4400, 4450, 4470, 4680, 4960.
  • Graduate Studies in Economics: ECON 4230, 4950, 4930.
  • Graduate Studies in Business: ECON 4500, 4950, 4470, 4810, 4930, 4960.
  • Graduate Studies in Human Resource Management: ECON 4470, 4950, 4960.
  • Graduate Studies in the Social Sciences: ECON 4080, 4350, 4600, 4680.

A Top Ranked Program: The Department of Economics is ranked 1st in Georgia, and 9th among 33 Southeastern programs, and 50th in the U.S., according to a recent issue of the Southern Economic Journal, with considerably higher national rankings in the subfields that our faculty selected as primary areas of concentration, including: 8th in Urban, Rural and Regional Economics; 11th in Public Economics; 20th in Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; 23rd in Labor and Demographic Economics. The department also got high marks in general Economics and teaching (14th), methodology and History of Economic Thought (16th).

Program Admission

There are no admission requirements above the requirements for admission to the University for enrollment in the B.A. or B.S. with a major in Economics or the B.A. with a major in International Economics and Modern Languages.

Program Financial Information

There are no additional fees other than the tuition and fees charged by the University for enrollment in these programs.

Program Degree Requirements

For degree credit, a minimum grade of C must be attained in ENGL 1101 and 1102, in all courses in the major common core curriculum, policy/business and minor for the B.A. and B.S. degrees with a major in Economics, and in all courses in the major common core curriculum and modern languages concentration for the B.A. with a major in International Economics and Modern Languages.

2110.10 Bachelor of Arts Major in Economics

Complete descriptions of requirements for Areas A through E of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum can be found in the “University Degree Requirements and Graduation” chapter of this catalog. The number of semester hours credit required for each section is shown in parentheses. Students may not receive both a B.A. and a B.S. degree from the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies with a major in economics.

Area A: Essential Skills (9)

Area B: Institutional Options (4)

Area C: Humanities and Fine Arts (6)

Area D: Math, Technology and Science (11)

Area E: Social Science (12)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics
  • MATH 1070 Elementary Statistics – If taken in Area D, a 1000/2000 level elective from Areas A-E may be substituted.
  • Foreign language requirement: (6) 1001/2002. Choose from Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Latin, Portuguese, Persian, Russian, Swahili, Spanish, or Turkish. A combined course, FREN 1101 or SPAN 1101, will satisfy the Area F requirement. If a language course level 1002 or higher is chosen in Area C, one or two additional 1000/2000 level elective(s) from Areas A-E must be chosen for Area F.
  • Elective: One 1000/2000 level course chosen from Areas A-E.

Area G: Major Common Core Curriculum (24) A minimum grade of C is required for all courses in this area.

  • ECON 3900 Macroeconomics-CTW
  • ECON 3910 Microeconomics
  • ECON 4999 Senior Capstone in Economic Policy-CTW*
  • Choose five 4000 level ECON courses (15)

*ECON 4999 is only offered during the Fall and Spring semesters of the academic year. The prerequisites for ECON 4999 are ECON 3900, ECON 3910, and two 4000-level economics courses with a grade of C or better. Students are to plan accordingly with regard to the course prerequisites and graduation.

Area H: Policy/Business (6) A minimum grade of C is required for all courses in this area. Select two courses from the following three topic areas. Both courses cannot be taken from the same topic area, and courses may not be from the department in which the student is receiving the minor.

Policy:

Math/Business:

  • MATH 3260 Differential Equations
  • MATH 3435 Introductory Linear Algebra
  • MATH 4211 Optimization
  • MATH 4265 Partial Differential Equations
  • MATH 4435 Linear Algebra
  • MATH 4751 Mathematical Statistics I
  • MATH 4752 Mathematical Statistics II
  • ACCT Any 3000/4000 course
  • CIS Any 3000/4000 course
  • FI Any 3000/4000 course
  • MGS Any 3000/4000 course
  • MK Any 3000/4000 course
  • RMI Any 3000/4000 course

Skills:

Area I: Minor (15) The 15 semester hours in the minor must include nine semester hours at the 3000/4000 level. A grade of C or higher is required in all minor courses. The minor area must consist of 15 semester hours in one department/school/institute other than the major. For some minors, the department/school/institute has designated specific courses that must be completed to constitute the minor.

Area J: Electives (15) These 15 semester hours must include six semester hours at the 3000/4000 level.

Elective courses to complement the major are selected in consultation with the faculty advisor or undergraduate academic advisor in the Office of Academic Assistance.

Total Semester Hours for Degree: 120

2110.11 Bachelor of Science Major in Economics

Complete descriptions of requirements for Areas A through E of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum can be found in the “University Academic Regulations” chapter of this catalog. The number of semester hours credit required for each section is shown in parentheses.

Area A: Essential Skills (9)

Area B: Institutional Options (4)

Area C: Humanities and Fine Arts (6)

Area D: Math, Technology and Science (11)

Area E: Social Science (12)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics
  • MATH 1070 Elementary Statistics – If taken in Area D, a 1000/2000 level elective from Areas A-E may be substituted.
  • MATH 1220 Survey of Calculus
  • Electives: Two 1000/2000 level courses from Areas A-E.

If all required hours are taken in Area F, any hours over 18 will be counted toward the second 60 semester hours.

Area G: Major Common Core Curriculum (24) A minimum grade of C is required for all courses in this area.

  • ECON 3900 Macroeconomics-CTW
  • ECON 3910 Microeconomics
  • ECON 4950 Econometrics and Applications
  • ECON 4999 Senior Capstone in Economic Policy-CTW*
  • Choose four 4000-level courses (12)

*ECON 4999 is only offered during the Fall and Spring semester of the academic year. The prerequisites for ECON 4999 are ECON 3900, ECON 3910, and two 4000-level economics courses with a grade of C or better. Students are to plan accordingly with regard to the course pre-requisites and graduation.

Area H: Policy/Business (6) A minimum grade of C is required for all courses in this area.

Select two courses from the following three topic areas. Both courses cannot be taken from the same topic area, and courses may not be from the department in which the student is receiving the minor.

Policy:

Math/Business:

  • MATH 3260 Differential Equations
  • MATH 3435 Introductory Linear Algebra
  • MATH 4211 Optimization
  • MATH 4265 Partial Differential Equations
  • MATH 4435 Linear Algebra
  • MATH 4751 Mathematical Statistics I
  • MATH 4752 Mathematical Statistics II
  • ACCT Any 3000/4000 course
  • CIS Any 3000/4000 course
  • FI Any 3000/4000 course
  • MGS Any 3000/4000 course
  • MK Any 3000/4000 course
  • RMI Any 3000/4000 course

Skills:

Area I: Minor (15) The 15 semester hours in the minor must include nine semester hours at the 3000/4000 level. A grade of C or higher is required in all minor courses. The minor area must consist of 15 semester hours in one department/school/institute other than the major. For some minors, the department/school/institute has designated specific courses that must be completed to constitute the minor.

Area J: Electives (15) These 15 semester hours must include six semester hours at the 3000/4000 level.

Elective courses to complement the major are selected in consultation with the faculty Advisor or undergraduate Advisor in the Office of Academic Assistance.

Total Semester Hours for Degree: 120

Concentration in Social Studies Education

The Social Studies Education Concentration in Economics is designed for students who wish to become secondary school teachers. This degree provides the initial content area preparation for the Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in Social Studies Education in the College of Education at Georgia State or a similar master’s degree at another university. For teacher certification, the student must also complete the M.A.T. in Social Studies Education or a similar master’s degree at another university.

The Social Studies Education Concentration in Economics is designed to provide students with the content area preparation required for teaching economics and other social studies courses at the middle and high school levels. Students pursuing this concentration must take 21 hours in economics and must also choose three allied fields from the following departments, taking nine hours in each (for a total of 27 hours in allied fields): African-American studies, geography, history, political science, and only one of the behavioral science departments of sociology, anthropology, or psychology.

Area G: Major Courses (21): A grade of C or higher is required in all major courses.

  • ECON 3900 Macroeconomics -CTW (3)
  • ECON 3910 Microeconomics (3)
  • Select five additional 4000 level economics courses (15)

Area H: Allied Fields (27): The student must take a total of 27 hours in three allied fields (nine hours in each field). The allied fields are political science, geography, history, or behavioral science. The behavioral science field consists of nine hours from anthropology, psychology, or sociology. The student should see each department’s list for the courses to be taken in the nine hours for that discipline.

Area I: Electives (12): Twelve hours (four courses) at the 3000/4000 level selected in consultation with the faculty Advisor.

Total Semester Hours for Degree: 120

Economics as an Allied Field: If a student chooses economics as one of their three allied fields, nine hours (three courses) must be chosen from the courses below:

Select three courses from the following two lists. At least one course must be taken from each list.

Macroeconomics & Policy: (These courses have ECON 2105 as a prerequisite.)

Microeconomics & Policy: (These courses have ECON 2106 as a prerequisite.)

2120 International Economics and Modern Languages

2120.10 Bachelor of Arts Major in International Economics and Modern Languages

Complete descriptions of requirements for Areas A through E of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum can be found in the “University Academic Regulations” chapter of this catalog. The number of semester hours credit required for each section is shown in parentheses.

Area A: Essential Skills (9)

Area B: Institutional Options (4)

Area C: Humanities and Fine Arts (6)

Area D: Math, Technology and Science (11)

Area E: Social Science (12)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics
  • MATH 1070 Elementary Statistics – If taken in Area D, a 1000/2000 level elective from Areas A-E may be substituted.
  • Elective:  One 1000/2000 level course chosen from Areas A-E. Students with a language concentration in Spanish must choose SPAN 2203 or 2501 as the Area F elective.
  • Choose one of the following three language options:

    or

    or

    or

    or

Note: Students who have not already attained elementary-level proficiency in their chosen language will be required to take prerequisite courses: CHIN, FREN, GRMN, ITAL, or SPAN 1001 and/or 1002. In that case, the 1002 language course may be used to satisfy 3 credit hours of core requirements in Area C, Humanities and Fine Arts.

Students who have already attained intermediate-level competency in the primary language may substitute 1000/2000 level courses in another language for CHIN, FREN, GRMN, ITAL, or SPAN 2001/2002 (or SPAN 2203 or SPAN 2501) upon approval of the Department of Modern and Classical Languages advisor.

Area G: Economics Common Core Curriculum (24) A minimum grade of C is required for all courses in this area.

*ECON 4999 is only offered during the Fall and Spring semesters of the academic year. The prerequisites for ECON 4999 are ECON 3900, ECON 3910, and two 4000-level economics courses with a grade of C or better. Students are to plan accordingly with regard to the course pre-requisites and graduation.

Area H: Modern Languages Common Core (24) A minimum grade of C is required for all courses in this area.

Chinese Studies:

or
French:

  • FREN 3013 Intensive Grammar Review
  • FREN 3023 Advanced Conversation and Composition
  • FREN 3033 Introduction to Analysis of Literary Texts-CTW
  • FREN 4033 French for International Business I
  • FREN 4043 French for International Business II
  • FREN 4053 Advanced Grammar and Translation
  • FREN 4123 Contemporary France -CTW
  • Choose one elective FREN 3000/4000 course (3)

or
German:

or
Italian:

  • ITAL 3301 Civilization
  • ITAL 3302 Adv Composition and Conversation
  • ITAL 3303 Italian Cultural Expression
  • ITAL 4414 Topics in Italian Literature (may be taken more than once if topic is different)
  • ITAL 4033 Italian for International Business I
  • ITAL 4043 Italian for International Business II
  • Choose two additional ITAL 3000/4000 level courses (6)

or
Spanish:

  • SPAN 3303 Advanced Grammar or Span 3501 Advanced Spanish for Heritage Speakers
  • SPAN 3307 Introduction to Study of Literary Texts-CTW
  • SPAN 3309 Spanish Culture and Civilization or Span 3311 Latin American Culture & Civilization
  • SPAN 4405 Spanish for International Business I
  • SPAN 4407 Spanish for International Business II
  • SPAN 4409 Techniques for Translation
  • Choose two elective SPAN 3000/4000 courses (6)

Area I: Electives (12) Choose any four 3000/4000 level courses, in consultation with the academic Advisor.

Total Semester Hours for Degree: 120

2125 Certificates in Economics

Certificates: The Department of Economics offers a certificate to students, which indicates that they have successfully completed (with a minimum grade of C) a concentration of economics courses in a specialty area. These certificates are conferred by the department and will not appear on official transcripts or diplomas from the university. Certificates are available to majors and non-majors.

Certificates are available in the following areas:

  • Analytical Economics (choose 3 or 4 courses): ECON 4230, 4750, 4930, 4950.
  • Business Policy Analysis (choose 3 of 4 courses): ECON 4470, 4500, 4950, 4960.
  • Development Economics (choose 3 of 4 courses): ECON 4600, 4610, 4620, 2100 (may be used in core Area E).
  • Economic History: Econ 4080, 4680, and choose one 4000-level Economics Elective.
  • The Economics of Urban Growth and the Quality of the Environment (choose 3 of 4 courses): ECON 4220, 4300, 4400, 4600.
  • Human Resource Economics (choose 3 of 4 courses): ECON 4210, 4300, 4350, 4960.
  • International Economics (choose 3 of 4 courses): ECON 4600, 4800, 4810, 2100 (may be used in core Area E).
  • Law and Economics: 4450, 4470, and choose one of the following: ECON 4080, 4220, 4400, 4960.
  • Public Policy (choose 3 of 4 courses): ECON 4220, 4350, 4400, 4470.

For more information about certificates or concentration in Economics visit this website: aysps.gsu.edu/econ/4367.

2130 Public Policy

Program Admission

There are no admission requirements above the requirements for admission to the University for enrollment in the B.S. program with a major in Public Policy.

Program Financial Information

There are no additional fees other than the tuition and fees charged by the University for enrollment in this program.

Program Degree Requirements

For degree credit, a minimum grade of C must be attained in ENGL 1101, 1102, ECON 2105, ECON 2106, MATH 1070 and all courses in the major common core curriculum and the concentration.

2130.10 Bachelor of Science Major in Public Policy

Mission: The mission of the Public Policy program is to prepare students for roles as effective citizens and people who work in the public service. We seek talented and motivated students who want to develop the knowledge, skills and values required to become responsible and visionary leaders in a wide range of settings. While many graduates of our program choose to enter a career in the public sector or in nonprofit agencies, others make contributions to their community, state, and nation as active citizens in the civic and public arenas.

The career of the namesake of the School, Ambassador Andrew Young, illustrates how individuals can move from nonprofit organizations to public life and the private sector, while being a part of our increasingly global society. Students in the Bachelor of Science in Public Policy program learn about the institutions of a democracy and the ways in which policy making organizations relate to one another. Students acquire skills in policy writing, critical thinking, and analysis that are in demand by governmental agencies and nonprofit groups, as well as graduate and professional schools. Above all, they learn how to make a difference by becoming engaged in civic and public life.

Career Opportunities: A policy major can work as a city manager, community relations specialist, local or regional planner, policy analyst, environmental resource specialist, human resource manager, journalist, politician or campaign strategist, volunteer coordinator, nonprofit leader, or in many other exciting careers that make a difference.

Many graduates of the Bachelor of Science in Public Policy establish careers in public service. These alumni work in a variety of agencies including federal, state, and local governments as well as a number of public agencies. Others are employed in not-for-profit organizations that address many important needs. Some alumni work in the business world, but use the knowledge and skills from their Public Policy degree to become better, more active citizens in the civic and public arenas. The degree program also provides an excellent preparation for graduate study in law, public policy and administration, and related fields.

A Top Ranked Program: The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies (AYSPS) is nationally recognized as having one of the elite programs in the field of public policy and management.  The U.S. News and World Report’s “2013 Edition America’s Best Graduate Schools” ranked the AYSPS 23rd overall among the 269 public affairs schools in the United States, and in the top 25 programs in the specialty areas of nonprofit management, public policy analysis and public management administration, and in the top 12 programs in public finance and budgeting, city management and urban policy, and information and technology management. A B.S. in Public Policy provides students the resources to be leaders and innovators in the public sphere for years after they have graduated from the program.

Complete descriptions of requirements for Areas A through E of the Undergraduate Core Curriculum can be found in the “University Academic Regulations” chapter of this catalog. The number of semester credit hours required for each section is shown in parentheses.

Area A: Essential Skills (9)

Area B: Institutional Options (4)

Area C: Humanities and Fine Arts (6)

Area D: Math, Technology and Science (11)

Area E: Social Science (12)

Area F: Courses Appropriate to the Major (18)

  • ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics (C or better) (3)
  • ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics (C or better) (3)
  • MATH 1070 Elementary Statistics (C or better) (3)
  • SOCI 1101 Introductory Sociology (3)
  • PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology (3)
  • Elective: One (3.0 course) chosen from the 1000-2000 level offerings of the College of Arts and Sciences, Robinson College of Business, College of Education (with restrictions), or the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

Area G: Major Common Core Curriculum (21): C or better grade is required of all courses in this area.

* Internships are required for all undergraduate students lacking significant prior administrative experience in a public or nonprofit agency or a related organization. Internship experiences provide students the opportunity to apply concepts and skills associated with their curriculum. This opportunity for professional growth and development requires enrollment in three hours of PMAP 4941. The department’s internship coordinators assist in the search for an appropriate internship opportunity. Students are expected to take the lead in this search. Internship credit requires the completion of 200 hours of work. Students are free to work full-time or part-time, according to their needs and those of their internship sponsor. Many students find paid internships, but there are some unpaid internships available that are very desirable. Students should consider the value of the experience that an internship provides, in addition to the pay. Internship information and applications are available from the Department of Public Management and Policy, or the PMAP internship homepage on the web at aysps.gsu.edu/career/internships.  Students with substantial prior administrative experience may petition to waive the internship requirement. Petition forms are available online through the Office of Academic Assistance at aysps.wufoo.com/forms/undergraduate-petition/.

Area H: Concentration (21): A C or better grade is required for all courses in this area.

Students must choose one concentration from:

  • Nonprofit Leadership or
  • Planning and Economic Development or
  • Public Management and Governance

Nonprofit Leadership (21):

The nonprofit leadership concentration allows students to learn about the important role of nonprofit organizations in addressing social issues and interests in a democratic society and participating in the formulation and implementation of public policy. Through this concentration, students will become aware of the many and diverse career opportunities in the nonprofit sector, in areas such as the arts, social services, education, health care, the environment, policy advocacy, and international relief and development. They will learn the skills, knowledge and challenges of leadership in this sector. This concentration involves a service learning component and will prepare students for entry level jobs in nonprofit management and for graduate study in nonprofit organizations, philanthropy, and related fields.

Required Courses (15):

  • PMAP 3210 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
  • PMAP 3213 Nonprofit Financial Resources
  • PMAP 3231 Nonprofit Management and Leadership
  • PMAP 4211 Human Resource Management Systems in Public and Nonprofit Organizations
  • PMAP 4411 Introduction to the Law for Public and Nonprofit Managers

Choose two courses from the following (6):

  • PMAP 3211 Career Development in Public and Nonprofit Organizations
  • PMAP 3411 Contemporary Planning
  • PMAP 3801 Public Administration and Politics
  • PMAP 4451 Economic Development Policy and Planning
  • ENGL 4510 Grant and Proposal Writing

Planning and Economic Development (21):

The planning and economic development concentration prepares students to work in both the public and private sectors addressing issues facing urban communities. It is appropriate for students who want to pursue careers or further study in the planning, development and management of communities. Courses introduce students to forces shaping the development of urban regions. Special attention is paid to planning for economic development, environmental quality, housing, land use, neighborhood revitalization, and transportation. During their studies, students learn about the variety of policies and strategies that citizens and planners can use to influence development.

Required courses (15):

Choose two courses from the following (6):

Public Management and Governance (21):

How does government work, and what can we do to make it work better? The public management and governance concentration is for students who are excited about how government operates and how policies are converted into action. These are fascinating topics for those interested in improving the lives of citizens in communities and nations, and learning how to better address specific policy issues. Students in this concentration will also acquire the skills needed to compete for entry level jobs in governments, consulting firms, and with government contractors. This is the type of knowledge that would also be useful for students contemplating a professional degree in public administration, law, planning, or some type of policy research (think tanks, advocacy groups, universities, and/or lobbying organizations).

Required courses (15):

Choose two courses from the following (6):

  • PMAP 3111 Urban Political Economy
  • PMAP 3210 Introduction to the Nonprofit Sector
  • PMAP 4211 Human Resource Management Systems in Public and Nonprofit Organizations
  • PMAP 4411 Introduction to the Law for Public and Nonprofit Managers

Area I: Approved Electives (18) Students make course selections with Advisor approval.

Total Semester Hours for Degree – 120

2130.15 Nonprofit Leadership Alliance Certificate in Nonprofit Management and Leadership

The Department of Public Management and Policy is affiliated with the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance, a national alliance of colleges, universities and nonprofit organizations dedicated to preparing undergraduates and graduates for careers in nonprofit leadership. To read more about the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance (NLA) program visit their website at: aysps.gsu.edu/nsp/nla-certificate.  Benefits for obtaining the NLA certificate include:

  • Certification in entry-level nonprofit employment competencies
  • Course work grounded in the foundations and practices of nonprofit management
  • Tested practices and principles through experiential learning
  • One-to-one support, career development and mentoring
  • Networking with prospective employers at local, regional, and national levels
  • Opportunity to test skills and various nonprofit roles through internships, co-curricular and community service activities
  • Potential for references and referrals from agency executive directors, advisory board members and community leaders
  • Exposure to a national nonprofit network of partners and career options
  • Increased sense of connection and belonging to the community
  • Opportunity for lasting friendships
  • Scholarships
  • Preparation for Graduate School or the Peace Corps

Students can earn the certificate in one of three ways:

  1. As a nonprofit leadership concentration in the Bachelor of Science in Public Policy.
  2. As a minor in Nonprofit Leadership.
  3. In conjunction with any undergraduate major by completing four (4) nonprofit leadership/management courses in the Department of Public Management and Policy.

This certificate is conferred by the department of Public Management and Policy and will not appear on official transcripts or diplomas from the University.

Certificate Requirements: Students seeking NLA certification must complete the following requirements:

  1. Course requirements: earn a grade of C or better in:
  2. Complete PMAP 4941, the undergraduate Internship, which requires completion of 300 clock hours in a nonprofit organization/setting.
  3. At the student’s own expense, attend the annual Nonprofit Leadership Alliance Management/Leadership Institute, which is traditionally held in Spring semester (January).

Students pursuing the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance Certificate are also strongly encouraged to join the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance student organization sponsored by the Andrew Young School. Student association activities help students develop and strengthen their knowledge, skills, leadership abilities, and understanding of the nonprofit sector. This organization will also undertake fundraising campaigns to sponsor student attendance at the annual Nonprofit Leadership Alliance Management/Leadership Institute.

For more information about the Nonprofit Leadership Alliance certificate, please contact the Dr. Maggie Tolan at mtolan@gsu.edu or visit the Public Management and Policy department degree information website at:  aysps.gsu.edu/nsp/nla-certificate.

2140 Social Work

School of Social Work
1242 Urban Life Building, 404/413-1050
aysps.gsu.edu/socialwork

The BSW program’s mission is to prepare students for generalist social work practice in a range of roles and services that deal with the existing and developing challenges that confront individuals, families, groups, and communities. The goals of the BSW program are to graduate students who will be able to: (1) think critically and communicate effectively in the application of social work knowledge, skills, and values to entry-level generalist practice, and (2) practice as entry-level generalist social workers.

Successful completion of this program may lead to advanced standing in many accredited graduate programs of social work.

The competencies and practice behaviors of the BSW program are designed to be consistent with the missions and goals of the BSW program, the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, and Georgia State University.  They are aligned with the Council of Social Work Education’s Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards.

BSW Program Competencies:

  1. Identify as a professional social worker and conduct oneself accordingly.
  2. Apply social work ethical principles to guide professional practice.
  3. Apply critical thinking to inform and communicate professional judgments.
  4. Engage diversity and difference in practice.
  5. Advance human rights and social and economic justice.
  6. Engage in research-informed practice and practice-informed research.
  7. Apply knowledge of human behavior and the social environment.
  8. Engage in policy practice to advance social and economic well-being and to deliver effective social work services.
  9. Respond to contexts that shape practice.
  10. Engage, assess, intervene, and evaluate with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Program Admission

The requirements and procedures for admission to Georgia State University are summarized in the university section of this General Catalog. That application process permits a potential student to indicate the college in which the individual wishes to register upon acceptance and to indicate the intended major. Based upon that application, an individual may be accepted by the university and by the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. Entering students who wish to major in social work begin their affiliation with the School of Social Work in a Pre-Social Work (PSW) status. A later, separate application and decision process is required before a student can be formally accepted into the Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) status. The priority application deadline is May 15 prior to the junior year. However, applications will be accepted after that date until August 1 on a space availability basis. (BSW applications are NOT processed between August – December.)

Pre-Social Work (PSW) Student

All students admitted to the School of Social Work begin as Pre-Social Work (PSW) students and change their status only after the student has made formal application and formal admission has been granted. PSW status is assigned to students who have not completed all lower-division courses in Areas A-F or have not met GPA eligibility requirements. To complete these areas, PSW students must register only for the lower-division courses specified in their advisement files.

Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Student

For a student to be considered for BSW status, the student must:

  1. Be in good standing at Georgia State University with a minimum institutional GPA of 2.5.
  2. File a formal application in the school for BSW status.
  3. Have grades of C or higher in English 1101 and 1102.
  4. Have successfully completed Areas A through F (except SW 2000).
  5. Have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 or better in the lower-division courses counted for completion of Areas A-F and a minimum grade of C or higher in SW 2000, if completed.

BSW status indicates that a student has demonstrated commitment to professional social work and has been recognized by the school as being ready to utilize that commitment in the demanding preparation for practice in this field. A student with BSW status is expected to internalize the values and ethics of social work and to develop and enhance professional practice skills. In this process, the BSW student is expected to abide by the academic regulations related to the program as outlined in this catalog and in the school’s Student Handbook. Among those academic regulations is the requirement that a student have a grade of C (2.0) or better in each of the social work major courses that are required in Area G.

Entry into the BSW program is a selective process on a space availability basis. A student who meets only the minimum GPA or other criteria is not necessarily guaranteed acceptance. Qualified students who are denied entry at one point in time will be placed on a competitive waiting list in the order of their denial to await possible access to the program at a subsequent time.

Program Financial Information

A $30 field site application is due by February 1st of the Junior year, no other special fees are associated with the Bachelor of Social Work program. Students must pay all tuition and fees required by the University.

Program Academic Regulations

Students in the School of Social Work are required to participate in academic advisement. Each entering BSW student is assigned to a professional staff member in the University Advisement Center or in the college’s Office of Academic Assistance who serves as the student’s academic adviser. BSW students should meet with that assigned academic adviser prior to registering for any courses, and those advisement appointments are available during any semester. When the student achieves BSW status, the student will be reassigned to the director of the BSW program for program advisement. The director of the BSW program will be the advisor throughout the program. The student is expected to meet with the assigned academic adviser at least once each academic semester for the purpose of beginning or enhancing acculturation to the field of social work, as well as for sequencing course selections in accordance with school procedures. BSW advisement appointments are scheduled only during the fall and spring semesters, so students are expected to plan accordingly.

Course sequencing in the BSW program begins only in the fall semester, and a student is admitted to BSW status in accordance with that schedule. PSW and BSW students are expected to follow the written course advisement plan developed in the advisement process, both in terms of course selections and in the sequencing of those courses. Deviations from the advisement plan without the written authorization of the assigned academic adviser or the BSW program director may result in the school’s blocking future registrations that do not conform to the advisement plan or may result in an extension of their course of study. In addition to the review and possible withdrawal of a student from the program, as described in “Review of Academic and Professional Practice Demands,” a student who misses or fails a course but is permitted by the school to continue in the program must work closely with the assigned academic adviser and the BSW program director to determine the most appropriate point at which to continue degree-related course work. If a student in BSW status is inactive for two academic semesters, the student will be returned to PSW status and must file a new, competitive application to reenter the BSW status.

Field Education

Field education is an integral component of the BSW curriculum and involves the placement of social work students in educationally supervised agency settings. The primary purpose of field education is to enable students to integrate social work theory and practice through the direct application of social work knowledge, values, and skills. Field education provides opportunities to test and refine classroom learning in professional social work settings. BSW students must have a minimum of 400 supervised hours of field education over a period of two consecutive semesters. Students are required to attend a classroom-setting field integrative seminar as part of their field education. The purpose of the integrative seminar is to provide field education students a forum for the synthesizing of classroom learning with their field-based internship.

Students may apply for field education only after lower-division and prescribed social work courses and other requirements have been satisfactorily completed, as explained in the school’s Student Handbook. Students enroll in field education for the fall-spring semesters. Field education applications must be turned in to the Director of Field Education by February 1st for the following fall semester placement.

Grant — Child Welfare

As funds are available, the School of Social Work, in partnership with the Georgia Department of Human Services, has scholarships available under the Title IV E, Child Welfare Scholars Program. The scholarship includes tuition and fees and a stipend. Recipients must take specific child welfare electives and must complete a field placement in a public child welfare setting. Upon graduation, recipients must commit to work for the Division of Family and Children Services on a year-for-year basis.

School of Social Work Policies and Procedures

Georgia State University is an equal educational opportunity institution. Faculty, staff, and students are admitted, employed, and treated without regard to race, sex, color, age, religion, national origin, sexual orientation, or disability. Georgia State University complies with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Civil Rights Act of 1991, Sections 503/504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the American with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act, as well as other applicable federal and state laws.

Students should refer to the current Undergraduate Catalog to ensure compliance with university policies and procedures.

Codes of Ethics

All students admitted into the B.S.W. program are expected to read, understand, and follow the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics. This code provides a set of values, principles, and standards to guide conduct and decision making when interacting with clients and colleagues and for when critical issues arise. A copy of the Code of Ethics can be found at the NASW website (www.naswdc.org)

Review of Academic and Professional Standards – The Policy

Students admitted into the School of Social Work will be held by the academic standards set by the University and the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies. Students will be held to the professional standards set by the school and the National Association of Social Workers. Students should familiarize themselves with these requirements as found in the undergraduate and graduate catalogs for the university and the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies.

A. Academic Competence

Undergraduate students are required to maintain at least a grade of C (2.00) or better in each of the social work major courses in Area G, and be in academic good standing with the University (an institutional GPA of 2.00). In cases where a student has a grade of D or F in an Area G course, the student must meet with the BSW Director and another faculty member of the BSW Committee to determine whether the student is eligible to continue in the program. If the student is allowed to continue in the program, he or she must retake the course and receive a grade of C or higher. Due to course sequencing, graduation date may be postponed in this situation. Undergraduates must also complete a minimum of 400 hours of field placement.

B. Professional Competence

Georgia State University’s School of Social Work has the goal of educating competent social work practitioners. If a student fails to meet the standards set by the National Association of Social Workers and/or the School of Social Work, corrective action may be taken. Corrective action is intended to provide students and faculty with the opportunity to openly discuss problems and issues identified, and to seek a solution to correct the situation or problem presented. Dismissal from the program is an option and may supersede any discussion of corrective action. Professional incompetence signifies that a student is not adequately or appropriately performing at his or her program level.

Failure to comply with the policies and procedures of Georgia State University and/or the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies and/or the School of Social Work may result in a student’s dismissal from the program.

Program Degree Requirements

Semester hours are shown in parentheses following an entry. Requirements for Areas A through E of the undergraduate core curriculum are listed in the “Core Curriculum” chapter of this catalog. Only senior BSW majors may take: SW 4100, SW 4200, SW 4500, SW 4900.

Area A: Essential Skills (9)

Area B: Institutional Options (4)

Area C: Humanities and Fine Arts (6)

Area D: Math, Technology and Science (11)

Area E: Social Science (12)

Area F: Courses Related to the Program of Study (18)

Area G: Major (48)

Required Courses (42)

  • SW 3000 Communication/Cultural Diversity (3)
  • SW 3200 Social Welfare Institutions (3)
  • SW 3300 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3)
  • SW 3400 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3)
  • SW 3500 Methods of Social Work Research (3)
  • SW 3600 Social Welfare Policy (3)
  • SW 3700 Communication Skills for Social Workers (3)
  • SW 3800 Case Management and Community Resources in Social Work (3)
  • SW 4100 Social Work Methods I (3)
  • SW 4200 Social Work Methods II (3)
  • SW 4500 Practicum I (6)
  • SW 4900 Practicum II (6)

Social Work Electives (6)
Choose two courses from the following:

  • SW 4320 Social Work Administration (3)
  • SW 4330 Contemporary Health Challenges (3)
  • SW 4340 Social Work and the Law (3)
  • SW 4350 Economics of Poverty (3)
  • SW 4360 Forensic Social Work (3)
  • SW 4450 Child Maltreatment Practice, Policy and Research (3)
  • SW 4460 Aging Practice, Policy and Research (3)
  • SW 4470 Substance Abuse Practice, Policy and Research (3)
  • SW 4480 Disabilities Practice, Policy and Research (3)
  • SW 4490 Child Welfare Practice, Policy and Research (3)
  • SW 4960 Seminar on Social Work Issues and Problems (3)
  • SW 4950 Selected Topics in Social Work (3)
  • SW 4990 Directed Individual Study (3)

Area H: Electives (12)

In consultation with an adviser, choose 12 semester hours of course work (4 courses).

Total Semester Hours for Degree:  120 semester hours

2150 Graduate Programs in the Andrew Young School of Policy Studies

The Andrew Young School of Policy Studies offers advanced studies and research leading to the following degree programs:

The Graduate Certificate in:

  • Disaster Management
  • Nonprofit Management & Social Enterprise
  • Planning and Economic Development

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice

The Master of Arts in Economics

The Master of Arts in Economics, Policy Track

The Master of Public Administration with concentrations in:

  • Criminal Justice
  • Management and Finance
  • Nonprofit Management
  • Planning and Economic Development
  • Policy Analysis and Evaluation
  • Public Health

The Master of Public Administration/Juris Doctor

The Master of Public Policy with concentrations in:

  • Disaster Policy
  • Nonprofit Policy
  • Planning and Economic Development Policy
  • Public Finance Policy
  • Social Policy

The Master of Social Work

  • Community Partnerships

The Doctor of Philosophy in Criminal Justice and Criminology

The Doctor of Philosophy in Economics with elective fields in:

  • Environmental, Urban, and Regional Economics (EURE)
  • Experimental Economics
  • Health Economics
  • Labor Economics
  • Public Finance

The Doctor of Philosophy in Public Policy with elective fields in:

  • Public Finance and Budgeting
  • Public and Nonprofit Management
  • Policy Design, Analysis and Evaluation

The Doctor of Philosophy in Public Policy joint degree program with the Georgia Institute of Technology with elective fields in:

  • Environmental Policy
  • Health Policy
  • Policy Design, Analysis and Evaluation
  • Public and Nonprofit Management
  • Public Finance
  • Science and Technology Policy
  • Urban and Regional Economic Development