4000 College of Education

(See Section 1600 for Educator Preparation)

Graduate programs in the College of Education are described in detail in this chapter. See subsections for specific program information as well as policies and procedures.

General Information

The information contained in this chapter applies to programs, course offerings, and requirements specific to the College of Education. However, the information in this chapter is to be considered supplemental to the general university information found in the preceding chapters of this catalog. Therefore, students should familiarize themselves thoroughly with general information on registration, fees and refunds, academic regulations, student life, and campus services. All policies, regulations, and requirements explained in the preceding chapters of this catalog also apply to the College of Education.

Office of the Dean

1000 College of Education Building (10th floor)
404/413-8100
http://education.gsu.edu/

Paul Alberto, Dean
Gwen Benson, Associate Dean for School, Community and International Partnerships
Walt Thompson, Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research
Joyce Many, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies and Educator Preparation
Matthew Gillett, College Administrative Officer

Accreditation

The Professional Education Faculty at Georgia State University is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), www.ncate.org. This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation programs and advanced educator preparation programs at Georgia State University. However, the accreditation does not include individual education courses that the institution offers to P-12 educators for professional development, relicensure, or other purposes.

The Mental Health Counseling MS, the School Counseling M.Ed., and the Counselor Education and Practice Ph.D. programs are accredited by The Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) The Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredits the Rehabilitation Counseling program in the College of Education. The American Psychological Association (APA) accredits the doctoral programs in Counseling Psychology and School Psychology.

The Master of Science (M.S.) program in Communication Sciences and Disorders (speech-language pathology) at Georgia State University is accredited by the Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2200 Research Boulevard #310, Rockville, Maryland 20850, 800-498-2071 or 301-296-5700.

4010 Research and Instructional Resources

Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence

350 College of Education Building
404/413-8070
http://crim.education.gsu.edu/

The Alonzo A. Crim Center for Urban Educational Excellence works in partnership with the larger Georgia State community, other universities, school systems, social agencies, and community organizations. Current work includes: (1) Benjamin E. Mays Lecture Series, an annual program which brings nationally prominent educators to Atlanta to address critical issues facing education;  (2)Coalition Urban Affiliate Liaisons, meetings between College of Education and Atlanta Public Schools urban affiliates to develop research agendas and to discuss difficult issues related to providing excellent education for those children who traditionally have been least well-served by schools;  (3) Quarterly Forums, events which address the topic, “Tapping Into the Genius of Our Children,” which allows teachers and educators to participate in dialogue with outstanding people who have demonstrated success in fostering academic excellence for economically disenfranchised children in urban schools;  (4)The Peachtree Urban Writing Project, a national writing project site and a collaborative of the Atlanta Public School System, Georgia State University, Morehouse College, and Spelman College;  (5) National Board Certification Resource Center, provides awareness training to principals and teachers who are going through National Board Certification (NBC), places special emphasis on the recruitment of minority candidates and houses an information library for NBC literature;  (6) Martin Luther King, Jr. Curriculum Project, lesson plans developed and designed to encourage hands-on, interactive exploration of materials available in The King Center, while providing historical and sociological knowledge to students as well as in social studies, civics, history, writing and language arts;  (7)Staff Development and Curriculum Enhancement, facilitates and hosts ongoing workshops and training sessions that promote professional development for in-service teachers, and identifies supplemental learning resources that will compliment the curriculums that are currently used by teachers. The director of the center is  Dr. Brian Williams.

Applied Physiology Laboratory

G18 Sports Arena
http://kh.education.gsu.edu/kh-facilities/applied-physiology-lab/

The Applied Physiology Laboratory serves the research, teaching, and service needs of the Department of Kinesiology and Health. The director of the laboratory is Dr. Andy Doyle.

Biomechanics Laboratory

137 Sports Arena
404/413-8056
http://kh.education.gsu.edu/kh-facilities/biomechanics-lab/

The Georgia State University Biomechanics Laboratory was established in 1989 to enhance biomechanical research productivity in the areas of sport and exercise activities, medical rehabilitation, and industrial and occupational activities. The director of the laboratory is Dr. Mark Geil.

Center for Pediatric Locomotion Sciences

http://education.gsu.edu/research/center-for-pediatric-locomotion-sciences/

The mission of the Center for Pediatric Locomotion Sciences is to perform innovative, interdisciplinary research to improve the lives of children and adolescents with mobility disorders. Currently, the center is conducting exploratory research in four primary areas that challenge children: idiopathic toe walking, Down syndrome, lower limb amputation and cerebral palsy, and has already made important gains in each of these areas. The co-directors of the center are Dr. Mark Geil and Dr. Jerry Wu.

Center for Research on School Safety, School Climate and Classroom Management

351 College of Education Building
404/413-8074
http://schoolsafety.education.gsu.edu/

The Center for Research on School Safety, School Climate and Classroom Management consists of faculty and staff members representing a broad span of academic orientations including education, psychology, nursing, social work, law, and criminal justice. The mission of the Center is to coordinate and support scholarly efforts to gain a fuller understanding of the variables affecting school safety, school climate and classroom management. This is accomplished by stimulating interdisciplinary basic and applied research in these areas, and by facilitating educational and outreach efforts that focus on our growing understanding of variables and interventions that affect school safety, school climate and classroom management. The director is Dr. Joel Meyers.

Educational Research Bureau

330 College of Education Building
404/413-8090
http://education.gsu.edu/research/educational-research-bureau/

The Educational Research Bureau provides assistance to students and faculty with grant searches, proposal processing, and post-award management. The director of the bureau is Dr. Susan Ogletree.

Instructional Technology Center

2nd floor, College of Education Building
404/413-8080
itc.gsu.edu/

The Instructional Technology Center serves faculty, students, and prekindergarten through twelfth-grade educators by encouraging and supporting technological confidence and expertise in the areas of teaching, collaboration, and consulting. The ITC serves as a resource center providing learning spaces, technology workshops, student computer access, and specialized educational technology resources. Our resources include computers, peripheral equipment, productivity and educational software titles, audio/video production and reproduction technology and over 100 years of combined educational technology expertise from our experienced staff.

The ITC will provide customized workshops for faculty and instructor-led classes on topics that support instruction. The ITC can create workshops for a variety of instructional technologies. It has a variety of purpose-built teaching facilities including smart classrooms, computer classrooms, a conference room and a student computing commons.

The director of the center is Mr. Randy Jones. Call the Instructional Technology Center for information and appointments or visit their website at itc.gsu.edu.

Principals’ Center

Fourth floor, College of Education Building
404/413-8256
www.principalscenter.org/

The Principals’ Center provides continuing professional development for Georgia State University graduates and other educational professionals from Georgia’s public and private K-12 schools with a focus on Instructional Leadership for Schools that Succeed for All Students. This professional development agenda is implemented under various formats which target principals, assistant principals, aspiring leaders and other practitioners interested in improving their leadership and school reform skills.  Some programming is assisted through various partnerships with school systems in Georgia. The Center is administered within the Department of Educational Policy Studies.

  • The Expert Leaders Series is a series of professional learning opportunities that builds awareness of innovative thinking on education issues or practical strategies for school improvement. Led by visionary thinkers, researchers, and practitioners through presentations and group discussions, the series is designed to inspire principals to leadership that will create schools where all children achieve.
  • The Tool Box Series is a series of full-day learning opportunities highlighting the work of current K-12 school practitioners and their teams in focused areas of interest.    These teams share successes, challenges, and strategies that have worked for them in order to inspire others to begin or improve their own skills and expertise. This series is designed to cover subjects that are relevant, current, and of pressing interest or need in Georgia’s K-12 schools.
  • The Aspiring Leaders Institute is designed to prepare future principals, recommended by their school districts, to become leaders of high  achieving schools. Members of the institute participate in interactive learning sessions, large and small groups, and self-assessments designed to strengthen leadership skills and in the monthly program meet to study issues of race and ethnicity, culture, equity, efficacy, change, community involvement and other topics that have an impact on increasing student achievement.
  • The Beginning Principals Academy is a one year professional development and support program for principals, in their first and second year as a school leader, under the guidance of experienced mentor principals. Members of the Academy: receive advice, guidance and support from distinguished, experienced principals; develop a broadened understanding of the instructional leadership process, enhance their decision-making skills; learn how to transform schools into Professional Learning Communities; and expand their network of professional colleagues.
  • The Institute for Assistant Principals is a one year professional development and support program for assistant principals, in their first or second year, under the guidance of experienced mentor assistant principals. Members of the AP Institute receive advice, guidance and support from distinguished, experienced assistant principals; develop a broadened understanding of school processes in relation to successful schools, enhance their decision-making skills; and expand their network of professional colleagues.
  • Academic Coaches Seminar Series is designed to provide professional development for educators who are in their first, or second, year as an academic or instructional coach, or who are aspiring to this role, within a school or at central office. Members of the Seminar will engage in interactive learning sessions that model the coach/teacher relationship to foster instructional improvement and student academic achievement. The Seminar Series is led by an experienced educational leader who has a proven track record in instructional leadership.

Saturday School

367 College of Education Building
404/413-8029
http://saturdayschool.education.gsu.edu/

Saturday School for Scholars and Leaders is offered by the Department of Early Childhood Education in the College of Education at Georgia State University. Saturday School provides a wide variety of enrichment classes for gifted students in grades K-8. Classes are held on the downtown campus during 5 sessions per year. Two 5-week sessions are held in the fall and spring semesters and one 4-week session is held each July. The director of the Saturday School is Dr. John Kesner.

Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic

8th floor, College of Education Building
404/413-8044

http://speechlanguagehearing.education.gsu.edu/

The Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic is operated by the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education to provide practicum and experience for students in the master’s level Communication Sciences and Disorders program offered through the College of Education. Students who are identified by faculty as needing evaluation may be referred to the clinic. Students can also receive evaluation and treatment at their own request. The director of the clinic is Dr. Debra Schober-Peterson.

4020 Students’ Responsibilities

Knowledge of Regulations

Graduate students must assume full responsibility for knowledge of the policies, rules, and regulations of the College of Education and the university as well as the departmental requirements concerning their individual programs.

It is the responsibility of the students to become knowledgeable of and to observe all regulations and procedures required by the program being pursued. In no case will a regulation be waived or an exception granted because a student pleads ignorance of the regulation or asserts that an adviser or other university authority did not inform the individual of a specific requirement. Each student should become especially familiar with the chapters of this catalog that present the academic requirements for the degree being sought, the offerings and requirements of the students’ major department, and any changes published in the online Schedule of Classes each academic term.

While the provisions set forth in this catalog will ordinarily be applied as stated, Georgia State University and the College of Education have the right to change any provision, including but not limited to academic requirements for graduation, without actual notice to individual students. Every effort will be made to keep students advised of any such changes. Information on changes will be available in the Office of the Dean and Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions when changes are made by the College of Education. It is especially important that each student note that it is the individual student’s responsibility to keep apprised of current graduation requirements for his or her particular degree program.

Criteria on Academic and Professional Integrity

The College of Education is committed to upholding standards of academic and professional integrity. These standards require that students enrolled in undergraduate and graduate programs within the College of Education adhere to both the University’s Student Code of Conduct as described on-line at http://codeofconduct.gsu.edu/ as well as their individual degree program’s Policy on Student Professionalism, Integrity and Retention. Students should contact their department for a copy of their degree program’s policy.

Continuous Enrollment

Graduate students must register for at least a total of six semester hours of course work during any period of three consecutive terms (fall, spring, summer) until completion of degree. In other words, the total enrollment of the current term plus the two terms preceding it must add to six hours or more at all times. In order to graduate, students must be actively enrolled in the program of study during the semester they finish degree requirements for graduation.

The minimum registration for the semester of completion of all degree requirements is one semester hour. This could be for a course, a special topics seminar, or thesis research, etc. If only an incomplete “I” grade is pending, the student will not have to register for the term of graduation.

In addition to this university policy, the College of Education has a specific requirement for all Ph.D. candidates. Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three-term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until graduation. These hours of credit must include a minimum of 15  semester hours of dissertation (9990) credit but may also include other coursework. Doctoral students must be enrolled in and successfully complete three semester hours of graduate credit (typically dissertation hours) the term all degree requirements are completed. Students must be enrolled in at least three semester hours of coursework during the academic term in which they defend the dissertation.

4030 Teacher Certification

Authority to recommend for certification rests with the dean of the College of Education. Questions about certification and certification requirements should be directed to the appropriate department. Instructions for applying for certification can be found here: http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/office-of-academic-assistance/applying-for-certification/certification-requirements/.

Graduate admission information may be obtained from the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions, 300 College of Education Building, 30 Pryor Street 404/413-8000 or online at http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/. Teachers interested in adding art, music, or foreign language certification should contact the College of Arts and Sciences Graduate Office, 800 Haas-Howell Building 404/413-5040. Add-on certification at the master’s and specialist degree levels requires admission at the graduate level. Certification at either of these degree levels requires a grade point average of “B” or higher in the certification courses. Some programs require a grade of “B” or higher in specific courses.

4040 Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions

http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/office-of-academic-assistance/
300 College of Education Building
404/413-8000

Nancy A. Keita, Director
Gabriela McNicoll, Assistant Director, Academic Assistance
Lashawndra Vannice, Assistant Director, Graduate Admissions and Student Services
Carla Woods, Academic Advisor III

The College of Education’s Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions serves the college’s students and applicants to its graduate programs. This office:

  • Provides application information and materials;
  • Receives and evaluates application materials for graduate study in the College of Education;
  • Explains catalog regulations;
  • Audits and clears students for graduation;
  • Administers appropriate policies for the college and the university; and
  • Refers students to other sources of assistance in the university.

The Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions will counsel applicants who are denied admission into the Colleges graduate programs, as needed, by appointment only.

Applicants needing assistance with their applications may send questions via email to EducAdmissions@gsu.edu or call 404/413-8000.

Department and Faculty Advisement

Each department in the college provides advisement and counseling to students enrolled in its graduate programs.  All admitted students are assigned a faculty adviser for academic and career development, the selection of electives, and any aspect of a student’s major area of study. The initiative for contact with the faculty adviser lies with the student, who may also have ready access to other members of the faculty.

4050 Changing Major or Degree Status

Georgia State University graduate students in the College of Education who wish to change to a different graduate major must complete  a “Change of Major or Degree Status” form and supply all required admission materials for the new major. In the College of Education, coursework completed in the previous program may be counted toward the requirements for the new major if the courses match those described in the new major’s program description and the credits meet all other College of Education guidelines for degree completion and if the student’s new program adviser approves the  use of previously earned credits toward the new program. If another college offers the new major, the students should contact the appropriate graduate office in that college for information about applying to its graduate program.

Graduate students admitted in nondegree status who wish to become admitted in a degree-seeking status must complete  the online application , pay the $50 application fee, and supply all required admission materials for the new degree program. No more than nine (9) semester hours of coursework taken in a nondegree status may be applied to a master’s or doctoral program in the College of Education. Nondegree credits may not apply to any specialist degree program.

4060 Required Change of Catalog Edition

College of Education students (a) who reenter the university after a period of one or more years during which time they did not earn academic credit at Georgia State University or (b) who re-enroll at Georgia State University after having attended another institution in any status other than as a college-approved transient student must change to the current catalog edition. They must meet all requirements of the current catalog edition.

4070 Courses

Prerequisite Courses

The faculty have designated prerequisites for many College of Education courses. Students are expected to have completed a course’s prerequisites prior to the first day of class. If students have appropriate academic and professional experience, they may ask the instructor or department to allow them to register for a course without having completed the published prerequisites for a course; however, the instructor and department are under no obligation to allow the students to enroll without having completed the prerequisites. In some courses, the students may be administratively withdrawn from the course if the instructor or department discovers that they have not completed the course’s prerequisites.

Separate Graduate and Undergraduate Programs

The graduate and undergraduate programs of the college are entirely separate and only those persons who have been admitted to a graduate program may enroll in courses numbered 6000 or higher.

Level of Courses

No undergraduate course credit may be applied toward any of the graduate-level program degree requirements. Undergraduate courses may be used to satisfy program prerequisites, if approved by the advisor. No course numbered 5000 to 5999 may be applied toward the requirements of any degree program offered by the college.

Only those persons who have been admitted to a graduate program may enroll in courses numbered 6000 or higher.

College of Education courses numbered 9000 or higher are restricted to students admitted to a doctoral program. Other graduate students may be eligible to enroll with consent of the instructor.

Minimum Grade in Courses

The formal coursework requirement is satisfied through successful completion of each course in the program of study with a grade of “C” or higher. Coursework in which a grade below “C” is earned may not be applied to a program.

Directed Readings Course

A directed readings course is assigned for an individual project or readings under supervision. An application for a directed readings course is available from the Office of Academic Assistance and requires consultation with the instructor of choice to develop the topic of study, approval of the students’ adviser, and approval of the department chair of the chosen instructor’s department. Directed reading courses may not substitute for courses that are part of the regular course offerings of the college.

4080 Practicum and Student Teaching Internships

Application Deadlines

Graduate students enrolled in initial teacher preparation programs will receive information from their department faculty regarding the process to request a field placement associated with the required courses in their program of study including the type of experience needed and application deadlines. The GSU Office of Field Placements will assist the departments by processing the paperwork required for the placements and will notify the department of the approved placements when received. Information for the Office of Field Placements can be found online at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/office-of-field-placements/.

Policies and Criteria

Specific information regarding policies related to practicum and student teaching internship placements may be obtained from the student’s department. In addition, all students are required to contact their advisers and chair of the department in which the internship is to take place for additional criteria and specific requirements of the experience.

The practicum or student teaching supervisor has the authority to withdraw students from a classroom experience if the students’ performance constitutes a detriment to the students in the class, and if such removal is necessary, the students will be given a grade of “F” for the course. If a student is removed from their practicum or student teaching placement, it is not guaranteed that an alternate placement will be obtained for the student in the same semester which may result in delaying the students completion of  their program.

4090 Student Complaints, Petitions for Policy Waivers and Variances, and Appeals

The appeals procedure for students will follow different courses of action depending on the nature of the student’s appeal. Please refer to University Information Section 1050.80 under Polices and Disclosures in this catalog or visit http://enrollment.gsu.edu/assistance/ for details.

Georgia State University seeks to maintain the highest standards of integrity and fairness in its relationships with students. The Undergraduate Catalog and the Graduate Catalog Student Code of Conduct set forth policies and requirements for Georgia State students. Students are expected to know and comply with these policies. Students may, however, seek relief or resolution when they believe that:

  • The application of these policies and procedures will create undue hardship for them or will not recognize their extraordinary or extenuating circumstances; or
  • Specific actions, practices, or decisions on academic or non-academic matters have been made or carried out in an arbitrary, discriminatory, or inequitable manner.

To adhere to University policy, the College of Education has developed three forms: Petition for Admission, Petition for Waiver or Variance, and Student Petition for Resolution. Students should complete these forms and submit to the appropriate department for review. Forms are available at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/.

Petition for Admissions

Applicants denied admissions who wish to appeal an admission decision or who desire a request for exception should complete the Petition for Admission Form available in the College of Education Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admission.

Petition for Waiver or Variance

Any student in the College of Education may petition for a waiver or variance of established policy, procedure, rule, or guideline governed by the college. This form should be used for requests of substitutions of required courses, waivers of college policies governing graduate students, or waivers of college policies governing doctoral students. The Student Petition for Waiver or Variance form must be submitted by the end of the term prior to the term in which the exception is needed. The form can be found at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/.

Student Petition for Resolution

Students are encouraged to discuss academic or non-academic problems or grade concerns with the instructor prior to filing a formal petition, in an effort to gain understanding about the basis of the treatment or grade. If the issue is not resolved informally, students should complete the Student Petition for Resolution process. The form can be found  at  http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/.

4100 Academic Discipline

Scholastic Warning

Graduate students whose cumulative grade point average (GPA) falls below a 3.00 at the end of a term or who fail to maintain the level of academic performance required by the department of their major will be placed on scholastic warning. GPA will be calculated based on all attempts at courses numbered 6000 or higher and will include any such courses whether or not they are required in the students’ program of study. The original grade in a course that has been repeated is not dropped from the cumulative GPA for purposes of determining academic standing. Upon completion of the subsequent term of required coursework, if the cumulative GPA is at least 3.00, then the students will return to good standing.

Students who wish to take a course or courses for personal enrichment or for other purposes not related to pursuit of a degree or certification program may audit those courses unless he or she wishes to have grades from that course or courses included in the cumulative grade point average for academic standing purposes.

Graduate students on scholastic warning whose GPA is not at least 3.00 upon completion of the subsequent term of required coursework but whose latest term’s grade point average is at least 3.00 will remain on scholastic warning until the cumulative grade point average of 3.00 is achieved. At that time, the students will return to good standing. Students may not graduate while on scholastic warning.

Scholastic Suspension

Graduate students on scholastic warning whose grade point average is not at least 3.00 and whose latest term’s GPA is not at least 3.00 will be suspended from the university for one academic term. During the term of suspension, the students may petition for readmission by completing a Petition for Readmission After Scholastic Suspension form and a reentry form and submitting them to the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions (300 College of Education Bldg) by the following deadlines:

  • To reenter Fall Semester June 15
  • To reenter Spring Semester October 15
  • To reenter Summer Semester March 1

There is no guarantee that students will be readmitted.

Scholastic Probation

Students who are reinstated after scholastic suspension will be on scholastic probation. If the students’ graduate grade point average for any term following reinstatement falls below 3.00, the students will be scholastically excluded from the College of Education. If the students’ cumulative GPA is less than 3.00, they will be given 12 semester hours in which to raise the cumulative grade point average to at least 3.00.

Scholastic Exclusion

Students may be scholastically excluded from the College of Education for one or more of the following three reasons:

  1. The students completed an academic term in which they did not earn a term GPA of at least 3.00 while they were on academic probation.
  2. The students did not achieve or maintain a cumulative graduate GPA of at least 3.00 by the end of the first 12 semester hours completed following reinstatement.
  3. The students failed to maintain the level of academic performance required by the department of their major.

Students scholastically excluded from the College of Education will not be admitted to any College of Education program and may never enroll in any College of Education course offerings.

4110 Graduate Admissions

All documents and other materials submitted by or for persons in connection with their interest in consideration for admission to a program become the property of this institution and cannot be returned at any time. It is the responsibility of each applicant to follow the application procedures completely and correctly and to be certain that all materials have been submitted to the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions by the application deadline. Incomplete applications will not be processed and will be withdrawn from consideration after the application deadline.

Admission is for entry in a specific major and concentration, when appropriate. Students who have been admitted to a graduate degree program may not change to a different major without receiving formal approval of an application for the new major. The applicant must meet all College of Education and departmental minimum criteria and all prerequisites for the new major.

General Application Procedures and Information

Applications for graduate study are available online at http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/. The University requires applicants who have a criminal or disciplinary history to complete a background review. Please refer to section 1100 Graduate Admissions for details.

Applications and supporting materials must be filed with the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions at the addresses listed at http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/ well in advance of the desired term of entry. Each applicant must allow adequate lead-time for admissions processing. International applicants should refer to the “International Applicant Admission ” section of this chapter for additional admissions information.

Application deadlines vary by program. Please check the application completion date for your degree program of interest at to http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/graduate-degree-programs-application-completion-deadlines/or for your nondegree program of interest at  http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/non-degree-program-application-completion-deadlines/.  The closing dates for receipt of applications and all supporting documents for each of the academic terms are listed in the information about each degree program. Materials submitted are not returned to the applicant and are not transferable to other institutions.

College of Education Policy on Admissions

A person seeking to pursue any of the programs of graduate study described in this section of this catalog must be admitted to Georgia State University through the College of Education. The requirements for admission stated in the following sections are those established by the University and the College. Additional requirements, if any, established by the separate departments/schools can be found in the descriptions of their programs and on their respective websites.

Visit the admissions section of the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions website for detailed information on college requirements, program requirements, and deadlines at http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/.

Admission is based upon a variety of factors among which is the quality of the applicant’s undergraduate record (and graduate record if appropriate), achievement on required admissions tests, the degree of preparation for the specific academic program to be pursued, and available space in the program. In addition to these general criteria, individual departments may consider additional factors in making admission decisions.

Each applicant must complete and submit the online application for admission to graduate study, required application materials, and the non-refundable $50.00 application fee.

All applicants must submit the following items and meet stated college minimum criteria:

  1. Two official transcripts (just one official transcript if submitting electronically through eSCRIP-SAFE or Parchment) from each college or university, domestic or overseas, from which they received a degree, or where they were enrolled in undergraduate or graduate level coursework. This may include courses taken in non-degree status, in transient status, or in post-baccalaureate status and is regardless of whether or not the courses led to a degree or are listed on another institution’s transcript.
  2. Applicants must hold an undergraduate degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a major in or with coursework that meets prerequisites for the planned graduate field of study.
    1. Applicants must have earned a grade point average of no less than 2.50 calculated on all undergraduate work attempted in which letter grades were awarded. Individual programs may have a higher standard.
    2. Applicants for the Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) programs must hold a graduate degree from a regionally accredited college or university unless specified otherwise by the program and have a grade point average of no less than 3.25 on all graduate coursework for which letter grades were awarded.
    3. Applicants for the Doctorate of Philosophy (Ph.D.) programs must have a grade point average of no less than 3.30 on all graduate coursework for which letter grades were awarded.
  3. Copies of scores on the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). Test scores must be from an examination taken within the last five years prior to the term of admission of the program. In addition to these copies, the applicant must have records of the scores directed specifically to Georgia State University (use University code only; do not use a department code) from their testing agencies. Some departments also require a minimum score or percentile on the Graduate Record Examination. Some programs accept the Miller Analogies Test in lieu of the GRE.
  4. Applicants who plan to complete a program for initial teacher certification, along with those who apply to programs that require it, must present passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment (formerly called Basic Skills Assessment)or qualify for exemption. The GACE Program Admissions Assessment can be exempted based on certain scores from the GRE, SAT, or ACT.
  5. Any supplemental application materials required by the major department. Programs may have additional application requirements.

The above list is a general guide. Applicants should visit the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions web site at  http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/ and the individual websites of the department/program of interest to discover the full list of materials required.

Admissions Appeals and Requests for Exceptions to Admissions Criteria

Applicants denied admissions who wish to appeal an admission decision or who desire a request for exception should complete the Petition for Admission Form. Contact the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions for more information and the form.

Reentry

A reentry student is one who has been enrolled at Georgia State and who meets at least one of these criteria:

  • has not registered for courses at Georgia State during any of the previous three semesters.
  • has been on scholastic suspension after an absence of one calendar year.
  • has been on scholastic exclusions after an absence of five or more years. (undergraduate students only)
  • has attended any semester as a transient and wishes to attend an additional term. (undergraduate students only)
Application Procedures for Reentry

The Reentry Application is available online at http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/instructions-for-reentry-into-a-graduate-program/. Students will need to submit a $25.00 application fee with their applications. Reentry students who are accepted but do not attend the semester in which they were admitted must contact the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions if they wish to attend the succeeding semester.

Reentry admission is not automatic. A student must reenter the program into which he or she was most recently admitted, and he or she must be able to meet all current admissions criteria for that program. Some graduate programs do not accept reentry students. Students interested in one of these programs must complete a new graduate application and follow the application procedures for that program. Students who have not registered for one calendar year or more must satisfy the degree requirements of the graduate catalog in effect at the time of reentry. If their academic program no longer exists at the time of reentry, they may not reenter but instead apply for a new degree program.

International and Immigrant Status Applicant Admission

It is the policy of Georgia State University to encourage the enrollment of students from other countries. The university subscribes to the principles of international education and to the basic concept that only through education and understanding can mutual respect, appreciation, and tolerance of others be accomplished. The recognition of the values of cultural exchange is grounded in our philosophy of education and is predicated on an awareness of the need to foster better cooperation, friendship, and understanding among the peoples of the world. In this regard, we welcome international students to our campus because we believe such a cultural exchange will be beneficial to our entire student body, to our international students in particular, and to metropolitan Atlanta.

Georgia State reserves the right to admit only those international applicants who are academically qualified. Applicants needing a student visa are required to document the availability of funds equal to the estimated cost of the first academic year at Georgia State before a certificate of eligibility will be issued.

International students applying from abroad must have application, fees, and supporting documentation on file in the Office of Admissions approximately three months prior to the beginning date of the academic term for which they seek admission.

International students with a student visa are required to carry a full course of study in each academic term excluding summer. A full course of study at Georgia State is nine semester hours for graduate students.

In addition to meeting the regular admission requirements, prospective international and immigrant status applicants who come from non-English speaking countries must demonstrate proficiency in the English language by taking the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) test. The TOEFL or IELTS  are not required for an applicant holding a degree from a U.S. college or university or whose native language is English.

Prior to registration for the first term, each international student is required to attend an international student orientation offered by International Student and Scholar Services.

The College of Education reserves the right to test international applicants with regard to their skills in English. Accepted applicants will be notified if any testing is required.

Academic credentials must be original documents with authoritative signatures, seals, and/or stamps. Whenever possible, these should be sent by the institution responsible for issuing such documents. In cases where it is impossible for an applicant to have those credentials sent from such institutions, the applicant should forward a duly “notarized” or “attested to” copy. The notarization should be done by the proper institutional officer or by the Ministry of Education in the home country. Documents in a language other than English must be accompanied by translations. The home country embassy or an appropriate official should make translations, and the original copies of the translations, acceptably notarized as described above, must be provided. As a general rule, documents translated by the Office of the American Friends of the Middle East (AFME) or the Institute of International Education (IHE) will be acceptable.

The application materials of foreign origin of all international and immigrant status applicants must be evaluated and judged equivalent by an independent evaluation service. Georgia State University accepts course-by-course evaluations from the  Josef Silny and Associates, Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE), and World Education Services (WES). The evaluations must come directly from the service.

Transient (Visiting) Student Admission

Students enrolled as regular students in a degree program in another accredited college or university may apply to register for a particular academic term at Georgia State University as transient (visiting) students. Such students are ones who expect to return to the college or university in which previously enrolled and must have permission from that institution to attend Georgia State University. Although the university cannot guarantee the availability of specific courses for transient students nor assume responsibility for advisement, every effort will be made to assist students unfamiliar with the university. Visiting student admission is valid for one term only. Enrollment in subsequent terms requires a new application. Visiting student status is limited to nine semester hours of credit.

Applicants desiring to enroll as transient students must submit the following materials to the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions, College of Education, Georgia State University, 30 Pryor Street, Suite 300, Atlanta, GA 30303 by the deadline date listed in the Transient section at http://education.gsu.edu/wp-content/blogs.dir/92/files/2013/08/Transient_ApplicationP.pdf  : (1) Graduate Transient Student Application, (2) a nonrefundable application fee of $50.00, and (3) a “Letter of Good Standing” sent directly to the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions from the institution the applicant is currently attending, indicating the specific Georgia State University course(s) being approved. The Letter of Good Standing should be addressed to Director, Nancy Keita, at the above address.

Georgia State University students currently pursuing degree programs in the College of Education and seeking transient (visiting) status at another institution must first secure permission from their academic advisor.  Once permission is secured, the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions provides a letter of good standing for the student.

Admission for Persons 62 Years of Age or Older

Pursuant to the provisions of an amendment to the Georgia Constitution adopted November 2, 1976, the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia has established rules with respect to enrollment of persons 62 years of age or older. To establish eligibility for such enrollment, one must:

  • Be classified as a resident student under the residency regulations of the Board of Regents; be 62 years of age or older at the time of registration; and present a birth certificate or other comparable written documentation of age to the residence auditor, and
  • Meet all regular Georgia State University admissions requirements as an entering undergraduate, transient, or graduate student.

Having established eligibility, individuals may enroll as regular students, for regular credit, in courses offered for resident credit on a “space available” basis without payment of fees, except for supplies or laboratory fees. In addition, students under this program will have all usual student and institutional records maintained. These students must meet all regular, appropriate degree requirements before receiving a degree.

Admission Decisions and Notifications

Admission decisions are based upon official transcripts of all prior college-level work, official results of standardized tests, and other pertinent sources of information. The College of Education reserves the right to investigate the health, character, and personality of each applicant.

Admission decisions are securely posted online and communicated in writing to applicants as soon as practical after all application materials have been received and evaluated. Admission decisions cannot be given by telephone, nor can they be given to any person other than the applicant without a written release from the applicant to do so.

Changing Term of Entry

Admission is for the specific academic term the applicant indicates on his or her application unless otherwise indicated by the acceptance letter. An accepted applicant who does not attend the academic term for which acceptance has been granted may reactivate his or her application for up to  two academic  terms  immediately following the original academic term of acceptance,  provided the program being applied for admits new students during at least one of those terms. Some programs only admit students one term during the academic year; therefore, postponing enrollment delays beginning the program by a calendar year. In this case, the applicant may not reactivate the application, but must submit a new online application instead (in keeping with university requirements for residency status verification). The applicant must meet current admission criteria and may also be required to resubmit supporting materials.

A written request for reactivation is required.  Address the request to Graduate Admissions, Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions, Attn: Director. Admission for a subsequent term is not automatic or guaranteed.

Deadlines for notification to change entry term are as follows:

  • Fall Semester  July 1
  • Spring Semester October 1
  • Summer Semester  March 1

If the deadline falls on a weekend or on a university holiday, requests to change term of entry will be accepted until the end of the next business day following the deadline.

Retention of Records

If an applicant fails to complete enrollment for the term in which admission was sought, the application must be renewed, and submission of such additional credentials and information as may be requested by the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions will be required. Application files are retained for a maximum of one year.

Any student who earns credit in a master’s or specialist level program and later become inactive may be required to reestablish his or her file. The Office of the Registrar will maintain a transcript of graduate credit earned at Georgia State University indefinitely.

4120 Master’s Degree Regulations

Dual Enrollment Admission

A dual enrollment option is available for master’s students who wish to earn simultaneously a Master of Science with majors in educational research and mental health counseling. Only these two majors may be combined in this manner. A description of program requirements for the Educational Research/Mental Health Counseling program is provided following the program description for the master’s program in Educational Research later in this chapter.

Dual enrollment applicants to the M.S. major in educational research and the M.S. major in mental health counseling must meet all entrance requirements and follow the application procedures for each of the separate majors. Participation in the dual enrollment program is contingent upon students being admitted to both majors prior to completion of either program and approval of the program director, Dr. William L. Curlette. Students who apply simultaneously for both majors but who are admitted to only one will be admitted to that major and may reapply for the other by the deadline for a subsequent academic term.

Concurrent Master’s/Ed.S. Admission

Applicants for the Master of Education degree in School Counseling may be considered for concurrent admission to the Specialist in Education degree with the same major. The applicant must meet the minimum admission requirements as listed in the “Specialist Programs” section of this chapter. Admission to these programs is concurrent; however, completion of degree requirements occurs sequentially.

Applicants for the Master of Education degree with a major in school psychology must concurrently apply for the Specialist in Education degree with the same major. Completion of both the M.Ed. and Ed.S. in School Psychology can lead to recommendation for initial certification in School Psychology in the State of Georgia. Admission to these programs is concurrent; however, completion of degree requirements occurs sequentially.

Concurrent Master’s/Ph.D. Admission

At the time of admission to the doctoral program in Educational Psychology students entering without a master’s degree in a related field are expected to enroll concurrently in the M.S. and Ph.D. programs. The applicant for concurrent Master’s/Ph.D. admission must have an undergraduate grade point average of 3.30 and meet the relevant admission requirements listed for the doctoral program in Educational Psychology.

Those applying to the doctoral program in School Psychology may apply for admissions after having successfully completed a bachelor’s degree with a major in psychology, education or a related field; a master’s degree in a related field; or a specialist degree in a related field. Those applying with a bachelor’s degree must have an undergraduate GPA of 2.5. Those applying with a master’s degree must have a GPA of 3.3. Students admitted to concurrent enrollment will not be eligible to advance to doctoral candidacy until they have successfully completed the master’s degree.

Multiple Master’s Degrees

Students who hold a degree from the College of Education may qualify for a different master’s degree of this college. To qualify, they must meet all admission requirements for the second degree and thereafter fulfill all requirements for the second master’s degree. Along with all other requirements, the students must have received satisfactory credit for a minimum of 27 semester hours of coursework that have not been applied to satisfy the requirements of any other degree.

Minimum Requirements for All Master’s Degrees

  1. Students must earn a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 calculated on all graduate coursework attempted at Georgia State University. The formal coursework requirement is satisfied through successful completion of each course in the program of study with a grade of “C” or higher.
  2. Coursework in which a grade below “C” is earned may not be applied to the master’s programs.
  3. Some departments require a grade of “B” or higher in specific courses and program areas. Students are responsible for contacting their departments regarding specific academic requirements that exceed college-wide minimums.
  4. A minimum of 36 semester hours of coursework is required.
  5. Students must take a minimum of 27 semester hours of coursework at Georgia State University.
  6. No coursework may be more than six calendar years old at the time of graduation except for coursework applied to the degree requirements in Mental Health Counseling, Rehabilitation Counseling, School Counseling, or School Psychology, which may be no more than seven calendar years old.
  7. Each student must meet the comprehensive examination (exit) requirement of his or her program.

Exit Requirement

All master’s-degree students must successfully complete an exit requirement in at least one of the following ways as determined by program faculty:

  1. Students successfully complete a written comprehensive examination which can be taken only after they have completed at least 27 semester hours of coursework in his or her program and which must be passed within three attempts. Students who do not pass their comprehensive examinations after three attempts will be scholastically excluded from the College of Education master’s-degree program for which they were being examined.
  2. Students complete and defend a project, portfolio, or thesis.

Electronic Master’s Theses and Doctoral Dissertations Policy

The University requires all students who produce a master´s thesis or doctoral dissertation in fulfillment of his/her degree to upload the final version of these documents to the Digital Archive@GSU as a condition of the award of the degree.

Electronic Submission Process:

1. After the student passes the thesis defense and sends the Thesis Chair the final PDF version, the student uploads the thesis on the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Submission Website.   If a faculty member submits the thesis defense, then a signed form needs to be received from the student.

2. The Digital Archives main page is located at http://scholarworks.gsu.edu/

3. The graduate student upload page is located at http://research.library.gsu.edu/ETD

4. The system generates an email to coordinator.

5. The coordinator logs in to library system, reviews, approves, posts, and updates the thesis.

6. The library system sends an email to the student that the work is published.

4130 Early Childhood Education (M.A.T.)

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)  in Early Childhood Education

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building, 404/413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair

The M.A.T. in Early Childhood Education in the Department of Early Childhood Education (ECE) at Georgia State University is an opportunity for post baccalaureate provisionally certified practicing teachers of record to work toward a graduate degree concurrent with their studies toward elementary teaching certification (grades Pk-5). This cohort based program encourages authentic collaboration around learning, teaching, and advocacy with colleagues similarly committed to pedagogical excellence and equitable educative opportunities for all children.

This five semester program has been intentionally designed to seamlessly link theory, content and practice across all courses. The M.A.T.  Early Childhood Education Program of Study aims to promote relevancy, interconnectedness, and applicability for beginning teachers of record. Coursework has been carefully constructed in order to support novice teachers as they work in urban high needs schools in the metro Atlanta area, preparing teachers without previous coursework in education not only to meet the needs of the students they serve, but also to address the challenges in their urban school contexts. To support beginning teachers of record during the vulnerable induction phase of teaching, the  M.A.T. emphasizes a scaffolded, developmental, and responsive coaching model over two academic years. Faculty/coaches provide an instructional bridge for beginning teachers as they learn to connect course content and effective pedagogical practices to their own classrooms.

Students who successfully complete the entire program of study and program requirements (44 credit hours of graduate coursework and the successful completion of EXC 4020 or its equivalent) receive a M.A.T. in Early Childhood Education and will be recommended by GSU for a clear renewable certificate (grades PK-5). In the case that students elect to only receive the certification and not complete the Master’s Degree, all coursework and program requirements indicated for certification only on the Program of Study (35 credit hours) must be successfully completed. Due to the permeable and iterative design of the program, all courses must be taken in sequence beginning in the fall.

Program Admission
Admissions criteria help to ensure that candidates are prepared for the rigorous curriculum requirements of the graduate program.

Candidates must meet all admission requirements of the College of Education as stipulated on the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions web site located at http://ece.education.gsu.edu/academics-and-admissions/graduate-admissions/.

Candidates who are considered for the M.A.T. Early Childhood Education program must meet the following criteria prior to program entry:

  • undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university
  • undergraduate GPA of 2.75 or higher
  • official scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) from the past five years
  • passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment or exemption from this test based on GRE, SAT, or ACT scores.
  • Candidates must also submit academic or professional letters of recommendation.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in Early Childhood Education

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPSF 7100 Critical Pedagogy (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and the Learner: The Young Child (3)

Content Courses of Teaching Certification In Early Childhood Education
Required (23):

  • ECE 6361 Responsive and Student Centered Pedagogy (3)
  • ECE 6390 Foundations of Learning and Teaching Mathematics (2)
  • ECE 6576 Integrative and Iterative Curriculum Design (6)
  • ECE 6586 Advocating for Students through the Descriptive Review of the Child (3)
  • ECE 6587 Language and Literacy Development (3)
  • ECE 7393 Number and Operation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7576 Teacher Inquiry for Critical Change (3)

Advanced Courses for Endorsement/Specialization (3)
Select three credit hours:

  • Courses should be selected from the list of recommended electives after consultation with advisor. Acceptable Prefixes include: CPS, ECE, EPY, EPSF, EDRD, EDLA, TSLE, EXC, EPEL, and EPRS. All courses elected must be at the 6000, 7000, or 8000 level. Courses with other prefixes may be selected with consent of advisor.

Internships (9)

  • ECE 6575 Beginning Teachers of Record as Reflective Practitioners I (2)
  • ECE 6585 Beginning Teachers of Record as Reflective Practitioners II (2)
  • ECE 7575 Induction Teachers as Change Agents I (2)
  • ECE 7585 Induction Teachers as Change Agents II (3)

Students must complete all Professional Studies and Content courses with a grade of “C” or higher and Internship courses (ECE 6575, ECE 6585, ECE 7575, and ECE 7585) must be completed with a “B” or higher in order to continue with the cohort. All courses in the ECE M.A.T. must be taken in sequence.

Students must complete EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3) or its equivalent to be eligible for recommendation for certification in addition to the program of study requirements.

Program Total: minimum of 44 semester hours

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program

Admission Assessment and GACE Content Assessment for Early Childhood Education and successfully completing:

4140 English Education (M.A.T.)

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in English Education

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in English Education provides initial teacher preparation for individuals holding bachelor’s degrees in English.

Program Admission

All applicants must meet the College of Education’s requirements for admission to graduate study. Additional admission requirements specific to this program include:

  • An undergraduate or graduate degree in English or the equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university (Coursework must have included at least 24 semester hours of upper-division or equivalent acceptable credit in English content, including a minimum of three semester hours in each of the following areas: American literature, British literature, written composition, and history or structure of the English language.)
  • Two letters of recommendation as follows: (a) one academic or professional letter; (b) one letter from someone who can evaluate the applicant’s personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of potential to work successfully with adolescents, or (c) one letter from a current work supervisor (if applicable).
  • Documentation of previous work experience (resume).

Program Academic Regulations
The M.A.T. program is a carefully sequenced program. Students who do not follow the prescribed program sequence will be withdrawn from the program and may reapply to enter the next program cycle.

Each student is advised by a committee consisting of faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences and faculty from the College of Education. Exit requirements for this program are:

  • Completion of all program coursework with a grade point average of no less than 3.00,
  • Successful completion of the teaching internships with a grade of “B” or higher, and
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment and GACE Content Assessment for English and successfully completing:

  • All content courses recommended for each individual by MSE and Arts and Sciences faculty upon admission to the program;
  • Students must complete EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3) or its equivalent to be eligible for recommendation for certification in addition to the program of study requirements;
  • EPY 7080, The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3), and
  • EDCI 6600, Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3); EDCI 7660, Practicum I (3); EDCI 7670, Practicum II (3); EDCI 7680, Practicum III (3); EDLA 6550, Principles of English Instruction (3); EDLA 7550, Theory and Pedagogy of English Instruction (3); and EDRD 7630, Literacy in the Content Areas (3); and
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in English Education

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

Select one (3):

Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (12):

  • EDCI 6600 Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3)
  • EDLA 6550 Principles of English Instruction (3)
  • EDLA 7550 Theory and Pedagogy of English Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Area (3)

Elective in the Teaching Field/Major (3)

Select One Course (3):

  • EDLA 7150 Children’s and Adolescent’s Literature (3)
  • EDLA 7440 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Literature (3)
  • EDLA 7460 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Writing (3)
  • EDLA 7480 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of the English Language (3)’
  • EDRD 7360 Literacy and Technology (3)
  • LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Select Advanced Studies in English or Folklore (12)

  • In consultation with an advisement committee, students select coursework numbered 6000 to 8999. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, and applications of English in secondary education.

Internship (9)
Required (9):

Program total: minimum of 45 semester hours

4150 Mathematics Education (M.A.T.)

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) in Mathematics Education

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Master of Arts of Teaching (M.A.T.) in Secondary Mathematics Education seeks to advance prospective and/or in-service mathematics teachers’ ability to effectively implement standards-based instructional practices. The program’s chief goal—to strengthen secondary students’ mathematical understandings—is achieved, in part, by providing mathematics teachers with opportunities to deepen their understandings of learners from diverse backgrounds, mathematics content and content pedagogical knowledge. The program prepares teachers to conduct action research in the context of their own classrooms in order to inform instruction, and to share the knowledge gained in a professional community of teachers. Through engaging teachers in advanced mathematics and mathematics education coursework, the program strengthens teachers’ mathematical content knowledge and their proficiency for teaching mathematics. In general, the Program of Study is framed by the principles and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) and the core propositions of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), InTASC, NCATE, and Common Core Georgia Performance Standards in Mathematics (CCGPS-M).

Program Admission

All applicants must meet the College of Education’s requirements for admission to graduate study. Additional admission requirements specific to this program include:

  • An undergraduate or graduate degree in mathematics or the equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university (Coursework must have included at least 24 semester hours of upper-division or equivalent acceptable credit in mathematics content, including a minimum of three semester hours in each of four of the following areas: modern or abstract algebra [similar to Math 4441], linear algebra [similar to Math 4435], college geometry [similar to Math 4301], mathematical statistics [similar to Math 4751], and advanced calculus [similar to Math 4661]. How recently these courses have been completed will be a consideration.
  • A minimum overall grade-point average of 2.75 for the four courses is used to meet the previous requirement.
  • Two letters of recommendation as follows: (a)one academic or professional letter; (b) one letter from someone who can evaluate the applicant’s personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of potential to work successfully with adolescent; or (c) one letter from a current work supervisor (if applicable).
  • Documentation of previous work experience (resume).

Program Academic Regulations
The department may specify additional requirements.

The M.A.T. program is a carefully sequenced program. Students who do not follow the prescribed program sequence will be withdrawn from the program and may reapply to enter the next program cycle.

Each student is advised by a committee consisting of faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences and faculty from the College of Education. Exit requirements for this program are:

  • Completion of all program coursework with a grade point average of no less than 3.00,
  • Successful completion of the teaching internships with a grade of “B” or higher, and
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment and GACE Content Assessment for Mathematics and successfully completing:

All content courses recommended for students by MSE and Arts and Sciences faculty upon admission to the program;

  • Students must complete EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3), or its equivalent to be eligible for recommendation for certification in addition to the program of study requirements;
  • EPY 7080, The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3), and
  • EDCI 6600, Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3); EDCI 7660, Practicum I (3); EDCI 7670, Practicum II (3); EDCI 7680, Practicum III (3); EDMT 6560, Principles of Math Instruction (3); EDMT 7560, Theory and Pedagogy of Mathematics Instruction (3).
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in Mathematics Education

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

Select one (3):

Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (12):

  • EDCI 6600 Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3)
  • EDMT 6560 Principles of Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 7560 Theory and Pedagogy of Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 7570 Special Topics for Secondary Mathematics Teachers (3)

Select Advanced Studies (15)

  • In consultation with his or her advisement committee, the students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Internship (9)
Required (9):

Program total: minimum of 45 semester hours

4160 Middle Level Education (M.A.T.)

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) Middle Level Education

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Middle Level Education provides initial teacher preparation for individuals holding bachelor’s degrees and who have an interest in teaching students in grades 4-8 in two areas of a concentration. The course of study meets the requirements for professional certification in Middle Level Education (grades 4-8) with concentrations in either language arts and social studies education or mathematics and science education.

Program Admission

All applicants must meet the College of Education’s requirements for admission to graduate study.

Additional requirements specific to this program include:

  • An undergraduate or graduate degree or the equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university.
  • The academic preparation of applicants must include the coursework listed below. Students may be admitted to the program and allowed to complete their academic preparation concurrently. Academic preparation must be completed prior to recommendation for certification.
  • Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (EXC 4020 or its equivalent)
  • Language Arts and Social Studies Education Concentration
    • 12 hours of English courses with at least 6 hours of upper division coursework.
    • 12 hours of social studies courses with at least 6 hours of upper division coursework.
    • Students must demonstrate academic proficiency in the following areas: (a) literature and folklore, (b) composition, (c) languages and (d) children’s and adolescent’s literature
    • Students must demonstrate academic proficiency in the following areas: (a) Georgia History, (b) geography, (c) World History/studies, (d) U.S. History/studies.
  • Mathematics and Science Education Concentration
    • 12 hours of mathematics courses with at least 6 hours of upper division coursework.
    • 12 hours of science courses with at least 6 hours of upper division coursework.
    • Students must demonstrate academic proficiency in the following areas: (a) geometry, (b) algebra, (c) number theory, and (d) probability/statistics.
    • Students must demonstrate academic proficiency in the following areas: (a) biology, (b) physical science, and (c) earth/space sciences.
  • Two letters of recommendation as follows: (a) one academic or professional letter, (b) one letter from someone who can evaluate the applicants’ personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of the potential to work successfully with pre-adolescents and adolescents, or (c) one letter from a current work supervisor (if applicable).
  • Documentation of previous work experience (resume).

Program Academic Regulations

The M.A.T. program is a carefully sequenced program. Students who do not follow the prescribed program sequence will be withdrawn from the program and may reapply to enter the next program cycle.

Students are advised by a committee of education and arts and sciences faculty including representatives from the students’ two areas of concentration. The committee and the students complete a planned program of study in light of the needs of the individual students. Exit requirements for this program are:

  • Completion of all program coursework with a grade point average of no less than 3.00.
  • Successful completion of the teaching internships with a grade of “B” or higher.
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment and GACE Content Assessments for Middle Grades and successfully completing:

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in Middle Level Education

Professional Studies (9)
Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3).

Select one (3):

Select one (3):

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (6):

  • EDCI 7020 Middle Schools in a Diverse Society (3)
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)

Elective (3):

  • Select an elective with the approval of the Middle Level Education Advisor.

Choose one concentration

Mathematics and Science Concentration
Required (6):

  • EDCI 6540 Principles of Instruction in Middle Childhood Science and Mathematics (3)
  • EDCI 7540 Theory and Pedagogy of Middle Childhood Science and Mathematics Instruction (3)

Advanced Studies – Mathematics (6)
In consultation with their advisement committee, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, and applications of mathematics education at the middle level. One course should be taken from the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and one course from mathematics education in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education.

Advanced Studies – Science (6)
In consultation with their advisement committee, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, and conceptual underpinnings of science as well as the applications of science education at the middle level.

Language Arts and Social Studies Concentration
Required (6):

  • EDCI 6560 Principles of Instruction in Middle Childhood Language Arts and Social Studies (3)
  • EDCI 7560 Theory and Pedagogy of Middle Childhood Language Arts and Social Studies Instruction (3)

Advanced Studies – Language Arts (6)
In consultation with their advisement committee, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, and applications of language arts education at the middle level. One course (ENGL) should be taken from the Department of English and one course (EDLA) from Language and Literacy Education in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education.

Advanced Studies – Social Studies (6)
In consultation with their advisement committee, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, and applications of social studies education at the middle level. One course should be taken from the College of Arts and Sciences and one course (EDSS) from social studies education.

Internship (9)
Required (9):

Program total: minimum of 45 semester hours

4170 Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (M.A.T.)

Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (M.A.T.)

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Master of Arts in Teaching major in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education provides initial teacher preparation in ESOL for individuals holding bachelor’s degree and who have an interest in English to speakers of other languages in K-12 settings. The course of study meets the requirements for professional certification at the initial level in ESOL and the requirements for a Reading Endorsement.

Program Admission

All applicants must meet the College of Education’s requirements for admission to graduate study. Additional requirements specific to this program include:

  • An undergraduate or graduate degree or the equivalent from a regionally accredited college or university.
  • The academic preparation of applicants should include the coursework listed below. Students may be admitted to the program and allowed to complete their academic preparation concurrently. Academic preparation must be completed prior to recommendation for certification.
  • Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (EXC 4020 or its equivalent)
  • Students must meet a language requirement that is intended to ensure that all graduates have had the experience of studying a second or foreign language. This requirement can be met in one of the following ways:
  • Successful completion of one academic year of a university-level foreign language sequence (three quarters or two semesters of the same language), or
  • Successful completion of two quarters or one semester of a non-Western language, or
  • One year living/studying abroad as an adult, or
  • The acquisition of English as a second language for non-native English speakers.
  • Two letters of recommendation as follows: (a) an academic or professional letter, (b) a letter from someone who can evaluate the applicant’s personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of the potential to work successfully with students at the K-12 levels, or (c) a letter from a current work supervisor (if applicable).
  • Documentation of previous work experience (resume).

Program Academic Regulations

The M.A.T. program is a carefully sequenced program. Students who do not follow the prescribed program sequence will be withdrawn from the program and may reapply to enter the next program cycle.

Each student is advised by a committee of education faculty including representatives from the Department of Middle and Secondary Education and the Department of Applied Linguistics. The committee and the students complete a planned program of study in light of the needs of individual students. Exit requirements for this program are:

  • Completion of all program coursework with a grade point average of no less than 3.0.
  • Successful completion of the teaching internships with a grade of “B” or higher.
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment and GACE Content Assessment for Teaching English as a Second Language and successfully completing:

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education

Professional Studies (9)
Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Select one (3):

Select one (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (24):

  • AL 8240 General Linguistics (3)
  • AL 8460 English Grammar for ESL/EFL Teachers (3)
  • AL 8470 Sociolinguistics (3)
  • EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)
  • TSLE 7250 Applied Linguistics for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Select one (3):

  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • AL 8330 Intercultural Communication (3)

Internship (9)

Program total: minimum of 45 semester hours

4180 Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (M.A.T.) Online

Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (M.A.T.) Online Program

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060

http://mse.education.gsu.edu/

Dana L. Fox, Chair

The online program in M.A.T. major in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education is offered through the Georgia ONmyLINE (GOML) system. GOML provides access to a full array of online and distance education offerings from the 31 colleges and universities in the University System of Georgia. To find out more about GOML and to apply, please go to  http://education.gsu.edu/online-education/.

The M.A.T. major in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (ESOL) Online Program provides initial teacher preparation in ESOL for individuals holding bachelor’s degree and who have an interest in English to speakers of other languages in P-12 settings. This program addresses the needs of teachers who work with literacy learners from diverse cultures. Although these teachers can have an undergraduate degree in any area, they must have had experience learning a second language. Candidates who are not currently working with P-12 ESOL students will need to work with the Office of Field Placement staff in consultation with the program advisor to help arrange field placements. The M.A.T. RLL ESOL course of study is designed to meet the requirements for professional certification at the initial level in ESOL and the requirements for a Reading Endorsement.

The M.A.T. RLL ESOL online program is 45 hours (9 hours of college core courses; 9 hours English as a Second Language; 9 hours reading endorsement; 9 hours of applied linguistics; 9 hours of practicum). Entry into the program could begin in any semester; however, applicants are required to take TSLE 7440 prior to enrolling in practicum hours, and EDRD 7600 or EDRD 7630 prior to enrolling in EDRD 7650. Consequently, M.A.T. students (who are required to complete a year-long fall/spring practicum) could enroll in summer and complete the program in a minimum of 4 semesters; otherwise, the program would take a minimum of 5 semesters. This degree addresses the professional standards from IRA for classroom teachers of reading and from TESOL for teachers of ELL learners.

Program Academic Regulations

Each student is advised by a committee of education faculty including representatives from the Department of Middle and Secondary Education and the Department of Applied Linguistics. Exit requirements for this program are:

  • Completion of all program coursework with a grade point average of no less than 3.0.
  • Successful completion of the teaching internships with a grade of “B” or higher.
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment and GACE Content Assessment for Teaching English as a Second Language and successfully completing:

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education Online Program

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):
EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations in Education (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (27):
AL 8240 General Linguistics (3)
AL 8460 English Grammar for ESL/EFL Teachers (3)
AL 8470 Sociolinguistics (3)
EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)
EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)
TSLE 7250 Applied Linguistics for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Internship (9)
EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
EDCI 7670 Practicum II (3)
EDCI 7680 Practicum III (3)

Program total: minimum of 45 semester hours

4190 Science Education (M.A.T.)

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) Science Education

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Science Education provides initial teacher certification for those holding bachelor’s degrees in engineering, science, or a related area.

Program Admission

All applicants must meet the College of Education’s requirements for admission to graduate study. Additional admission requirements specific to this program include:

  • An undergraduate or graduate degree in engineering, a science field, or a related field from a regionally accredited college or university. A minimum of a major (24 upper-division semester hours) in a science area must be part of prior coursework.
  • Two letters of recommendation as follows: (a) one academic or professional letter, (b) one letter from someone who can evaluate the applicant’s personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of potential to work successfully with adolescents, or (c) one letter from a current work supervisor (if applicable).
  • Documentation of previous work experience (resume).

Undergraduate students in the Bachelor of Science with a major in Physics can apply to the M.A.T. in Science Education if they meet the following requirements.

  • Students must participate in pre-advising sessions with faculty in the Department of Physics and Astronomy.
  • Students must have completed at least 30 hours of academic credit (including MATH 2211 and PHYS 2211K).
  • Students must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.3.
  • Students may apply to the option at any time after completing 30 hours but prior to completing 90 hours of undergraduate coursework.
    • Complete the B.S./M.A.T. application form. This will be kept on file in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and in the Office of Academic Assistance in the College of Arts and Sciences.
    • Documentation of previous work experience (resume or curriculum vitae).
    • Personal statement of goals and/or reasons for teaching.
  • Formal acceptance into the M.A.T. portion of the program will be contingent upon the following:
    • Filing an application to the M.A.T. program by the appropriate deadline at education.gsu.edu/oaa/4427.html
    • Maintaining a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher;
    • Completion of 90 hours towards the B.S. degree in Physics (including PHYS 7460 and PHYS 7850);
    • Submission of passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment or demonstrate an exemption upon application to the program;
    • Submission of acceptable GRE scores;
    • Acceptance into the Teacher Education track is contingent upon acceptance into the M.A.T. portion, completion of 24 hours in physics, and passing or exempting the GACE Program Admission Assessment;
    • 2-3 letters of recommendation: (a) one academic or professional letter; (b) one letter from someone who can evaluate the applicant’s personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of potential to work successfully with adolescents; (c) one letter from a current work supervisor, if applicable.

Program Academic Regulations

The department may specify additional requirements.

The M.A.T. program is a carefully sequenced program. Students who do not follow the prescribed program sequence will be withdrawn from the program and may reapply to enter the next program cycle.

Exit requirements for this program are:

  • Completion of all program coursework with a grade point average of no less than 3.00,
  • Successful completion of the teaching internships with a grade of “B” or better, and
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Students in this program will be prepared to teach in broad field science or in one of the science specialties of biology, chemistry, earth/space science and physics in grades 6-12. The student’s advisory committee will approve the student’s planned program of study for either the broad field science preparation or preparation in one of the specialties of biology, chemistry, earth/space science and physics after a transcript analysis of previous work and consultation with the student.

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment and GACE Content Assessments for licensure in Science or in their specialty area and successfully completing:

  • All content courses recommended for the students by MSE and Arts and Sciences faculty upon the students’ admission to the program;
  • Students must complete EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3) or its equivalent to be eligible for recommendation for certification in addition to the program of study requirements;
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EDCI 6600 Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3); EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3); EDCI 7670 Practicum II (3); EDCI 7680 Practicum III (3); EDSC 6550 Principles of Science Instruction (3)
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in Science Education

Professional Studies (12)
Select one (3):
EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)

Select one (3):
EPSF 7100 Critical Pedagogy (3)
EPSF 7110 Multicultural Education (3)
EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)

Required (3):
EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Select One (3):
EDSC 8430 The Nature of Science (3)
LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)
TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Teaching Field/Major (24)
Required (9):
EDCI 6600 Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3)
EDSC 6550 Principles of Science Instruction (3)
EDSC 7550 Theory and Pedagogy of Science Instruction (3)

Select Advanced Studies (15)
In consultation with their advisory committee, the students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher related to science education. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, and applications of science education.
Students in this program will be prepared to teach in broad field science or in one of the science specialties of biology, chemistry, earth/space science and physics in grades 6-12. The student’s advisory committee will approve the student’s planned program of study for either the broad field science preparation or preparation inn on one of the specialties of biology, chemistry, earth/space science and physics after a transcript analysis of previous work and consultation with the student.

Internship (9)
Required (9):
EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
EDCI 7670 Practicum II (3)
EDCI 7680 Practicum III (3)

Program total: minimum of 45 semester hours

4200 Social Studies Education (M.A.T.)

Master of Arts in Teaching in Social Studies Education (M.A.T.)

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Master of Arts in Teaching in Social Studies Education provides initial teacher preparation for individuals holding bachelor’s degrees in history or one or more of the social sciences.

Program Admission

All applicants must meet the College of Education’s requirements for admission to graduate study. Admission to the program occurs twice each year. Additional admission requirements specific to this program include:

  • An undergraduate or graduate degree in history or in one or more of the social sciences from a regionally accredited college or university. A minimum of a major (24 upper-division semester hours) in history or a social science must be part of prior coursework.
  • Two letters of recommendation as follows: (a) one academic or professional letter, (b) one letter from someone who can evaluate the applicant’s personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of potential to work successfully with adolescents, or (c) one letter from a current work supervisor (if applicable)
  • Documentation of previous work experience (resume).

Program Academic Regulations

The department may specify additional requirements.

The M.A.T. program is a carefully sequenced program. Students who do not follow the prescribed program sequence will be withdrawn from the program and may reapply to enter the next program cycle.

Exit requirements for this program are:

  • Completion of all program coursework with a grade point average of no less than 3.00,
  • Successful completion of the teaching internships with a grade of “B” or higher, and
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Students in this program will be eligible to be recommended for Georgia initial certification after earning passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment and GACE Assessments in Economics, Geography, History, and/or Political Science for licensure in the Social Studies content area(s) and successfully completing:

  • All content courses recommended for the students by MSE and Arts and Sciences faculty upon the students’ admission to the program;
  • Students must complete EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3) or its equivalent to be eligible for recommendation for certification in addition to the program of study requirements;
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3) and
  • EDCI 6600 Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3), EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3), EDCI 7670 Practicum II (3), EDCI 7680 Practicum III (3), EDSS 6560 Principles of Social Studies Instruction (3), EDSS 7540 Theory and Pedagogy of Social Studies Instruction (3).
  • Successful presentation of a professional portfolio.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Arts in Teaching in Social Studies Education

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):
EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)

Select one (3):
EPSF 7100 Critical Pedagogy (3)
EPSF 7110 Multicultural Education (3)
EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)

Required (3):
EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (9):
EDCI 6600 Introduction to Secondary Teaching (3)
EDSS 6560 Principles of Social Studies Instruction (3)
EDSS 7540 Theory and Pedagogy of Social Studies Instruction (3)

Elective in Teaching Field/Major (6)
Select Two:
EDCI 7980 Teaching and Learning in Urban Contexts (3)
EDSS 7560 Teaching History and the Social Sciences (3)
EDSS 7570 Social Studies Concepts and Issues (3)
LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)
TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
Other education electives may be selected with consent of the advisor.

Select Advanced Studies in Social Studies (12)
The students select at least 12 semester hours of 6000-level and above coursework related to history and the social sciences in consultation with their advisory committee. Because students will be certified in single fields of social studies, additional undergraduate or graduate coursework may be required for the students to demonstrate competence in these four areas: economics, geography, history, and political science. The advisement committee will approve the students’ planned program of study after a transcript analysis of previous work and consultation with the students.

Internship (9)
Required (9):
EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
EDCI 7670 Practicum II (3)
EDCI 7680 Practicum III (3)

Program total: minimum of 45 semester hours

4210 Collaborative Program (M.A.T.)

Georgia Institute of Technology-Georgia State University B.S./M.A.T. Option

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

Undergraduate students in a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) program at the Georgia Institute of Technology can apply to Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) program at Georgia State University in the Department of Middle and Secondary Education if they meet the following requirements.

  • Students must participate in pre-advising sessions with faculty in their academic department and the Director of Pre-Teaching at Georgia Tech.
  • Students must have completed at least 30 hours of academic credit at Georgia Tech.
  • Students must have earned a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.5.
  • Students may apply to the option at any time after completing 30 hours but prior to completing 90 hours of undergraduate coursework.
  • Applicants are applying for early acceptance into a M.A.T. program and therefore must submit the following documentation in addition to meeting the GPA requirement.
    • Complete the B.S./M.A.T. application form. This will be kept on file in both the student’s academic major department and in the office of the Director of Pre-Teaching at Georgia Tech.
    • 2-3 letters of recommendation: (a) one academic or professional letter; (b) one letter from someone who can evaluate the applicant’s personal qualifications, experience, and background in light of potential to work successfully with adolescents; (c) one letter from a current work supervisor, if applicable.
    • Documentation of previous work experience (resume or curriculum vitae).
    • Personal statement of goals and/or reasons for teaching.
    • Successful interview with the faculty in the Department of Middle and Secondary.
  • Formal acceptance into the M.A.T. portion of the program will be contingent upon the following:
    • Maintaining a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher at Georgia Tech;
    • Completion of an undergraduate degree in a field appropriate for the MAT program;
    • Submission of passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment or demonstrate an exemption upon application to the program;
    • Submission of acceptable GRE scores; and
    • Filing an application to the M.A.T. program by the appropriate deadline.

4220 Behavior/Learning Disabilities (M.Ed.)

Master of Education(M.Ed.) in Behavior/Learning Disabilities

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communications Disorders
835 College of Education Building, 404/413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

Students entering this program must already hold a certificate in special education based on an accredited college/university program or will complete
the approved certification sequence prior to enrolling in master’s level courses. The M.Ed. major in Behavior/Learning Disabilities provides students
with the depth of knowledge and breadth of skill in educating students with mild disabilities required of a “master teacher.” The M.Ed. program is an
advanced program that emphasizes research-based strategies, effective pedagogy, and data-based decision making. Students are provided advanced
instruction on how to select appropriate curricula, employ effective methods of instruction, make assessment based decisions, and utilize effective
classroom and student management procedures. Additionally, students are prepared to work collaboratively and exhibit the highest standards of
professionalism while maximizing pupil learning and development.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Behavior/Learning Disabilities

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

Select one (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Select one (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)

Teaching Field/Major (21)
The Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders requires that students earn a grade of “B” or higher in each
course in the teaching field/major. If students earn a grade below “B” in a course, they must repeat that course. Students will be allowed to repeat a
course in this manner one time. Students who fail to earn a grade of “B” or higher after taking the course a second time will be scholastically
excluded from this major.

Required (21):

  • EDMT 7400 Mathematical Concepts for Special Learners (3)
  • EXC 7130 Assessment for Instructional Planning (3)
  • EXC 7150 Methods for Teaching Academics to Students with Behavior and Learning Disabilities(3)
  • EXC 7160 Strategies for Social and Emotional Behavior in Students with Behavior and Learning Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7170 Methods for Teaching Functional Life Skills to Students with Behavior and Learning Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7460 Mathematical Instruction in Special Education I (3)
  • EXC 7941 Practicum III: Special Education General Curriculum: Consultative (3)

Elective (6)
Students must select two of the following guided electives:

  • EXC 7010 Language Development and Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavioral Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7310 Strategies for Challenging Behaviors (3)
  • EXC 7320 Methods of Teaching Students with Autism (3)
  • EXC 7340 Post-School Transition for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7470 Mathematical Instruction in Special Education II (3)

Or other courses with the approval of the program advisor.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

Highly Qualified in Mathematics
Students may become highly qualified in mathematics by passing the following courses (a) EXC 7460 Mathematics Instruction in Special Education (I),
(b) EXC 7470 Mathematics Instruction in Special Education (II), (c) EDMT 7400 Math Concepts for Special Learners, and (d) two additional courses in
mathematics as approved by the advisor.

Additional information
Substitutions may be made with the approval of the student’s advisor for courses previously taken or other appropriate experiences. Students must pass
a comprehensive examination. The minimum number of credit hours is 36 for a master’s degree.

Students must receive a satisfactory grade of “B” or better in all core special education courses. Students who do not receive a grade of “B” or better
must retake the course and satisfactorily pass the course prior to taking additional special education core coursework in the program. A course may be
repeated once. Students who do not satisfactorily pass a course twice will be administratively removed from the program.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of each student’s performance in all academic settings. Inappropriate or
unprofessional conduct by any student may result in the student being dropped from a course or program. If such removal from a course is necessary, the
student will receive the grade of “F” and may be judged ineligible to re-enroll in the course. Georgia State University will only recommend an
individual for a degree who has completed a program approved by the College of Education’s Professional Education Faculty and developed under the
guidance of a faculty advisor.

4230 Early Childhood Education – UACM (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) Early Childhood Education – Urban Accelerated Certification and Master’s Program (UACM)

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building, 404/413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair

This initial certification program for the major in Early Childhood Education prepares teachers of young children (Pre-K through 5th grade) to teach in
an urban environment. The program is designed for people who already hold a baccalaureate or higher degree and want to teach in an urban elementary
school.

Program Admission

In addition to the College of Education graduate degree admission requirements, applicants for this program must have earned a minimum of 2.75
undergraduate grade-point average calculated on all work attempted. The department requires applicants to submit GRE scores taken within the last 5
years. Students must present passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment or demonstrate an exemption upon application to the program.
Applicants must also participate in oral and written interviews conducted by faculty and school-based personnel. The Department of Early Childhood
education reserves the right to specify additional criteria for applicants.

Course work is offered in a fixed sequence beginning Summer (May) session of each academic year and runs for six consecutive terms. Successful
completion of Phase I of the program (45 prerequisite semester hours) and a passing score on GACE Content Assessments in Early Childhood Education
leads to a recommendation for initial certification (T-4). Applicants have the option of completing an English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)
Endorsement simultaneously.

Applicants who are recommended to and successfully complete Phase II of the program (30 semester hours) will earn a Master of Education degree (M.Ed.).
During Phase II, each applicant is required to be employed as a full-time teacher in an urban classroom and participate in a mentoring experience. The
applicant may not complete Phase II course work prior to recommendation to the program. No prerequisite course work may be counted toward fulfillment
of the M.Ed. Admission to the program occurs once each year. For application and supporting materials, please contact the Department of Early Childhood
Education at 404/413-8020.

Phase I: Prerequisites

Summer Semester (17)

ECE 6360 Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (6)
ECE 6370 Classroom Management and Instruction (3)
ECE 6380 Foundation of Literacy Instruction for Young Children (3)
ECE 6390 Foundations of Learning and Teaching Mathematics (2)
EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)

Fall Semester (12)

ECE 6385 Teaching Literacy to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners I (3)
ECE 6391 Teaching Mathematics, Pre-Kindergarten to Grade Five – I (3)
ECE 6395 Child Growth and Development in Urban Education (3)
ECE 6655 Student Teaching I (3)

Spring Semester (16)

ECE 6375 Responsive Practice for Urban Education (3)
ECE 6386 Teaching Literacy to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Learners II (2)
ECE 6387 ESOL: Language Acquisition (3)
ECE 6392 Teaching Mathematics, Pre-Kindergarten to Grade Five – II (2)
ECE 6405 Science and Social Studies in the Urban Classroom (3)
ECE 6656 Student Teaching II (3)

Optional ESOL Endorsement: If students would like to complete the ESOL Endorsement, they must complete ECE 6657 ESOL Student Teaching (2) [Available in fall and spring semesters].

Total prerequisite hours: minimum of 45 semester hours

Exit Requirements:

  • Completion of all required course work with a 3.00 cumulative grade point average
  • Successful completion of the GACE Early Childhood Education Content Assessment for licensure.
  • Successful completion of Student Teaching I and Student Teaching II with grades of “B” or higher

Phase II: Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Early Childhood Education UACM

Professional Studies (9)

  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)
  • EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Teaching Field/Internship (18)

  • ECE 6415 Curriculum and Assessment for Urban Education I (3)
  • ECE 6416 Curriculum and Assessment for Urban Education II (3)
  • ECE 6660 Mentorship in the Urban Classroom I (3)
  • ECE 6661 Mentorship in the Urban Classroom II (3)
  • ECE 6830 Critical Theories and Research in Urban Education I (3)
  • ECE 6831 Critical Theories and Research in Urban Education II (3)

Capstone Experience (3)

  • ECE 6800 Urban Education Capstone Seminar (3)

Program total: minimum of 30 semester hours

Exit Requirements

  • Completion of all required course work with a 3.00 cumulative grade point average
  • Successful completion of Mentorship in the Urban Classroom I and II (ECE 6660 and ECE 6661) with a grade of “B” or higher
  • Successful completion of the capstone experience.

4240 Educational Leadership (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) Educational Leadership

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building, 404/413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

The M.Ed. major in Educational Leadership prepares leaders in the field of educational administration. Specifically, the program is for persons who are
beginners in the field and who seek to fill leadership positions at the building level. The program is developed around a set of academic and field
experiences that provide basic knowledge and skills for school leadership positions. Completion of the master’s degree program meets the course
requirements for the L-5 certification in the State of Georgia.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Educational Leadership

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

Select one (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Select one (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)

Major (24)
The students in a cohort group take the following seven courses in sequence during three consecutive academic terms.

Required (18):

  • EPEL 7000 Educational Leadership and Organizational Culture (3)
  • EPEL 7020 Leadership in a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPEL 7330 Law, Policy, and Governance (3)
  • EPEL 7410 Instructional Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 7500 Management and School Operations (3)
  • EPSF 7450 Curriculum Foundations for the Educational Leader (3)

Required (6):

  • EPEL 7680a Practicum Seminar: Data Analysis and School Improvement Processes for School Leaders (3)
  • EPEL 7680b Practicum Seminar: Action Research for School Leaders (3)

Elective (3)

  • With adviser approval, the students select one additional EPEL course.

Comprehensive Examination Requirement
Each student must complete and successfully defend a master’s project. Contact the department for more information regarding this project.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4250 Elementary Education (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Elementary Education

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building, 404/413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair

The M.Ed. in Elementary Education is a graduate degree designed for teachers who wish to pursue advanced preparation in a specific content area at the elementary level (reading, mathematics, or science). Successful completion of the program leads to a master’s degree (T-5) and qualifies the candidate for an endorsement in the area of the content concentration. Through an integrated approach that provides choices and opportunities for decision making and dynamic group interactions, teachers participating in one of the master’s program become partners with faculty in shaping the path or paths by which content is learned.

Program Academic Regulations

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) program in Elementary Education is based on the assumption that learning is a constructive process which builds on the knowledge and experience of the learner. The teacher functions as a collaborator with parents and children to focus on strategies for enhancing effective child learning. Therefore, all ECE coursework and instruction will incorporate reflective practice, collaboration, theories of child development, strategies for managing classrooms and affirming diversity. Through advanced study in a specific content area, teachers will become knowledgeable of current research and methods for teaching the content and establishing learner-centered classrooms consistent with the appropriate
national and state standards.

Teachers who apply for the program choose one area of content concentration: Elementary Literacy, Elementary Literacy in Reading Recovery, Elementary Mathematics, or Elementary Science. Upon meeting the College of Education admissions requirements, students are eligible to pursue either of these courses of study.

All applicants must meet minimum college admission criteria and have obtained teaching certification (Georgia T-4 clear and renewable in Early Childhood Education or equivalent).

  • Program begins each semester
  • 36 semester hours
  • 15 credit hours of coursework in one content concentration: Elementary Literacy, Elementary Literacy in Reading Recovery, Elementary Mathematics Education, or Elementary Science Education.
  • Candidates for the Mathematics and Science Endorsements must have one year of teaching before starting the endorsement coursework, professional core,
  • and ECE core.
  • Commit to two semesters of continuous study with a cohort (9 total credit hours)
  • Candidate must be currently teaching or working in an early childhood/elementary setting or available to complete teaching assignments in an early childhood/elementary setting.
  • IP grading may be assigned for some courses.
  • Interviews may be required.

In addition to the college-wide graduation requirement of an overall 3.00 grade point average (calculated on all graduate work attempted), the Department of Early Childhood Education requires that the students maintain satisfactory progress as he or she pursues the program of study. Any student who faculty believes is not making satisfactory progress toward fulfillment of degree requirements may be removed from the program.

Students must file a formal application for graduation with the Graduation Office, Office of the Registrar, at least two academic terms in advance of the expected date of graduation to establish eligibility for graduation with the M.Ed. in Elementary Education.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Elementary Education

Professional Studies (9)
Select One Course (3):

Select One Course (3):

Select One Course (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)

Elementary Education Core (9)
Required (9):
Students must enroll in the ECE Core Courses (ECE 7390, ECE 7400, ECE 7410) as part of a cohort in the fall semester of a year and complete over fall/spring consecutive semesters.

  • ECE 7390 Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom I (3)
  • ECE 7400 Curriculum in the Early Childhood Classroom II (3)
  • ECE 7410 Critical Issues in Early Childhood Education I (3)

Concentration (15): Select ONE Concentration

Elementary Literacy Concentration (15)
Required (6):

  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Area (3)*
  • ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Education Classroom I (3)

Students must enroll in ECE 7740 concurrent with one of the following courses: EDRD 7630, EDRD 6600, EDRD 7600, EDRD 7550, or EDRD 7650.

Select One Course (3):*

  • EDRD 6600 Introduction to Materials and Methods in Reading Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)

Select One Course (3):*

  • EDRD 7550 Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)

Select One Course (3):

  • ECE 7280/EDLA 7280] Early Writing Development (3)
  • ECE 7580/EDLA 7580 Language Foundations of Literacy Learning: From Acquiring Oral Language to Reading Words (3)
  • EDRD 7260 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3)
  • ECE 8400 Teacher Development (3) [Students must have completed ECE 7390, ECE 7400, ECE 7410, and 6 hours in the content concentration before enrolling in this course.
  • Other courses as approved by the concentration advisor.

*Successful completion of EDRD 7630 and EDRD 6600 or EDRD 7600 and EDRD 7550 or EDRD 7650 and the Reading Endorsement portfolio qualifies an individual for the reading endorsement at the level of the base certificate.

Elementary Literacy Concentration in Reading Recovery (15)

  • This concentration includes a fixed sequence of required courses (ECE 7360, ECE 7370, ECE 7380) with enrollment fall through spring term.
  • Successful completion of ECE 7360, ECE 7370, and ECE 7380 qualifies the individual for the Reading Endorsement at the level of the base certificate.
  • Prior to enrolling in the required Reading Recovery courses the student must submit a school district or consortia site application or the school of employment must be an approved Reading Recovery site.
  • The student must complete the Observation Survey Institute in the summer semester prior to enrolling in the required course sequence.

Required (9):

  • ECE 7360 Reading Recovery Clinical For Teachers I (3)
  • ECE 7370 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers II (3)
  • ECE 7380 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers III (3)

Select Two Courses (6):

  • ECE 7280/EDLA 7280 Early Writing Development (3)
  • ECE 7580/EDLA 7580 Language Foundations of Literacy Learning: From Acquiring Oral Language to Reading Words (3)
  • EDRD 7260 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3)
  • ECE 8400 Teacher Development (3) [Students must have completed ECE 7390, ECE 7400, ECE 7410, and 6 hours in the content concentration before enrolling in this course.
  • ECE 8680 Internship in Early Childhood Education (3) (prerequisite is ECE 8400)
  • Other courses as approved by the concentration advisor.

Successful completion of ECE 8400 and ECE 8680 qualifies an individual for the TSS Endorsement.

Elementary Mathematics Education Concentration (15)
Candidates must have one year of teaching experience to be eligible to enroll in the mathematics concentration courses for the K-5 Mathematics Endorsement.

Required (15):

  • ECE 7393 Numbers and Operations in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7394 Geometry and Measurement in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7395 Algebra in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7396 Data Analysis and Probability in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Classroom I (3) (Students must enroll in ECE 7740 concurrent with one of the following courses: ECE 7393, ECE 7394, ECE 7395, or ECE 7396.)

Successful completion of ECE 7393, ECE 7394, ECE 7395, ECE 7396, and ECE 7740 qualifies an individual for the K-5 Mathematics Endorsement.

Elementary Science Education Concentration (15)
Candidates must have one year of teaching experience to be eligible to enroll in the science concentration courses for the K-5 Science Endorsement.

Required (12):

  • ECE 8420 Describing Relationships and Changes across the Sciences in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 8430 Analyzing Evidence to Create Models for Scientific Explanation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 8440 Using Scientific Practices to Examine Natural Systems in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Classroom I (3) (Students must enroll in ECE 7740 concurrent with one of the following courses: ECE 8420,
  • ECE 8430, or ECE 8440.)

Successful completion of ECE 8420, ECE 8430, ECE 8440, and ECE 7740 qualifies an individual for the K-5 Science Endorsement.

Select One Course (3):

  • ECE 8400 Teacher Development (3) [Students must have completed ECE 7390, ECE 7400, ECE 7410, and 6 hours in the content concentration before enrolling in this course.]
  • Other courses as approved by the concentration advisor.

Capstone (3)
Required (3):

The Capstone course is completed during the final semester in which the student plans to graduate and with the approval of the concentration advisor.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4260 Health and Physical Education (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Health and Physical Education

Department of Kinesiology and Health
137 Sports Arena, 404/413-8050
http://kh.education.gsu.edu/
Jacalyn Lund, Chair

This M.Ed. major in Health and Physical Education is designed for P-12 health and physical educators who wish to extend their content and pedagogical knowledge for improved professional practice. The program features an integration of health and physical education content where it is appropriate and includes a combination of coursework, simulated teaching, field experiences, and school-based inquiry. Students can choose to emphasize in health, physical education, or adapted physical education within the program.

Program Admission

Students who do not hold a current (T-4) initial certificate in Health and Physical Education may be admitted to the program if they meet all other admission requirements and successfully pass the GACE Program Admission Assessment. Those students can qualify for certification (T-5) by completing the M.Ed. program requirements, the initial certification requirements, and the following courses.

Prerequisites or equivalents for those who do not hold the T-4 initial certification in Health and Physical Education (P-12):

EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3) (or equivalent)
KH 2130 Introduction to the Allied Fields of Health, Physical Education, and Fitness (3)
KH 2220 Anatomy in Kinesiology and Health (3)
KH 2230 Physiology in Kinesiology and Health (3)
KH 3010 Performance and Analysis Area I: Skill Themes and Movement Concepts (3)
KH 3020 Performance and Analysis Area 2: Fitness and Physical Activity for P-12 (3)
KH 3030 Performance and Analysis Area 3: Team Sports (3)
KH 3040 Performance and Analysis Area 4: Lifetime Sports (3)
KH 3200 Instructional Skills for Health and Physical Education, P-12 (4)
KH 3250 Teaching Comprehensive School Health Education (3)
KH 3410 Assessment in Health and Physical Education (3)
KH 3420 Curriculum in Health and Physical Education (3)
KH 3600 Biomechanics (3)
KH 3610 Motor Learning and Development (3)
KH 3650 Physiology of Exercise (4)
KH 3700 Sexuality Education3700 Sexuality Education for P-12 (3)
KH 4540 Contemporary Instructional Models for Adaptive and Inclusive Physical Education (3)
KH 4650 Opening School Experience (0-1)
KH 6710 Graduate Practicum for Elementary Physical Education (3)
KH 6720 Graduate Practicum for Secondary Physical Education (3)

Program Academic Regulations

Non-coursework requirements for T-5 certification includes Tort Liability Coverage; criminal background check; first aid and CPR proficiency (including infant, child, adult) or completion of KH 3390; and passing scores on GACE Content Assessment.

Students who have a T-4 Certificate in Health and Physical Education (does not have to complete the above prerequisites) will have the option of completing a hybrid program in Health and Physical Education. The hybrid model comprises of online courses and face-to-face courses. Please contact the Department of Health and Physical Education at 404-413-8050 or khwaitlist@gsu.edu for more information.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Health and Physical Education

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field (21)
Required (12):

  • EDUC 8360 Teacher Support Specialist (3)
  • KH 7240 Advanced Teaching Skills in Health, Physical Education, and Adapted Physical Education (3)
  • KH 7250 Teaching Models for Health and Physical Education (3)
  • KH 7780 Drug Use Prevention and Intervention (3)

Select three (9) with adviser’s consent or any other courses with adviser’s approval:

  • EDUC 8660 Teacher Support Specialist Internship (3)
  • LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)
  • KH 6280 Psychology of Physical Activity (3)
  • KH 6940 Workshop in Kinesiology and Health (3)
  • KH 6960 Seminar (3)
  • KH 7200 Cultural Aspects of Sport (3)
  • KH 7230 Developing Teaching Skills for HPE/APE (3)
  • KH 7460 Using Popular Culture to Reduce Youth Risk Behaviors (3)
  • KH 7470 Using Technology to Assess in Health, Physical Education, and Adapted Physical Education (3)
  • KH 7480 Curriculum Development for Health, Physical Education, and Adapted Physical Education (3)
  • KH 7500 Physiology of Exercise (3)
  • KH 7510 Biomechanics (3)
  • KH 8550 Sport and Movement Studies for Athletes with Disabilities (3)
  • KH 8650 Physical Education for Students with Developmental, Physical and Sensory Disabilities (3)
  • KH 8655 Inclusion through Disability Sport (3)
  • KH 8665 Assessment and Curriculum Development for Students with Disabilities (3)

Inquiry for Practice (6)
Required(3):

  • KH 7790 Current Issues in School Health and Physical Education (3)

Choose one of the following with permission of adviser (3):

  • KH 7370 Foundations for Effective Portfolio Design (3)
  • KH 7990 Master’s Thesis (3)

Teacher Support Specialist Certification

Students who complete EDUC 8360 and EDUC 8660 qualify for Teacher Support Specialist (TSS) Certification in the state of Georgia.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4270 Mathematics Education (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Mathematics Education

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The mission of the Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree with a major in Mathematics Education is to prepare educators (i.e., teachers and other professional school personnel) who are: 1) informed by research, knowledge, and reflective practice; 2) empowered to serve as change agents; 3) committed to and respectful of all learners; and 4) engaged with learners, their families, schools, and local and global communities. The M.Ed. Mathematics Education program ensures that candidates gain increased mathematics knowledge and pedagogical knowledge, demonstrate success in bringing middle and high school students from diverse backgrounds to high levels of learning, and use technology skillfully as a tool for teaching and learning mathematics.

The program’s chief goal—to strengthen secondary students’ mathematical understandings— is achieved, in part, by providing mathematics teachers with opportunities to deepen their understandings of learners from diverse backgrounds and to explore issues of equity in mathematics classrooms within urban environments. The program prepares teachers to conduct action research in the context of their own classrooms in order to inform instruction, and to share the knowledge gained in a professional community of teachers. Through engaging teachers in advanced mathematics coursework, the program strengthens teachers’ mathematical content knowledge. In general, the Program of Study is framed by the principles and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the core propositions of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Mathematics Education

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

Select one (3):

Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (9):

  • EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)
  • EDMT 8820 Ethnomathematics and the Historical Development of Mathematics (3)
  • LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)

Choose One Course (3)

  • EDMT 7360 Integration of Technology in Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 7560 Theory and Pedagogy of Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 8290 Study of Learning and Instruction in Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 8420 Topics in School Mathematics Curriculum (3)
  • EDMT 8550 Trends and Issues of Teaching Mathematics (3)

Required 15 hours with MATH prefix
With the consent of their adviser, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher related to mathematics. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, and applications of mathematics.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4280 Mathematics Education (M.Ed.) Online

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Mathematics Education Online Program

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
639 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The online program in M.Ed. major in Mathematics Education is offered through the Georgia ONmyLINE (GOML) system. GOML provides access to a full array of online and distance education offerings from the 31 colleges and universities in the University System of Georgia. To find out more about GOML and to apply, please go to http://education.gsu.edu/online-education/.

The M.Ed. major in Mathematics Education Online Program is a parallel program to the traditional Master of Education Mathematics that has been offered at Georgia State University as a major since Fall 1982. This entirely online program is designed to be completed in four semesters. The M.Ed. major in Mathematics Education seeks to advance early and mid-career mathematics teachers’ ability to effectively implement standards-based instructional practices. The program’s chief goal – to strengthen secondary students’ mathematical understandings – is achieved, in part, by providing mathematics teachers with opportunities to deepen their understandings of learners from diverse backgrounds and to explore issues of equity in mathematics classrooms. The program prepares teachers to conduct action research in the context of their own classrooms in order to inform instruction, and to share the knowledge gained in a professional community of teachers. Through engaging teachers in advanced mathematics coursework, the program strengthens teachers’ mathematical content knowledge. In general the program of study is framed by the Extended Georgia Framework for Teaching, the principles and standards of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics and the core propositions of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

The online program is 36 hours (9 hours of college core courses; 9 hours mathematics education, 15 hours Mathematics, 3 hours of teachers and technology).

The M.Ed. online program will be available to teachers holding a clear and renewable T4 certificate in Math.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Mathematics Education Online Program

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (12):

  • EDMT 7360 Integration of Technology in Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 7560 Theory and Pedagogy of Mathematics Instruction (3) Take with EPRS 7900
  • EDMT 8420 Topics in School Mathematics Curriculum (3)
  • EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)

Select 5 courses (15 hours):

  • MATH 6301 College Geometry (3)
  • MATH 6435 Linear Algebra (3)
  • MATH 6547 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics (3)
  • MATH 7420 Applied Combinatorics (3)
  • MATH 7610 Special Problems and Problem Solving (3)
  • MATH 7820 Historical and Cultural Development of Mathematics I (3)
  • MATH 7821 Historical and Cultural Development of Mathematics II (3)
  • With the consent of their adviser, students can select other coursework with the MATH prefix numbered 6000 or higher related to mathematics. The coursework should lead to the development of an understanding of the history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, and applications of mathematics.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4290 Multiple and Severe Disabilities (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Multiple and Severe Disabilities

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building, 404/413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

Certification areas: Special Education Adapted Curriculum (Intellectual Disabilities), Special Education General and Adapted Curriculum (Autism Spectrum Disorders), Special Education Deaf Education, Early Childhood Special Education, Special Education Physical and Health Disabilities (Orthopedic Impairments)

The M.Ed. major in Multiple and Severe Disabilities prepares students to teach children with moderate, severe, and profound intellectual disabilities; autism spectrum disorders; physical and health disabilities (orthopedic impairments); hearing loss; or young children with disabilities. The students are provided coursework and practicum experiences resulting in knowledge of characteristics, curriculum, instructional strategies, and classroom management procedures.

The master’s degree program contains those courses required for professional certification within each certification area listed. For students wanting basic professional certification only, course requirements are available in the department office. Georgia State University only recommends for certification an individual who has completed a planned program developed with his or her faculty adviser.

Program Academic Regulations

Students entering this program should have completed coursework at the undergraduate or graduate level in each of the areas listed below. None of this coursework will be counted toward the master’s degree requirements.

  • Applied Behavior Analysis (physical and health disabilities, early childhood special education general curriculum, deaf education)
  • Human Growth and Development (all)
  • Introduction to Exceptional Children (all)
  • Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction or Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (early childhood special education general
  • curriculum)
  • Methods of Teaching Mathematics (physical and health disabilities, early childhood special education curriculum)
  • Methods of Teaching Reading (all) (SDU/PLU credits will be accepted only for students in ID or those in ASD who will have content concentration in an
  • area other than reading).
  • Student Teaching/Practicum (all; deaf education students, this experience must have been with deaf/hard of hearing children)

A PSC Georgia Reading Endorsement is required as part of all the MSD programs except Intellectual Disability and Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Additional Information Regarding Deaf Education Certification: Students in the deaf education certification area must post a score of “Intermediate” on a recognized assessment of their signing skills (e.g., SLPI, ASLPI, EIPA) before admission to student teaching. Students who are unable to pass the sign language requirement may complete the Master’s degree but will not be recommended for certification.

Students must earn a grade of “B” or higher in each course in the teaching field/major area (B). If students earn a grade below “B” in a course, they must repeat that course. Students will be allowed to repeat a course in this manner one time. Students who fail to earn a grade of “B” or higher after taking the course a second time will be scholastically excluded from this major. A grade of “B-” does not meet the requirement.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s performance in all academic settings. Inappropriate or unprofessional conduct by a student may result in the student being withdrawn from a course, a practicum, or the program. If removal from a course is necessary, the student will receive the grade of “F” and may be judged ineligible to re-enroll in the course.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Multiple and Severe Disabilities

Substitutions may be made for courses previously taken or other appropriate experiences with the consent of the students’ major adviser and the department chairperson.

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

Select one (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Early Childhood Special Education concentration students can take EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3) or EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3).

Teaching Field/Major (27) – Select one of the following five concentration areas:

Early Childhood Special Education Concentration (27)
Required (27):

  • EXC 7000 Collaboration with Parents and Professionals (3)
  • EXC 7010 Language Development and Language Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7300 Assistive Technology: Reading and Academics (3)
  • EXC 7320 Methods of Teaching Low-functioning Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7330 Physical and Health Management of Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7650 Characteristics of Young Children with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7660 Methods of Teaching Young Children with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7939 Practicum II: Early Childhood (3)

In the Professional Studies section, Early Childhood Special Education concentration students can take EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3) or EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3).

Special Education Adapted Curriculum ( Intellectual Disabilities) Concentration (27)
Required (24):

  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7250 Characteristics of Severe Intellectual Disability and Autism (3)
  • EXC 7260 Characteristics of Severe Physical and Multiple Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7280 Methods for Teaching Students with Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7281 Adapted/Functional Curriculum for Students with Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7290 Methods for Teaching Students with Physical and Multiple Disabilities: Reading/Academics (3)
  • EXC 7330 Physical and Health Management of Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7935 Practicum II: Severe Intellectual Disability (3)

Select one (3):

  • EXC 7282 Teaching Academic and Functional Curricula to Students with Physical and Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7310 Strategies for Challenging Behaviors (3)
  • EXC 7320 Methods of Teaching Low-functioning Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7340 Post School Transition (3)
  • Other graduate level courses must be approved by major professor.

Students who are not already highly qualified teachers per the federal mandate of No Child Left Behind will select two of three courses listed as “Professional Studies” in the options listed above in section A plus ECE 7580/EDLA 7580 Language Foundations of Literacy Learning (3) or EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3).

Special Education Deaf Education Concentration (30)
Required (30):

  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)
  • CSD 6480 Hearing Science and Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7350 Psychosocial Characteristics of Deafness (3)
  • EXC 7360 Language Development in Students Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7390 Reading and Writing Instruction for Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7400 Methods of Teaching Students Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7430 Auditory and Speech Development in Students Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7940 Practicum: Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)

Students, such as those who do not yet have a score of Intermediate on a test of sign language, who need an extra practicum prior to student teaching may also take EXC 7930 Practicum II: Deaf/Hard of Hearing.

Candidates must post a rating of “Intermediate” on a recognized assessment of their signing skills (e.g. SLPI, ASLPI, EIPA) before admission to EXC 7940 Practicum: Deaf/Hard of Hearing.

Several of the courses in this program have an online option. Students who live an excessive distance from the university should discuss this option with the Deaf Education advisor prior to enrolling.

Special Education General/Adapted (Autism Spectrum Disorders) Concentration (27)
Required (27):

  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7250 Characteristics of Severe Intellectual Disability and Autism (3)
  • EXC 7280 Methods for Teaching Students with Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7310 Strategies for Challenging Behaviors (3)
  • EXC 7315 Assessment and Curricular Planning for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7320 Methods of Teaching Low-functioning Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7325 Methods of Teaching High-functioning Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7936 Practicum II: Autism (3)

Students who do not have a content concentration based on previous coursework in social science, science, math, or language arts, will complete the Reading Endorsement and will select two of the three “Professional Studies” courses from the options listed above in section A, plus EDRD 7650 Individual Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3).

Special Education Physical and Health Disabilities (Orthopedic Impairments) Concentration (27)
Required (24):

  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7260 Characteristics of Severe Physical and Multiple Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7280 Methods for Teaching Students with Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7290 Methods for Teaching Students with Physical and Multiple Disabilities: Reading and Academics (3)
  • EXC 7300 Assistive Technology: Reading and Academics (3)
  • EXC 7330 Physical and Health Management of Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7937 Practicum II: Physical and Health Disabilities (3)

Elective (3): Select one graduate level course with consent of major advisor.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours (Deaf Education Concentration is a minimum of 39 hours)

4300 Reading, Language, and Literacy (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The program for the major in reading, language, and literacy provides for master’s level study of literacy processes and literacy instruction for culturally diverse learners. A specialization in reading instruction is designed to prepare the graduate to work as a teacher of reading and literacy leader in grades P-12 and leads to certification as a Reading Specialist.

Program Admission

Entry into the program for the major in reading, language, and literacy education requires a bachelor’s-level certification in any area of teaching or a service certificate in speech-language pathology.

Certification Only

Individuals who already have a master’s degree in education will be eligible to be recommended for the Reading Specialist Certification after successfully completing the following course work, passing the program key assessments, and the GACE II Reading Specialist examination.

  • EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
  • EDRD 7550 Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 8610 Supervision of School Literacy Programs (3)

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education

Professional Studies (9)
Students are encouraged to complete the following professional studies courses early in their programs.

Select one (3):

Select one (3):

Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (12):

Reading Instruction (15)
Required (9):

  • EDLA 7150 Children’s and Adolescents’ Literature (3)
  • EDRD 7550 Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 8610 Supervision of School Literacy Programs (3)

Select one (3):

  • EDLA 7580 Language Foundations of Literacy Learning: From Acquiring Oral Language to Reading Words (3)
  • EDRD 7260 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3)

Select one (3):
Courses may be selected from the list below or from other literacy-related courses with consent of a language and literacy education adviser.

  • ECE 7380 Reading Recovery Clinical Teacher III (3)
  • EDLA 7440 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Literature (3)
  • EDLA 7460 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Writing (3)
  • EDLA 7480 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of the English Language (3)
  • EDRD 7360 Literacy and Technology (3)
  • EDRD 8280 Literacy for a Diverse Society (3)
  • EDRD 8550 Trends and Issues in Language and Literacy Education (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)
  • TSLE 7250 Applied Linguistics for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Students must complete a portfolio as an exit requirement.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4310 Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (M.Ed.) Online

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education Online Program

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The online program in M.Ed. major in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (ESOL) is offered through the Georgia ONmyLINE (GOML) system. GOML provides access to a full array of online and distance education offerings from the 31 colleges and universities in the University System of Georgia. To find out more about GOML and to apply, please go to http://education.gsu.edu/online-education/.

The M.Ed. major in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education (ESOL) Online Program provides advanced teacher preparation in ESOL for individuals holding bachelor’s degree and who have an interest in English to speakers of other languages in P-12 settings. This program addresses the needs of teachers who work with literacy learners from diverse cultures and is open to all certified teachers, regardless of their initial preparation area. The course of study has been designed to meet the Georgia Professional Standards System requirements for an ESOL Endorsement (P-12) and the requirements for a Reading Endorsement (at the level of the candidate’s base certificate).

The M.Ed. program is 36 hours (9 hours of college core courses; 9 hours English as a Second Language; 9 hours reading endorsement; a choice of 6 out of 9 offered hours of applied linguistics, and 3 hours of practicum). Candidates are required to take TSLE 7440 prior to enrolling in practicum hours and EDRD 7600 or EDRD 7630 prior to enrolling in EDRD 7650. M.Ed. students could enroll in any semester and complete the course work within 4 semesters if they averaged 3 courses per semester. This degree addresses the professional standards from IRA for classroom teachers of reading and from TESOL for teachers of ELL learners.

Program Admission

Entry into the program for the major in reading, language, and literacy education requires a bachelor’s-level certification in any area of teaching or a service certificate in speech-language pathology.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education Online Program

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research (3)
  • EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (21):

  • EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
  • EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)
  • TSLE 7250 Applied Linguistics for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Select two courses (6):

  • AL 8240 General Linguistics (3)
  • AL 8460 English Grammar for ESL/EFL Teachers (3)
  • AL 8470 Socio Linguistics (3)
  • EDRD 7550 Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction (3)*
  • EDRD 8610 Supervision of School Literacy Programs (3)*

*NOTE: Successful completion of EDRD 7550 and EDRD 8610 (see * above) and a passing score on the Reading Specialist GACE test will lead to certification as a Reading Specialist in the state of Georgia.

Students must complete a portfolio as an exit requirement.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4320 School Counseling (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in School Counseling

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building, 404/413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The M.Ed. major in School Counseling prepares students for State Certification in Georgia. Degree requirements may exceed the minimum number of hours for professional certification. The Master of Education program in School Counseling is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

Program Objectives

  • Students will develop skills to enable them to provide individual counseling services, group counseling experiences, and developmentally appropriate classroom guidance lessons for children and adolescents that are consistent with the ASCA National Model for School Counseling Programs.
  • Students will develop skills to enable them to understand children and adolescents from a holistic, developmental approach, grounded in theory that leads to appropriate strategies to enhance the adjustment and learning of all students.
  • Students will develop skills to enable them to use data to develop a comprehensive, developmentally appropriate guidance program and to evaluate the program’s effectiveness.
  • Students will develop skills to enable them to understand child and adolescent academic, career, and personal/social needs in the context of a socioculturally diverse school environment.
  • Students will develop skills to enable them to provide a career guidance program that is developmentally appropriate.
  • Students will develop skills to enable them to provide collaborative consultation services to teachers, parents, administrators, other school professionals and community resources.
  • Students will develop skills that will enable them to provide appropriate counseling and consultation services for special needs students, their families and teachers.
  • Students will develop leadership skills to enable them to advocate for students, parents, and others especially with regard to closing achievement gaps between diverse groups.
  • Students will develop skills that will enable them to work within the framework of ethical guidelines of the American Counseling Association and the American School Counselors Association.
  • Students will learn their legal responsibilities as school counselors.
  • Students will develop skills that will enable them to work within the framework of an existing school guidance program and work in collaboration with other counseling and educational professionals to enhance learning for all students.
  • Students will develop skills that will enable them to use technology in appropriate ways with students, parent, teachers, and other school staff.
  • Students will use current school counseling research to develop, monitor, and evaluate effective counseling programs.
  • Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics, and the most recent version of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) Ethical Standards for School Counselors.

Program Academic Regulations

M.Ed. School Counseling curriculum is designed in a cohort format. This requires students take prescribed classes in certain semesters, sharing the educational experience with students who have the same educational needs. If a student must deviate from the cohort schedule there is the possibility the courses may not be available in semesters other than those in which they are scheduled. In addition, students entering the cohort must commit to doing their Practicum/Internship in a Professional Development School.

Delivery systems used for instructions include: lecture, group work, required readings, presentations using advanced technology, simulated activities, and applied practice followed by individual and group supervision in some courses.

All school counseling students must complete CPS 6020 (Introduction to Elementary and Middle School Counseling) or CPS 6030 (Introduction to Secondary School Counseling) with a grade of “B” or higher. A grade lower than “B” requires repetition of the course. During the academic term in which CPS 6020 or CPS 6030 is first taken, other courses may be taken concurrently. However, when repetition of CPS 6020 or CPS 6030 is necessary, no other CPS coursework may be taken concurrently or prior to successful completion of CPS 6020 or CPS 6030. All school counseling students must pass the GACE Content Assessments in school counseling to graduate from the Master of Education program in School Counseling.

For elementary-middle school counseling students to be eligible to begin the applied practice (CPS 7661), the following courses must be successfully completed: CPS 6020, CPS 6150, CPS 6410, CPS 6450, CPS 7260, CPS 7300, CPS 7340, CPS 7500 or EPY 7500, CPS 8260, CPS 8400 and CPS 8470. CPS 7550 must be taken concurrently with the applied practice (CPS 7661). Students are approved to begin the applied practice based upon the number of hours and courses they have completed in their programs.

For secondary school counseling students to be eligible to begin the applied practice (CPS 7661), the following courses must be successfully completed: CPS 6030, CPS 6150, CPS 6410, CPS 6450, CPS 7260, CPS 7300, CPS 7340, CPS 7500 or EPY 7500, CPS 8260, CPS 8470 and one of the following: CPS 8380, CPS 8400, or CPS 8460. CPS 7550 must be taken concurrently with the applied practice (CPS 7661). Students are approved to begin the applied practice based upon the number of hours and courses they have completed in their programs.

The School Counseling applied practice (CPS 7661) and internship (CPS 7681) sequence begins only in fall semester of the second year of the School Counseling program. Students cannot register for CPS 7661 and CPS 7681 without being admitted into the School Counseling program. Upon admittance, students cannot register for CPS 7661 and CPS 7681 until the following academic year.

School counseling students must attend one applied practice/internship orientation workshop before turning in the applied practice application, and becoming eligible to register for CPS 7661 and CPS 7681. The applied practice internship workshops are held in the student’s first fall semester – dates are posted online at the midpoint of the first fall semester. If students do not attend this workshop, they cannot participate in CPS 7661 in the upcoming fall and CPS 7681 in the upcoming fall and spring.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s academic performance as well as the student’s performance in laboratory, applied practice, and internship classes. A student may be dropped from a course, the program, or both if the welfare of the student’s clientele or prospective clientele or the functioning of a school or agency is, in the judgment of the CPS faculty, in jeopardy as a result of the student’s behavior.

School counseling students who do not already have initial certification in the State of Georgia must successfully complete EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities and the appropriate GACE Content Assessment before Georgia State University will recommend them for graduation and/or certification in School Counseling.

Departmental Endorsement Policy

The Department of Counseling and Psychological Services requires that program faculty endorsement be given only for the program for which graduate students have been prepared.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in School Counseling

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • CPS 8260 Program Evaluation, Advocacy, and Leadership in School Counseling (3)
  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • CPS 7340 Social/Cultural Issues in Counseling and Psychological Services (3)

Teaching Field/Major (32)
Required (20):

  • CPS 6150 Ethical and Legal Standards in Counseling and Psychological Services (2)
  • CPS 6410 Basic Counseling Skills (3)
  • CPS 6450 Group Counseling Systems (3)
  • CPS 7260 Counseling Systems and Interventions (3)
  • CPS 7500/EPY 7500 Individual and Family Over the Life Span (3)
  • CPS 7550 Consultation in School Counseling (3)
  • CPS 8470 Crisis Intervention (3)

Select one of the following two options (12):

Elementary-Middle Grades School Counseling
Required (12):

  • CPS 6020 Introduction to Elementary and Middle School Counseling (3)
  • CPS 7300 Career Theory, Assessment, and Intervention (3)
  • CPS 7450 Educational and Psychological Appraisal (3)
  • CPS 8400 Introduction to Play Therapy (3)

Secondary School Counseling
Required (9):

  • CPS 6030 Introduction to Secondary School Counseling (3)
  • CPS 7300 Career Theory, Assessment, and Intervention (3)
  • CPS 7450 Educational and Psychological Appraisal (3)

Select one (3):

  • CPS 8380 Family Systems and Interventions (3)
  • CPS 8400 Play Therapy (3)
  • CPS 8460 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Addictions (3)

Applied Practice (7)
Required (3):

  • CPS 7661 Applied Practice I: School Counseling (3)

Required (4):

  • CPS 7681 Internship: School Counseling (4)

Program total: minimum of 48 semester hours

4330 School Psychology (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in School Psychology

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building, 404/413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The professional in school psychology is educated in the major disciplines of education and psychology. He or she is equipped to undertake and manage processes and problems related to the education and development of children within schools. A major portion of his or her training concerns the interaction of the child with the social institution of the school. Because of this special orientation, the school psychologist must be well grounded in the philosophy and methods of education and must achieve a high level of understanding of the psychological processes such as learning, personality, and social competence.

Program Objectives

The school psychologist is an applied psychologist who brings skills, instrumentation, and techniques to bear on learning and behavioral problems in the school setting. He or she must be prepared to:

  • Intervene constructively when acute and chronic behavior problems occur.
  • Consult effectively with change agents in the child’s life (i.e., parents, administrators, teachers).
  • Participate in the assessment of individual learning problems.
  • Participate in education program planning and management.
  • Provide information to promote effective use of the resources of agencies outside the school setting.
  • Design and carry out action and situational research requiring knowledge of the school and of the learner in interaction in such a setting.

Program Academic Regulations

The M.Ed. major in School Psychology requires a minimum of 36 semester hours with a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 3.00.

This program is an integrated component of the combined Master’s/Ed.S. program in School Psychology and is taken concurrently with the Ed.S. program. This program does not lead to certification in the state of Georgia. The Master of Education degree in School Psychology is prerequisite to the Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) degree with a major in School Psychology.

The master’s degree is ideally completed in four consecutive academic terms, commencing fall term. There are two major training thrusts in the School Psychology program. The training first provides a knowledge base about schools, instructional methods, research methods, learning, and developmental issues. Secondly, application skills are developed in the area of cognitive and achievement assessment as well as interviewing. Skills in both teacher and parent consultation are developed.

The M.Ed./Ed.S. School Psychology program is not designed for part-time students. Each semester students are expected to enroll in 12-14 semester credits. Students may distribute their coursework to a maximum of four years rather than the usual three. However, they must maintain continuous enrollment of at least 9 credits per semester during this period (i.e., full time enrollment). The usual period of study in the M.Ed./Ed.S School Psychology program including internship, is three years. Some coursework can be completed during the summers. Under highly unusual circumstances (e.g., medical emergencies) the program faculty will consider requests to extend completion of the program beyond 4 years. Under unusual circumstances, students can apply for a one year leave of absence from the program. Should a student drop out of the program prior to completion, reapplication for admission is necessary. There is no guarantee the student will be readmitted to the program. If a student deviates from a normal schedule, then there is the possibility that the course may not be available in semesters other than those which they are scheduled.

All school psychology students must complete CPS 6040, CPS 7490, CPS 7495, CPS 7510, CPS 7515, CPS 7520, CPS 7570, CPS 8440, and CPS 8570 with grades of “B” or higher. A grade lower than “B” requires repetition of the course. Students cannot repeat a course more than once. Unless otherwise indicated, students may not register for any other CPS course until they have completed CPS 6040 with a grade of “B” or higher. For School Psychology students to be eligible to register for the CPS 7662 Applied Practice I, they must have completed the following courses: CPS 6040, CPS 6150, CPS 6410, CPS 7490, CPS 7495, CPS 7510, CPS 7515, CPS 7520, and CPS 8440.

All master’s students must meet a comprehensive exam requirement to graduate from the School Psychology program. All school psychology students must pass the Praxis II Assessment in school psychology and their test scores must be reported to Georgia State University prior to graduation.

Students seeking certification from the State of Georgia Professional Standards Commission are required to pass the GACE Basic Skills Assessment (or provide an exemption) and GACE Content Assessment in School Psychology.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s academic performance as well as the student’s performance in laboratory, applied practice, and internship classes. A student may be dropped from a course, the program, or both if the welfare of the student’s clientele or prospective clientele or the functioning of a school or agency is, in the judgment of the CPS faculty, in jeopardy as a result of the student’s behavior. Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Principles for Professional Ethics.

Departmental Endorsement Policy

The Department of Counseling and Psychological Services requires that program faculty endorsement be given only for the program for which the graduate students have been prepared.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in School Psychology

Professional Studies (9)
Required (6):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • Any 7000-level or above EPY course in Learning Theory (3)

Select One (3):

Major (27)
Required (27):

  • CPS 6040 Introduction to School Psychological Services (3)
  • CPS 6410 Basic Counseling Skills (3)
  • CPS 7490 Individual Assessment I (3)
  • CPS 7495 Individual Assessment I: Lab (2)
  • CPS 7510 Individual Assessment II (3)
  • CPS 7515 Individual Assessment II: Lab (2)
  • CPS 7520 Data-Based Decision Making for Academic Interventions in School Psychology (2)
  • CPS 7570 Psychological Consultation in the Schools I (3)
  • CPS 7662 Applied Practice I: School Psychology (3)
  • CPS 8440 Social/Emotional Assessment of Children and Adolescents (3)

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4340 Science Education (M.Ed.) Online

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Science Education Online Program

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The online program in M.Ed. major in Science Education is offered through the Georgia ONmyLINE (GOML) system. GOML provides access to a full array of online and distance education offerings from the 31 colleges and universities in the University System of Georgia. To find out more about GOML and to apply, please go to http://education.gsu.edu/online-education/.

The M.Ed. major in Science Education Online Program is designed for teachers who already hold a clear, renewable cerificate in science at the secondary level. This program will provide students an opportunity to expand their knowledge of science content which will aid them in implementing a standards based curriculum. If teachers become proficient in their implementation of a standards based curriculum then ultimately student performance will improve as well as their knowledge of science. In addition to strengthening their knowledge base, the M.Ed. Science Education (GOML) will enhance the teaching dispositions of the participants which will provide them opportunities to deepen their understandings of learners from diverse backgrounds and to explore issues of equity in the science classroom. A need exists for science teachers to expand their knowledge of research; therefore, program participants will be expected to engage in action research in the context of their own classrooms in order to inform instruction, and to share the knowledge gained in a professional community of teachers. The ultimate goal of the program is to engage teachers in advanced courses that will strengthen their scientific content and broaden their pedagogical practices. In general the Program of Study is framed by the principles and standards of the Next Generation Science Standards and the core propositions of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Science Education Online Program

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Required (12):

  • EDSC 7550 Theory and Pedagogy in Science Instruction (3)
  • EDSC 8400 Strategies of Instruction in Science (3)
  • EDSC 8600 Science in the School Curriculum (3)
  • LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)

Required (15 hours):

  • BIOL 7440 Fundamentals of Evolution (3)
  • EDSC 8430 Nature of Science (3)
  • GEOS 6097 Topics in Geological Sciences (3)
  • PHYS 7110 Conceptual Physics I (3)
  • PHYS 7120 Conceptual Physics II (3)
  • With the consent of their advisor, students select from among 6000 – 8000 level courses with prefixes ASTR, BIOL, GEOL, GEOG, PHIL, PHYS, or NSCI, related to science in terms of its history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, applications and relationships to the secondary curriculum.

Students must complete a portfolio as an exit requirement.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4350 Social Studies Education (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Social Studies Education

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
600 College of Education Building, 404/413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The M.Ed. major in Social Studies Education provides learning experiences for teachers who have been initially prepared in secondary social studies education.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Social Studies Education

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

Select one (3):

Required (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Teaching Field/Major (27)
Select four (12):

  • EDCI 7980 Teaching and Learning in Urban Contexts (3)
  • EDSS 7560 Teaching History and the Social Sciences (3)
  • EDSS 7570 Social Studies Concepts and Issues (3)
  • EDSS 8420 Topics in the School Social Studies Curriculum (3)
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • Other education courses may be substituted with consent of his or her advisor.

Select Advanced Studies in Social Studies (15)
With consent of their adviser, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher in the following areas: anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, psychology, and sociology.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4360 Urban Teacher Leadership (M.Ed.)

Master of Education (M.Ed.) in Urban Teacher Leadership

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building, 404/413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

Concentrations: Elementary Mathematics; Elementary Science; English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL); English Education; Leadership; Mathematics Education; Middle Level Education; Reading Education; Science Education; Social Studies Education

The Master of Education in Urban Teacher Leadership is a collaborative program between the Departments of Early Childhood Education, Educational Policy Studies, and Middle and Secondary Education.

The Master of Education in Urban Teacher Leadership develops a cadre of teachers who will become change agents that positively affect their classrooms, their schools, their communities, and their school districts as well as the national conversation about educational issues and change. Specifically, the program is designed for teachers in urban school settings who will remain in their classrooms while assuming leadership roles in the schools and within the larger context of the school community. Both experience in urban schools and urban research studies suggest that urban communities meet unique challenges that must be addressed by teachers in those schools.

The program is developed around a set of academic and field experiences that provide knowledge and skills for leadership in collaboration, writing for change, reflective and critical thinking, problem solving, and the advocacy of excellence in urban education grounded in concentration areas: ESOL, English Education, Leadership, Mathematics, Middle Level, Reading, Science, and Social Studies Education. The Teacher Leader and Coaching Endorsements are embedded within the program and the Reading Endorsement is available. Students will collaborate inside and outside the classroom with cohort members, university faculty, community agencies, and urban leaders. To complete the program, the student must develop and implement an action research project developed to affect school change.

Program Admissions

The M.Ed. Urban Teacher Leadership program is an interdisciplinary degree designed to offer content specialists preparation leading to both a teacher leadership certification and a coaching endorsement.

All applicants must meet minimum college admission criteria and have either obtained a teaching certification or at least one-year teaching experience and must submit the following with their application.

  • Three (3) professional letters of recommendation;
  • Evidence of knowledge and/or experience in the concentration area;
  • A written discussion of the applicant’s professional goals

Applicants to the teaching concentrations leading to a teacher leader certification and a coaching endorsement (Elementary Math, Elementary Science, English Education, ESOL Education, Math Education, Middle Level Education, Reading Education, Science Education, and Social Studies Education) must meet the following additional requirements.

  • Have 3 years teaching experience;
  • Submit a letter of recommendation from their school system superintendent or designee;
  • Meet the appropriate requirements for the concentration chosen:
  • Elementary Mathematics: Hold T-4 certificate or higher in Elementary Education or in field in Middle Level Mathematics Education
  • Elementary Science: Hold T-4 certificate or higher in Elementary Education or in field in Middle Level Science Education
  • English Education: Hold T-4 certificate or higher in English Education
  • ESOL Education: Be “in field” in ESOL Education
  • Mathematics Education: Hold T-4 certificate or higher in Mathematics Education
  • Middle Level Education: Be “in field” in Middle Level Education
  • Reading Education: Be “in field” in Reading Education
  • Science Education: Hold T-4 certificate or higher in Science Education
  • Social Studies Education: Hold T-4 certificate or higher in Social Studies Education

Note: Applicants to the Educational Leadership concentration will not be eligible for certification upgrade to a T-5 level nor for admission into the Teacher Leader certification program.

Portfolio

Candidates are expected to compile a Teacher Leader Portfolio demonstrating competencies related the standards associated with the Georgia Teacher Leader Certification program as an end of coursework requirement.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Education in Urban Teacher Leadership

Professional Studies (12)
Select One (3):

Select One (3):

NOTE: Leadership concentration students are required to take EPRS 7920 as part of their concentration and should select a second course EPRS course to fulfill the Professional Studies requirement.

Select One (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)

Major (12)
Required (12):

  • EDCI 7980 Teaching and Learning in Urban Contexts (3)
  • EPEL 7000 Educational Leadership and Organizational Culture (3)
  • EPEL 7020 Leadership for a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPEL 7680B Practicum Seminar: Action Research for School Leaders (3)

Concentration (15): Select ONE Concentration

Elementary Mathematics Concentration (15):
Candidates must hold T-4 or higher at the elementary level OR be in field in Middle Level Mathematics Education AND teach in grades 4th or 5th to qualify for the endorsement.

  • ECE 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)
  • ECE 7393 Numbers and Operations in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7394 Geometry and Measurement in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7395 Algebra in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7396 Data Analysis and Probability in the Elementary Classroom (3)

Candidates seeking a Mathematics Endorsement must all enroll in ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Education I while taking ECE 7393, ECE 7394, ECE 7395, or ECE 7396.

Elementary Science Concentration (15):
Candidates must hold T-4 or higher at the elementary level OR be in field in Middle Level Education AND teach in grades 4th or 5th to qualify for the endorsement.

  • ECE 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)
  • ECE 8420 Describing Relationships and Changes Across the Sciences in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 8430 Analyzing Evidence to Create Models for Scientific Explanation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 8440 Using Scientific Practices to Examine Natural Systems in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Classroom I

Students seeking a Science Endorsement must enroll in ECE 7740 concurrently with one of the following courses: ECE 8420, ECE 8430, ECE 8440.

English to Speakers of other Languages (ESOL) Concentration (15):
Required (9):

  • EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
  • EDCI 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)
  • TSLE 7440 Methods/Materials for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher(3)

Select two courses (6):

  • EDRD 8280 Literacy for a Diverse Society
  • EDRD 8550 Trends and Issues in Language and Literacy Education
  • TSLE 7250 Applied Linguistics for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

English Education Concentration (15):
Required (3):

  • EDCI 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)

Select Three Courses (9):

  • EDLA 7150 Children’s and Adolescents’ Literature (3)
  • EDLA 7440 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Literature (3)
  • EDLA 7460 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Writing (3)
  • EDLA 7480 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of the English Language (3)
  • Other English Education or English course may be selected with consent of advisor.

Select one course (3):
Select the remaining course in the section above or one from the list below:

  • EDLA 8330 Language Variation and Learning (3)
  • EDRD 7360 Literacy and Technology (3)
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
  • EDRD 8280 Literacy for a Diverse Society (3)
  • EDRD 8550 Trends and Issues in Language and Literacy Education (3)
  • Any 6000 level or higher ENGL course for which the students meet prerequisites
  • Other English Education related electives may be selected with consent of advisor.

Leadership Concentration (15):
Required (15):

  • EPEL 7330 Law, Policy, and Governance (3)
  • EPEL 7410 Instructional Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 7680A Practicum Seminar: Data Analysis and School Improvement Processes for School Leaders (3)
  • EPEL 8970 Seminar in Educational Leadership (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading and Assessment (3)

Mathematics Education Concentration (15):
Required (6):

  • EDCI 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)
  • EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)

Select two courses (6):

  • EDMT 7360 Integration of Technology in Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 7560 Theory and Pedagogy of Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 8290 Study of Learning/Instruction in Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 8420 Topics in School Mathematics Curriculum (3)
  • EDMT 8550 Trends/Issues of Teaching Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 8820 Enthomathematics and the Historical Development of Mathematics
  • MATH 8800 Topics in Mathematics (3)
  • Other Mathematics Education electives may be selected with consent of advisor.

Required (3):
Any 6000-8000 level MATH courses related to mathematics in terms of its history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, applications, and relationships to the secondary curriculum.

Middle Level Education Concentration (15):
Required (6):

  • EDCI 7400 Curriculum Issues in Middle Childhood Education (3)
  • EDCI 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)

Select three (9):
Each student selects an area of advanced study of three courses (9 semester hours) from one of the options below. (Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies).

Middle Level Language Arts Option (9)
Select two courses (6):

  • EDLA 7440 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Literature (3)
  • EDLA 7460 Theory and Pedagogy in the of Writing (3)
  • EDLA 7480 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of the English Language (3)

Select one course (3):

  • EDLA 7150 Children’s and Adolescents’ Literature (3)
  • EDRD 7360 Literacy and Technology (3)
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
  • Any 6000 level or higher EDLA course or ENGL course for which the students meet prerequisites.
  • Other Language Arts Education related electives may be selected with consent of advisor.

Middle Level Mathematics Option (9)
Required (3):

  • EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)

Select two courses (6):

  • EDMT 7360 Integration of Technology in Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 7560 Theory and Pedagogy of Mathematics Instruction (3)
  • EDMT 8290 Study of Learning/Instruction in Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 8420 Topics in School Mathematics Curriculum (3)
  • EDMT 8550 Trends/Issues of Teaching Mathematics (3)
  • Any 6000-8000 level EDMT courses or MATH courses related to mathematics in terms of its history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, applications, and relationships to the secondary curriculum.

Middle Level Science Option (9)
Select two courses (6):

  • EDSC 8400 Strategies of Instruction in Science (3)
  • EDSC 8430 Nature of Science (3)
  • EDSC 8440 Advanced Science Concepts& Issues (3)
  • EDSC 8550 Trends/Issues in Teaching Science (3)
  • EDSC 8600 Science in the School Curriculum (3)

Required (3):
Select 3 hours with science prefixes such as ASTR, BIOL, GEOL, GEOG, GEOS, PHYS, or NSCI. Students select from among 6000 – 8000 level courses related to science in terms of its history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, applications and relationships to the secondary curriculum.

Middle Level Social Studies Option (9)
Select two courses (6):

  • EDSS 7560 Teaching History and the Social Sciences (3)
  • EDSS 7570 Social Studies Concepts and Issues (3)
  • EDSS 8290 Learning / Curriculum/ Instruction in Social Studies (3)
  • EDSS 8420 Topics in the School Social Studies Curriculum (3)
  • Other Social Studies Education electives may be selected with consent of advisor.

Required (3):
Select a course numbered 6000 or higher in the following areas: anthropology (ANTH), economics (ECON), geography (GEOG), history (HIST), political science (POLS), psychology (PSYC), and sociology (SOCI)

Reading Education Concentration (15):
Required (9):

  • EDCI 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)
  • EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy of Reading (3)*
  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)*

Select one course (3):*

  • EDRD 7550 Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)

Select one course (3):

  • ECE 7280/EDLA 7280 Early Writing Development (3)
  • ECE 7580/EDLA 7580 Language Foundations of Literacy Learning: From Acquiring Oral Language to Reading Words (3)
  • EDLA 7150 Children’s and Adolescents’ Literature (3)
  • EDRD 7260 Early Literacy Development and Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7360 Literacy and Technology (3)
  • EDRD 8610 Supervision of School Literacy Programs (3)
  • Any 7000 level or higher EDRD course for which the students meet prerequisites.
  • Other Reading Education related electives may be selected with consent of advisor.

*Successful completion of EDRD 7600, EDRD 7630 and either EDRD 7550 or EDRD 7650 and the Reading Endorsement portfolio qualifies a person for the bachelor’s, master’s, or specialist level endorsement, depending on the upon the student’s current level of certification.

Science Education Concentration (15):
Required (3):

  • EDCI 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)

Select three courses (12):

  • EDSC 8400 Strategies of Instruction in Science (3)
  • EDSC 8430 Nature of Science (3)
  • EDSC 8440 Advanced Science Concepts & Issues (3)
  • EDSC 8550 Trends/Issues in Teaching Science (3)
  • EDSC 8600 Science in the School Curriculum (3)
  • Other science/science education content electives may be selected with consent of advisor.

Required (3):
Select 3 hours with science prefixes such as ASTR, BIOL, GEOL, GEOG, GEOS, PHYS, or NSCI. Students select from among 6000 – 8000 level courses related to science in terms of its history, philosophy, conceptual underpinnings, applications and relationships to the secondary curriculum.

Social Studies Education Concentration (15):
Required (3):

  • EDCI 7680b Practicum II: Advanced Teaching and Supervision (3)

Select three courses (9):

  • EDSS 7560 Teaching History and the Social Sciences (3)
  • EDSS 7570 Social Studies Concepts and Issues (3)
  • EDSS 8290 Learning / Curriculum/ Instruction in Social Studies (3)
  • EDSS 8420 Topics in the School Social Studies Curriculum (3)
  • Other Social Studies Education electives may be selected with consent of advisor.

Required (3):
Select a course numbered 6000 or higher in the following areas: anthropology (ANTH), economics (ECON), geography (GEOG), history (HIST), political science (POLS), psychology (PSYC), and sociology (SOCI).

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4370 Communication Sciences and Disorders (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building, 404/413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree with a major in Communication Sciences and Disorders prepares speech-language pathologists to work with individuals of all ages who have communication disorders. The Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology accredits the program. It is designed to lead to the Professional Standards Commission licensure at the master’s level, licensure by the Georgia Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology, and certification in speech-language pathology by the Council for Clinical Certification of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA).

Program Admission

Students entering this program must hold a baccalaureate degree in communication disorders or baccalaureate degree in another area and have completed coursework in each of the areas listed below:

  • Anatomy and Physiology for Communication
  • Augmentative Communication
  • Audiologic Rehabilitation
  • Behavioral or Social Science
  • Biological Science
  • Exceptional Children and Youth
  • Hearing Science and Disorders
  • Introduction to Communication Disorders
  • Introduction to Language Development
  • Introduction to Language Disorders
  • Statistics
  • Phonetics
  • Physical Science (Chemistry or Physics)
  • Sign Language
  • Student Teaching in Communication Disorders

Students who have not completed study in each of the areas listed above may still gain admission to the program; however, they will be required to complete this coursework as part of the program of study. Such coursework will not substitute for program courses and will not count toward the master’s degree minimum semester hour requirement.

Program Academic Regulations

Upon enrollment in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program students must complete all required courses at Georgia State University. Requests for exceptions to this policy must have prior approval of the Communication Sciences and Disorders faculty.

Students must earn a grade of “B” or higher in all courses in the teaching field/major (B). If students earn a grade below “B” in a course, that course must be repeated. Students will be allowed to repeat a course one time. Students who fail to earn a grade of “B” or higher after taking the course a second time will be scholastically excluded from this major. If students earn a grade below “B” in a practicum experience or earns a grade below “B” in more than one course, the Communication Sciences and Disorders faculty will review the students’ progress in the program to determine if the students will be allowed to continue the program of study.

In addition to the successful completion of academic coursework and a comprehensive portfolio, the students must also accumulate 400 clock hours of supervised clinical experience during practicum experiences to be eligible for graduation. Of the 400 clock hours, no less than 375 must be earned at the graduate level. The distribution of clock hours must comply with the current requirements as contained in the Communication Sciences and Disorders program Student Handbook.

Students who have successfully completed all master’s-degree program requirements as well as the additional coursework requirements described above will be recommended for professional certification. This recommendation is made only at the conclusion of all master’s degree requirements. Students seeking licensure from the State of Georgia Professional Standards Commission must also achieve a passing score on the Praxis II (ASHA) exam for speech pathology before being recommended by Georgia State University. [Georgia will continue to accept results of the Speech and Language Pathology PRAXIS II test administered by ETS with test code 0330 and passing score 600.]

Evaluation of the student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s performance in all academic settings. Inappropriate or unprofessional conduct by a student may result in the student being dropped from a course or a program. If such removal from a course is necessary, the student will receive the grade of “F” and may be judged ineligible to re-enroll in the course.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Professional Studies (9)
The following professional studies courses should be taken early in the students’ program.

Select one (3):

Select one (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Select one (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)

Teaching Field/Major (54)
Students must earn a grade of “B” or higher in all courses in the teaching field/major. If students earn a grade below “B” in a course, that course must be repeated. Students will be allowed to repeat a course one time. Students who fail to earn a grade of “B” or higher after taking the course a second time will be scholastically excluded from this major. If students earn a grade below “B” in a practicum experience or earns a grade below “B” in more than one course, the Communication Sciences and Disorders faculty will review the students’ progress in the program to determine if the students will be allowed to continue the program of study.

Required (54):

  • CSD 7450 Language Disorders in Young Children (3)
  • CSD 7455 Language Disorders in School Age Children (3)
  • CSD 7510 Neuroscience for Communication (3)
  • CSD 7520 Speech Sound Disorders (3)
  • CSD 7530 Voice Science and Disorders (3)
  • CSD 7540 Fluency Disorders (3)
  • CSD 7550 Acquired Aphasia (3)
  • CSD 7560 Diagnostic Methods of Speech and Language Disorders (3)
  • CSD 7570 Advanced Audiological Assessment (3)
  • CSD 7590 Contemporary Issues in Communication Disorders (2)
  • CSD 7600 Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders (3)
  • CSD 7610 Motor Speech Disorders (3)
  • CSD 7630 Fundamentals of Clinical Practice (2)
  • CSD 7840 Research in Communication Disorders (1)
  • CSD 7910 Clinical Practicum in Communication Disorders (7)
  • CSD 7950 Communication Disorders Medical Internship (6)
  • CSD 8330 Acquired Neurocognitive Communication Disorders (3)

Program total: minimum of 63 semester hours

4380 Educational Psychology (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Educational Psychology

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building, 404/413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

Program Theme: Informed, Empowered, Committed, and Engaged Educators

Study in educational psychology involves the application of the principles of psychology to the systematic study of education. A major in educational psychology allows students to emphasize such content areas as learning, instruction, life-span development, applied behavior analysis, cognition, and socialization. The Educational Psychology program prepares students to pursue a variety of career paths, including research, evaluation, and the applied practice of a number of disciplines. Those students who are currently certified or licensed in such fields as teaching, nursing, speech pathology, and physical therapy can further develop their expertise in these fields by studying the psychological principles of development and learning.

Advisory Committee

A committee of three faculty members guides study for the M.S. major in Educational Psychology. After completing nine semester hours of work, the students must select two faculty members to be on their advisory committee. These two faculty members must approve the students’ planned program of study. A third faculty member must be added before the students begin working on their thesis, project, or examination. Two of the three committee members (including the chair) must be from the Educational Psychology faculty.

Program Academic Regulations

Students in Educational Psychology fulfill the college’s Comprehensive Examination requirement by completing (1) a thesis, (2) project, or (3) a master’s examination.

  1. The master’s thesis is either a basic or applied research project conducted by the students under the supervision of the chair of his or her advisory committee.
  2. The project generally consists of a comprehensive review of literature on a selected topic. A written prospectus describing in detail the proposed thesis or project must be submitted to and approved by all three members of the students’ advisory committee before the work is begun.
  3. The master’s examination consists of a 4 hour in-house written examination on a question or questions to be determined by the student in collaboration with the committee.

On completion of the thesis, project, or master’s examination, each student must complete an oral examination of approximately two hours. The students’ advisory committee will administer the oral examination, and it will focus on the thesis, project, or examination.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s performance in all academic settings. Only courses in which the student earns a grade of “B” or higher will be counted toward degree fulfillment. Failure to make progress in a timely manner or inappropriate or unprofessional conduct by a student may result in the student’s withdrawal from a course or a program. If such removal from a course is necessary, the student will receive the grade of “F” for the course and may be judged ineligible to re-enroll in the course.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Educational Psychology

Professional Studies (15)

Educational Research (6)
Required (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • Select one (3): One additional EPRS course (3)

Social Foundations of Education (3)
Required (3):

  • One course with the EPSF prefix (3)

Educational Psychology (6)

For students completing a thesis:
Required (6):

For students completing a project:
Required (3):

  • EPY 7990 Master’s Capstone (3)
  • Select one (3): One course with the EPY prefix (3)

For students completing the Master’s examination :
Required (3):

  • EPY 7990 Master’s Capstone (3)
  • Select one (3): One course with the EPY prefix (3)

Major (15)
The students select a minimum of 15 semester hours of coursework in a field of Educational Psychology. At least 12 hours must be courses with the EPY prefix. One of these courses must be EPY 8961 Professional Development Seminar in Educational Psychology (3). With the consent of the advisor, an additional three hours can be a course with a Non-EPY prefix.

Electives (6)
The students select six semester hours of program-related coursework with consent of their adviser. The purpose of the elective hours is to enable students to create a program of study to fit their individual intellectual interests.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4390 Educational Research (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Educational Research

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building, 404/413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

Educational research involves the study of quantitative and qualitative research methods as they are applied to the systematic study of education. A major in educational research allows students to have a concentration in statistics, measurement, program evaluation, survey research, computer applications, qualitative research, institutional research, or policy research. This degree prepares graduates to conduct research in the schools and in other settings.

Program Academic Regulations

To complete the degree requirements, students must fulfill the 9-credit master’s core requirement, 18 credit hours of credit for the Educational Research major, including a master’s project or master’s thesis, and three elective courses (9 credits). A committee of three faculty members guides study for the M.S. major in Educational Research. The adviser (committee chair) and one committee member should be from the students’ major area. All members of the committee should hold doctorates.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Educational Research

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Select one (3):

Select one (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)

Major (18)
Select courses (18): The students and their advisory committee select 18 semester hours of coursework in a concentration area. These courses are usually selected from EPRS course offerings; however, courses in other departments may be appropriate to include as part of the students’ program.If the students desire to write a master’s thesis and the advisory committee approves, the students must enroll in EPS 7990 for 6 semester hours as partial fulfillment of the 18 semester hour major requirement. If the students do not intend to write a master’s thesis, then they must enroll in EPS 7991 for 3 semester hours as partial fulfillment of the 18 semester hour major requirement.

Electives (9)
Select three (9): With the consent of their advisory committee, the students select 9 semester hours of electives. These electives must support either the concentration or understanding of the context in which educational research occurs.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4400 Educational Research (M.S.) Online

Master of Science (M.S.) in Educational Research Online Program

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building, 404/413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Educational Research Georgia ONmyLINE (GOML) program involves the study of quantitative and qualitative research methods as they are applied to the systematic study of education. A major in educational research allows students to take coursework in statistics, measurement, program evaluation, survey research, computer applications, qualitative research, institutional research, or policy research. This degree prepares graduates to conduct research in the schools and in other settings.

Program Academic Regulations

A program coordinator will serve as a point of contact to all students enrolling in the online program track. Students will be assigned academic advisors from the current faculty members in the Educational Research unit. The program coordinator will hold an online orientation each semester that will serve to introduce all programmatic requirements. Using GoView (Desire 2 Learn) as the official delivery system for the online classes to provide real-time voice communication between students and the program coordinator, this orientation will provide new students with an overview of the program, a projected schedule of course offerings, and an in-depth introduction to the master’s project requirements.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Educational Research Online Program

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)

Major (27)
Required (3):

Choose 24 Hours of Courses:

  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading and Assessment (3)
  • EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education I (3)
  • EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II (3)
  • EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
  • EPRS 8600 Computer Use in Educational Research (3)
  • EPRS 8620 Educational Evaluation (3)
  • EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods(3)
  • EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles, and Questionnaire Design (3)
  • EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
  • EPS 7810 Directed Readings or Research (1-3)

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4410 Educational Research/Mental Health Counseling (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Educational Research/Mental Health Counseling

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building, 404/413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building, 404/413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The Department of Educational Policy Studies and the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services offer a dual enrollment, master’s-level program leading to a Master of Science degree with majors in Educational Research and Mental Health Counseling. This program provides the Educational Research students a content area in which to apply the educational research methodology and provides the Mental Health Counseling students the capability to combine research and evaluation with counseling in their work setting. In general, this dual degree program provides the students with increased career opportunities both within academia and in the work setting.

Program Degree Requirements

Degree requirements are the same as those for each separate major. The one required course from the professional counseling major that may be counted toward the educational research major is EPRS 7900. Additionally, nine semester hours of electives in the Educational Research program may be courses used to complete professional studies or major requirements in the Mental Health Counseling program. Students are responsible for making sure they meet all prerequisites for courses taken in this program.

4420 Exercise Science (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Exercise Science

Department of Kinesiology and Health
137 Sports Arena, 404/413-8050
http://kh.education.gsu.edu/
Jacalyn Lund, Chair

Concentrations: Fitness and Health Promotion; Exercise Physiology; Biomechanics

The M.S. major in Exercise Science prepares students at the graduate level to enter fields of worksite health promotion or fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, or related clinical programs; or to perform research in exercise science, including biomechanics and exercise physiology. The program includes classroom, laboratory, research, and field experience in biomechanics, exercise physiology, fitness assessment, exercise program design, program management and related interdisciplinary coursework. The concentration areas within the degree program provide advanced academic preparation for a successful career in the health and fitness field or for advancement to doctoral-level study.

Program Academic Regulations

Fitness and Health Promotion Concentration and Exercise Physiology Concentration

Students holding undergraduate degrees in physical education, exercise science, or health-related field (e.g., physical therapy, nutrition, respiratory therapy, nursing, or biology) or other departmentally approved degrees will be reviewed to determine if any undergraduate coursework must be completed prior to entry into the Exercise Science program. Minimum undergraduate coursework includes applied human musculoskeletal anatomy (KH 2220), human physiology (KH 2230), exercise physiology (KH 3650), biomechanics (KH 3600), fitness assessment and exercise prescription (KH 4630), and biochemistry or organic chemistry. Students with deficiencies in these areas will be required to take remedial coursework.

Biomechanics Concentration

Students holding undergraduate degrees in physical education, exercise science, engineering, physics, mathematics, or a health-related field (e.g., physical therapy, occupational therapy, or orthopedics) or other departmentally approved degrees will be reviewed to determine if any undergraduate coursework must be completed prior to entry into the Exercise Science program. Minimum undergraduate coursework includes applied human musculoskeletal anatomy (KH 2220), calculus through differential equations (Math 3260), mechanical physics or engineering statics and dynamics, exercise physiology (KH 3650), and biomechanics (KH 3600). Students with deficiencies in these areas will be required to take remedial coursework.

Culminating Experience and Comprehensive Examination

Students in the Exercise Physiology concentration or Biomechanics concentration must successfully produce and defend a master’s project. Students in the Fitness and Health Promotion concentration must successfully complete an approved master’s internship. Students should contact the Department of Kinesiology and Health (404/413-8050) for additional information about these requirements.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Exercise Science

Professional Studies (6)
Required (6):

Major/Electives (30)
The students select one of the following three concentration areas (30):

Fitness and Health Promotion Concentration
Select one (3):

Required (18):

  • KH 6280* Psychology of Physical Activity (3)
  • KH 7550 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (3)
  • KH 7620 Clinical Exercise Physiology (3)
  • KH 7630 Fitness Program Management (3)
  • KH 7710 Practicum in Exercise Science (1)
  • KH 7750 Internship in Exercise Science (5)

*Students who have taken KH 4280 (Psychology of Physical Activity) and/or KH 4350 (Fitness Program Management) may substitute another graduate course with consent of adviser.

Select three (9): In consultation with their advisor, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher.

Exercise Physiology Concentration
Select two (6):

Required (6):

Required (15):

  • KH 7530 Applied Anatomy for Sports Medicine (3)
  • KH 7550 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (3)
  • KH 7620 Clinical Exercise Physiology (3)
  • KH 7640 Exercise Bioenergetics (3)
  • KH 8270 Advanced Topics in Exercise Physiology (3)

Select one (3): In consultation with their advisor, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher.

Biomechanics Concentration
Select two (6):

Required (9):

Required (12):

  • KH 7530 Applied Anatomy for Sports Medicine (3)
  • KH 8830 Motion Analysis (4)
  • KH 8870 Biomechanics of Orthopedic Injuries (3)
  • KH 8980 Seminar in Biomechanics (2)

Elective Course (3): In consultation with their advisor, students select coursework numbered 6000 or higher.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4430 Instructional Design and Technology (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Instructional Design and Technology

Learning Technologies Division
233-242, 2nd Floor, College of Education Building
http://ltd.education.gsu.edu/
Stephen Harmon, Chair

The M.S. major in Instructional Design and Technology is offered online and provides students with the basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to perform as instructional technologists. An instructional technologist is a professional educator who can combine knowledge of the learning process, knowledge of instructional systems theory, and knowledge of various forms of media and learning environments to create the most effective and efficient learning experiences. The program is designed for individuals interested in working in the field of instructional technology in a wide variety of education, training, and development areas such as those found in P-12 schools, business, and industry. To meet the individual needs and interests of the instructional technology students, the program provides a maximum amount of flexibility in course selection. In addition, ample opportunities are provided for applying the competencies learned in the classroom to job-related situations.

Program Admission

The applicant must aspire to or currently hold a position related to the application of instructional technology in an education or training environment. In addition, the applicant must possess basic computing technology skills.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Instructional Design and Technology

Professional Studies (9)
Select one (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Select two (6):

  • EPSF 8440 Foundations of Curriculum Development (3)
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)

Major (24)
Required (15):

  • LT 7100 Design of Performance and Instructional Systems (3)
  • LT 7150 Analysis of Performance and Instructional Systems (3)
  • LT 8000 Foundations of Instructional Technology (3)
  • LT 8150 Managing Instructional Technology Projects (3)
  • LT 8200 Diffusion and Adoption of Technological innovation (3)

Select three (9):

  • LT 7360 Integrating Technology in School-Based Learning Environments (3)
  • LT 8050 Evaluation and Assessment of Online Learning (3)
  • LT 8090 Internet for Educators (3)
  • LT 8360 E-Learning Design and Development (3)
  • LT 8390 Analysis of Education, Training, and Performance Support Centers (3)
  • LT 8400 Developing Digital Multimedia for Learning (3)
  • LT 8420 Topics in Instructional Technology (3)
  • LT 8440 eLearning Environments (3)
  • LT 8550 Human Performance Technology (3)
  • Other courses may be selected with consent of advisor.

Internship (3)
Required (3):

  • LT 8660 Internship in Instructional Technology (3)

Students must have completed at least 24 semester hours of program coursework before taking LT 8660.

Exit Requirement:  Students must achieve a satisfactory score on a written departmental examination and successfully present a portfolio of their work in instructional technology.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4440 Mental Health Counseling (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Mental Health Counseling

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building, 404/413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The M.S. major in Mental Health Counseling is a noncertification program that prepares persons to function as counselors in mental health centers, governmental agencies, labor departments, employee assistance programs, community agencies, religious settings, and correctional agencies.

Program Objectives

The counselor employs skills, principles, and techniques to assist people to identify and resolve personal, social, career, intrapersonal, and interpersonal concerns.

The counselor is prepared to:

  • work individually and with groups of clients on educational, vocational, social, emotional, or personal problems.
  • counsel and consult with diverse populations
  • consult with other professionals and administrators concerning the client’s development needs.
  • participate in educational, social, and career assessment programs, including the interpretation of test results.
  • provide information and understanding to clients in the areas of educational, social, and career planning.
  • conduct and facilitate program evaluation and research efforts.
  • practice according to the ethical codes of the American Counseling Association.
  • use appropriate technology to assist clients with educational, social, and career planning.
  • further their identity as a professional counselor through advocacy for the profession.

Program Academic Regulations

A minimum of 60 semester hours of graduate coursework must be completed with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. Degree objectives may require more than the minimum number of hours to meet certain professional standards. The M.S. in Mental Health Counseling program is not designed for part-time students. Students will distribute their required semester hours over a six or seven semester period. It is not feasible for students to work full time while adhering to this model program. Students who are working full or part time must plan to extend their programs over a period of time of more than eight semesters.

Usually, 12 credit hours of the students’ program consist of laboratory experiences. The remainder of the courses occurs in classroom settings. Delivery systems used for instruction include lecture, group work, required readings, presentations using advanced technology, simulated activities, and applied practice followed by individual and group supervision in some courses.

The program culminates in an extensive supervised practicum and internship, consisting of two semesters of work in an agency setting for a minimum of 700 hours over the two semesters. It is not recommended that students attempt to work full time or take more than nine (9) credit hours in either of the semester of practicum or internship.

All mental health counseling students must complete CPS 6010 with a grade of “B” or higher. A grade lower than “B” requires repetition of the course.  CPS 6010 is a prerequisite for most CPS courses. During the academic term in which CPS 6010 is first taken, other courses may be taken concurrently. However, when repetition of CPS 6010 is necessary, no other CPS coursework may be taken concurrently or prior to successful completion of CPS 6010.

Students must successfully complete the following courses to take the comprehensive exam: CPS 6010, CPS 6410, CPS 6450, CPS 7000, CPS 7260, CPS 7300, CPS 7340, CPS 7450, CPS 7500 /EPY 7500, CPS 8100, CPS 8380, CPS 8430, CPS 8460, CPS 8470, and EPRS 7900. Contact the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (404/413-8010) for information on the comprehensive examination schedule.

For mental health counseling students to be eligible to begin the applied practice (CPS 7660), the students must successfully complete the following courses: CPS 6010, CPS 6410, CPS 6450, CPS 7000, CPS 7260, CPS 7300, CPS 7340, CPS 7500/EPY 7500, CPS 8100, CPS 8380, and CPS 8460. Students may be required to take CPS 7450 prior to or concurrently with their fall semester of practicum (CPS 7660) and internship (CPS 7680), depending on course offering. Students are approved to begin applied practice based on the number of hours they have completed in their programs and based on space available in applied practice sections. The department may delay students’ beginning their applied practice for one or more academic terms.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s academic performance as well as the student’s performance in laboratory, applied practice, and internship classes. A student may be dropped from a course and/or the program if the welfare of the student’s clientele or prospective clientele or the functioning of a school or agency is, in the judgment of the CPS faculty, in jeopardy as a result of the student’s behavior. Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics.

Departmental Endorsement Policy

The Department of Counseling and Psychological Services requires that program faculty endorsement be given only for the program for which the graduate students have been prepared.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Mental Health Counseling

Professional Studies (9)
Required (8):

  • CPS 7340 Social/Cultural Issues in Counseling and Psychological Services (3)
  • CPS 7500/EPY 7500 Individual and Family Over the Life Span (3)
  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)

Major (36)
Required (36):

  • CPS 6010 Professional Identity and Ethics in Mental Health Counseling (3)
  • CPS 6410 Basic Counseling Skills (3)
  • CPS 6450 Group Counseling Systems (3)
  • CPS 7000 Consultation, Advocacy, and Leadership in Mental Health Counseling (3)
  • CPS 7260 Counseling Systems and Interventions (3)
  • CPS 7300 Career Theory, Assessment, and Intervention (3)
  • CPS 7450 Educational and Psychological Appraisal (3)
  • CPS 8100 Psychobehavioral Diagnosis (3)
  • CPS 8380 Family Systems and Interventions (3)
  • CPS 8430 Advanced Counseling Skills (3)
  • CPS 8460 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Addiction (3)
  • CPS 8470 Crisis Intervention (3)

Applied Practice Sequence (12)
Required (12):

  • CPS 7660 Applied Practice I: Mental Health Counseling (3)
  • CPS 7680 Internship: Mental Health Counseling (9)

Elective (3)
A list of approved electives for Mental Health Counseling Master’s Degree students is available in each student’s handbook and in the department at the front desk (COE 950).

Program total: minimum of 60 semester hours

4450 Rehabilitation Counseling (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Rehabilitation Counseling

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building, 404/413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The M.S. major in Rehabilitation Counseling prepares the students for employment in a variety of corporate and agency rehabilitation settings. The Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredits the Rehabilitation Counseling program. Students who complete the program are prepared to take the examination for certification as a certified rehabilitation counselor.

Program Objectives

The rehabilitation counselor employs skills, instrumentation, and techniques to assist people to identify and resolve personal, social, vocational, intrapersonal, and interpersonal concerns.

The rehabilitation counselor is prepared to:

  • work individually with clients on educational, vocational, social, emotional, or personal problems.
  • consult with other professionals and administrators concerning the client’s development needs.
  • participate in psychological assessment programs, including the interpretation of test results.
  • provide information and understanding to clients in the areas of educational, social, or vocational planning.
  • conduct and facilitate local research efforts.

Program Academic Regulations

A minimum of 48 semester hours of graduate coursework must be completed with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.00. Degree objectives may require more than the minimum number of hours to meet certain professional standards.

Usually, six semester hours of the students’ program consist of laboratory experiences. The remainder of the courses occurs in classroom settings. The program culminates in an extensive supervised practicum and internship.

During their first term of enrollment, all rehabilitation counseling students must complete CPS 6050 with a grade of “B” or higher. If the students do not complete CPS 6050 with a grade of “B” or higher, they may not register for any other CPS course until they have completed CPS 6050 with a grade of “B” or higher. Students will be allowed to retake CPS 6050 for this reason only once. CPS 6050 is offered only during fall term.

The following courses must be completed before the students may take their comprehensive examination: CPS 6050, CPS 6410, CPS 6450, CPS 7260, CPS 7300, CPS 7340, CPS 7430, CPS 7500/EPY 7500, CPS 8100, CPS 8410, CPS 8420, CPS 8460, and EPRS 7900. Contact the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (404/413-8010) for information on the comprehensive examination schedule.

For rehabilitation counseling students to be eligible to begin the applied practice (CPS 7663), he or she must have successfully completed the following courses: CPS 6050, CPS 6410, CPS 6450, CPS 7260, CPS 7340, CPS 7500/EPY 7500, CPS 8100, and CPS 8410. Students must also attend a practicum internship workshop prior to starting internship. These workshop dates are announced on the CPS website during the first fall semester of the program. Students are approved to begin applied practice based on the number of hours and courses they have completed in their programs, and based on space available in applied practice sections. The department may delay students’ beginning their applied practice for one or more academic terms. Students must maintain a 3.00 cumulative GPA to participate in the practicum/internship sequence.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s academic performance as well as the student’s performance in laboratory, applied practice, and internship classes. A student may be dropped from a course and/or the program if the welfare of the student’s clientele or prospective clientele or the functioning of a school or agency is, in the judgment of the CPS faculty, in jeopardy as a result of the student’s behavior. Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics, as well as the most recent version of The Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) Code of Professional Ethics.

Departmental Endorsement Policy

The Department of Counseling and Psychological Services requires that program faculty endorsement be given only for the program for which the graduate students have been prepared.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling

Professional Studies (5)
Required (5):

  • CPS 7340 Social/Cultural Issues in Counseling and Psychological Services (2)
  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)

Major (33)
Required (33):

  • CPS 6050 Introduction to Professional Identity, Practice, and Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors (3)
  • CPS 6410 Basic Counseling Skills (3)
  • CPS 6450 Group Counseling Systems (3)
  • CPS 7260 Counseling Systems and Interventions (3)
  • CPS 7300 Career Theory, Assessment, and Intervention (3)
  • CPS 7430 Assessment of Rehabilitation Potential (3)
  • CPS 7500/EPY 7500 Individual and Family Over the Life Span (3)
  • CPS 8100 Psychobehavioral Diagnosis (3)
  • CPS 8410 Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disability I (3)
  • CPS 8420 Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disability II (3)
  • CPS 8460 Biopsychosocial Aspects of Addiction (3)

Applied Practice Sequence (7)
Required (7):

  • CPS 7663 Applied Practice I: Rehabilitation Counseling (2)
  • CPS 7683 Internship: Rehabilitation Counseling (5)

Elective (3)
A list of approved electives for the Rehabilitation Counseling Master’s degree is available in each student’s handbook and in the department at the front desk (COE 950).

Program total: minimum of 48 semester hours

4460 Social Foundations of Education (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) Social Foundations of Education

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building, 404/413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

Social foundations of education is a broadly conceived field of educational study that derives its character from a number of academic disciplines and interdisciplinary studies. At Georgia State University, the disciplines involved in social foundations inquiry are history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and political science; the interdisciplinary field is cultural studies. The purpose of social foundations study is to bring intellectual resources derived from these areas to bear in developing interpretive, normative, and critical perspectives on education, both inside of and outside of schools. Applicants to the Master of Science program with a major in social foundations of education must, in addition to standard admission requirements, (a) interview with program faculty, (b) submit a writing sample; and (c) submit three letters of recommendation, two of which should represent familiarity with the applicant’s academic ability.

Advisory Committee

A master’s advising committee of three faculty members guides each student’s study for the M.S. degree in Social Foundations of Education in the Department of Educational Policy Studies. One member of the Social Foundations faculty should be selected as the chair of the committee. The students and the chair will select two other members for the committee, at least one of who must be a member of the Social Foundations faculty. The committee is responsible for planning the program of study and for directing master’s thesis research or master’s projects. During the last academic term of coursework, each student will be required to complete an oral examination. The candidate’s committee will administer the examination, which is not to exceed two hours.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Social Foundations of Education

Professional Studies (15)
Select one (3):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3)
  • EPRS 7910 Action Research (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)

Select one (3):

Select one (3):

  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • EPY 7090 The Psychology of Learning and Learners: The Young Child (3)

For students completing a master’s thesis (6)
Required (6):

For students completing a master’s project (6)
Required (6):

  • EPS 7991 Master’s Project (3)
  • Select one course with the EPSF prefix (3)

Major (15)
Taking a minimum of 15 semester hours of coursework from the social foundations offerings fulfills the major in social foundations of education. Majors may represent the disciplines of history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and political science and the interdisciplinary field of cultural studies. These courses are selected from the following list. Courses in other program areas in the Department of Educational Policy Studies or other courses in the college or university may also be appropriate to include as part of the major with approval from the students’ advisory committee.

Select five (15):

  • EPSF 7100 Critical Pedagogy (3)
  • EPSF 7110 Multicultural Education (3)
  • EPSF 7120 Social and Cultural Foundations of Education (3)
  • EPSF 7450 Curriculum Foundations for the Educational Leader (3)
  • EPSF 8010 Cultural Studies in Education: Film (3)
  • EPSF 8040 Cultural Studies in Education: Gender (3)
  • EPSF 8260 Sociology of Inner-City Children (3)
  • EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
  • EPSF 8330 Globalization and Education Policy (3)
  • EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
  • EPSF 8350 Comparative Educational Systems (3)
  • EPSF 8440 Foundations of Curriculum Development (3)

Electives (6)
The elective requirement is fulfilled by taking a minimum of 6 semester hours chosen from graduate courses in other program areas, departments, and/or colleges in the university.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4470 Sports Administration (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Sports Administration

Department of Kinesiology and Health
137 Sports Arena, 404/413-8050
http://kh.education.gsu.edu/
Jacalyn Lund, Chair

The Master of Science in Sports Administration degree program seeks to prepare graduates with professional skills and knowledge for careers in the $300-plus billion dollar sports business industry through an exceptional program inspired by excellence, vision, scholarship, leadership, and entrepreneurship.

The sport industry segment includes careers in youth, amateur, community, professional, and international sport organizations, in addition to affiliated industries such as event management, media, facilities, merchandising, club management, entrepreneurial enterprising, sports travel and tourism, and athlete representation and management. Potential career paths can be found in such areas as management, marketing, law, finance, media, promotions, public relations, sports information, and coaching. The program is designed to meet the curriculum standards for the Commission on Sport Management (COSMA).

Regulations for the Degree:

  1. Prerequisites: This program is specifically designed for students with an undergraduate degree in sport management and a background in the sport business industry. Incoming students without this background may be required to take prerequisite courses. For those students, you will complete any prerequisites required by the faculty advisor prior to your third semester of work in the program.
  2. Research Requirement: All students will complete the university’s basic certification course for human subjects research. See the university’s research office website and your faculty advisor for details.
  3. Internship/Thesis Requirement: Students have the option to complete the internship requirement or elect to pursue the thesis track. The internship is the cornerstone and culminating experience of the program in which the student will work in an approved sport business enterprise under professional supervision. The student is required to acquire the place for the internship in consultation with a faculty advisor. The internship cannot be taken until all other courses of the program have been completed unless as otherwise specified and permitted by a faculty advisor. Along with the internship requirement, the student will also be required to pass the Comprehensive Exam. The thesis track requires Master’s-level students in sports administration to conduct original research and complete a formal thesis. It must be started two semesters prior to graduating and is overseen by a faculty advisor. The thesis track does not require taking the Comprehensive Exam, but instead requires a formal proposal and defense of the research.
  4. Course Requirements: The course requirements for the Master of Science degree in Sports Administration and the format of the program follow. Students should consult with a faculty advisor for any questions or concerns. The Course Descriptions section contains a listing and description of the courses. The Georgia State University Graduate Catalog which includes all regulations concerning graduate programs can be found on the university’s web site.
  5. Electives: Students may take courses of their choice in consultation with a faculty advisor from those listed here or from courses in other related such programs as business, management, marketing, hospitality, risk management, law, information technology, finance, education, international business, and research.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Sports Administration

Major (27)
Required (18):

  • KH 6380 Introduction to Sport Management (3)
  • KH 6560 Budgeting and Finance in Sports and Recreation (3)
  • KH 7100 Administration of Sports Programs (3)
  • KH 7200 Cultural Aspects of Sport (3)
  • KH 7410 Sport Marketing (3)
  • KH 7610 Sport Law (3)

Research Requirement
Select One Course (3):

Internship or Thesis Track Requirement
Select One Course (6):

  • KH 7662 Internship in Sports Management (6)
  • KH 7990 Master’s Thesis (6)

Electives (9)
Select Three Courses (9)

  • KH 6960 Seminar (3)
  • KH 7150 Development and Revenue Generation in Sports (3)
  • KH 7380 Sport Facility Management (3)
  • KH 7440 Sport Communication and Media (3)
  • KH 7680 Sport Marketing Field Research (3)
  • KH 7690 Practicum in Sports Administration (3)
  • KH 7810 Directed Readings and Research (3)

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4480 Sports Medicine (M.S.)

Master of Science (M.S.) in Sports Medicine

Department of Kinesiology and Health
137 Sports Arena, 404/413-8050
http://kh.education.gsu.edu/
Jacalyn Lund, Chair

The M.S. major in Sports Medicine prepares students for career opportunities in the field of athletic training. The program includes coursework and laboratory experiences in the prevention, management, evaluation, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. The purpose of this program is to provide qualified candidates with in-depth experiences beyond entry-level athletic training expectations. Additionally, all students must complete a minimum of 400 hours of clinical experience in an approved setting as part of the degree program requirements.

Program Admission

Candidates for this program must either be National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA) certified athletic trainers or be eligible for certification. Candidates may be eligible for certification upon graduation from a CAATE accredited undergraduate athletic training curriculum.

Additionally, a program applicant must provide three letters of recommendation, including one from the applicant’s supervising certified athletic trainer, resume, and cover letter. Applicants will also be required to participate in an on-campus interview with faculty.

Program Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Sports Medicine

Professional Studies (12)
Required (12):

  • EPRS 7900 Methods of Research in Education (3) or KH 7820 Research Design (3)
  • KH 7500 Physiology of Exercise (3)
  • KH 7530 Applied Anatomy for Sports Medicine (3)
  • KH 8780 Biomechanics of Sports Medicine (3)

Major (24)
Required (16):

  • KH 7580 Concepts of Orthopedic Rehabilitation (3)
  • KH 7660 Practicum in Athletic Training (4)
  • KH 8265 Therapeutic Modalities in Orthopedic Rehabilitation (3)
  • KH 8300 Orthopedic Basis of Injury (3)
  • KH 8900 Evidence Based Practice in Sports Medicine (3)

For students completing a master’s thesis (8)

  • Required (5): KH 7990 Master’s Thesis (5)
  • Elective (3): Choose one course from elective list (3 hours)

For students completing a master’s project (8)

  • Required (2): KH 8820 Scientific Inquiry in Sports Medicine (2)
  • Elective (6): Choose two courses from elective list (6 hours)

Elective Course List:

  • BIOL 7240 Human Physiology (3)
  • BIOL 7250 Human Physiology Laboratory (1)
  • EPY 7080 The Psychology of Learning and Learners (3)
  • KH 6560 Budgeting and Finance in Sports Recreation (3)
  • KH 7200 Cultural Aspects of Sport (3)
  • KH 7380 Planning and Management of Sports Facilities (3)
  • KH 7550 Fitness Assessment and Exercise Prescription (3)
  • KH 7610 Sport Law (3)
  • KH 7620 Clinical Exercise Physiology (3)
  • KH 7780 Drug Use Intervention and Prevention (3)
  • KH 7820 Research Design (3)
  • KH 8390 ECG and Exercise Stress Testing (3)
  • RT 6005 Clinical Cardiopulmonary Physiology (3)
  • SNHP 6000 Research for the Health Professions (3)
  • Other courses may be selected with consent of adviser.

Program total: minimum of 36 semester hours

4490 Specialist Degree Academic Regulations

The Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) degree for Educator Preparation Programs is a terminal degree that advances educators in their instructional and leadership skills beyond the master’s level of competence. The purpose of this applied degree is to extend the academic preparation and teaching skills of experienced classroom teachers and instructional leaders and to foster the application of these skills and abilities to a variety of educational settings. Persons interested in a research degree and a career in higher education are encouraged to consider a doctoral degree offered by the College of Education.

Educator preparation Ed.S. programs address the following objectives:

  • To develop advanced theoretical and practical knowledge in the areas of human growth and development, foundations of education, curriculum development, classroom practice, and educational measurement.
  • To develop and apply knowledge of theory and research in the areas of supervision and school organization to the development and assessment of staff in-service and supervision.
  • To develop and apply knowledge of research methodology to the assessment of curriculum content and organization and classroom practice.

Specialist Residency

Specialist residency requires each Ed.S. student to maintain close and continuous involvement with faculty, professional colleagues, and other graduate students in the field. It also provides time for reading, reflection, and research appropriate for an advanced professional degree. Each department within the College of Education provides a variety of experiences designed for its Ed.S. students who are fulfilling residency requirements.

Each department determines specific activities and experiences that are required in its Ed.S. programs. These may include specific coursework requirements as well as other professional activities. During his or her first term of enrollment, a student should discuss with his or her Ed.S. adviser the specialist residency requirements specific to their program.

A residency plan must be formulated and reported on the “Ed.S. Residency Form”. This form is available online at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/. Each student and his or her adviser must plan activities to enable the students to fulfill the intent of the residency. The residency plan must be approved by the student’s adviser and department chair prior to the commencement of any residency activities. The department is responsible for verifying a student’s completion of specialist residency requirements and for notifying the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions of such completion.

Minimum Requirements for All Specialist Degrees

  • Only courses taken after admission to the Specialist in Education degree program may be used to fulfill program requirements for the Ed.S. degree.
  • Students must earn a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 calculated on all graduate coursework attempted while admitted to the Ed.S. program. The formal coursework requirement is satisfied through successful completion of each course in the program of study with a grade of “C” or higher.
  • Coursework in which a grade below “C” is earned may not be applied to the specialist programs.
  • Some departments require a grade of “B” or higher in specific courses and program areas. Students are responsible for contacting their departments regarding specific academic requirements that exceed college-wide minimums.
  • Students must complete a minimum of 27 semester hours of program coursework at Georgia State University.
  • Students seeking specialist-level teacher certification must have completed three years of appropriate school experience prior to completion of the Specialist in Education degree.
  • No coursework may be more than six calendar years old at the time of graduation.

Comprehensive Examination

Educational Leadership. The skill development phase of the Ed.S. degree in Educational Leadership culminates with EPEL 8690, in which the students implement a project of their own design in the field. The project is developed, refined, and approved while the students are enrolled in the program. A final written report of the implemented project is required.

School Counseling. Successful completion of CPS 8661 Applied Practice II: School Counseling satisfies the Comprehensive Examination requirement for this program.

School Psychology. Successful completion of CPS 8680 Internship in School Psychology satisfies the Comprehensive Examination requirement for this program.

4500 Educational Leadership (Ed.S.)

Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) in Educational Leadership

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building, 404/413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

The Ed.S. degree in Educational Leadership is designed to build the capacity of practicing educators and administrators to be effective educational leaders. The program fulfills the requirements of the Performance-Based Educational Leadership certification for the State of Georgia. Applicants for the Ed.S. degree must be full time, practicing educators and be employed in a partnering school system. Because leadership certification is no longer a self-select program in the state of Georgia, applicants must receive written permission from their employers in order to participate. Applicants must hold a master’s degree or higher in any education field or in other Georgia Professional Standards Commission accepted non-education fields.

Program Academic Regulations

To graduate with an Ed.S. major in Educational Leadership, students must earn a “B” or higher in all courses in the Ed.S. degree program. If students earn a grade below a grade of “B” in a required course, the students with the advice and consent of his or her adviser may substitute another course for that requirement.

Program Degree Requirements

Specialist in Education in Educational Leadership

Professional Studies (6)
Select one (3):

  • EPSF 8260 Sociology of Inner-City Children (3)
  • EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
  • EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
  • Other appropriate courses numbered 8000 to 8999 may be selected with the approval of your advisor.

Select one (3):

  • EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
  • EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
  • EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
  • EPY 8250 Psychology of Inner-City Children (3)

Major (24)
Required (24):

  • EPEL 8000 Research in Educational Leadership and Organizational Structure (3)
  • EPEL 8020 Leadership for Change in a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPEL 8420 Advanced Instructional Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 8690 Research-Based Decision Making for School Leaders (3)
  • EPEL 8970 Seminar in Educational Leadership (9)
  • EPSF 8440 Curriculum Design and Analysis (3)

Following the completion of coursework, persons wishing to obtain the PL-6 certification in the State of Georgia must receive a passing score on the GACE Educational Leadership Tests.

Program total: minimum of 30 semester hours

4510 School Counseling (Ed.S.)

Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) in School Counseling

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building, 404/413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The Ed.S. major in School Counseling (elementary, middle, or secondary) prepares certified school counselors to function at higher levels of competence in their work settings.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s academic performance as well as the student’s performance in laboratory, practicum, and internship classes. A student may be withdrawn from a course and/or the program if the welfare of the student’s clientele or prospective clientele or the functioning of a school or agency is, in the judgment of the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services faculty, in jeopardy as a result of the student’s behavior. Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics, and the most recent version of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) Ethical Standards for School Counselors.

Program Degree Requirements

Specialist in Education in School Counseling

Professional Studies (6)
Required (3):

  • EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education I (3)

Required (3):
Select one of the following Social Foundation of Education Courses (3)

  • EPSF 8040 Cultural Studies in Education: Gender (3)
  • EPSF 8260 Sociology of Inner-City Children (3)
  • EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
  • EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)

Teaching Field/Major (12)
Required (12):

  • CPS 8450 Advanced Group Counseling (3)
  • CPS 8480 Supervision of School Counseling Services (3)
  • CPS 8490 Current Trends and Ethical Issues in School Counseling (3)
  • CPS 8661 Applied Practice II: School Counseling (3)

Electives (12)
Students can choose electives that are 7000 level and above in programs from the College of Education or the Sociology, Psychology, or Anthropology Departments in College of Arts and Science (with the exception of Master’s level Applied Practice and Internship courses, such as CPS 7660, CPS 7661, CPS 7663, CPS 7680, CPS 7681, and CPS 7683 and Graduate Assistant Seminar courses, such as CPS 7975, ECE 7975, EPY 7975, etc.). Students can contact the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services (404/413-8010) for a School Counseling program outline that offers suggested, appropriate electives.

Program total: minimum of 30 semester hours

4520 School Psychology (Ed.S.)

Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) in School Psychology

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building, 404/413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The professional in school psychology is educated in the major disciplines of education and psychology. He or she is equipped to undertake and manage processes and problems related to the education and development of children within schools. A major portion of his or her training concerns the interaction of the child with the social institution of the school. Because of this special orientation, the school psychologist has to be well grounded in the philosophy and methods of education and must achieve a high level of understanding of psychological processes such as learning, personality, and social competence.

Program Objectives

The school psychologist is an applied psychologist who brings skills, instrumentation, and techniques to bear on learning and behavioral problems in the school setting. He or she must be prepared to:

  • Intervene constructively when acute and chronic behavior problems occur.
  • Consult effectively with change agents in the child’s life (i.e., parents or guardians, administrators, and teachers).
  • Participate in the assessment of individual learning problems.
  • Participate in education program planning and management.
  • Provide information to promote effective use of the resources of agencies outside the school setting.
  • Administer programs of psychological services in the educational setting.
  • Design and carry out action and situational research requiring knowledge of the school and of the learner in interaction in such a setting.

Program Academic Regulations

The Ed.S. degree is the second major component (in addition to the master’s degree) of the combined Master’s/Ed.S. program in School Psychology. At times, students may enroll concurrently in some courses from the master’s degree and some courses from the Ed.S. degree to meet the requirements of the combined program. In addition to the areas of knowledge covered under the master’s level of training, the specialist program has some advanced focus on emotional and behavioral development of the child’s psychoeducational functions, study in the field of learning disorders, school-based intervention and consultation. Counseling and consultation skills will be employed, with opportunities for utilizing advanced consultation methods in the school setting. The combined Master’s/Ed.S. program meets the State of Georgia renewable certification requirements and requires a minimum of 36 semester hours for a master’s degree in this major and an additional 42 semester hours to qualify for certification recommendation. A two term internship in a public school setting is required as part of the coursework for the Ed.S. degree and is required for successful completion of the combined Master’s/Ed.S. program.

The M.Ed./Ed.S. School Psychology program is not designed for part-time students. Each semester students are expected to enroll in 12-14 semester credits. Students may distribute their coursework to a maximum of four years rather than the usual three. However, they must maintain continuous enrollment of at least 9 credits per semester during this period (i.e., full time enrollment). The usual period of study in the M.Ed./Ed.S School Psychology program including internship, is three years. Some coursework can be completed during the summers. Under highly unusual circumstances (e.g., medical emergencies) the program faculty will consider requests to extend completion of the program beyond 4 years. Under unusual circumstances, students can apply for a one year leave of absence from the program. Should a student drop out of the program prior to completion, reapplication for admission is necessary. There is no guarantee the student will be readmitted to the program. If a student deviates from a normal schedule, then there is the possibility that the course may not be available in semesters other than those which they are scheduled.

All school psychology students must complete CPS 6040, CPS 7490, CPS 7495, CPS 7510, CPS 7515, CPS 7520, CPS 7570, CPS 8440, CPS 8570 with grades of “B” or higher. A grade lower than a “B” requires repetition of the course. A student cannot repeat a course more than once. Unless otherwise indicated, students may not register for any other CPS course until they have completed CPS 6040 with a grade of “B” or higher.

Successful completion of CPS 8680 Internship in School Psychology satisfies the comprehensive examination requirement for this program.

Students seeking certification from the State of Georgia Professional Standards Commission are required to pass the GACE Basic Skills Assessment (or provide an exemption) and GACE Content Assessment in School Psychology.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s academic performance as well as the student’s performance in laboratory, practicum, and internship classes. A student may be withdrawn from a course and/or the program if the welfare of the student’s clientele or prospective clientele or the functioning of a school or agency is, in the judgment of the Department of Counseling and Psychological Services faculty, in jeopardy as a result of the student’s behavior. Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Principles for Professional Ethics.

Program Degree Requirements

Specialist in Education in School Psychology

Professional Studies (9)
Required (9):

  • EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education I (3)
  • EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)
  • Any 7000-level or above EXC course with permission of advisor (3)

Teaching Field/Major (34)
Required (34):

  • CPS 6150 Ethical and Legal Standards in Counseling and Psychological Services (2)
  • CPS 6450 Group Counseling (3) OR CPS 8400 Introduction to Play Therapy (3)
  • CPS 7340 Social/Cultural Issues in Counseling and Psychological Services (2)
  • CPS 8540 Child/Adolescent Psychopathology (3)
  • CPS 8570 Psychological Consultation in the Schools II (3)
  • CPS 8662 Applied Practice II: Consultation and Intervention Practice in School Psychology (3)
  • CPS 8665 Intervention Strategies for Students with Learning Problems (3)
  • CPS 8680 Internship in School Psychology (12)
  • CPS 8760 Topical Seminar in School Psychology (3)

Program total: minimum of 43 semester hours

4530 Doctoral Programs Admissions

http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/

Admission to the doctoral programs in the College of Education is competitive and an applicant meeting the published minimum requirements is not guaranteed admission.

All documents and other materials submitted by or for persons in connection with their interest in consideration for admission to a program become the property of Georgia State University and cannot be returned at any time. It is the responsibility of each applicant to follow the application procedures completely and correctly and to be certain that all materials have been submitted to the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions by the application deadline. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

Admission to the doctoral program is for the specific academic term the applicant indicates on his or her application unless otherwise indicated on the acceptance letter. An accepted applicant who does not attend the academic term for which acceptance has been granted may reactivate his or her application for up to two academic terms immediately following the original academic term of acceptance, provided the program being applied for admits new students during at least one of those terms. Some programs only admit students one term during the academic year; therefore, postponing enrollment delays beginning the program by a calendar year. In this case, the applicant may not reactivate the application, but must submit a new online application instead (in keeping with university requirements for residency status verification). The applicant must meet current admission criteria, and may also be required to resubmit supporting materials.

A written request for reactivation is required. Address the request to Graduate Admissions, Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions, Attn: Director. Admission for a subsequent term is not automatic or guaranteed.

Deadlines for notification to change entry term are as follows:

  • Fall Semester July 1
  • Spring Semester October 1
  • Summer Semester March 1

If the deadline falls on a weekend or on a university holiday, requests to change term of entry will be accepted until the end of the next business day following the deadline.

Application Procedures and General Admission Criteria

Every applicant must submit the online application. Information requested on the application must be furnished. No items should be left unanswered. Incomplete applications will not be processed and will be withdrawn from consideration after the completion deadline. Applicants must apply online and send all supplemental materials to the addresses listed at http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/. Go to http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/required-application-materials-for-graduate-admissions/  for a current list of required program specific materials.

Admission Completion Deadlines

The Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions must receive applications and supporting materials at the address indicated above no later than the application deadline listed. Should the deadline date fall on a weekend or a holiday, applications and supporting materials will be accepted until the close of business on the next business day following the deadline. Each applicant is responsible for following these application procedures completely and correctly. All application completion deadlines are available online at   http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/non-degree-program-application-completion-deadlines/.

International Applicants

International applicants must provide materials earlier than other applicants to allow for translation and evaluation of foreign documents and for processing of paperwork related to Visa status as well as to allow for travel arrangements for accepted applicants. Application and supporting materials should be received at least three months prior to the doctoral deadline . International applicants should refer to http://education.gsu.edu/international-students/ for additional information.

Reentry Applications

Doctoral students in the College of Education who do not register at Georgia State University for regular courses during three consecutive academic terms are considered inactive for the purposes of registration. If inactive students wish to register, they must file a Reentry Application with the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions. The form, instructions, and the deadline dates are available online at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/.

Doctoral students who have not registered for six consecutive academic terms will be withdrawn from the doctoral program. A notation to that effect will be added to the students’ permanent record. Upon notification of withdrawal, the students will have a maximum of 30 days to petition for readmission. If the petition is approved, the students must satisfy the degree requirements of the graduate bulletin in effect at the time of readmission.

Term of Admission and Term of First Matriculation

All doctoral students’ term of admission is the term for which they were accepted into the program. The term of admission is identified on the students’ letters of acceptance. Students are held responsible for the coursework requirements published in the catalog corresponding to their term of admission.

Term of first matriculation refers to the academic term in which the students took the first course they will include in their program of study. For many students, the term of admission and the term of first matriculation will be the same. However, students who wish to include coursework taken prior to the term of admission will have an earlier term of first matriculation. The seven-year time limit for completion of all nondissertation requirements and the nine-year time limit for completing all requirements both begin the term of first matriculation.

4540 Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) General Information

Admission

Applicants to the Professional Doctorate in Education program must complete and submit the online application for graduate study, pay the nonrefundable application fee of $50.00, and send in all required application materials.

Graduate Assistantships

Graduate teaching assistantships (GTAs) and graduate research assistantships (GRAs) are available to selected doctoral students who demonstrate outstanding academic skills and expertise. Assistantships are made available through the student’s department. The number of GTA and GRA positions available depends on current class loads and research needs.

Doctoral Advisory Committee

Upon admission to a cohort, the student is assigned a major adviser. An additional faculty member will become a member of the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee. Prior to the student’s defense of his or her dissertation, he or she must secure a minimum of one additional member of his or her Doctoral Advisory Committee. This additional member may be a university faculty member or a field-based practitioner who meets the university requirements for membership on a doctoral advisory committee. The major advisor and one of the two additional faculty members must hold graduate faculty status; one of who must hold Graduate Research Faculty Status.

The major advisor serves as the chair of the Doctoral Advisory Committee, is a full-time member of the College of Education faculty, holds primary appointment in the College of Education, has been a faculty member at Georgia State University for at least one academic year, and holds an earned doctorate.

A second member of the Doctoral Advisory Committee must be a full-time member of the College of Education faculty holding an earned doctorate. A third member of the Doctoral Advisory Committee is an individual who can support the student’s dissertation research. The third member must also hold an earned doctorate. After the Doctoral Advisory Committee has been established, the committee, the student, and the department chair must approve any subsequent change of membership.

Dissertation

In addition to the minimum requirements described above, each doctoral student must enroll in a minimum of nine semester hours of dissertation credit. The final grade will be assigned the term the student successfully defends the dissertation.

Comprehensive Examination

The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to evaluate the students’ ability to use the subject content defined in the approved program of study to prepare a dissertation using the “Review and Research Format,” which is currently one of the approved formats in the Georgia State University College of Education.

The comprehensive examination includes a written examination and may also include an oral portion. The students have two opportunities to pass the comprehensive examination. Students who do not pass the examination on the second attempt are not permitted to continue in the doctoral program.

Requirements Following Successful Completion of the Comprehensive Examination

Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until the students have graduated. This enrollment must include a minimum of nine semester hours of dissertation (9990) credit but may also include other coursework.

Enrollment for dissertation credit is permitted only after successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Dissertation Prospectus

The purpose of the dissertation prospectus is to offer the Doctoral Advisory Committee evidence of the significance and rationale of the proposed study. The prospectus presents a statement of the problem or issue, describes the philosophical/theoretical knowledge base within which the dissertation topic is developed, the methodology or procedures to be employed, and the expected implications of findings or conclusions. The prospectus reflects each student’s preparedness to conduct the investigation and write the dissertation. Before beginning work on the prospectus, students should review the college’s Guide for Preparing Dissertations at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/.

Presentation of the Dissertation Prospectus

The students shall publicly present the dissertation prospectus to provide an opportunity for College of Education faculty to contribute to a scholarly critique of the proposed research. The announcement of the prospectus presentation includes the date and location of the presentation and an abstract of the prospectus. No fewer than three members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee must attend the prospectus presentation.

Admission to Doctoral Candidacy

When the students have completed all coursework requirements for the degree except the dissertation the students’ Doctoral Advisory Committee may recommend to the Dean of the College of Education that the students are admitted to candidacy for the Professional Doctorate of Education degree. To be recommended for candidacy, the students must additionally have successfully completed the comprehensive examination, and submitted and presented an approved dissertation prospectus.

Dissertation and Final Dissertation Defense

The dissertation and defense are the culminating activities in the students’ doctoral program, demonstrating high levels of scholarly and intellectual activity. The dissertation is an original contribution to knowledge in the field of study through disciplined inquiry. Conducting, writing, and defending the dissertation are done in accordance with the highest professional standards.

Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three-term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until graduation. These hours of credit must include a minimum of nine semester hours of dissertation (9990) credit but may also include other coursework. Doctoral students must be enrolled in and successfully complete three semester hours of graduate credit (typically dissertation hours) the term all degree requirements are completed. The students must be enrolled in at least three semester hours of coursework during the academic term in which they defend the dissertation.

All doctoral dissertations must comply with the format, style, and procedural instructions established by the College of Education in its Guide for Preparing Dissertations at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/. The guide should be consulted soon after the students complete their comprehensive examination successfully.

The purpose of the oral defense of the dissertation is to enable the Doctoral Advisory Committee to judge the quality of the investigation and the students’ ability to defend their work.

When the dissertation is completed, a public announcement of the oral defense of the dissertation is disseminated via the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions to the College of Education faculty. Additionally, the dissertation must be defended between the first day of classes and the last day of final examinations; it cannot be defended between academic terms. Students should consult the current deadlines for doctoral candidates to plan the timely announcement of the dissertation defense.

At the same time the announcement of the oral defense is submitted, two typed copies of the completed dissertation are made available for faculty review in the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions. The announcement of the oral defense includes the date and location of the defense and an abstract of the dissertation of no more than 350 words.

The oral defense will be scheduled during regular dates of operation (i.e., between the first day of classes and the last day of final examinations each term, excluding official holidays). The oral defense must be attended by no fewer than three (3) members of the Doctoral Advisory Committee and is open to all College of Education faculty and invited guests. The committee will invite other faculty and guests present to question the candidate and to communicate to the committee their professional reactions.

Approval and acceptance of the doctoral dissertation requires a favorable vote of a majority of the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

Electronic Master’s Theses and Doctoral Dissertations Policy

The University requires all students who produce a master´s thesis or doctoral dissertation in fulfillment of his/her degree to upload the final version of these documents to the Digital Archive@GSU as a condition of the award of the degree.

The full policy can be found online at http://webdb.gsu.edu/policies/policy_index.cfm?view_policy=4628&system=1.

Electronic Submission Process:

1. After the student passes the thesis defense and sends the Thesis Chair the final PDF version, the student uploads the thesis on the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Submission Website. If a faculty member submits the thesis defense, then a signed form needs to be received from the student.

2. The Digital Archives main page is located at http://digitalarchive.gsu.edu/

3. The graduate student upload page is located at http://research.library.gsu.edu/ETD

4. The system generates an email to coordinator.

5. The coordinator logs in to library system, reviews, approves, posts, and updates the thesis.

6. The library system sends an email to the student that the work is published.

Requirements for Degree Completion

The purpose of requiring completion of all degree requirements within a fixed period of time is to ensure currency, continuity, and coherence in the academic experiences leading to the degree.

All degree requirements must be successfully completed within five years of the students’ term of first matriculation. Moreover, all requirements for doctoral candidacy (coursework, comprehensive examination, prospectus approval) must be completed within four years of the students’ first term of matriculation. No coursework that was completed more than four years prior to admission to candidacy may be used to meet any doctoral degree requirement.

Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until graduation. This enrollment must include a minimum of nine semester hours of dissertation (9990) credit but may also include other coursework.

The students must be enrolled in and successfully complete three semester hours of graduate credit (typically dissertation hours) during the academic term in which all degree requirements are completed.

Graduation

Graduate degree candidates must file a formal application for graduation with the Graduation Office at least two academic terms in advance of their expected graduation dates. Deadlines are published online Registration Guide each term. Students receiving the Ed.D. degree may have some additional cost relative to graduation and should contact the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions for further information.

Forms for changing the date of graduation may be obtained from the Graduation Office.

4550 Curriculum and Instruction (Ed.D.)

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
639 College of Education Building
404-413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair

The Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) promotes an understanding of the complex dynamics among theory, research, and practice. We believe in preparing empowered scholar-educators who advocate for social justice and educational equity at the classroom, school, district, and state levels. Grounded in rigorous and relevant research, our interdisciplinary courses offer students the opportunity to conceptualize, theorize, dialogue, problem-pose, problem-solve, create, and evaluate a wide range of educational theories, practices, and policies as related to Curriculum and Instruction. Embracing the principles of social justice, the Ed.D. in C&I emphasizes innovation, diversity, and advocacy in PK-12 settings.

The degree is designed for curriculum leaders who may hold other roles in schools such as classroom teachers, assistant principals, coaches, curriculum developers, department chairs, principals, subject/content area coordinators at the school or county level, and clinical faculty. The Doctorate of Education (Ed.D.) in Curriculum and Instruction (C&I) prepares master teachers to become instructional leaders and curriculum specialists at the school and/or school system levels and who wish to develop expertise in the following areas:

  • Advocacy for equity in teaching and learning
  • Curriculum theory and development
  • Pedagogical leadership

The Ed.D. in C&I is a rigorous, collaborative, interdisciplinary program between the departments of Early Childhood Education and Middle and Secondary Education, in the College of Education and Art, Music, and Foreign Language Education in the College of Arts and Sciences. This degree offers an interdisciplinary approach across Pre-Kindergarten through Secondary levels in multiple content areas, Art, Early Childhood and Elementary, Language and Literacy, Mathematics, Middle Level, Foreign Language, Music, Science, and Social Studies Education.

The program is a three-year, flexible cohort model, which is characteristic of nationally recognized exemplary professional doctorate programs. The program consists of 45 hours of course work and 9 hours of dissertation work for a total of 54 hours. Degree requirements include coursework, school- based residency requirement embedded in cohort courses (to include engagement in the professional community such as conference presentation, professional development delivery or publication), qualifying paper, prospectus presentation, and a dissertation using the approved dissertation format for the Georgia State University College of Education. The dissertation will consist of a research study contextualized in the PK-12 school or family setting. A committee consisting of three faculty members, including a minimum of two College of Education graduate or professional faculty members will support the student including review of the qualifying paper and dissertation prospectus proposal and defense.

The Ed.D. in C&I is designed in light of the new Curriculum and Instruction certification rules and graduates of this program will be eligible to obtain the new Curriculum and Instruction service certificate at the S7 level. Students holding a valid Clear Renewable, Level 4 or higher Georgia Teaching (T), Service (S), Technical Specialist (TS), or Leadership (L or PL) certificate at time of admission in their field of study would be eligible to add the Curriculum and Instruction certificate upon completion of the Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction program and completion of the Georgia state approved content assessment.

Admissions

The College of Education admissions requirements for this degree follow doctoral admission criteria listed at http://education.gsu.edu/admissions/graduate-admissions/.

In addition to the general criteria for doctoral admissions in the College of Education, Ed.D. in Curriculum and Instruction applicants will be required to meet the following criteria:

  • At least one degree in the desired content area (concentration) or substantial number of years teaching in desired subject area
  • Master’s degree or Ed.S. in education or closely related field with a GPA of 3.30 or higher
  • A minimum of three (3) years teaching experience
  • 2 professional letters of reference
  • Goals Statement
  • Resume
  • Interview; students applying to the Music Education Concentration includes demonstration of musical skill; students applying to the Art Education
  • Concentration includes professional portfolio
  • Writing sample (i.e., print or electronic publication, course paper, professional blog series, etc.)

Program Academic Regulations

Students enrolled in this program are expected to be working professional educators and as such, their position in the school community will serve as an internship/field experience. Students who are not employed while enrolled will arrange with the Program Coordinator to work in a local setting. Residency requirements are embedded within cohort coursework.

This program is designed to lead to a Georgia Curriculum and Instruction service certificate; however, the service certificate and the doctoral degree are not mutually exclusive. To be eligible for the certificate individuals must meet the following requirements:

  • An admission requirement of a clear and renewable T4 certificate.
  • Completion of a minimum of 9 hours of coursework within a concentration area that aligns with a previously held certification or endorsement field.
  • Passage of the GACE content exam in curriculum and instruction (test is under development).

Up to 9 graduate credit hours total may transfer to the Ed.D. in C&I. Transfer courses may substitute for the research or concentration core(s) only; transfer courses may not be used for program cohort courses. Transfer may not occur for courses taken more than 7 years prior to candidacy. Candidacy is established upon passing of the comprehensive exam.

All courses consist of three (3) hours credit each, unless otherwise indicated.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction

Research Core (15 hours)

  • EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education I (3)
  • EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education I (3)
  • EPRS 8620 Educational Evaluation (3)
  • EDCI 9900 Critique of Educational Research (3)

Choose one:

Major in Curriculum and Instruction (30 hours)
Required (18 hours):

  • EDCI 8400 Complexities of Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum Design (3)
  • EDCI 8650 Curriculum and Instruction in Contemporary Urban Settings (3)
  • EDCI 8900 Educational Inquiry and Assessment in Educational Contexts (6)
  • EDCI 8980 Seminar in Professional Learning and Development (3)
  • EDCI 9850 Research Seminar (3)

Concentrations (12 hours):
Students choose advanced content electives from 8000-9000 level courses in the following concentration areas:

Art Education (12 hours)
Select (12 hours):

  • AE 8000 Introduction to Research in Art Education (3)
  • AE 8010 Philosophy & Curriculum (3)
  • AE 8020 Learning Theory (3)
  • AE 8030 Leader Supervision In Art Education (30
  • AE 8050 Computer Imaging & Instructional Technology (3)
  • AE 8060 Project in Art Education (3)
  • AE 810 Seminar in Art Education (3)
  • AE 8200 History, Culture, & Communication In Art Education (3)
  • AE 8300 Research in Art Education (30
  • AE 8400 Aesthetics and Critical Theory (3)
  • AE 8500 Directed Study (3)
  • AE 8980 Special Problems (3)
  • Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Early Childhood and Elementary Education (12 hours)
Required (6 hours):

  • ECE 9840 Socio-Cultural Issues in Early Childhood and Elementary Education (3)
  • ECE 9960 Advanced Theory and Research in Child Development (3)

Select (6 hours):

  • ECE 9393 Number and Operation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 9394 Geometry and Measurement in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 9395 Algebra in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 9396 Data Analysis and Probability in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 9420 Early Literacy Learning (3)
  • ECE 9820 Teacher-child Relationships in Early Childhood (3)
  • Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Foreign Language Education (12 hours)
Required (6 hours):

  • FORL 8223 Modern Foreign Language Pedagogy: Theory and Practice (3)
  • FORL 8227 Teaching Culture in the Foreign Language Classroom (3)

Select (6 hours):

  • FORL 8226 Teaching Literature in the Foreign Language Classroom (3)
  • FORL 8250 Topics in Pedagogy (3)
  • FORL 8800 Research in Foreign / Second Language Education (3)
  • Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Language and Literacy Education (12 hours)
Required (6 hours):

  • EDRD 8310 Theoretical Models and Processes of Literacy Learning (6) (repeatable)

Select (6 hours):

  • ECE 9420 Early Literacy Learning (3)
  • EDLA 8330 Language Variation and Learning (3)
  • EDRD 8550 Trends and Issues in Language and Literacy Education (3)
  • EDRD 8610 Supervision of School Reading Programs (3)
  • Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Mathematics Education (12 hours) **
Required (3 hours):

  • EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)

Select three (9 hours):

  • ECE 9393 Number and Operation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 9394 Geometry and Measurement in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 9395 Algebra in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 9396 Data Analysis and Probability in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • EDMT 8290 Study of Learning and Instruction in Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 8420 Topics in the School Mathematics Curriculum (3)
  • EDMT 8550 Trends and Issues of Teaching Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 9870 Advanced Research Seminar in Mathematics Education (3)
  • Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Middle Level Education (12 hours)
Required (3 hours):

  • EDCI 8550 Trends and Issues in Middle Level Education (3)

Select three (9 hours):
Each student selects an area of advanced study of three courses (9 semester hours) in the content areas of Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, or Social Studies:

Middle Level Language Arts (9 hours)

  • EDRD 8310 Theoretical Models and Processes of Literacy Learning (6) (repeatable)
  • EDLA 8330 Language Variation and Learning (3)

Middle Level Mathematics (9 hours)
Required (3 hours):

  • EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)

Select 2 courses for six (6 hours):

  • EDMT 8290 Study of Learning and Instruction in Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 8420 Topics in the School Mathematics Curriculum (3)
  • EDMT 8550 Trends and Issues of Teaching Mathematics (3)
  • EDMT 9870 Advanced Research Seminar in Mathematics Education (3)

Middle Level Science (9 hours)

  • EDSC 8430 Nature of Science (3)
  • EDSC 9870 Advanced Research Seminar in Science Education (3) (repeatable)

Middle Level Social Studies (9 hours)

  • EDSS 8290 Learning, Curriculum, and Instruction in Social Studies (3) (repeatable)
  • EDSS 8420 Topics in the School Social Studies Curriculum (3) (repeatable)
  • EDSS 8550 Trends and Issues of Teaching Social Studies (3) (repeatable)

*Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Music Education (12 hours)
Required (12 hours):

  • MUS 8260 Curriculum & Assessment in Music Education (3)
  • MUS 8900 Non-Thesis Research in Music Education (3)
  • MUS 8960 Proseminar in Music Education (3) (repeatable)
  • Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Science Education (12 hours)
Choose from the following courses*:

  • EDSC 8430 Nature of Science (3)
  • EDSC 9870 Advanced Research Seminar in Science Education (3) (repeatable)
  • *Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Social Studies Education (12 hours)
Choose from the following repeatable courses*:

  • EDSS 8290 Learning, Curriculum, and Instruction in Social Studies (3) (repeatable)
  • EDSS 8420 Topics in the School Social Studies Curriculum (3) (repeatable)
  • EDSS 8550 Trends and Issues of Teaching Social Studies (3) (repeatable)
  • *Additional courses may be selected with the consent of the advisor.

Dissertation (9 hours)
EDCI 9990 Dissertation (9 hours)

Program Total: Minimum of 54 semester hours

**Optional K-5 Mathematics Endorsement:
As part of the coursework leading to the Doctor of Education degree, students who hold a current teaching certification from the Georgia Professional Standards Commission may satisfy part of the K-5 Mathematics Endorsement requirements by completing four 9000-level courses (ECE 9393, ECE 9394, ECE 9395, and ECE 9396). To apply for the K-5 Mathematics Endorsement, students must also complete ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Education I (3) while enrolled in one of the four specified 9000-level endorsement courses. ECE 7740 does not satisfy the 8000-9000 level-course requirements for the College of Education courses applicable to the Doctor of Education degree.

4560 Educational Leadership (Ed.D.)

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building
404-413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

The Ed.D. in educational leadership targets the professional needs of educational leaders whose long-term career goals include leading schools, school districts and other education agencies in a complex, highly competitive global environment.

The purpose of the program is to advance the development and practice of effective educational leadership by providing senior-level administrators with the following:

  • the knowledge and skills necessary to deal effectively with the complex issues facing education today
  • the methods of inquiry necessary to analyze current educational problems
  • the leadership skills necessary to direct the development and implementation of programs to address those problems and to disseminate the results in various professional and public forums
  • the knowledge and applied skills rarely provided in traditional advanced degree programs in educational leadership in an alternative format that meets the needs of senior-level administrators.

Program Academic Regulations

The program, delivered in a three-­year, closed cohort model, consists of 45 hours of course work and 9 hours of dissertation for a total of 54 hours. Candidates who hold the performance­-based Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) or performance-based add-­on may transfer up to six courses (18 hours) into the Ed.D. program. A transcript review is required for candidates seeking to transfer courses into the program from institutions other than Georgia State University.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership

Required Courses (54):

  • EPEL 8000 Research in Educational Leadership and Organizational Culture (3)
  • EPEL 8020 Leadership for Change in a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPEL 8330 Advanced Law, Policy, and Governance (3)
  • EPEL 8420 Advanced Instructional Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 8500 Central Office Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 8620 Psychological Aspects of Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 8930 Applied Research (3)
  • EPEL 9000 Concepts of Leadership and Research in Educational Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 9970 Advanced Seminar in Educational Leadership (3)
  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
  • EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education I (3)
  • EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)
  • EPRS 8620 Educational Evaluation (3)
  • EPSF 8440 Curriculum Design and Analysis (3)
  • EPS 8360 Educational Policy Making and Analysis (3)
  • EPS 9990 Dissertation (9)
  • Other appropriate courses numbered 8000 to 8999 may be substituted into the program of study by the Educational Leadership unit and the Ed.D. cohort coordinator.

Program total: minimum of 54 semester hours

4570 Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) General Information

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree offered by the Georgia State University College of Education is congruent in purpose with the following statement of the Council of Graduate Schools in the United States:

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is the highest academic degree granted by American universities. It is awarded to those who have demonstrated mastery of the field and successfully completed and defended a dissertation. The degree is a clear recognition that the student has the ability to complete a substantial piece of research work, to present formally the results of this work, and to appreciate its significance in the general field. The degree has always been considered the most significant achievement in preparation for an active career in scholarship and research. The requirements set by American universities for attainment of the Ph.D. degree may vary considerably among universities, but all have a common set of experiences and tasks designed to produce a scholar and researcher with recognized competence in the chosen field. The successful candidate for the Ph.D. is then considered prepared to undertake a career of scholarship, research, and service to society.

Each doctoral major field of study offered by the College of Education provides preparation for careers of scholarship, research, and service to society.

Doctoral Assistantships, Instructorships, and Fellowships

Graduate teaching assistantships (GTAs) and graduate research assistantships (GRAs) are available to selected doctoral students who demonstrate outstanding academic skills and expertise. Assistantships are made available through the student’s department. The number of GTA and GRA positions available depends on current class loads and research needs.

Minimum Requirements for Degree Completion

Each doctoral student admitted to the College of Education will (a) complete a program of coursework approved by his or her Doctoral Advisory Committee, (b) complete an approved residency, (c) perform successfully on a comprehensive examination, (d) develop and present a dissertation research prospectus, (e) gain admission to candidacy, and (f) submit and successfully defend a doctoral dissertation. Individual programs may have additional requirements that the students must complete. All requirements must be completed within a nine-year time period as described below.

Doctoral Advisory Committee

The Doctoral Advisory Committee assist the students in planning an appropriate program of study and preparing for completion of non-coursework requirements, including the comprehensive examination. The Doctoral Advisory Committee has the supervisory responsibility for approving the program of coursework and approving non-coursework requirements.

Upon admission to a doctoral major in the College of Education, each student is assigned a temporary adviser from among the faculty of the major field of study in which admission has been granted. This temporary adviser assists the student until a Doctoral Advisory Committee is established. The student should establish the permanent doctoral adviser and advisory committee as soon as feasible but not later than the accrual of 27 semester hours of coursework nor later than one calendar year from the undertaking of coursework.

The initial Doctoral Advisory Committee consists of a minimum of three members as follows:

  1. The major adviser serves as the chair of the Doctoral Advisory Committee, is a full-time, tenure track member of the College of Education faculty, holds primary appointment in the College of Education, has been a faculty member at Georgia State University for at least one academic year, is a member of the faculty of the major to which the students have been admitted, and holds an earned doctorate.
  2. A second member of the Doctoral Advisory Committee must be a full-time member of the College of Education faculty holding an earned doctorate.
  3. A third member of the Doctoral Advisory Committee must represent a major outside the student’s major.

The Doctoral Advisory Committee must include a minimum of three people holding earned doctorates.

All appointments to the Doctoral Advisory Committee, including its chair, are subject to approval by each student, the department chair, and the dean of the College of Education. After the Doctoral Advisory Committee has been established, the committee, each student, the department chair, and the dean of the College of Education must approve any subsequent change of membership.

Program of Study

The primary emphasis of the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree program is the preparation of students as researchers, scholars, and scientist practitioners. Research experiences will be a continual part of students’ learning including completion of substantial coursework focused on research and scholarship as well as participation in research activities. Congruent with this perspective, students will be active participants in ongoing research activities and scholarship with GSU faculty and/or in research teams from the beginning of their enrollment in the doctoral program. Students in College of Education Ph.D. programs will continually participate in such activities throughout their doctoral program resulting in conference presentations and scholarship submitted for publication. While these experiences will be time-intensive and may overlap with some coursework, these efforts are expected to occur above and beyond doctoral students’ coursework.

The formal coursework requirement is satisfied through successful completion of each course in the program of study with a grade of “C” or higher (including S), with an overall cumulative grade point average of 3.50 or better. Coursework in which a grade below “C” is earned may not be applied to the doctoral program.

A minimum of 36 semester hours, excluding dissertation credit, is required in each student’s doctoral program. To meet coursework requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, a minimum of 24 semester hours must be earned in the doctoral program of study at Georgia State University. The 24 semester hour minimum may not include credits transferred from other institutions, from other doctoral programs within the college or university, from a specialist program, or from a nondegree status. All coursework applied to the doctoral program of study must be post-master’s work. The use of credits earned beyond the master’s degree while in a nondegree status is limited to a maximum of nine semester hours and should be counted as part of the 12 semester hours allowed in transfer.

No coursework (transferred or from Georgia State University) that has been completed more than seven years prior to admission to candidacy may be used to meet any doctoral degree requirement. (Admission to candidacy occurs after admission to the program.)

Planning of coursework for doctoral study is done individually with consideration of each student’s career goals, prior academic work, and professional experience; however, all programs of study will foster the development of skills and abilities in a major area and a core area. This catalog is the sole source for approved program requirements. Programs of study should be planned to conform to requirements stated in this catalog. A minimum of 36 semester hours of coursework is required in each student’s doctoral program. College of Education courses applied to meet these requirements must be at the 8000 or 9000 level. No dissertation credit may be applied to the minimum requirement of 36 semester hours of coursework. The minimally required 36 semester hours are distributed among the core and major areas as follows:

Core area

A minimum of 18 semester hours; The purpose of the core area requirement is to develop general research competence, including expertise in at least one particular research method appropriate to the major field and/or dissertation research, and to develop awareness of the context in which educational issues can be understood and interpreted. The general requirements of the core area are described later in this chapter. Variations for each program are included with the program’s description.

Major area

A minimum of 18 semester hours; The purpose of the major area requirement is to increase the doctoral student’s knowledge base in the academic area in which scholarly activity is to be pursued.

Dissertation

In addition to the minimum requirements described above, each doctoral student must enroll in a minimum of 15 semester hours of dissertation credit. The final grade will be assigned the term the student successfully defends the dissertation.

Research

A minimum of 30 semester hours of research must be completed, which includes 15 semester hours of dissertation and 15 semester hours of coursework as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

Doctoral Residency

The purpose of the residency is (a) to provide close and continuous involvement with faculty, professional colleagues, and other graduate students; (b) to provide a supervised opportunity for development in the areas of scholarship, teaching, and service; and (c) to provide a period of time for concentrated study and coursework, reading, reflecting, and research appropriate for the advanced degree.

Doctoral students must complete five of the following six elements for their Residency Program Plan.

  1. Participate in ongoing research and scholarly experiences
  2. Submit a research/scholarly manuscript to a peer-reviewed journal as primary or lead author (or as an author with substantial contribution to the research study and manuscript)
  3. Participate in identifying and applying for a grant/fellowship
  4. Present at a research/scholarly conference
  5. Engage in university teaching internship
  6. Serve the institution and/or profession

Comprehensive Examination

The purpose of the comprehensive examination is to evaluate the students’ ability to use the subject content of the major, core, and cognate areas (if applicable) as defined in the approved program of study to perform cognitive tasks including recall and application and especially focusing on analysis, synthesis, and evaluation of that content.

The comprehensive examination includes a written examination and may also include an oral portion. The students have two opportunities to pass the comprehensive examination. Students who do not pass the examination on the second attempt are not permitted to continue in the doctoral program.

To be eligible to take the comprehensive examination, the students’ cumulative grade point average in the doctoral program of study must be no less than 3.50. Each student’s doctoral committee determines what coursework must be completed before he or she may take the comprehensive examination.

Requirements Following Successful Completion of the Comprehensive Examination

Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until the students have graduated. This enrollment must include a minimum of 15 semester hours of dissertation (9990) credit but may also include other coursework.

Enrollment for dissertation credit is permitted only after successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Review of Research for the Protection of Human Subjects

Students, faculty, or staff who are planning to conduct research involving human subjects must submit pertinent information for review by the Institutional Review Board for the Protection of Human Subjects in Research (IRB). The IRB is charged with protecting the rights and welfare of human subjects by reviewing the background, purpose, methodology, and instrumentation of all research involving human subjects conducted by faculty, staff, students, and employees of Georgia State University.

All research involving human subjects requires review by the IRB. Procedures and the necessary forms for submitting proposals to the IRB are available from each student’s department.

A copy of the appropriate human subjects review form showing all necessary approval must be submitted with the recommendation to Doctoral Candidacy form to the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions before final approval can be obtained for these documents.

For further information regarding this review process, students should contact their respective departments.

On Campus Resources

The Learning Resource Unit in the Counseling and Testing Center offers a variety of services, including writing and editorial services that can be useful to doctoral students. Contact 404/413-1640 for further information.

Dissertation Prospectus and Dissertation Advisory Committee

The purpose of the dissertation prospectus is to offer the Dissertation Advisory Committee evidence of the significance and rationale of the proposed study. The prospectus describes the
philosophical/theoretical knowledge base within which the dissertation topic is developed, the methodology or procedures to be employed, and the expected implications of findings or conclusions. The prospectus reflects each student’s preparedness to conduct the investigation and write the dissertation. Before beginning work on the prospectus, students should review the college’s Guide for Preparing Dissertations at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/.

Following completion of the student’s comprehensive examination but before approval of the prospectus, the student and the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee will consider reconstitution of the committee to form the Dissertation Advisory Committee. All requirements for the construction of the Doctoral Advisory Committee apply to the Dissertation Advisory Committee with the addition that a majority of the committee, including the committee chair, must hold graduate faculty status in the College of Education. The resulting Dissertation Advisory Committee should represent expertise in both the area of the research topic and the proposed research methodology and consist of no fewer than four members with earned doctorates, which mean that at least three Dissertation Advisory Committee members must be College of Education faculty who hold graduate faculty status.

The Dissertation Advisory Committee aids each student in developing the dissertation prospectus and later the dissertation. The committee is responsible for judging the significance and acceptability of the dissertation prospectus, the soundness and acceptability of the dissertation, and the competence and acceptability of the students’ oral defense of the dissertation.

Presentation of the Dissertation Prospectus

The students shall publicly present the dissertation prospectus to provide an opportunity for College of Education faculty to contribute to a scholarly critique of the proposed research. The announcement of the prospectus presentation includes the date and location of the presentation and an abstract of the prospectus. No fewer than four members of the Dissertation Advisory Committee must attend the prospectus presentation.

Announcement of the prospectus presentation must be made at least twelve (12) business days prior to the date of the scheduled prospectus presentation. Additionally, the prospectus must be presented between the first day of classes and the last day of final examinations; it cannot be presented between academic terms. Students should consult the current deadlines for doctoral students to plan the timely announcement of the prospectus presentation.

Approval and acceptance of the dissertation prospectus requires a favorable vote of a majority of the Dissertation Advisory Committee, but the majority for this vote must include no fewer than four members regardless of the size of the committee.

Admission to Doctoral Candidacy

When the students have completed all coursework requirements for the degree except the dissertation and, in the case of counseling psychology and counselor education and practice majors only, the internship, the students’ Dissertation Advisory Committee may recommend to the Dean of the College of Education that the students are admitted to candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree. To be recommended for candidacy, the students must additionally have fulfilled their department’s residency requirement, completed all required examinations during the comprehensive examination, and submitted and presented an approved dissertation prospectus. The students must be recommended for candidacy within seven years of their term of first matriculation, that is, when they took the first course to be counted toward completion of degree requirements.

Dissertation and Final Dissertation Defense

The dissertation and defense are the culminating activities in the students’ doctoral program, demonstrating high levels of scholarly and intellectual activity. The dissertation is an original contribution to knowledge in the field of study through disciplined inquiry. Conducting, writing, and defending the dissertation are done in accordance with the highest professional standards.

Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three-term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until graduation. These hours of credit must include a minimum of 15 semester hours of dissertation (9990) credit but may also include other coursework. Doctoral students must be enrolled in and successfully complete three semester hours of graduate credit (typically dissertation hours) the term all degree requirements are completed. The students must be enrolled in at least three semester hours of coursework during the academic term in which they defend the dissertation.

All doctoral dissertations must comply with the format, style, and procedural instructions established by the College of Education in its Guide for Preparing Dissertations at http://education.gsu.edu/student-services/forms-policies-regulations/. The guide should be consulted soon after the students complete their comprehensive examination successfully.

The purpose of the oral defense of the dissertation is to enable the Dissertation Advisory Committee to judge the quality of the investigation and the students’ ability to defend their work.

When the dissertation is completed, a public announcement of the oral defense of the dissertation is disseminated via the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions to the College of Education faculty. The announcement must be submitted to the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions at least ten business days prior to the scheduled defense. Additionally, the dissertation must be defended between the first day of classes and the last day of final examinations; it cannot be defended between academic terms. Students should consult the current deadlines for doctoral candidates to plan the timely announcement of the dissertation defense.

At the same time the announcement of the oral defense is submitted, two typed copies of the completed dissertation are made available for faculty review in the Office of Academic Assistance and Graduate Admissions. The announcement of the oral defense includes the date and location of the defense and an abstract of the dissertation of no more than 350 words.

The oral defense is scheduled on the main campus of the university during regular dates of operation (i.e., between the first day of classes and the last day of final examinations each term, excluding official holidays). The oral defense must be attended by no fewer than four (4) members of the Dissertation Advisory Committee and is open to all College of Education faculty and invited guests. The committee will invite other faculty and guests present to question the candidate and to communicate to the committee their professional reactions.

Approval and acceptance of the doctoral dissertation requires a favorable vote of a majority of the Dissertation Advisory Committee.

Electronic Master’s Theses and Doctoral Dissertations Policy

The University requires all students who produce a master´s thesis or doctoral dissertation in fulfillment of his/her degree to upload the final version of these documents to the Digital Archive@GSU as a condition of the award of the degree.

The full policy can be found online at http://webdb.gsu.edu/policies/policy_index.cfm?view_policy=4628&system=1.

Electronic Submission Process:

1. After the student passes the thesis defense and sends the Thesis Chair the final PDF version, the student uploads the thesis on the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Submission Website. If a faculty member submits the thesis defense, then a signed form needs to be received from the student.

2. The Digital Archives main page is located at http://digitalarchive.gsu.edu/

3. The graduate student upload page is located at http://research.library.gsu.edu/ETD

4. The system generates an email to coordinator.

5. The coordinator logs in to library system, reviews, approves, posts, and updates the thesis.

6. The library system sends an email to the student that the work is published.

Requirements for Degree Completion

The purpose of requiring completion of all degree requirements within a fixed period of time is to ensure currency, continuity, and coherence in the academic experiences leading to the degree.

All degree requirements must be successfully completed within nine years of the students’ term of first matriculation. Moreover, all requirements for doctoral candidacy (coursework, comprehensive examination, prospectus approval) must be completed within seven years of the students’ first term of matriculation. No coursework that was completed more than seven years prior to admission to candidacy may be used to meet any doctoral degree requirement.

Enrollment for a minimum of three semester hours of credit is required during at least two out of each three term period following successful completion of the comprehensive examination until graduation. This enrollment must include a minimum of 15 semester hours of dissertation (9990) credit but may also include other coursework.

The students must be enrolled in and successfully complete three semester hours of graduate credit (typically dissertation hours) during the academic term in which all degree requirements are completed.

Graduation

Graduate degree candidates must file a formal application for graduation with the Graduation Office at least two academic terms in advance of their expected graduation dates. Deadlines are published online  at http://registrar.gsu.edu/graduation/. Students receiving the Ph.D. degree may have some additional cost relative to graduation.

The form for changing the date of graduation is also located at http://registrar.gsu.edu/graduation/.

General Core Area Requirements (18 hours)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course(3):

  • EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education I (3)
  • EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education I (3)

Required (12):

  • A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
  • Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology

  • EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
  • EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
  • EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
  • EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
  • EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
  • EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
  • EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
  • EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
  • EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
  • EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
  • EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology

  • ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
  • EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
  • EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
  • EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
  • EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
  • EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
  • EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
  • EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology

  • EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
  • EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology

  • EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
  • EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology

  • EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
  • EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
  • EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
  • EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):

  • EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
  • EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
  • EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
  • EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
  • EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
  • EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
  • EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
  • EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
  • EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
  • EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

4580 Counseling Psychology (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Counseling Psychology

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building
404-413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The American Psychological Association accredits the Ph.D. major in Counseling Psychology at Georgia State University. It subscribes to a scientist practitioner model for the training of counseling psychologists. Students are prepared to profit from and contribute to the body of knowledge underlying counseling psychology. Graduates are also equipped with a rich array of clinical skills and are eligible for licensure as applied psychologists. The program of study prepares students for employment in academic and private settings.

Philosophy

The services of counseling psychology are primarily directed to the problems of everyday living rather than to psychopathology. Although psychopathology is also studied to allow for a more accurate reading of normal behavior, it is not the central focus of the program. It is rather cultural discontinuities, developmental difficulties and challenges, educational and occupational choice making and adjustment, marriage and family problems, high risk behaviors, unhealthy lifestyles, and the like that receive primary attention. In assisting persons to adjust creatively and to fulfill their human potential, the counseling psychologist is expected to perform three complementary roles: a preventative role in helping persons anticipate, circumvent, and forestall future adjustment difficulties; a developmental role in helping persons make use of life experiences in the realization of their potentials; and a remedial role in helping persons overcome personal problems. Students are trained to use individual and group counseling, psycho-educational techniques, and consultation skills to address the above mentioned problem areas.

The program emphasis is on counseling psychology and not psychological counseling. Therefore, students are expected to affiliate with psychology because it is the generic discipline from which the counseling psychology specialty arises. The program seeks to train psychologists who will prepare themselves for licensure, the diplomate, and other forms of professional sanctioning. While the faculty reserves the right to change program requirements as the need arises, the following is representative of current program requirements for the degree. Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.

Program Admission

Students beginning the doctoral program in Counseling Psychology should have completed a master’s degree in an appropriate major, such as counseling or clinical psychology. Students lacking an appropriate master’s will be required to complete compensatory curricular experiences as stipulated by their doctoral advisory committees.

Program Academic Regulations

The internship (CPS 9680) is an essential component of doctoral training programs in professional psychology. It provides trainees with the opportunity to take substantial responsibility for carrying out major professional functions in the context of appropriate supervisory support, professional role modeling, and awareness of administrative structures. The internship is distinguished from the applied practice experience by the increased responsibility and independence afforded the students and by the more intense nature of client contact. Internships in Counseling Psychology require either a fulltime experience for one academic or calendar year or a halftime experience for two consecutive years.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Counseling Psychology

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):
A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning course (3)

Choose One Course (3):
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (50-51)

Required (38):
CPS 8350 Biopsychology and Medication (3)
CPS 8370 Advanced Career Counseling (3)
CPS 8450 Advanced Group Counseling (3)
CPS 8530 Professional Issues and Decisions (3)
CPS 8650 Advanced Counseling Theory (3)
CPS 8660 Applied Practice II: Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling (6)
CPS 9480 Supervision of Counseling Services (3)
CPS 9680 Doctoral Internship (3)
CPS 9920 Research and Publication (2)
CPS 9962 Counseling Psychology Seminar (6)
PSYC 8500 History of Psychology (3)

Select one course (3):
PSYC 8510 Advanced Social Psychology (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)
(If EPY 8220 is completed to satisfy the Core area requirements, PSYC 8510 must be completed to satisfy this requirement. EPY 8220 can only be applied to one area of study. It cannot satisfy both the Core Area and the Major Area.)

Select one course (3):
CPS 8100 Psychobehavioral Diagnosis (3)
CPS 8540 Child/Adolescent Psychopathology Assessment (3)

Required (3):
CPS 9665 Assessment Practicum (3)

Select one course (3-4):
CPS 9410 Assessment of Intelligence (3)
CPS 9420 Adult Personality Assessment (3)
PSYC 8030 Assessment II (4)

C. Cognate Area (18)

Required (9):
CPS 8340 Advanced Multicultural Counseling Strategies and Intervention (3)
CPS 9660 Applied Practice III (6)

The cognate area provides the students an opportunity to enrich their preparation as counseling psychologists with further study in a related area of expertise. The students must select one of the following cognate areas (9): child and family, clinical assessment, health psychology, human sexuality, psychotherapy, multicultural, geriatric psychology, organizational development, rehabilitation psychology, or research methodology. Students should contact their Doctoral Advisory Committees for a program outline for Counseling Psychology. The program outline describes the course sequencing and describes additional cognate course requirements.

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
CPS 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 101-102 semester hours

4590 Counselor Education and Practice (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Counselor Education and Practice

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building
404-413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The Counselor Education and Practice program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) Doctoral training extends beyond course content hours and field experiences. Doctoral students learn to examine critically the state of the art, to generate research inquiries, and to advance the profession of counseling through oral and written contributions. The doctoral level counselor represents a “scientist-practitioner” model and should be both consumer and producer of research. Students in this program are expected to follow the most recent version of the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics.

Departmental Endorsement Policy

The Department of Counseling and Psychological Services requires that program faculty endorsement be given only for the program for which the graduate students have been prepared.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Counselor Education and Practice

A. Core Area (21)

The Core Area consists of 18 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (18 hours)

Required (6):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning course (3)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (44)

Required (44):
CPS 8370 Advanced Career Counseling (3)
CPS 8450 Advanced Group Counseling (3)
CPS 8530 Professional Issues and Decisions (3)
CPS 8650 Advanced Counseling Theory (3)
CPS 8660 Applied Practice II: Professional and Rehabilitation Counseling (3)
CPS 9480 Supervision of Counseling Services (3)
CPS 9660 Applied Practice III (3)
CPS 9661 Supervision Internship (3)
CPS 9680 Doctoral Internship (9)
CPS 9920 Research and Publication (2)
CPS 9963 Leadership in Counselor Education: Professional and Social Advocacy (6)
EPY 9000 Facilitating College Teaching (3)

C. Cognate Area and Elective (12)

The cognate area provides students an opportunity to enrich their preparation as a counselor with further study in a related area of expertise. Students select one of the following cognate areas:

Clinical Rehabilitation Counseling
Behavior Therapy
Research
Wellness
Multiculturalism
Child Clinical/Family

Students may design an individual cognate area with permission from their Doctoral Advisory Committee. The students’ Doctoral Advisory Committee may require courses in the cognate area be from outside the department, outside the College of Education, or both.

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
CPS 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 92 semester hours

4600 Early Childhood and Elementary Education (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Early Childhood and Elementary Education

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair

Philosophy

The theoretical stance of the Early Childhood and Elementary Education PhD Program is pragmatic. No single theory or research approach can solve the complex issues that impact children in a rapidly changing world; thus, we (the PhD faculty) believe that collaborative, comprehensive research and scholarship is our most powerful tool for investigating and answering questions about children’s learning and education.  Our diverse faculty has expertise in qualitative and quantitative research and evaluation. Interweaving theory, research, and practice, we inquire about how children’s learning is shaped by educational inequities across race, gender, (dis)ability, and social class; educational globalization; community, home, and school connections; culturally responsive pedagogy; urban education; and curricular and technological innovations. We leverage this expertise to advocate for children’s learning in multiple contexts, in and out of school.

Program Academic Regulations

If students in the Educational Specialist program in Early Childhood Education completed ECE 8400 Teacher Development (3) and ECE 8410 Curriculum Theory, Design, and Application (3), these courses can substitute for  ECE 9360 Curriculum, Issues, and Historical Perspectives in Early Childhood and Elementary Education (3) and ECE 9400 Teacher Development (3) in the Ph.D. program in Early Childhood Education.

In addition to the college-wide requirements for doctoral students, the department requires that each doctoral student has experience with young children and that each student participate in Residency experiences. For a detailed description of  program requirements, please refer to the Program Manual for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Early Childhood Educationavailable from the department.

Components

Each doctoral student’s planned program of study is divided into two academic components: Research and the Major. The Research component includes 21 credit hours, including a Core set of courses that introduce research methods as well as courses that deepen knowledge about a particular set of complementary methods (qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods). The Major includes a set of 27 hours of courses intended to deepen knowledge of research methodologies that guide scholarly inquiry in elementary and early childhood education, theories of human development, curricular issues, and historical perspectives. The Major also includes a set of electives from which students can choose. Electives can also be taken outside the Department of Early Childhood Education. Students will choose electives that will, together, create an area of specialization. Each program of study will culminate with a dissertation.

Research and Evaluation Design and Methodology

Doctoral students are expected to be able to design, implement, and interpret research. Therefore, doctoral students are expected to have knowledge of research designs and methods. Doctoral students are also expected to engage in high quality research via a research apprenticeship experience and a dissertation. Courses suggested to develop this competence are listed in the Program Manual for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Early Childhood and Elementary Education.

Early Childhood and Elementary Education

All doctoral students in the Early Childhood and Elementary Education Major will be expected to promote scholarly advocacy for children, to understand the nature of children and their development, to understand theories undergirding educational practices and issues, and to excel as teacher educators. Required residency experiences ensure that students develop knowledge and skills about mentoring and teaching educators as well as conducting research. Courses required in the Major ensure that doctoral students share knowledge about historical, political, developmental, and theoretical paradigms that have shaped educational contexts and research. In addition, elective courses allow for individualization of the doctoral program to create an area of expertise within Early Childhood and Elementary Education. The Major course offerings are further described in the Program Manual for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Early Childhood and Elementary Education.

Planned Study

Planning doctoral study coursework to address the goals mentioned above is done in consultation with an Advisor with consideration of each student’s career goals, prior academic work, and professional experience. Each program, therefore, is unique. However, the following courses are offered:

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Early Childhood and Elementary Education

A. Core Area (21)

The Core Area consists of 18 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (18 hours)

Required (6):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):
A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (27)

Required (12):
ECE 9360 Curriculum, Issues, and Historical Perspectives in Early Childhood and Elementary Education (3)
ECE 9800 Doctoral Studies (1) [taken 3 times in first two years]
ECE 9860 Evaluating and Interpreting Research in Early Childhood and Elementary Education (3)
ECE 9960  Advanced Theory and Research in Child Development (3)

Elective Courses: (minimum 15)
At least 12 hours of elective courses must come from within the department. Doctoral-level elective courses offered within the Department include:
EPRS 9120/ECE 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
ECE 9380/EPRS 9380 Discourse Analysis (3)
ECE 9393 Number and Operation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 9394 Geometry and Measurement in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 9395 Algebra in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 9396 Data Analysis and Probability in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 9400 Teacher Development (3)
ECE 9420 Early Literacy Learning (3)
ECE 9810 Directed Readings (1-3)
ECE 9820 Teacher-Child Relationships in Early Childhood (3)
ECE 9840 Socio-Cultural Issues in Early Childhood and Elementary Education (3)
ECE 9850 Research Seminar in Early Childhood and Elementary Education (3)
ECE 9890 Research Apprenticeship (3)
ECE 9910 Developing as a scholarly writer (3)

K-5 Mathematics Endorsement (optional):

As part of the coursework leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree, students who hold a current teaching certification from the Georgia Professional Standards Commission may satisfy part of the K-5 Mathematics Endorsement requirements by completing four 9000-level courses (ECE 9393, ECE 9394, ECE 9395, and ECE 9396). To apply for the K-5 Mathematics Endorsement, students must also complete ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Education I (3) while enrolled in one of the four specified 9000-level endorsement courses. ECE 7740 does not satisfy the 8000-9000 level-course requirements for the College of Education courses applicable to the Doctor of Philosophy degree.

C. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
ECE 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 63 semester hours

4610 Education of Students with Exceptionalities (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Education of Students with Exceptionalities

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

Concentration Areas: Autism Spectrum Disorders; Behavior Disorders; Communication Disorders; Deaf/Hard of Hearing; Early Childhood Special Education; Intellectual Disabilities Learning Disabilities; Physical and Health Disabilities (Orthopedic Impairments)

The Ph.D. major in Education of Students with Exceptionalities provides graduates with the skills necessary to succeed in university positions as they perform the roles of teaching, research, and grant writing; and/or to provide a high level of competence for leadership in a variety of community, state, or national service agencies. The program is designed to educate future special education leaders in greater knowledge, understanding, and expertise in one area of concentration in special education, while at the same time making sure that they are fully equipped with a broad knowledge of general special education and with advanced skills in research and design methods.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s performance in all academic settings. Students who fail to make progress in a timely manner or who demonstrate inappropriate or unprofessional conduct may be withdrawn from a course or the program. If such removal from a course is necessary, the student will receive the grade of “F” and may be judged ineligible to reenroll in the course.

Students complete coursework depending on their background and concentration. These could be special education (EXC) courses or any university courses that support the major area of study and are approved by the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Education of Students with Exceptionalities

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (19 minimum)

Required (16):
EXC 8961 Professional Development Seminar in Special Education  (4)
EXC 8980 Professional Investigation and Writing in Special Education (3)
EXC 9900 Research Seminar in Special Education (3)
EXC 9981 Grant Proposal Writing in Special Education (3)
EXC 9985 Ethics and the Advancement of Research (3)

Select (3):  Course will be selected and approved by the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee.

C. University Teaching Cognate  (6)

Required (6):
EPY 9000 Facilitating College Teaching (3)
EXC 9660 Internship in Special Education I (3)

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EXC 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 58 semester hours

4620 Educational Policy Studies (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Educational Policy Studies

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building
404-413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

Concentration Areas: Educational Leadership; Research, Measurement, and Statistics; Social Foundations of Education

The Ph.D. major in Educational Policy Studies allows students to examine the philosophy and practice of education and to utilize various methods for the study of educational theory and practice to become policy makers and examiners of policy and the effects of policy on education. The broader requirements of the Department of Educational Policy Studies offer students the opportunity to link their programs of study with broader social and educational issues in such areas as race, gender, class, leadership, and policy. This broader context establishes an understanding of the programs of study as essential components rather than separate structures of our social, economic, and political lives.

Concentration Areas

Students select one of the concentration areas as part of his or her doctoral program. Newly admitted students will be assigned a temporary adviser from the department at the time of admission.

Concentration in Educational Leadership

This concentration emphasizes organizational leadership, policy development, supervision, and management. The leadership concentration will be designed to satisfy the career objectives of the students. Graduates may anticipate careers in school administration, governmental education agencies, and the professorate.

Concentration in Research, Measurement, and Statistics

This concentration prepares graduates to investigate research methodologies, to conduct research related to schools, and to conduct and critique research in educational practice, policy, and administration. Students develop knowledge and skills in qualitative and quantitative research and evaluation methods.

Concentration in Social Foundations of Education

Social foundations is a broadly conceived field of educational study that derives its character from a number of academic disciplines and interdisciplinary studies. At Georgia State University, the disciplines involved in social foundations inquiry are history, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and political science; the interdisciplinary field is cultural studies. The purpose of social foundations study is to bring the intellectual resources derived from these areas to bear in developing interpretive, normative, and critical perspectives of educational theory, policy, and practices, both inside of and outside of schools.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Policy Studies

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

The Social Foundations and Psychology of Learning Core requirements (3) must be completed during the first two years of the students’ program.

B. Major Area (24)

The students must take EPS 9270 during the first year after being admitted and EPS 9260 during the subsequent academic term.

Required (6):
EPS 9260 Issues of Race, Class, and Gender in Education (3)
EPS 9270 Research in Educational Policy Studies (3)

The students select one of the following three concentration areas:

B.1 – Ph.D. Concentration in Educational Leadership (18 hours)

In consultation with your doctoral advisory committee, please choose six courses from one of these specializations: Leadership and Administration (This specialization can be designed to add-on the PL Georgia Leadership certification to a level 6 or level 7 certification. Students interested in the PL certification must meet all prerequisites described for the program.); Leadership and Policy; or Leadership and Urban Education. These specializations are specifically designed for candidates who aspire to positions in academia and other closely related areas. For questions about the PL certification requirements, please contact the coordinator of the educational leadership program.

Leadership and Administration Specialization (18):

This specialization can be designed to add-on the PL Georgia leadership certification to a level 6 or level 7 certificate. Completion of the prerequisite courses – EPEL 7000 and EPEL 7330 is required prior to beginning the concentration courses for those seeking PL leadership certification.

EPEL 8000 Research in Educational Leadership and Organizational Culture (3)
EPEL 8020 Leadership for Change in a Diverse Society (3)
EPEL 8260 Theory in Educational Leadership (3)
EPEL 8330 Advanced Law, Policy, and Governance (3)
EPEL 8420 Advanced Instructional Leadership (3)
EPEL 8500 Central Office Leadership (3)
EPEL 8620 Psychological Aspects of Leadership (3)
EPEL 8650 The Principal (3)
EPEL 8690 Research-Based Decision Making for School Leaders (3)
EPEL 8970 Seminar in Educational Leadership (3) (repeatable)

Leadership and Policy Specialization (18):

This specialization is not designed to meet Georgia PL certification requirements.  It is specifically designed for students who seek to gain a clearer understanding of the issues associated with educational leadership and how those issues are related to the policy arena.

EPEL 8020 Leadership for Change in a Diverse Society (3)
EPEL 8260 Theory in Educational Leadership (3)
EPEL 8330 Advanced Law, Policy, and Governance (3)
EPEL 8620 Psychological Aspects of Leadership (3)
EPS 8800 Independent Study (3)
EPS 8810 Directed Reading and Research (1-3)
EPS 8970 Seminar in Educational Policy Studies (3)
EPS 9980 Research Seminar in Educational Policy Studies (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)

Leadership and Urban Education Specialization (18):

This specialization is not designed to meet Georgia PL certification requirements.  It is specifically designed for students who seek to better understand educational leadership as it relates to the urban education and the issues associated with educating urban children.

EPEL 8020 Leadership for Change in a Diverse Society (3)
EPEL 8260 Theory in Educational Leadership (3)
EPEL 8970 Seminar in Educational Leadership (3) (repeatable)
EPEL 9000 Concepts of Leadership and Research in Educational Leadership (3)
EPEL 9970 Advanced Seminar in Educational Leadership (3)
EPS 8800 Independent Study (3)
EPS 8810 Directed Reading and Research (1-3)
EPSF 8010 Cultural Studies in Education: Film (3)
EPSF 8040 Cultural Studies in Education: Gender (3)
EPSF 8260 Sociology of Inner-City Children (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)

Other appropriate courses numbered 8000 to 8999 may be selected with the consultation of your advisor and the coordinator of educational leadership programs.

B.2 – Ph.D. Concentration in Research, Measurement, and Statistics (18 hours)

Select six courses (18 ) from the list below:
ECE 9380/EPRS 9380 Discourse Analysis (3)
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretative Research in Education I (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education I (3)
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II (3)
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8600 Computer Use in Educational Research (3)
EPRS 8620 Educational Evaluation (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles, and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9120/ECE 9120 Poststructural Inquiry 93)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II (3)
EPRS 9600 Advanced Computer Methods for Educational Research (3)
EPRS 9670 Practicum in Educational and Psychological Research (3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)
EPRS 9920 Seminar in Special Topics in Qualitative Research (3)
EPS 8950 Professional Development Seminar (1)

B.3 – Ph.D. Concentration in Social Foundations of Education (18 hours)

Select six courses (18) from the list below:
EPSF 8010 Cultural Studies In Education: Film (3)
EPSF 8040 Cultural Studies in Education: Gender (3)
EPSF 8260 Sociology of Inner-City Children (3)
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8330 Globalization and Education Policy (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 8350 Comparative Educational Systems (3)
EPSF 8440 Foundations of Curriculum Development (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

C. Cognate Area  (12)

The major and cognate areas should represent a cohesive program of study.

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EPS 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 69 semester hours

4630 Educational Psychology (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Educational Psychology

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

The Ph.D. major in Educational Psychology develops a substantial knowledge base in the related fields defining educational psychology. This program prepares persons for careers as faculty members in colleges and universities, as researchers in departments of education and in government and business, and as professionals in training research programs in government and industry.

Program Academic Regulations

Doctoral students in Educational Psychology who have little or no background in educational psychology may be required to complete additional coursework beyond the minimum requirements described below.

Students must complete the departmental residency requirements. Transfer credit hours may not be used to satisfy more than one third of the credit hours for the major area. Details of these requirements and clarification of other policies are available in the Educational Psychology’s Policy Guide for Doctoral Students available at  http://epse.education.gsu.edu/academics-and-admissions/educational-psychology-ph-d/.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s performance in all academic settings. Only courses in which a student earns a grade of “B” or higher will be counted toward degree fulfillment. Failure to make progress in a timely manner or inappropriate or unprofessional conduct by a student may result in the students being withdrawn from a course or the program. If such removal from a course is necessary, the student will receive a grade of “F” for the course and may be judged ineligible to reenroll in that course.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Psychology

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (18-24)

Required (9):
EPY 8010 Professional Studies in Educational Psychology (3)
EPY 8961 Professional Development Seminar in Educational Psychology (3)
EPY 9000 Facilitating College Teaching (3)

Select (9-15): Students must select a minimum of 15 hours of additional credit hours of coursework, a majority of which must be in educational psychology. As an exception, students who have a Master’s degree in Educational Psychology from Georgia State University select a minimum of 9 additional credit hours.

C. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EPY 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 51-57 semester hours

4640 Instructional Technology (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Instructional Technology

Learning Technologies Division
233-242,2nd Floor, College of Education building
http://ltd.education.gsu.edu/
Stephen Harmon, Chair

The Ph.D. major in Instructional Technology provides specialization for individuals in the following areas: instructional design, alternative instructional delivery systems, research, management, and consulting. The program is designed for highly competent individuals who are working in the instructional technology field in a wide variety of educational, training, and development areas such as those found in schools, higher education, business, industry, and government agencies.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Instructional Technology

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (27)

The required courses provide a conceptual base of research, emerging issues in education, and an in-depth examination of research in the major field. The internship (LT 8660) facilitates the application of theory to practice in the major field of study.

Required (15):

LT 9850 Research Seminar in Learning Technologies (9)
(Students will take LT 9850 for one hour every semester until they are admitted into candidacy.)
LT 9900 Critique of Educational Research in Learning Technologies (3)
LT 8660 Internship in Instructional Technology (3)

Select (12):
Students and Doctoral Advisory Committee select additional departmental courses relating to instructional technology.

C. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
LT 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 60 semester hours

4650 Kinesiology (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Kinesiology

Department of Kinesiology and Health
137 Sports Arena
404-413-8050
http://kh.education.gsu.edu/
Jacalyn Lund, Chair

Concentration Areas: Biomechanics and Physical Rehabilitation, Exercise Physiology, Exercise Psychology, and Physical Education Teacher Education

The Ph.D. major in Kinesiology is designed to prepare students for research and teaching careers at colleges and universities and for health, physiological performance, rehabilitative science, and related fields. Concentration areas that are available within this program: Biomechanics and Physical Rehabilitation, Exercise Physiology, Exercise Psychology, and Physical Education Teacher Education.

The concentration in Biomechanics and Physical Rehabilitation focuses on the scientific description of human movement through advanced techniques utilizing computerized film and high speed video graphical analysis systems, computerized force measuring systems, electromyography, and other state-of-the-art instrumentation with applications in many disciplines, including ergonomics, engineering, medicine, sport, and exercise.

The concentration in Exercise Physiology prepares students to teach and to conduct research in areas related to cardiopulmonary and neuromuscular physiology with particular emphases on exercise metabolism and performance in healthy populations, and in populations with chronic diseases (e.g., cardiovascular, metabolic, and neuromuscular diseases).

The concentration in Exercise Psychology prepares students to teach and to conduct research in areas related to the correlates of physical activity, mental health benefits of physical activity, theory-based behavior change strategies, and the design, implementation, and testing of theory-based physical activity interventions. Completion of this concentration will not lead to students becoming licensed psychologists.

The concentration in Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) prepares students for careers in higher education as scholars, researchers, and teacher educators. Research expertise will be acquired in the areas of instruction, curriculum, assessment, teacher education, and teacher development. The cognate area will prepare students as members of communities of scholars in higher education.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in Kinesiology

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (19-21)

The students select one of the following four concentration areas:

B1 – Biomechanics and Physical Rehabilitation Concentration (19)

Required  (19):
KH 8830 Motion Analysis (4)
KH 8870 Biomechanics of Orthopedic Injuries (3)
KH 9560 Neuromechanics of Human Locomotion (3)
KH 9820 Research in Kinesiology (5)
KH 9960 Advanced Research Seminar in Kinesiology (4)

B2 – Exercise Physiology Concentration (19)

Required (19):
KH 9520 Advanced Exercise Physiology: Energy Metabolism (3)
KH 9530 Advanced Exercise Physiology: Cardiorespiratory (3)
KH 9550 Advanced Exercise Physiology: Myocellular (3)
KH 9820 Research in Kinesiology (6)
KH 9960 Advanced Research Seminar in Kinesiology (4)

B3- Exercise Psychology Concentration (19)

Required (19):
CPS 8820 Health Psychology (3)
KH 8600 Physical Activity Interventions and Behavior Change (3)
KH 9280 Advanced Topics in Exercise Psychology (3)
KH 9820 Research in Kinesiology (6)
KH 9960 Advanced Research Seminar in Kinesiology (4)

B4- Physical Education Teacher Education (21)

Required (15):
KH 9660 Analysis of Teaching Physical Education (3)
KH 9670 Models of Teacher Education in Physical Education (3)
KH 9820 Research in Kinesiology (3)
KH 9830 Research on Teaching and Learning in Physical Education (3)
KH 9960 Advanced Research Seminar in Kinesiology (3)

Select 6 hours from the list of courses:
KH 8610 Curriculum Theory in Physical Education (3)
KH 8620 Assessment Theory in Physical Education (3)
KH 8630 Instructional Design for Physical Education (3)
KH 8685 Initial Supervision and Teacher Development in Physical Education (3)
KH 8690 Technology in Physical Education Instruction and Teacher Education (3)
Other appropriate courses numbered 8000-8999 may be substituted into the program of study with the approval of the student’s Doctoral Advisory Committee.

C. Cognate Area (9)

Coursework applied to meet the cognate area requirement must be taken outside the major field of study.

C1 – Biomechanics Concentration (9):

The purpose of the cognate area requirement is to provide opportunities for doctoral students to develop an extended knowledge base associated with the major field of study. Courses fulfilling the cognate requirement will be determined in consultation with the doctoral advisor and approved by the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

C2 – Exercise Physiology Concentration (9):

The purpose of the cognate area requirement is to provide opportunities for doctoral students to develop an extended knowledge base associated with the major field of study. Courses fulfilling the cognate requirement will be determined in consultation with the doctoral advisor and approved by the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

C3- Exercise Psychology Concentration (9):

The purpose of the cognate area requirement is to provide opportunities for doctoral students to develop an extended knowledge base associated with the major field of study. Courses fulfilling the cognate requirement will be determined in consultation with the doctoral advisor and approved by the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

C4- Physical Education Teacher Education Concentration (9):

The purpose of the cognate area requirement is to provide opportunities for doctoral students to develop an extended knowledge based associated with the major field of study, with an emphasis on careers in higher education. Courses fulfilling the cognate requirement will be determined in consultation with the doctoral advisor and approved by the Doctoral Advisory Committee.

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
KH 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total (Biomechanics and Physical Rehabilitation): minimum of 61 semester hours
Program total (Exercise Physiology): minimum of 61 semester hours
Program total (Exercise Psychology): minimum of 61 semester hours
Program total (Physical Education Teacher Education): minimum of 63 semester hours

4660 School Psychology (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in School Psychology

Department of Counseling and Psychological Services
950 College of Education Building
404-413-8010
http://cps.education.gsu.edu/
Brian Dew, Chair

The Ph.D. major in School Psychology prepares psychologists for licensure as applied psychologists and focuses on the application of psychological knowledge and skills to school related problems. The American Psychological Association accredits the program. Completion of a bachelor’s degree within a major in psychology, education, or a related field or a master’s degree in an area related to school psychology is required for admission to the program.

Program Academic Regulations

The practicum and internship (CPS 8680 and CPS 9680) are essential components of the doctoral training program in School Psychology. They provide trainees with the opportunity to take substantial responsibility for carrying out major professional functions in the context of appropriate supervisory support, professional role modeling, and awareness of administrative structures. The internship is distinguished from the applied practice experience by the increased responsibility and independence afforded the students and by the more intense nature of client contact. The practicum (CPS 8680) is a one-term, full-time experience. The doctoral internship (CPS 9680) in school psychology requires either a full time experience for one calendar year or a halftime experience for two consecutive years.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of the student’s academic performance as well as the student’s performance in laboratory, practicum, and internship classes. A student may be dropped from a course and/or the program if the welfare of the student’s clientele or the functioning of a school or agency is, in the judgment of Department of Counseling and Psychological Services faculty, in jeopardy as a result of the student’s behavior. Students in this program are expected to follow the latest version of the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) Principles for Professional Ethics, as well as the most recent version of the American Psychological Association (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct.

Program Degree Requirements

Doctor of Philosophy in School Psychology

A. Core Area (18; 12 for B.A.-to-Ph.D. students)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):
A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning course (3):
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)
or another course from the Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee:
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)

B. Major Area (Required: 38; 35 for B.A.-to-Ph.D. students)

The major area of requirements complete the basic body of knowledge for applied professional practice as a school psychologist, building upon the foundation acquired at earlier graduate levels school psychology. A minimum of credits must be earned in the doctoral major, and these must include the courses listed below. Content for some of the required courses listed below may have been obtained in the master’s or Ed.S. program prior to admission to the doctoral program. In such cases, appropriate substitutions and/or credit for prior coursework, may be made with approval of the student’s doctoral advisory committee. Students who have prior coursework that is judged by the advisory committee to meet some of these course requirements must earn a minimum of 38 semester hours at Georgia State University to complete the major area of the doctoral program.

  • CPS 8350 Biopsychology and Medication (3)
  • CPS 8640 Administration and Supervision in Pupil Personnel Services (3)
  • CPS 8760 Advanced Topical Seminar in School Psychology  (9; 6 for B.A.-to-Ph.D.) [topics rotate; Advanced Topical Seminar taken as part of the Ed.S. program may be counted towards this requirement.]
  • CPS 9680 Doctoral Internship (9)
  • CPS 9760 School Psychology Research Seminar (3-9) [Must be taken at three times (minimum total = 9 credits). Student must maintain continuous enrollment until doctoral candidacy is reached.]
  • CPS 9920 Research and Publication (2)
  • PSYC 8500 History of Psychology (3)

Note: CPS 8680 Internship in School Psychology is an Ed.S.-level internship that serves as the doctoral practicum requirement. The student’s doctoral advisory committee will determine whether the student has completed a comparable course in a prior graduate work and has sufficient skills and field experience to meet the criteria for this doctoral practicum. Based on input from the doctoral advisory committee, some students may be required to enroll in an additional practicum experience.

C. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
CPS 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total: minimum of 71 semester hours (62 semester hours for B.A.-to-Ph.D. students)

4670 Teaching and Learning (Ph.D.)

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Teaching and Learning

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
639 College of Education Building
404-413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

Concentration Areas: Language and Literacy Education; Mathematics Education; Music Education; Science Education; Social Studies Education; Teaching and Teacher Education.

The Ph.D. major in Teaching and Learning is designed to prepare scholars for research and leadership positions by developing a substantial knowledge base in one of the following areas of concentration: Language and Literacy Education, Mathematics Education, Music Education, Science Education, Social Studies Education, and Teaching and Teacher Education. In addition, the program prepares professional educators as scholarly inquirers who ask thoughtful questions, who can conduct sound inquiry, and who can recommend informed policy.

Program Degree Requirements for Each Concentration

Doctor of Philosophy in Teaching and Learning with concentrations in Language and Literacy Education; Mathematics Education; Music Education, Science Education, Social Studies Education, and Teaching and Teacher Education

1 – Concentration Area: Language and Literacy Education

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (30)

Required (18):
EDCI 8970 Seminar in Teaching and Learning (3)
EDCI 9850 Research Seminar (3)
EDCI 9900 Critique of Educational Research (3)
EDRD 8310 Theoretical Models and Processes of Literacy Learning (language, reading, and writing) (9)

Select (12):  The student and Doctoral Advisory Committee select additional coursework (12 hours).

C. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EDCI 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total:  Minimum of 63 semester hours

2 – Concentration Area: Mathematics Education

The Ph.D. in Teaching and Learning with a concentration in Mathematics Education prepares professional mathematics educators to make scholarly contributions to both the theoretical and practical knowledge base of mathematics teaching and learning in a broad range of educational settings. Graduates of this program typically assume positions as college or university professors in schools or colleges of education or departments of mathematics. In these positions, their primary responsibilities are to conduct research on elementary, middle, secondary, or post-secondary mathematics teaching and learning, to teach content and pedagogy courses, and to direct theses and dissertations. Graduates are also qualified to assume positions as mathematics education leaders in school districts, research laboratories, or publishing companies.

During the degree program, students develop advanced professional proficiencies and scholarly knowledges through the successful completion of the (a) Program of Study, (b) Residency Plan, (c) Comprehensive Examination, (d) Research Prospectus, and (e) Dissertation. The degree program, in general, is framed by the principles to guide doctoral programs adopted by the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (18)

Required (9):
EDCI 9850 Research Seminar (3)
EDCI 9900 Critique of Educational Research (3)
EDMT 9870 Advanced Research Seminar in Mathematics Education (3)

Choose three required courses (9 hours):
EDMT 8290 The Study of Learning and Instruction in Mathematics (3)
EDMT 8420 Topics in the School Mathematics Curriculum (3)
EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)
EDMT 8550 Trends and Issues of Teaching Mathematics (3)

C. Cognate Area (18)

Required (6):
EDCI 8970 Seminar in Teaching and Learning (3)
EDCI 9660 Internship (3)

Select (12):  The student and Doctoral Advisory Committee select additional coursework (12 hours).

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EDCI 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total:  Minimum of 69 semester hours

3 – Concentration Area: Music Education

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (18)

Choose three required courses from the list of courses below (9):
MUS XXXX (graduate methods course in area of focus) (3)
MUS XXXX (graduate music education elective) (3)
MUS XXXX (graduate music education elective) (3)
MUS 8980 Advanced Research Project in Music Education (3)

Required (9):
EDCI 9660 Internship (3)
EDCI 9850 Research Seminar (3)
EDCI 9900 Critique of Educational Research (3)

C. Cognate Area (15)

Required (15):
EDCI 8970 Seminar in Teaching and Learning (3)
MUS 8960 Proseminar in Music Education (3) (repeatable course taken four times)
Semester A – Current Issues & Sociology of Music Teaching and Learning
Semester B – Philosophy of Music Teaching and Learning
Semester C – History of Music Teaching and Learning
Semester D – Perception, Cognition & Creativity in Music Teaching and Learning

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EDCI 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total:  Minimum of 66 semester hours

4 – Concentration Area: Science Education

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (18)

Required (18)
EDCI 9850 Research Seminar (3)
EDCI 9900 Critique of Educational Research (3)
EDSC 8430 Nature of Science (3)
EDSC 9870 Seminar in Teaching and Learning (9) (repeatable course taken three times)

C. Cognate Area (18)

Required (6):
EDCI 8970 Seminar in Teaching and Learning (3)
EDCI 9660 Internship (3)

Select (12):  The student and Doctoral Advisory Committee select additional coursework (12 hours).

D. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EDCI 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total:  Minimum of 69 semester hours

5 – Concentration Area: Social Studies Education

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (33)

Required (18):
EDCI 9660 Internship (6)
EDCI 9850 Research Seminar (3)
EDCI 9900 Critique of Educational Research (3)
EDSS 8290 Learning, Curriculum and Instruction in Social Studies (3)
EDSS 8550 Trends and Issues of Teaching Social Studies (3)

Select (15):  The student and Doctoral Advisory Committee select additional coursework (15 hours).

C. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EDCI 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total:  Minimum of 66 semester hours

6 – Concentration Area: Teaching and Teacher Education

This concentration prepares scholars for research, practice, and policy work in teaching and the preparation of teachers. Working alongside faculty who have close connections to practice in urban schools and to the development, implementation, and evaluation of teacher education programs, graduate students will be prepared to contribute to the quality of professional practice and policy at the K- 12 level, as well as in the education and development of practicing professionals.

A. Core Area (18)

The Core Area consists of 15 semester hours of research coursework and 3 semester hours of Social Foundation of Education and Psychology of Learning coursework.

Research Core (15 hours)

Choose one course (3):
EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education (3)
EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education (3)

Required (12):

A two course sequence (6 hours) in research methodology (see below for specific tracks/courses)
Two courses (6 hours) in advanced research methods as identified by the Doctoral Advisory Committee

Quantitative Methodology
EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II
EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
EPRS 8820 Institutional Research (3)
EPRS 8830 Survey Research, Sampling Principles and Questionnaire Design (3)
EPRS 8840 Meta-Analysis (3)
EPRS 8660 Bayesian Statistics (3)
EPRS 9550 Multivariate Analysis (3)
EPRS 9560 Structural Equation Modeling (3)
EPRS 9570 Hierarchical Linear Modeling I (3)
EPRS 9571 Hierarchical Linear Modeling II(3)
EPRS 9900 Advanced Research (3)

Qualitative Methodology
ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)

Single-Case Methodology
EPY 8850 Introduction to Single-Case Methodology (3)
EPY 8860 Applications of Single-Case Methodology (3)

Historical/Philosophical Methodology
EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)

Measurement Methodology
EPRS 7920 Classroom Testing, Grading, and Assessment (3)
EPRS 8920 Educational Measurement (3)
EPRS 9350 Introduction to Item Response Theory (3)
EPRS 9360 Advanced Item Response Theory (3)

Social Foundations of Education and Psychology of Learning Core (3 hours)

In addition to highly specialized research in specific areas, doctoral students in the College of Education must possess a deep understanding of comprehensive, theoretical principles and broad ideological conceptualizations.

Through historical, philosophical, sociological, and anthropological inquiry, knowledge of social foundations fosters the types of speculative investigations essential for thorough understandings of those theoretical principles and ideological conceptualizations necessary to uphold the integrity of the Ph.D. degree.

The psychology of learning component is based on the following guiding principles: (1) Educational leaders make judgments that affect learning. (2) Doctoral students should have a substantial understanding of the psychology of learning.

Select one (3):
EPSF 8270 Philosophy of Education (3)
EPSF 8280 Anthropology of Education (3)
EPSF 8310 Sociology of Education (3)
EPSF 8320 Politics and Policy in Education (3)
EPSF 8340 History of American Education (3)
EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)
EPY 8030 Advanced Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
EPY 8050 The Psychology of Instruction (3)
EPY 8070 Understanding and Facilitating Adult Learning (3)
EPY 8080 Memory and Cognition (3)
EPY 8180 Development During School Age (5 to 18 Years) (3)
EPY 8200 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Cognition and Intellect (3)
EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)

B. Major Area (27)

Required (18):
EDCI 8970 Seminar in Teaching and Learning (3)
EDCI 9660 Internship (6)
EDCI 9760 Seminar in Teacher Education (3)
EDCI 9850 Research Seminar (3)
EDCI 9900 Critique of Educational Research (3)

Select (9):  The student and Doctoral Advisory Committee select additional coursework (9 hours).

C. Dissertation (15)

Required (15):
EDCI 9990 Dissertation (15)

Program total:  Minimum of 60 semester hours

4680 Add-On PL-6 Leadership Certification

Add-on PL-6 (Performance-Based) Leadership Certification

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building
404-413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

The add-on in Educational Leadership is designed to build the capacity of practicing educators and administrators to be effective educational leaders. The program fulfills the requirements of the Performance-Based Educational Leadership certification for the State of Georgia. Applicants for the add-on must be full time, practicing educators and be employed in a partnering school system. Because leadership certification is no longer a self-select program in the state of Georgia, applicants must receive written permission from their employers in order to participate. Applicants for the add-on must hold a specialist’s degree or higher in any education field or in other Georgia Professional Standards Commission accepted non-education fields.

Program Academic Regulations

Students must earn a “B” or higher in all courses in the add-on program. If students earn a grade below a grade of “B” in a required course, the students with the advice and consent of his or her adviser may substitute another course for that requirement.

Required (24):

  • EPEL 8000 Research in Educational Leadership and Organizational Culture (3)
  • EPEL 8020 Leadership for Change in a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPEL 8420 Advanced Instructional Leadership (3)
  • EPEL 8690 Research-Based Decision Making for School Leaders (3)
  • EPEL 8970 Seminar in Educational Leadership (9)
  • EPSF 8440 Curriculum Design and Analysis (3)

Following the completion of coursework, persons wishing to obtain the PL-6 certification in the State of Georgia must receive a passing score on the GACE Educational Leadership Tests.

Total hours for certification: minimum of 24 semester hours.

4690 Certificate in International Education

A Graduate Certificate in International Education is available from the College of Education to eligible students enrolled as non-degree students in the College of Education or in graduate programs at Georgia State University. To earn the certificate, students must complete a minimum of 18 credit hours with a collective GPA of 3.0 or higher in those courses.

Students must submit a proposed program of study to the College of Education Associate Dean of Associate Dean of School, Community, International Partnerships along with syllabi for each proposed course. The specific courses to be included will be reviewed in light of the guidelines below. The program must be approved by the Associate Dean of Associate Dean of School, Community, International Partnerships and a minimum of two COE faculty associated with the International Education certificate.

In order to be eligible to earn the certificate, students must:

  • be enrolled in a non-degree program in the College of Education or in a graduate program at Georgia State University
  • submit the proper form to the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research officially indicating an intention to work toward earning the certificate (the form is available from the COE Dean’s Office or from the Office of Academic Assistance), a list of the proposed courses, and accompanying syllabi.
  • complete the approved program of study coursework with a 3.0 GPA or higher.

Program of Study

The program of study for the Graduate Certificate in International Education must include the following:

International Education: Core (3 hours)

The program must include a Core course that provides an understanding of teaching, learning, and/or development from an international perspective. The lens framing this course should be comprehensive in the international focus rather than specific to a given area/country.

Select One Course (3):

  • EDCI 8970 Seminar in Teaching and Learning: Global Perspectives in Literacy Education (3)
  • EDRD 8280 Literacy for a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPEL 7020 Leadership for a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPEL 8020 Leadership for Change in a Diverse Society (3)
  • EPSF 8330 Globalization and Educational Policy (3)
  • EPSF 8350 Comparative Educational Systems (3)
  • Other international education core courses approved by ICE faculty committee

International Education: Study Abroad (3 hours)

The program must include a minimum of 3 graduate credit hours that incorporate a study-abroad experience.

Select One Course (3):

  • ECE 9810 Directed Readings in Early Childhood Education (3)
  • ECE 8000 Issues in International Education (3)
  • EDUC 7777 Field Experiences in International Education (3)
  • EDMT 8420 Topics in Mathematics Teaching and Learning (3)
  • EDMT 8430 Sociocultural and Sociohistorical Issues of Mathematics Education (3)
  • EPEL 8970 Seminar in Educational Leadership (3)
  • KH 7810 Directed Readings And Research In Sports Administration (3)
  • KH 8680 International Experience in Sport and Exercise Science (3)
  • Or other study abroad courses as approved by ICE faculty committee

International Education: Electives (12 hours)

Students may choose electives from across the university which may be broadly focused or country/region specific. The course foci may include: (a) educational issues in a specific region/country, (b) development of language expertise or background knowledge associated with a region/country, or involvement in studying/interacting/teaching with international populations who are living in our own country. After having met the Core and Study Abroad area requirements above, students may also count as electives any additional courses taken from the ones listed in those sections

Select Four Courses (12):

  • CPS 7340 Social/Cultural Issues In CPS (3)
  • CPS 8340 Advanced Multicultural Counseling Strategies & Interventions (3)
  • ECE 6360 Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (3)
  • ECE 8100 Social, Cultural, and Political Issues in Teaching and Learning (3)
  • EDLA 8020 Social, Cultural, and Political Contexts Shaping Early Literacy Instruction (3)
  • EDLA 8330 Language Variation and Learning (3)
  • EDRD 8550 Trends and Issues in Language and Literacy Education (3)
  • EDSS 8290 Learning, Curriculum & Instruction in Social Studies (3)
  • EDSS 8420 Topics in the School Social Studies Curriculum (3)
  • EDSS 8550 Trends and Issues in Social Studies (3)
  • EPSF 7110 Multicultural Education (3)
  • EPSF 8010 Cultural Studies in Education (3)
  • EPSF 8040 Cultural Studies in Education: Gender (3)
  • EPY 8180 Development during School Age (3)
  • EPY 8220 Advanced Developmental Psychology: Personality and Socialization (3)
  • KH 7200 Cultural Aspects of Sport (3)
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/ESL Teacher (3)
  • TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for the Bilingual/ESL Teacher (3)
  • Other internationally focused elective courses as approved by ICE faculty committee

Program Total: minimum of 18 hours

4700 Certificate in Qualitative Research in Education

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building
404-413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

A Graduate Certificate in Qualitative Research in Education is available from the College of Education to eligible students enrolled in a doctoral program at Georgia State University. To earn the certificate, students must complete a minimum of seven 3-credit-hour doctoral-level qualitative research methods courses with a collective GPA of 3.5 or higher in those courses, with no grade lower than a B in any course to be counted toward the certificate.

Four of the seven courses must be the following:

  • EPRS 8500 Qualitative/Interpretive Research in Education I (3)
  • EPRS 8510 Qualitative Research in Education II (3)
  • EPRS 8520 Qualitative Research in Education III (3)
  • EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning

The remaining three courses must be doctoral-level qualitative method courses, bearing a call number of 8000 or higher, from the approved list of certificate courses. The list is updated yearly and available in the Department of Educational Policy Studies. A current list of these courses is provided below:

  • EPRS 8640 Case Study Methods (3)
  • EPRS 8700 Visual Research Methods (3)
  • EPRS 9120 Poststructural Inquiry (3)
  • EPRS 9400 Writing Qualitative Research Manuscripts (3)
  • EPSF 9280 Interpretive Inquiry in Education (3)
  • ANTH 8010 Qualitative Methods in Anthropology (3)
  • EPSF 9850 Historical Research in Twentieth Century American Education (3)
  • EPSF 9930 Philosophical Analysis and Method (3)
  • SOCI 8342 Qualitative Methods in Sociology (3)
  • COMM 8160 Style and Narrative Analysis (3)
  • COMM 8410 Qualitative Methods (3)

In addition, students must successfully defend a qualitative or multi-methods research dissertation. Although a faculty member from the Research, Measurement and Statistics (RMS) program of the Department of Educational Policy Studies need not be on the student’s dissertation committee, the prospectus for the dissertation must be endorsed by an appropriate member of the RMS faculty, as determined by the RMS Coordinator.

Eligibility

In order to be eligible to earn the certificate, students must:

  • be enrolled in a doctoral program at Georgia State University
  • have completed at least three courses from the College of Education Doctoral Research Core, with a collective GPA in those courses of 3.5 or higher
  • submit the proper form to the Department of Educational Policy Studies officially indicating an intention to work toward earning the certificate (the form is available from the Department of Educational Policy Studies or from the Office of Academic Assistance)

Normal Time to Complete Program

One additional semester with 3 courses is estimated to be additional coursework which would be included within the doctoral program timeframe because it is likely that at least 4 courses meet both the certificate and doctoral requirements. The certificate program requires 7 courses. Courses beyond the three courses in the doctoral core which meet the certificate requirements may be included in the doctoral program of study for the student based on each student’s individualized program. Typically, at least one course meeting certificate requirements beyond the three from the doctoral core would be included in the student’s doctoral program for the student’s doctoral degree.

On-Time Graduation Rates

On-time graduation rate is 100% based on the College of Education doctoral program timeframe.

Program Costs*

Graduate Tuition per credit hour: In-State $348.00; Out-of-State $1,212.00
Mandatory Student Fees per term: $1,064.00
Books and Supplies per term: $500.00
Room and Board per term: $6,742.00

*All figures are estimates only and subject to change without notice.

Occupations

The Qualitative Research in Education Certificate aids in the preparation of students to be employed as:
Ethnology Professors (SOC 25-1062)
Ethnologists (SOC 19-3099)
Historians (SOC 19-3093)

You can find additional information on the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and occupational profiles on these professions at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and O*Net web sites: http://www.bls.gov/soc/ and http://www.onetcenter.org/.

Other Certificate Information

There is no state or accrediting agency that requires tracking placement rates. Students who receive a certificate also complete the doctoral program which is a higher credentialed program; thus, calculation of median loan debt for the certificate program is not required.

4710 Certificate in Quantitative Research in Education

Department of Educational Policy Studies
450 College of Education Building
404-413-8030
http://eps.education.gsu.edu/
William Curlette, Chair

A Graduate Certificate in Quantitative Research in Education is available from the College of Education to eligible students enrolled in a doctoral program at Georgia State University. To earn the certificate, students must complete a minimum of seven 3-credit-hour doctoral-level quantitative research methods courses with a collective GPA of 3.5 or higher in those courses, with no grade lower than a B in any course to be counted toward the certificate.

Four of the seven courses must be the following:

  • EPRS 8530 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education I (3)
  • EPRS 8540 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education II (3)
  • EPRS 8550 Quantitative Methods and Analysis in Education III (3)
  • EPSF 9260 Epistemology and Learning (3)

The remaining three courses must be doctoral-level quantitative method courses, bearing a call number of 8000 or higher, from the approved list of certificate courses. The list is updated yearly and available in the Department of Educational Policy Studies. A current list of these courses is provided below:

In addition, students must successfully defend a quantitative or multi-methods research dissertation. Although a faculty member from the Research, Measurement and Statistics (RMS) program of the Department of Educational Policy Studies need not be on the student’s dissertation committee, the prospectus for the dissertation must be endorsed by an appropriate member of the RMS faculty, as determined by the RMS Coordinator.

Eligibility

In order to be eligible to earn the certificate, students must:

  • be enrolled in a doctoral program at Georgia State University
  • have completed at least three courses from the College of Education Doctoral Research Core, with a collective GPA in those courses of 3.5 or higher
  • submit the proper form to the Department of Educational Policy Studies officially indicating an intention to work toward earning the certificate (the form is available from the Department of Educational Policy Studies or from the Office of Academic Assistance)

Normal Time to Complete Program

One additional semester with 3 courses is estimated to be additional coursework which would be included within the doctoral program timeframe because it is likely that at least 4 courses meet both the certificate and doctoral requirements. The certificate program requires 7 courses. Courses beyond the three courses in the doctoral core which meet the certificate requirements may be included in the doctoral program of study for the student based on each student’s individualized program. Typically, at least one course meeting certificate requirements beyond the three from the doctoral core would be included in the student’s doctoral program for the student’s doctoral degree.

On-Time Graduation Rates

On-time graduation rate is 100% based on the College of Education doctoral program timeframe.

Program Costs*

Graduate Tuition per credit hour: In-State $348.00; Out-of-State $1,212.00
Mandatory Student Fees per term: $1,064.00
Books and Supplies per term: $500.00
Room and Board per term: $6,742.00

*All figures are estimates only and subject to change without notice.

Occupations

The Quantitative Research in Education Certificate aids in the preparation of students to be employed as:
Statistics Professors (SOC 25-1022)
Survey Research Professors (SOC 25-1069)
Survey Researchers or Survey Methodologists (SOC 19-3022)
Program Analysts (SOC 13-1111)
Research Methodology and Quantitative Methods (SOC 15-2041) for Statisticians
Research Methodology and Quantitative Methods (SOC 11-9199) for Managers and All Others

You can find additional information on the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) and occupational profiles on these professions at the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and O*Net web sites: http://www.bls.gov/soc/ and http://www.onetcenter.org/.

Other Certificate Information

There is no state or accrediting agency that requires tracking placement rates. Students who receive a certificate also complete the doctoral program which is a higher credentialed program; thus, calculation of median loan debt for the certificate program is not required.

4720 Coaching Endorsement

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair
Sue Duncan, Executive Director

The Department of Early Childhood Education offers graduate courses in literacy which apply to Georgia’s Coaching Endorsement. These courses focus on four areas (a) understanding literacy – the reading and writing process, (b) linking assessment and instruction, (c) using instructional strategies in specific content areas and (d) professional development, supervision and systematic change.

The Coaching Endorsement – Literacy presupposes certification at least at the Master’s level. Successful completion of application sequences (Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Strand) qualifies a person for the master’s, or specialist level endorsement, depending on the current level of certification. This endorsement qualifies an individual to be considered ‘in field’ as a coach at the level of the base certificate. Teachers pursuing the coaching endorsement are enrolled as non-degree students in specific programs for certification in either the concentration for Reading Recovery Teacher Leaders or the concentration for Literacy Coach Certificate.

Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Concentration

Strand 1:

Understanding Literacy – Reading and Writing Process/Linking Assessment and Instruction

  • ECE 8300 Reading Recovery Theory I (3)
  • ECE 8360 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders I (3)

Strand 2:

Understanding Literacy – Struggling Readers and Writers/Linking Assessment and Instruction

  • ECE 8310 Reading Recovery Theory II (3)
  • ECE 8320 Reading Recovery Theory III (3)
  • ECE 8370 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders II (3)

Strand 3: Using Instructional Strategies in Specific Content Areas/Professional Development, Reflective Analysis of Teaching and Systematic Change

  • ECE 8380 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders III (3)
  • ECE 8700 Reading Recovery Supervision (3)

Literacy Coach Certificate Concentration

Theory and Research (6):

  • ECE 7980 Theory and Practice in Literacy (3) or EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)
  • ECE 7964 Comprehensive Literacy Model for School Improvement (3)

Practicum/Field Experience (9):

  • ECE 7981 Supervision and Organization of Reading Programs (3) or EDRD 8610 Supervision of School Literacy Programs (3)
  • ECE 7982 Professional Experiences in Reading (3) or EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
  • ECE 7983 Literacy Coaches as Agents of Change (3)

Curriculum Framework (3):

  • ECE 7984 Curriculum Design and Evaluation (3)

4730 Comprehensive Intervention Model

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair
Sue Duncan, Executive Director

The Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM) is a well-coordinated, Response to Intervention seamless design for providing intervention services to struggling readers. The CIM is a systemic model for reversing the reading failures of struggling readers through layered interventions, including differentiated classroom instruction and supplemental interventions in small groups or one-to-one. The goal is two-fold. In grades K-3 the goal is to increase the overall literacy achievement by the end of the third grade and to reduce the number of children identified with learning disabilities within 1.5% or less of the general population. In grades 4-6, interventions focus on research-based strategies for reading and writing in the content areas.

The system goal of the CIM is to change the achievement profile of a school by providing:

  • research-based interventions that increase the literacy levels of low-performing children, and
  • training and professional development for teachers that increase their knowledge and expertise in teaching the lowest performing children.

Prerequisites

In addition to completing the Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM) Institute the previous summer, participants are required to have completed ECE 7963 Practicum in Interventions or be a trained Reading Recovery teacher, Reading Recovery teacher leader or Literacy Collaborative coordinator. Candidates must be employed as an interventionist in a school setting.

Program of Study

This year-long program of study focuses on preparing K-6 educators to differentiate reading and writing instruction within a range of settings for students experiencing difficulty in literacy learning. The training consists of intensive study of the Comprehensive Intervention Model Framework and focuses on gaining in-depth knowledge and skills in designing and implementing a portfolio of small-group interventions for K-6 students. Intervention candidates complete 6 hours of academic credit. Intervention candidates continue to work full-time in their school districts in addition to completing coursework.

Required (9):

  • ECE 7963 Practicum in Interventions (3)
  • ECE 7964 Comprehensive Literacy Model for School Improvement (3)
  • ECE 7965 Intervention Designs for Struggling Readers (3)

4740 ESOL Endorsement

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
639 College of Education Building
404-413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Endorsement

The Department of Middle and Secondary Education of the College of Education and the Department of Applied Linguistics and English as a Second Language of the College of Arts and Sciences offer graduate courses in bilingual/English as a second language to give teachers additional training to work with non-English speaking or limited English speaking students at the early childhood, middle childhood, and secondary school levels.

Successful completion of the following coursework and completion of a portfolio demonstrating competencies established for ESOL teachers by TESOL qualifies a person for the bachelor’s, master’s, or specialist level endorsement, depending upon the students’ current level of certification. The program presupposes certification at least at the bachelor’s level. Students must be admitted as graduate students to the College of Education. (See the program description for the M.Ed. major in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education for application of TSLE courses to a degree program. Students who do not hold an initial certification in a teaching field may apply to the M.A.T. major in Reading, Language, and Literacy Education to receive initial certification in ESOL and a reading endorsement.)

Required (6):

  • EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
  • TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Select one (3):

  • AL 8250 Second Language Acquisition (3)
  • TSLE 7250 Applied Linguistics for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Select one (3):

  • AL 8330 Intercultural Communication (3)
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher (3)

Total hours for endorsement: minimum of 12 semester hours

4750 ESOL Endorsement Online

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
639 College of Education Building
404-413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

English to Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) Online Endorsement

The Department of Middle and Secondary Education offers online graduate courses in bilingual/English as a second language that apply to the Georgia ONmyLINE non-degree English as a Second Language Endorsement. The non-degree GOML ESOL Endorsement provides teachers with additional training to work effectively with non-English-speaking or limited-English-speaking students at the early childhood, middle childhood, and secondary school levels. The GOML non-degree ESOL Endorsement is approved by the State of Georgia Professional Standards Commission.

Successful completion of the Georgia ONmyLINE non-degree ESOL endorsement course work and a portfolio qualifies a person for the bachelor’s, master’s, or specialist level endorsement, depending upon his or her current level of certification. Students seeking only the non-degree GOML ESOL endorsement must be admitted to the graduate program in the College of Education as a non-degree GOML student. All courses in the Georgia ONmyLINE non-degree ESOL Endorsement must be completed online through Georgia ONmyLINE; no other courses may apply.

Required Georgia ONmyLINE Courses for the Non-degree ESOL Endorsement:

  • EDCI 7660 Practicum I
  • TSLE 7250 Applied Linguistics for the Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher
  • TSLE 7260 Cultural Issues for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher
  • TSLE 7440 Methods and Materials for Bilingual/English as a Second Language Teacher

Total Program Hours: 12 semester hours

4760 Initial Certification in Early Childhood Special Education

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education, and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

The Initial Certification program in Early Childhood Special Education offers two certification options, including:

  • Early Childhood Special Education-General Curriculum (certified to teach all core subjects for children from preschool through 5th grade with and without disabilities included in the general curriculum)
  • Special Education Preschool (certified to teach children 3-5 years old with disabilities)

Requirements for Certification in Early Childhood Special Education-General Curriculum:

Prerequisite Courses (21):

  • EDMT 7400 Mathematics Concepts for Special Learners (3)
  • EDRD 6600 Introduction to Materials and Methods in Reading Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7550 Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction OR EDRD 7650 Individualized Assessment and Instruction (3)
  • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development (3)
  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7929 Practicum I: Early Childhood (3)

Program Courses (27):

  • EXC 7000 Collaboration with Parents and Professionals (3)
  • EXC 7010 Language Development and Language Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7300 Assistive Technology: Reading and Academics (3)
  • EXC 7320 Methods of Teaching Low Functioning Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7330 Physical and Health Management of Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7650 Characteristics of Young Children with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7660 Methods of Teaching Young Children with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7939 Practicum II: Early Childhood (3)

Requirements for Certification in Special Education Preschool:

  • EXC 7010 Language Development and Language Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7650 Characteristics of Young Children with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7660 Methods of Teaching Young Children with Disabilities (3)

4770 Initial Certification in Special Education Adapted Curriculum

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

Initial Certification in Special Education Adapted Curriculum (Intellectual Disabilities) course of study is for students seeking only teacher certification. Certification only students complete a planned program that leads to a College of Education recommendation to the Professional Standards Commission for certification K-12 as a teacher of Special Education Adapted Curriculum. The focus of the coursework is students with moderate, severe, and profound mental retardation.

Prerequisite Courses

  • EDRD 6600 Introduction to Materials and Methods in Reading Instruction (3)
  • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development (3)
  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7925 Practicum I: Severe Mental Retardation (3)

Program Courses

  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7250 Characteristics of Severe Intellectual Disability and Autism (3)
  • EXC 7280 Methods of Teaching Students with Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7281 Adapted/Functional Curriculum for Students with Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7935 Practicum II: Severe Intellectual Disability (3)

4780 Initial Certification in Special Education Deaf Education

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

Applicants who hold a bachelor’s degree and clear, renewable teaching certification in an area of regular education or special education and are highly
qualified in a content area based on coursework may apply to this program. Applicants must be teachers or paraprofessionals in classrooms of students who
are deaf or hard of hearing, or they must submit a letter from a school superintendent verifying access to deaf or hard of hearing students.

Prerequisites

  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3) or similar introduction to special education course (3)
  • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development or equivalent (3)

Required Courses

  • CSD 6480 Hearing Science and Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7350 Psychosocial Characteristics of Deafness (3)
  • EXC 7360 Language Development in Students Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7390 Reading and Writing Instruction for Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7400 Methods of Teaching Students who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7430 Auditory and Speech Development in Students Who are Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)
  • EXC 7940 Practicum: Deaf/Hard of Hearing (3)

Candidates must post a rating of “Intermediate” on the Signed Language Proficiency Interview (SLPI) before admission to EXC 7940 Practicum.

Total hours for certification: minimum of 21 Hours

4790 Initial Certification in Special Education General/Adapted Curriculum

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

The sequence of courses emphasizing Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) at Georgia State University (GSU) is contained in the Multiple and Severe Disabilities (MSD) program. Georgia does not have a separate teaching certification for autism. However, at GSU, a student can earn a teaching certificate in either “Special Education (P-12) General Curriculum” or “Special Education (P-12) Adapted Curriculum”. The certificate is determined based on the characteristics of pupils with ASD the student is, or plans on, working with and the Praxis II or GACE completed. Either certification results in the student being uniquely qualified to educate children and youth with autism spectrum disorders. Students who wish only certification can apply to the non-degree program and take the courses that lead to certification, enabling them to be better prepared to educate individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

Required Courses

  • EDRD 6600 Introduction to Materials and Methods in Reading Instruction (3)
  • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development (3)
  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7250 Characteristics of Severe Intellectual Disability and Autism (3)
  • EXC 7280 Methods of Teaching Students with Severe Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7310 Strategies for Challenging Behaviors (3)
  • EXC 7315 Assessment and Curricular Planning for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7320 Methods for Teaching Low-Functioning Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7325 Methods for Teaching High-Functioning Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7926 Practicum I: Autism (3)
  • EXC 7936 Practicum II: Autism (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3) also is required for students who wish to acquire the Reading Endorsement.

4800 Initial Certification in Special Education General Curriculum P-12

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

The Special Education program in the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education offers a teaching certification sequence in special education for certification in Special Education General Education Curriculum: Consultative. This is a nondegree, initial certification program for students who already hold an undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university. Students seeking admission to this initial certification program must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.75 and have passing scores on the GACE Program Admission Assessment or be exempt based on equivalent SAT, ACT or GRE scores.

The sequence of required certification courses are as follows:

  • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development (3)
  • EXC 4010 Characteristics of Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 6560 Educational Evaluation of Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 6570 Individual and Classroom Management (3)
  • EXC 6580 Instructional Methods for Students with Behavior Learning Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 6590 Functional and Social Methods for Students with Behavior Learning Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 6661 Practicum I: Special Education General Curriculum: Consultative (3)
  • EXC 6671 Partnerships and Practicum II: Special Education General Curriculum: Consultative (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EDRD 6600 Introduction to Material and Methods of Reading Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individual Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)

Total hours for certification: 33 semester hours

Students may not transfer any core special education coursework into the certification program. Students may be given credit for EPY 2050 if prior appropriate coursework can be documented. Students must become highly qualified in reading by completing the Reading Endorsement, through passing EDRD 6600, EXC 7190, and EDRD 7650, and completing a reading portfolio as required. Students must receive a satisfactory grade of “B” or better in all core special education courses. Students who do not receive a grade of “B” or better must retake the course and satisfactorily pass the course prior to taking additional special education core coursework in the program. A course may be repeated once. Students who do not satisfactorily pass a course after two attempts will be administratively withdrawn from the program.

Evaluation of a student’s performance is continuous and involves consideration of each student’s performance in all academic settings. Inappropriate or unprofessional conduct by any student may result in the student being dropped from a course or program. If such removal from a course is necessary, the student will receive the grade of “F” and may be judged ineligible to re-enroll in the course. Georgia State University will only recommend an individual for their certification who has completed a program approved by the College of Education’s Professional Education Faculty and developed under the guidance of a faculty advisor.

4810 Initial Certification in Special Education Physical and Health Disabilities

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

The Initial Certification in Special Education Physical and Health Disabilities Program (formally known as the Orthopedic Impairments program) prepares teachers to instruct students in the special education category of orthopedic impairments. This includes students with a wide range of physical impairments, neuromotor impairments, degenerative diseases, and severe health impairments who may have additional cognitive/learning or sensory impairments. To prepare teachers to instruct students with orthopedic impairments, a wide range of coursework is provided which includes such areas as characteristics, specialized instructional strategies to teach academics, specialized curricular areas, physical and health management, and assistive technology.

Certification only students complete a planned program that leads to the College of Education recommendation to Professional Standards Commission for certification in Special Education Physical and Health Disabilities (P-12). This certification will make these teachers eligible to instruct students who are in the special education category of orthopedic impairments.

Prerequisite Courses

  • EDMT 7400 Mathematics Concepts for Special Learners (3)
  • EDRD 6600 Introduction to Materials and Methods in Reading Instruction (3)
  • EPY 2050 Human Growth and Development (3)
  • EXC 4020 Characteristics and Instructional Strategies for Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7030 Applied Behavior Analysis (3)
  • EXC 7927 Practicum I: Physical and Health Disabilities (3)

Program Courses

  • EXC 7260 Characteristics of Severe and Multiple Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7290 Methods for Teaching Students with Physical and Multiple Disabilities: Reading and Academics (3)
  • EXC 7300 Assistive Technology: Reading and Academics (3)
  • EXC 7330 Physical and Health Management of Students with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7937 Practicum II: Physical and Health Disabilities (3)

4820 K-5 Mathematics Endorsement

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair

This endorsement is intended for teachers who hold a clear, renewable certificate, level 4 or higher in in one of the following areas: Early Childhood Education, Middle Grades – Mathematics, or Special Education General Curriculum/Early Childhood Education. Other areas of Special Education are eligible to enroll if they have a core academic content concentration in mathematics. Requirements for the K-5 Mathematics Endorsement include 15 hours of concentrated coursework in elementary (PreK-5) mathematics education. Students must be admitted to the university and may be enrolled as a non-degree student or pursuing another advanced degree.

Required (15):

ECE 7393 Number and Operation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 7394 Geometry and Measurement in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 7395 Algebra in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 7396 Data Analysis and Probability in the Elementary Classroom (3)
ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Classroom I (3)

Total hours for endorsement: minimum of 15 semester hours

4830 K-5 Science Endorsement

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair

This endorsement is intended for teachers who hold a clear, renewable certificate, level 4 or higher in early childhood education (P-5) or another eligible field specified in PSC Educator Preparation Rules and are interested in adding additional expertise in science education to their certificate. Requirements for the K-5 Science Endorsement include 12 hours of concentrated coursework in elementary (K-5) science education. Students must be admitted to the university and may be enrolled as a nondegree student or pursuing another advanced degree.

Required (12):

  • ECE 8420 Describing Relationships and Changes across the Sciences in the Elementary Classroom 3)
  • ECE 8430 Analyzing Evidence to Create Models for Scientific Explanation in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 8440 Using Scientific Practices to Examine Natural Systems in the Elementary Classroom (3)
  • ECE 7740 Internship in Early Childhood Classroom I (3)

Students must complete a portfolio as an exit requirement.

Total hours for endorsement: minimum of 12 semester hours

4840 Literacy Coach Certificate

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair
Sue Duncan, Executive Director

The Literacy Coach Certificate is also referred to as the Partners in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) program.

The Partners in Comprehensive Literacy (PCL) is a research-based companion program to the Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM). PCL is a systemic school improvement model based on the principles of apprenticeship learning. Inherent to the model is the coaching and mentoring feature. The series of courses for Literacy Coach Certificate are designed to prepare individuals for supporting accountability with a school-wide assessment system using multiple ways for evaluating student achievement; providing embedded professional development for teachers; assisting with the development of a well-designed school-wide literacy plan; and with assisting teachers to expand their knowledge and expertise particularly in providing differentiated classroom instruction.

With the growing need to support classroom teachers serving diverse populations, there is an increased demand for embedded professional development as well as coaching and mentoring within school settings. Thus the demand for school-based literacy coaches has increased over the past few years. Also, teachers serving as literacy coaches desire to further develop their knowledge and expertise to increase their effectiveness as an instructional facilitator/coach.

The certificate program focuses on specialized coursework for preparing teachers to serve as highly qualified teachers/coaches equipped to collaborate across classrooms, with school administrators, parents and community representatives in order to improve student achievement.

The Literacy Coach/Instructional Facilitator certificate program is an 18-hour program of study designed for students who already have a master’s degree or a minimum of 9 hours of appropriate reading coursework, and are seeking specialized training as an Instructional Facilitator/Literacy Coach. The training is restricted to candidates employed as a literacy coach in a school setting.

The admission requirements for the Literacy Coach Certificate program follow the same standards for admission to a non-degree graduate program. A Baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university with a grade point average of no less than 2.50 (4.0 scale). In addition, the candidate must have a valid teaching license (Georgia or other state); a master’s degree or a minimum of 9 hours of appropriate reading coursework; and be employed as a literacy coach in a school setting.

Program of Study

Theory and Research (6 hours)

  • ECE 7980 Theory and Practice in Literacy (3) or EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)
  • ECE 7964 Comprehensive Literacy Model for School Improvement(3)

Practicum/Field Experiences (9 hours)

  • ECE 7981 Supervision and Organization of Reading Programs (3) or EDRD 8610 Supervision of School Literacy Programs (3)
  • ECE 7982 Professional Experiences in Reading (3) or EDCI 7660 Practicum I (3)
  • ECE 7983 Literacy Coaches as Agents of Change (3)

Curriculum Framework (3 hours)

  • ECE 7984 Curriculum Design and Evaluation

4850 Preschool Special Education Endorsement

Department of Educational Psychology, Special Education and Communication Disorders
835 College of Education Building
404-413-8040
http://epse.education.gsu.edu/
Laura Fredrick, Chair

In addition to full field teacher certification preparation, Georgia State University offers preparation for state certification endorsements in some specific areas of training, service, and leadership. All such programs require acceptable teaching or appropriate school experiences and admission to the College of Education as graduate students. Program applicants must be fully certified teachers.

All coursework for the Preschool Special Education endorsement must be completed with a grade of “B” or higher.

Nine semester hours of coursework are required for endorsement in preschool special education for professionals holding teacher certification in early childhood education, special education, or speech language pathology. Completion of the coursework requirements below, as designated, qualifies the students for endorsement in preschool handicapped education.

Required (6):

  • EXC 7650 Characteristics of Young Children with Disabilities (3)
  • EXC 7660 Methods of Teaching Young Children with Disabilities (3)

Select one (3):

  • CSD 4320 Introduction to Language Disorders (3)
  • EXC 7010 Language Development and Language Disabilities (3)

Total hours for endorsement: minimum of 9 semester hours

4860 Reading Endorsement (ECE)

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair
Sue Duncan, Executive Director

The Department of Early Childhood Education offers graduate courses in literacy which apply to Georgia’s Reading Endorsement for classroom teachers. These courses focus on three areas (a) understanding readers and the reading process, (b) linking assessment and instruction, and (c) using instructional strategies in specific content areas.

The Reading Endorsement Program presupposes certification at least at the bachelor’s level. Successful completion of application sequences (Reading Recovery Teacher Strand or Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Strand) qualifies a person for the bachelor’s, master’s, or specialist level endorsement, depending on the current level of certification. This endorsement qualifies an individual to be considered ‘in field’ in reading at the level of the base certificate. Teachers pursuing the reading endorsement are enrolled as nondegree students in specific programs for certification as a Reading Recovery Teacher or a Reading Recovery Teacher Leader.

Strand 1: Understanding Readers and the Reading Process/Linking Assessment and Instruction

  • ECE 7360 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers I (3)
  • ECE 8300 Reading Recovery Theory I (3)
  • ECE 8360 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders I (3)

Strand 2: Understanding Readers and the Reading Process

  • ECE 7370 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers II (3)
  • ECE 8310 Reading Recovery Theory II (3)
  • ECE 8320 Reading Recovery Theory III (3)
  • ECE 8370 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders II (3)

Strand 3: Using Instructional Strategies in Specific Content Areas

  • ECE 7380 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers III (3)
  • ECE 8380 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders III (3)

4870 Reading Endorsement (MSE)

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
639 College of Education Building
404-413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Department of Middle and Secondary Education and the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education offer graduate courses in literacy which apply to Georgia’s Reading Endorsement for classroom teachers. These courses focus on three areas (a) understanding readers and the reading process, (b) linking assessment and instruction, and (c) using instructional strategies in specific content areas. All students who wish to obtain a reading endorsement must attend a MSIT orientation session and complete an exit requirement of a portfolio. The portfolio will be aligned with the PSC requirements and will require the demonstration of the ability to teach reading at the applicable levels of the base certificate.

The Reading Endorsement Program presupposes certification at least at the bachelor’s level. Successful completion of three of the following courses qualifies a person for the bachelor’s, master’s, or specialist level endorsement, depending on the current level of certification. This endorsement qualifies an individual to be considered ‘in field’ in reading at the level of the base certificate. Teachers pursuing the reading endorsement may be enrolled as nondegree students or may be enrolled in specific programs.

Strand 1: Understanding Readers and the Reading Process

Select one (3):

  • EDRD 6600 Introduction to Materials and Methods in Reading Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading (3)

Strand 2: Linking Assessment and Instruction

Select one (3):

  • EDRD 7550 Linking Literacy Assessment and Classroom Instruction (3)
  • EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction (3)

Strand 3: Using Instructional Strategies in Specific Content Areas

Select one (3):

  • EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas (3)
  • EXC 7190 Alternative Approaches to Literacy for Students with Disabilities (3)

Total hours for endorsement: minimum of 9 semester hours

4880 Reading Endorsement Online

Department of Middle and Secondary Education
639 College of Education Building
404-413-8060
http://mse.education.gsu.edu/
Dana L. Fox, Chair

The Department of Middle and Secondary Education offers online graduate courses in literacy that apply to the Georgia ONmyLINE non-degree Reading Endorsement for classroom teachers. These courses focus on three areas (a) understanding readers and the reading process, (b) linking assessment and instruction, and (c) using instructional strategies in specific content areas. The GOML non-degree Reading Endorsement is approved by the State of Georgia Professional Standards Commission.

The Georgia ONmyLINE non-degree Reading Endorsement program presupposes certification at least at the bachelor’s level. Successful completion of the Georgia ONmyLINE non-degree Reading Endorsement course work and a portfolio qualifies a person for the bachelor’s, master’s, or specialist level endorsement, depending on his or her current level of certification. This endorsement qualifies an individual to be considered “in field” in reading at the level of the base certificate. Students seeking only the non-degree GOML Reading Endorsement must be admitted to the graduate program in the College of Education as a non-degree GOML student. All courses in the Georgia ONmyLINE non-degree Reading Endorsement must be completed online through Georgia ONmyLINE; no other courses may apply.

Required Georgia ONmyLINE Courses for the Non-degree Reading Endorsement:

EDRD 7600 Theory and Pedagogy in the Study of Reading
EDRD 7630 Literacy in the Content Areas
EDRD 7650 Individualized Literacy Assessment and Instruction
EDCI 7660 Practicum I

Total Program Hours: 12 semester hours

4890 Reading Recovery

Department of Early Childhood Education
550 College of Education Building
404-413-8020
http://ece.education.gsu.edu/
Barbara Meyers, Chair
Sue Duncan, Executive Director

The program for training in Reading Recovery prepares teachers to observe, assess, and address reading problems in children in the first grade, using assessment, observation, and early intervention/prevention and teaching procedures developed by Dr. Marie Clay. Two levels of training are offered: teacher training and teacher leader training.

The Georgia State University Reading Recovery Program meets the requirements established by Professor Marie M. Clay, the faculty of The Ohio State University College of Education, and the Reading Recovery Council of North America (RRCNA). It has been granted a royalty free license to use the name “Reading Recovery” in conjunction with the program.

This program is a fixed sequence with enrollment fall through spring term. Admission to the program occurs once a year, and a school district and/or consortia must submit a site application and supporting materials. (Call 404/413-8024 for materials required for such applications.) The program begins in the summer with the Observation Survey Institute.

Students selected for training in Reading Recovery must apply for admission to an appropriate level of graduate study (e.g., nondegree, M.Ed., Ed.S., graduate transient) in the College of Education and must meet published criteria for admission.

A student must earn a cumulative grade point average of 3.00 in Reading Recovery courses to become a registered Reading Recovery teacher or teacher leader. Completion of Reading Recovery Teacher Training or Reading Recovery Teacher Leader Training qualifies the completer for the Georgia Teacher Certification Reading Endorsement.

Teacher Training Level

Teacher Training prepares teachers to observe, assess, and select children for Reading Recovery understanding; to teach children using Reading Recovery methods and procedures; to make informed instructional decisions using records and materials unique to the program; to accelerate the progress of Reading Recovery children to meet the average level of reading achievement in each child’s classroom; and to communicate with other teachers, principals, parents, and their peers about the effectiveness of the program and its impact in the school and community.

Teachers in training continue to work full time in their school districts in addition to attending class once each week. Teacher training requires school and district support to release the in-training teacher from classroom duties at least half time for one academic year. This requirement allows the teacher in training to work with four children in his or her school for 30 minutes per day, five days per week.

Applicants must hold a bachelor’s degree and a current teaching certificate, among other criteria. Contact the department for further details.

Teachers in training enroll in the following courses for academic credit:

Required Fall Term (6):

  • ECE 7360 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers I (3)
  • ECE 7370 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers II (3)

Required Spring Term (3):

  • ECE 7380 Reading Recovery Clinical for Teachers III (3)

Program total: minimum of 9 semester hours

Students enrolled in the M.Ed. program in Early Childhood Education who have previously completed Reading Recovery Teacher Training may substitute ECE 7370 (3 hours) and ECE 7380 (3 hours) for ECE 7800 (Capstone Experience; 6 hours). Reading Recovery students enrolled in the Ed.S. program may substitute ECE 7380 (3 hours) for ECE 8680 (Internship; 3 hours). Because of the special nature of this program, students who withdraw will not be able to complete the program unless they apply to enter a later cycle. The faculty of the Georgia State University Reading Recovery Program reserves the right to refuse admission to any student who applies for a program cycle after having withdrawn from a previous cycle.

Teacher Leader Training Level

Teacher Leader Training prepares teachers to implement Reading Recovery in their home systems or regions; to recruit, select, and train teachers in Reading Recovery observation and teaching methods; to select children for service and assess their progress in the program; to supervise Reading Recovery teachers; to evaluate and oversee teaching decisions using record keeping materials unique to the program; to conduct public and professional awareness sessions for school systems and communities; to conduct research on the effectiveness of the program; and to teach children using Reading Recovery techniques, procedures, and methods.

Teacher leader training requires support from the trainee’s home system, private school association, or consortium. Trainees are expected to attend a yearlong study program full time where they are trained through coursework, clinical sessions, and field experience. Teacher leaders must hold a minimum of a master’s degree and meet other criteria for selection. (Contact the department for further details.)

Because the training of Reading Recovery teachers and Reading Recovery teacher leaders is different, students previously trained as Reading Recovery teachers who are later selected for teacher leader training will be required to complete the entire training sequence.

Teacher leaders in training enroll in the following courses for academic credit:

Required Fall Term (12):

  • ECE 8300 Reading Recovery I (3)
  • ECE 8360 Reading Recovery for Leaders (3)
  • ECE 8370 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders II (3)
  • ECE 8700 Reading Recovery Supervision (3)

Required Spring Term (15):

  • ECE 8310 Reading Recovery Theory II (3)
  • ECE 8320 Reading Recovery Theory III (3)
  • ECE 8380 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders III (3)
  • ECE 8390 Reading Recovery Clinical for Leaders IV (3)
  • ECE 8700 Reading Recovery Supervision (3)

Program total: minimum of 27 semester hours

Students enrolled in the Ed.S. degree program in Early Childhood Education may substitute ECE 8310 Reading Recovery Theory II (3 hours) and ECE 8320 Reading Recovery Theory III (3 hours) for ECE 8400 Curriculum and Teacher Development (6 hours), and they may substitute ECE 8700 Reading Recovery Supervision (3 hours only) for ECE 8680 Internship (3 hours).